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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 21, 2022 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. anthony albanese wins the australian general election, becoming the country's first labor prime minister in almost a decade. tonight at the australian people have voted for change. two people have been taken to hospital after a stand collapsed in central london during a rehearsal for the trooping the colour military two people have been taken to hospital after a stand collapsed in central london during a rehearsal for the trooping the colour military parade to mark the queen's official birthday next month. switzerland and the netherlands are the latest countries to report cases of monkeypox — doctors warn the outbreak could badly affect access to sexual health services. president biden — on a visit to south korea — has said he would consider meeting
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the north's leader, kimjong un. and an unprecedented spring heatwave hits spain — we hearfrom a resident sweltering in madrid. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the australian opposition labor party leader, anthony albanese, has said he is "humbled" by his party's victory in australia's general election. addressing supporters, he pledged to transform the country into a renewable energy superpower and to work towards lifting wages and profits. our correspondent shaimaa khalil reports from sydney. this is the labor party's first election victory in almost a decade and
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it will be led by one of australia's longest serving politicians. it has been a long time in the darkness and now finally... we can smile again. anthony albanese promised change as he worked to kick out the coalition which has been in power since 2013. together, we can end the climate wars. together, we can take advantage of the opportunity for australia to be a renewable energy superpower. it has been a sombre night for the ousted prime minister, scott morrison. going into the election, all signs indicated that the incumbent was in trouble. mr morrisson�*s tenure has been
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dominated by national disasters, covid and many scandals. i have always believedl in australians and their judgment and tonight they have delivered their verdict. - independents have also done well in the election amid public dissatisfaction with the major parties. albanese may have to rely on them. anthony albanese had one key message for australians, anthony albanese had one key message foraustralians, it anthony albanese had one key message for australians, it is now time for change. the people have listened, now it is up to the politicians. the rising cost—of—living and climate change have dominated the election as two key issues for voters. this is a country that is anxious and divided. its new leader has vowed that his will be a government of
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optimism and unity. paul smith is president of the australian labour party abroad, based here in london. he remains confident that the party will get a majority, helping it to push its policy on climate change. they came in with a commitment on climate change, cut it by 42%, and what is different is that it is backed up by government investment and also they are going to cut prices for ordinary people in terms of fuel and energy, and whilst the government is going to face things out of a time, that doesn't preclude a whole range of energy options. its main concern is to cut fossil fuels and in the emission target overall. also to make for a just transition for working people. what has changed is labor has a real commitment for actual climate change. add four justice for working people. you will see over the next two years as a
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government that stallions can weep aduu government that stallions can weep adult because they will be taking real action on climate change and investing money in new technologies that will actually be the future of energy rather than the fossil fuels of the past. —— australians can take pride in. president zelensky has said diplomacy is the only way the war with russia will end. ukraine's leader suggested his military had "broken the back" of russia's army, but that a resolution would only emerge from negotiations. as russian forces intensify their attacks in the eastern donbas region. from kyiv, our correspondent james waterhouse reports. ukraine's resistance is far from waning, but in luhansk it is going backwards — it is an area moscow claims will soon be in russian control. this coal miner still tries to evacuate people. even with his van riddled with bullets. i have to help people — there are grandmothers and grandfathers, people with disabilities who remain. they have to be pulled out.
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russia's gains are only a few miles here, people in luhansk are used to eight years of war already, since russia backed separatists in 2014. for some, the fighting has finally reached their doorstep. translation: my daughter - is in france and my son in poland. they told me to leave immediately. but how can i leave? this is our home. the invaders are looking to surround this town and are resorting to the old tactics of bombarding it from the outside. the president of ukraine sent this message to countries yet to send weapons. we are fighting a war on our. territory and even if you think you could get used to donbas being russian territory, - we would like to say it is not
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a good thing to get used to, | these are our territories and we are going step by step to _ liberate our territories. ukraine's leader believes peace will only come from talks. given the lack of dialogue between the two sides, it is a long way off. filling the silence, the ongoing brutality of this war. melinda haring from the atlantic counciljoins me now. where do you see us in terms of where this conflict is? it where do you see us in terms of where this conflict is?— where do you see us in terms of where this conflict is? it has been three months _ where this conflict is? it has been three months and _ where this conflict is? it has been three months and russia - where this conflict is? it has been three months and russia has - where this conflict is? it has been three months and russia has only managed to take two large cities in ukraine. it managed to take mariupol this week, it is important to keep that in context. phase one, moscow said it would come into kyiv and
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take it and also get rid of zelensky, it is still a pro—russian puppetr “ zelensky, it is still a pro—russian puppet, —— install. it pulled back its forces from kyiv and from the north and now it is focusing on the donbas. british intelligence says russian forces are not doing well, they have made small gains in eastern ukraine, and they have lost about a third of the forces they committed. about a third of the forces they committed-— about a third of the forces they committed. , ., .,, ., ., committed. they have lost a third of their forces. — committed. they have lost a third of their forces, not _ committed. they have lost a third of their forces, not doing _ committed. they have lost a third of their forces, not doing well - committed. they have lost a third of their forces, not doing well yet - their forces, not doing well yet they still persist in renewing those attacks in that part of the country. what is their end game, to concentrate just on that area? i concentrate just on that area? i don't think dad mia putin has changed his goals. he still was to take ukraine, —— i don't think that ma putin has changed his goals. it has changed his tactics for the bottom—line is that russia and ukraine are going to be bogged down
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in eastern ukraine for the next couple of months. this is no longer a conflict about days, weeks or months, it is probably going to be years. figs months, it is probably going to be ears. �* , months, it is probably going to be ears, �* , months, it is probably going to be ears. ~ , ., ., ., ., years. as we look ahead to what could be years. _ years. as we look ahead to what could be years, we _ years. as we look ahead to what could be years, we see - years. as we look ahead to what could be years, we see very - years. as we look ahead to what l could be years, we see very much years. as we look ahead to what - could be years, we see very much the security situation in the region changing potentially forever in terms of country to have remained neutral up until now changing their stance, do you feel european situation now is more or less secure than before? the situation now is more or less secure than before?— situation now is more or less secure than before? the european situation is massively — than before? the european situation is massively changing, _ than before? the european situation is massively changing, the _ than before? the european situation is massively changing, the germans| is massively changing, the germans have changed their tune, europe has decided that russia is a real threat and it sees russia as a threat after faber 24th. the situation could be the work and beats —— war could be shorter, my prediction is it could last a long time, a long slog but it doesn't have to be if the west does the things it needs to do, the british government has done an amazing job, washington has done an
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okjob, but if the amazing job, washington has done an ok job, but if the west continues to 0k job, but if the west continues to send weapons and more heavy weapons that kyiv has required, this war could be over much sooner, it is not an overstatement to say that the ukrainian could push the russians backin ukrainian could push the russians back in the donbas by crassness if not sooner. do you agree or not with president zelensky when he says the ukraine war with russia can only be resolved through diplomacy? you think you trainees to push the russians out?— think you trainees to push the russians out? , , , russians out? president zelensky is ri . ht, russians out? president zelensky is right. diplomacy _ russians out? president zelensky is right. diplomacy is _ russians out? president zelensky is right, diplomacy is dead _ russians out? president zelensky is right, diplomacy is dead at - russians out? president zelensky is right, diplomacy is dead at this - right, diplomacy is dead at this point, the russians are not serious about it and in the ukrainian saps are unwilling to negotiate after the war crimes, and they are right. the bottom line is this will be ugly, everyone wants peace, it will eventually happen, but what happens right now on the battlefield will determine the contours of a negotiation and this is about the future of europe, if vladimir putin has not stopped in ukraine, he will go after poland on the baltic states
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next, that is why it is imperative he is stopped in ukraine now. the turkish president recep tayyip erdogan has spoken by telephone to the leaders of sweden and finland, to demand they take "concrete steps" to end support for what he called "terrorist groups". both countries applied this week to join nato. but turkey — a nato member — has threatened to derail their bid, which needs unanimous approval. mr erdogan accuses the nordic countries of supporting kurdish militants, including the separatist group, the pkk. officials in the chinese capital beijing have moved 13,000 people to quarantine hotels, after discovering around 20 new covid infections in their neighbourhood. all had tested negative for coronavirus — they'll have to isolate for at least seven days. china is trying to prevent a similar scale of outbreak in bejing to that which happened in shanghai where millions of people have spent months under lockdown. switzerland and the netherlands are the latest countries to report cases of monkeypox.
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here in the uk, doctors say they're worried that the virus — which can spread through close contact — could have a massive impact on access to sexual health services, with staff having to isolate if they come into contact with anyone who's infected. cases of the virus are rare outside of central and west africa. now at least 90 infections have been confirmed. that's in about 12 different countries, according to the world health organisation. scientists say they were not expecting this kind of outbreak because, for the first time, the disease is being found in people with no clear connection to areas in africa. dr hans kluge, the world health organization's regional director for europe, says the disease is not a new one. it is known quite well, usually self—limiting in nature, difficult
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and slow to transmit, the question here is to clarify why we see so many cases coming now in europe without a travel history with a bit more human—to—human transmission. but again, this is not covid, this is not smallpox, it is usually a geopolitically rare, not severe disease. it is spread by close physical contact, so now we are studying why it is that those cases are surging in europe, usually it is what because supportive treatment, anti—virals as well. but also vaccines, limited dose, i think we are not at that stage, we should very well study from wire the spread
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is coming and why is it that hugely this disease is in west africa or central africa not in europe, from the 90 confirmed cases, 82 are in europe, eight are in countries out of europe, australia, canada, united states. two people have been taken to hospital after part of a stand collapsed at a trooping the colour event at horse guards parade in central london. in two weeks' time, the queen is due to attend. here's bbc london's shelly phelps. members of the army rushing to the scene in video footage filmed by a member of the public close to where part of a stand reportedly collapsed. a number of people can be seen climbing over the back wall close to where a section of the structure is understood to have given way. the area was evacuated, one stand at a time. we were invited to stand
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for the national anthem and there was a commotion behind us, and the floor boards in the temporary arena had cracked and several people had fallen through. the incident took place just before 11am, as crowds gathered to watch rehearsals marking the queen's birthday. stjohn's ambulance were first on scene. we treated six patients. four were minor incidents and two were taken to hospital. this the army says safety is its priority and it is working to understand what happened and ensure it doesn't happen again. the headlines on bbc news... anthony albanese, has won the australian general election, becoming the country's first labor prime minister in almost a decade.
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two people have been taken to hospital after a stand collapsed in central london during a rehearsal for the trooping the colour military parade to mark the queen's official birthday next month. switzerland and the netherlands are the latest countries to report cases of monkeypox — doctors warn the outbreak could badly affect access to sexual health services. parts of spain are experiencing their hottest may ever with temperatures of more than 40c in some places, according to the state weather agency. the agency issued heat warnings in ten regions for saturday, saying it could be "one of the most intense" heatwaves in years. climate change is making heatwaves more frequent and more intense. spain's unseasonably warm spring weather is a result of hot air coming from north africa. tell me, how hot is it where you
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are? i tell me, how hot is it where you are? . ~ . tell me, how hot is it where you are? ., ~ ., . ~' , tell me, how hot is it where you are? . w , ., are? i am in madrid, luckily we have had a storm — are? i am in madrid, luckily we have had a storm but _ are? i am in madrid, luckily we have had a storm but had _ are? i am in madrid, luckily we have had a storm but had very _ are? i am in madrid, luckily we have had a storm but had very hot - are? i am in madrid, luckily we have had a storm but had very hot days, | had a storm but had very hot days, not something you would except for this time of year. haifa not something you would except for this time of year.— this time of year. how bad has it been, this time of year. how bad has it been. how _ this time of year. how bad has it been, how have _ this time of year. how bad has it been, how have you _ this time of year. how bad has it been, how have you coped? - this time of year. how bad has it l been, how have you coped? trying this time of year. how bad has it - been, how have you coped? trying to sta inside been, how have you coped? trying to stay inside as — been, how have you coped? trying to stay inside as much _ been, how have you coped? trying to stay inside as much as _ been, how have you coped? trying to stay inside as much as i _ been, how have you coped? trying to stay inside as much as i could, - stay inside as much as i could, going to collect the kids by car rather than walking, taking them this morning early to play out and still it was really hot, additive air—conditioning and avoiding being outside —— a bit of air—conditioning. outside -- a bit of air-conditioning. outside -- a bit of air-conditioninu. ., ., , air-conditioning. normally when it is this hot, — air-conditioning. normally when it is this hot, it _ air-conditioning. normally when it is this hot, it is _ air-conditioning. normally when it is this hot, it is in _ air-conditioning. normally when it is this hot, it is in august, - air-conditioning. normally when it is this hot, it is in august, people | is this hot, it is in august, people tend to leave the big cities and go to the coast, you just cannot do that, that must make it very difficult. , , ., , difficult. yes, it definitely does because you — difficult. yes, it definitely does because you are _ difficult. yes, it definitely does | because you are psychologically ready for it in july because you are psychologically ready for it injuly or august but
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not now, and also it is the hardest, the first you days until your body gets used in the heat. —— first few days. it has been a surprise but hopefully ever in a couple of days. you have lived in madrid for quite a while, have you ever seen anything like cecil or are people who have lived there for many decades seen anything like this? i lived there for many decades seen anything like this?— anything like this? i have lived here all my — anything like this? i have lived here all my life, _ anything like this? i have lived here all my life, this _ anything like this? i have lived here all my life, this is - anything like this? i have lived here all my life, this is the - anything like this? i have lived| here all my life, this is the first time i recall such a hot may. hour time i recall such a hot may. how worried are _ time i recall such a hot may. how worried are you _ time i recall such a hot may. how worried are you about _ time i recall such a hot may. how worried are you about the actual summer season coming up? i would exect summer season coming up? i would exoect that — summer season coming up? i would expect that things _ summer season coming up? i would expect that things will _ summer season coming up? i would expect that things will get _ summer season coming up? i would expect that things will get a - summer season coming up? i would expect that things will get a bit - expect that things will get a bit better and it will not go increasingly like this because otherwise it wouldn't be sustainable. but hoping to have a bit of a break before the summer. when people in madrid at the moment are talking or the local news stations talk about what is happening, do they talk about climate change and this event in terms of that? i
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climate change and this event in terms of that?— climate change and this event in terms of that? i haven't heard that much about _ terms of that? i haven't heard that much about that _ terms of that? i haven't heard that much about that because - terms of that? i haven't heard that much about that because we - terms of that? i haven't heard that much about that because we have | terms of that? i haven't heard that i much about that because we have not long ago had a very cold winter, but definitely it is an issue that has been spoken in general by a lot of people. it been spoken in general by a lot of --eole. . , been spoken in general by a lot of neale, ., , , been spoken in general by a lot of --eole. , ., ., ,, been spoken in general by a lot of neale, , ., ., ~' ., people. it has been good to talk to ou, i people. it has been good to talk to you. i wish — people. it has been good to talk to you. i wish you _ people. it has been good to talk to you, i wish you all— people. it has been good to talk to you, i wish you all the _ people. it has been good to talk to you, i wish you all the best - people. it has been good to talk to you, i wish you all the best of- you, i wish you all the best of luck, trying to keep cool in this hot weather. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's lizzie. hello and thanks forjoining us. we'll start with a quick look at the uspga championship, the second men's golf major of the year. the overnight leader will zalatoris bogeyed two of his first four holes, so the new leader is chile's mito perreira on 10 under. rory mcilroy is eight shots off the lead, though, after double bogeying the sixth. it was a very disappointing day for tiger woods. seven bogies and a double bogey meant he finished on 12 over par — the worst round of his professional
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career. some surprising football non—transfer news as kylian mbappe signed a new three—year contract to stay at paris saint—germain. the french international had been heavily linked with a move to real madrid this summer but mbappe has now committed his future to the french champions, in a very lucrative deal that runs until 2025. lyon have won the women's champions league for an eighth time after beating barcelona 3—1 in turin. a stunning strike from amandine henry after six minutes gave the french side the lead. and the fomer world player of the year, ada hegerberg, who has struggled with injuries for the past few seasons, was also amongst the goal—scorers as lyon surprised the defending champions, who were favourites. the final in germany's dfb cup has gone to extra time in berlin. it finished sc freiburg 1, rb leipzig 1 in normal time, with leipzig down to ten men as well. leipzig are taking part in the showpiece event for the third time in the last four years, while
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it's freiburg's first german cup final in their 118—year history. charles leclerc will be on pole for tomorrow's spanish grand prix. there weren't too many surprises in qualifying, the ferrari driver had been quickest in every practice session in barcelona. the championship leader was about a quarter of a second quicker than red bull's max verstappen, with ferrari team—mate carlos sainz in third. it was a very difficult session, especially in q3, it was a very difficult session, especially in 03, i had mistaken the first run, and only had one lap, but went extremely well, had a bit of moments of my lap but made it stick and i'm very happy with pill position, it was very good, the car was amazing, so very happy —— pole position. athletics' second diamond league meeting of the year took place in birmingham. britain's dina asher—smith won the women's 100 meters, beating shericka jackson
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by a hundreth of a second. but there was no elaine thompson—herah, the olympic champion pulled out as a precaution. canada's aaron brown won the men's 100 metres ahead of yohan blake with jerome blake third. trayvon bromell and zarnell hughes were both disqualified for false starts. and hansel parchment continued his fine form to win the men's 110 metre hurdles in a world—leading time of 13.09, ahead of fellow jamaican omar mcleod and asier martinez of spain. the french open starts on sunday. rafael nadal is hoping his chronic foot problem will ease enough for him to challenge for a 14th title at roland garros. nadal is attempting to reclaim the crown taken from him by novak djokovic 12 months ago. nadal is seeded fifth for the tournament and hasn't won a clay—court title so far this season. world number one, iga swiatek, is the favourite in the women's draw. the pole, who won the 2020 title, has won her last five tournaments,
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a winning streak of 28 matches. i have very positive thoughts and honestly a couple of times during these tournaments i was already stressed about that and i was able to work through it and do a really good job atjust focusing on tennis, so hopefully i will be able to continue that, but still i have a few more days until my first match so i guess we will see. i have proved to myself and other people that i can be top of the game, and before i didn't have that much confidence, so this year i feel much more peace. that's all the sport for now. president biden has said he might be willing to meet the north korean leader, kim jong un for face—to—face talks but only if mr kim is �*sincere and serious�*. mr biden, who's on a visit to south korea, said he was also prepared to shore up defences against north korea. the president and his counterpart
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in seoul, yoon suk—yeol, discussed the possible deployment of extra american jets, bombers and missiles to south korea. our seoul correspondent jean mackenzie reports. good evening, president biden. the first task for the president upon landing, learn the mechanics of the computer chip. the focus of the trip was supposed to be semiconductors and supply chains. things that will help these countries compete with an increasingly dominant china. but by the time the leaders sat down to talk, an increasingly hostile north korea was top of the agenda. the door to dialogue with the north was still open, they said. with regard to whether i would meet with the leader of north korea, it would depend on whether he was sincere and serious. the situation in north korea is serious, with covid affecting many of its population.
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the united states hopes this could lead to a reconciliation. we have offered vaccines, we're prepared to do that immediately. we have had no response. despite the pleas to come back to the negotiating table, the focus here was much more on south korea and the united states being ready for if the north were to attack, how they can be more prepared for if the worst were to happen. remembering us soldiers that died fighting the korean war. since this battle divided korea, the south has relied on the us to defend it. we go together. earlier, joe biden agreed to send more weapons if needed. translation: we discussed timely deployment of strategic _ assets, including fighter
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jets and missiles. the relationship has never been stronger or more vital, according to mr biden. it certainly seems on pretty firm ground. rain across the far north—west of scotland continuing to linger over the next few hours, more cloud along west facing coast. conditions start of murky first thing on sunday. best of murky first thing on sunday. best of the clearer skies across central and southern areas, one or two rural areas seeing temperatures as low as five or six ounces. some lovely sunshine here from bristol over towards norwich, anywhere south and east dry, settled, sunny, warm. a lot of low cloud to the west, scattered showers, persistent rain lingering in the far north—west.
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temperatures around 11—17 c. in the best of the sunshine, highs of 23. it looks like as we move into monday, wind direction changing north—westerly, slightly cooler with a few scattered showers has well. take care.
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celebrations for australia's labor party as it wins the country's general election.
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it means this man, anthony albanese, is set to form the next government though it's not yet clear whether it will be a majority or minority administration. it says a lot about our great country that the son of a single mum who was a disability pensioner, who grew up in public housing down the road in camperdown can stand before you tonight as australia's prime minister. ukraine's president zelensky has said that diplomacy is the only way russia's war on his country will end. opposition parties demand an explaination from borisjohnson after he met with the senior civil servant sue gray ahead of the publication of her report into lockdown parties at downing street. two people have been taken to hospital after a stand collapsed during a trooping the colour rehearsal in central london. now on bbc news, our world: eurovision, ukraine's victory. music plays.
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this is kalush orchestra, winners of this year's eurovision song contest. but they are no ordinary band. they are from ukraine, a country in the midst of a bloody war. in the lead—up to the contest, all the band members faced a difficult decision. now, their winning song has become a powerful statement of defiance.
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and they hope their global stardom will help ukraine's

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