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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 22, 2022 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. australia's prime minister—elect gets ready to take to the world stage, promising a new approach on climate change. there is a change of government, there will be some changes in policy, particularly with regard to climate change and our engagement with the world. deadline day for the report into lockdown breaches in downing street— those named have until 5pm to respond ahead of its long awaited publication. the ukrainian government says it won't agree to a ceasefire with russia that involves giving up territory in an apparent hardening of its position. president biden arrives injapan for the second leg of a trip to asia intended to reinforce us ties in the asia pacific region. a city remembers — five years on from the manchester
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arena bomb that killed 22 people. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. australia's incoming prime minister, anthony albanese has vowed to sweep aside his country's reputation for dragging its heels in the fight against climate change. wildfires, bleached out coral reefs and flooding has made made australia a byword for climate—fuelled disruption. mr albanese looks set to be sworn—in as prime minister on monday, before he heads to tokyo for a meeting with the leaders of the us, japan and india. he's signalled a major shift in climate change policy, saying australia could become a renewable energy superpower. our sydney correspondent,
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shaimaa khalil, has more the shaimaa khalil, has more meeting is a priority for australia the meeting is a priority for australia and it enables us to send a message to the world that there is a message to the world that there is a change of government, there will be some changes in policy, but clearly with regard to climate change and our engagement with the world on those issues. our sydney correspondent, shaimaa khalil, has more on anthony albanese�*s priorities. the new leader wasted no time in saying that climate action, climate policies are going to take centre stage for his government. in his acceptance speech, he said australia could be a renewable energy superpower, it would be a leader in that field. and whether or not he forms a majority or minority government, with a coalition, he will have to work with green mps and the independents, who have put climate action as the centre of their campaigning but this is not
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going to be an easy task. remember, australia is a country that has been on the front line of climate disasters, whether that is the bushfires of 2019, 2020, or the catastrophic floods that have happened a couple of months ago but it is also a country that is still very much economically wedded to fossil fuels, very much economically wedded to fossilfuels, so to very much economically wedded to fossil fuels, so to convince people, especially in the mining industry, people that have been economically dependent on this industry, is going to be difficult. but anthony albanese has called for change, called for safe change, and it was a message for those areas as well that this is not going to happen overnight, that there is going to be a plan to phase out fossil fuels. there are other things that the new prime minister will have to deal with and that has to do with the engagement, engaging the rest of the world, he will be sworn in on monday and then fly out of tokyo to meet with presidential biden, the leaders
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ofjapan and india and he indicated earlier how important that is going to be. and a big foreign policy issueis to be. and a big foreign policy issue is the relationship with china, of course. that has been very tense over the past couple of years. how anthony albanese and his government are going to engage with china is quite crucial. but generally, you do see a shift, a change in the way that he wants to do things. earlier today, anthony albanese said, i want to see change, i want to see change in the way politics operates in this country and i think this is a message from him notjust for australians but and i think this is a message from him not just for australians but for the rest of the world as well. as shaimaa said, anthony albanese promises to turn australia into a renewable energy superpower, but what exactly does he mean? at the moment, roughly 96% of australia's power is generated through using fossil fuels, with coal providing around a0%. that requires the use of around 130 million tonnes of coal each year. mr albanese has promised
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to reduce australia's emissions by 43% by 2030, dropping to net zero by 2050. he hasn't said what he plans to do about fossil fuels. but he has promised to make electric vehicles cheaper, roll out 85 solar banks around australia to ensure more households can benefit from rooftop solar and install 400 community batteries across the country. the potential for solar and wind power in australia is huge. however, there's still the question of its fossil fuel exports. it provides more than a third of the world's coal exports each year, worth roughly $41; billion and bringing an end to that could be hard. earlier i spoke with bob ward from the grantham research institute on climate change at the london school of economics — for more on the incoming leader's climate policy. if he ends up relying on the green party or on the so—called steel
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independents, who made increased action a priority, he will need to negotiate something that is more ambitious and climate change. the outgoing government target for 2030 were to reduce emissions by 28%, compared with 2005 and that was regarded as ambitious. add albanese has put this increase target forward but the greens have been targeted on greater reductions. it is not yet clear what they would do about tackling coal, which is a major problem in tackling climate change in australia. ., problem in tackling climate change in australia-— in australia. that is exact what i was going _ in australia. that is exact what i was going to — in australia. that is exact what i was going to ask— in australia. that is exact what i was going to ask you. _ in australia. that is exact what i was going to ask you. with - in australia. that is exact what i was going to ask you. with 96%| in australia. that is exact what i i was going to ask you. with 96% of australia's energy provided by fossil fuel and that he would income that comes from coal, how difficult is it going to be to turn these things around?— is it going to be to turn these things around? that 96% figure includes transport _ things around? that 96% figure includes transport and - things around? that 96% figure includes transport and the - things around? that 96% figure includes transport and the use | things around? that 96% figure | includes transport and the use of petrol and diesel. if you look at
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the power sector alone, 76% comes from fossil fields, the power sector alone, 76% comes from fossilfields, most the power sector alone, 76% comes from fossil fields, most of which is call. it has 25% of its electricity coming from renewables and the potential for it to supply a much bigger proportion of its electricity for renewables, especially solar, australia has lots of wide—open spaces where they could put solar panels and lots of sunshine and it could very quickly get rate of its dependence on coal. that is a promising opportunity if they can generate a lot of cleaner and a trustee, they can get away from petrol and diesel driven vehicles and have that i would buy cleaner atrocity. the potential is absolutely enormous. he atrocity. the potential is absolutely enormous. he has said australian business _ absolutely enormous. he has said australian business now - absolutely enormous. he has said australian business now that - absolutely enormous. he has said| australian business now that good action on climate change is good for jobs and good for our economy and i want tojoin the jobs and good for our economy and i want to join the global asset. how big a task is he going to face
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keeping people who do rely on the fossil fuel sector for income, for jobs, to actually embrace this shift? it jobs, to actually embrace this shift? . ., , , jobs, to actually embrace this shift? . . ,, ., shift? it certainly is an issue that there are local— shift? it certainly is an issue that there are local communities - shift? it certainly is an issue that there are local communities in i there are local communities in australia that rely very heavily on the coal industry but it is not alone in that challenge. we see in germany for instance that they have been very dependent on coal but they are already making the shift away and the government there is looking at schemes like places where they are going to shutdown coal mines, that they build new car manufacturing plants and then commit to retraining the workers, so they can be redeployed there and that is the kind of thing that can be done. and which i hope now anthony albanese will start to look at because you can adjust for the plug on the coal industry. you have to work out what to do about the workers. there are solutions and i hope he will look seriously at that
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and move sharply. the long awaited report into gatherings in downing street during lockdown is expected to be published within days. the senior civil servant sue gray has given people she intends to name in her report until 5pm today to respond. meanwhile, pressure is growing on the prime minister to explain what was discussed at a meeting between him and ms gray several weeks ago. 0ur political correspondent, iain watson, reports. the long—awaited report into gatherings at the heart of government is being finalised this weekend, and it is expected to be published within days. the senior civil servant sue gray has contacted all those she is intending to name or criticise, and they have until 5:00pm today to respond. but if some of them challenge her account of what went on here, the report could be delayed further, and labour are questioning why borisjohnson met sue gray a month ago if she was supposed to be working independently of downing street. number ten say the prime minister hasn't seen the contents of the report or tried
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to influence it. but labour is calling for all the evidence, including more than 500 photos or cctv images of gatherings, events and parties which went on here during lockdown, to be made public. that won't happen, but it is possible some photos will be published if sue gray thinks they are relevant. for example, if she wants to make a point about social distancing, or lack of it, then we may well see images of crowded rooms. there haven't been new calls from conservative mps for borisjohnson to go, but when the detail of some of the gatherings in downing street is revealed, it could still prove damaging. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, explained what we can expect when the report is finally published. this will be all about the detail and all about the conclusion that sue gray and her team have reached about the nature and the extent of the events which were happening. in the events which were happening. in the last couple of days, we have
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seen a bit of a debate about a meeting which sue gray and the prime minister held, who instigated that, what was discussed, slightly different versions of events between downing street and sue gray's team and the education secretary ledeen deans howley has been facing questions about that this morning, declining to say, perhaps because he doesn't know, who first suggested that as an idea but very clear that as far as he is concerned and the government is concerned the prime minister has never sought to interfere or influence sue gray, saying he in fact would welcome her publishing all of the evidence that has been amassed. sue publishing all of the evidence that has been amassed.— has been amassed. sue gray has comlete has been amassed. sue gray has complete control— has been amassed. sue gray has complete control over _ has been amassed. sue gray has complete control over this. - has been amassed. sue gray has complete control over this. i - has been amassed. sue gray has| complete control over this. i have not seen — complete control over this. i have not seen the report. she will publish — not seen the report. she will publish that report when... but you would welcome _ publish that report when... but you would welcome it. _ publish that report when. .. but you would welcome it. i _ publish that report when... but you would welcome it. i would - publish that report when... but you i would welcome it. i would absolutely welcome it- — would welcome it. i would absolutely welcome it- it _ would welcome it. i would absolutely welcome it. it is _ would welcome it. i would absolutely welcome it. it is the _ would welcome it. i would absolutely welcome it. it is the right _ would welcome it. i would absolutely welcome it. it is the right thing - would welcome it. i would absolutely welcome it. it is the right thing to . welcome it. it is the right thing to do and _ welcome it. it is the right thing to do and i_ welcome it. it is the right thing to do and i think it is important that the prime — do and i think it is important that the prime minister comes back to the dispatch— the prime minister comes back to the dispatch box and responds to that, as he _ dispatch box and responds to that, as he has— dispatch box and responds to that, as he has promised he would do. ultimately, what matters is people
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understand what happened and then learn the _ understand what happened and then learn the lessons.— learn the lessons. learning the lessons will _ learn the lessons. learning the lessons will be _ learn the lessons. learning the lessons will be a _ learn the lessons. learning the lessons will be a phrase - learn the lessons. learning the lessons will be a phrase i - learn the lessons. learning the lessons will be a phrase i think| learn the lessons. learning the i lessons will be a phrase i think we hear repeated after the publication of this report and as said there, the prime minister has committed to coming to parliament and making a statement on the findings of sue gray and her report. of course, once thatis gray and her report. of course, once that is over, the metropolitan police investigation has concluded into all of this as well, sir keir starmer still faces an investigation into his actions at a particular eventin into his actions at a particular event in north—east of england during a campaign for a by—election, when he was pictured with a beer and he and his staff were having a takeaway curry. and that if you like is important context because it has meant that labour have, although they still argue there was lawbreaking on an industrial scale and it is a completely different magnitude of order, compared with what sir keir starmer is facing, it does make it more difficult for them to criticise borisjohnson and the government for what has happened and
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the shadow chief secretary to the treasury, pat mcfadden, has been talking about that on sky news this morning and sir keir starmer�*s promise that if he has been found to have broken the law to resign his position. ihis have broken the law to resign his osition. , , ., , ., ., position. his statement showed real inteuri position. his statement showed real integrity and — position. his statement showed real integrity and leadership. _ position. his statement showed real integrity and leadership. he - position. his statement showed real integrity and leadership. he is - position. his statement showed real integrity and leadership. he is a - integrity and leadership. he is a former— integrity and leadership. he is a former director of public prosecutions and takes adherence to the low— prosecutions and takes adherence to the low extremely seriously. and if you contrast that to the culture that has — you contrast that to the culture that has been exposed both by what the met _ that has been exposed both by what the met police have uncovered and what we _ the met police have uncovered and what we are likely to see in sue gray's _ what we are likely to see in sue gray's report, you see that culture comes— gray's report, you see that culture comes from — gray's report, you see that culture comes from the top.— comes from the top. jonathan, in terms of how _ comes from the top. jonathan, in terms of how much _ comes from the top. jonathan, in terms of how much detail - comes from the top. jonathan, in terms of how much detail there l comes from the top. jonathan, in l terms of how much detail there will be, how many names there will be, what are you expecting question mark there will be names. ah, what are you expecting question mark there will be names.— there will be names. a group of around 30 _ there will be names. a group of around 30 people, _ there will be names. a group of around 30 people, senior - there will be names. a group of i around 30 people, senior officials, senior civil servants, have been contacted by sue gray and her team to notify them that they will be named in the report and they have
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until 5pm today to respond and object, if they see fit, to anything thatis object, if they see fit, to anything that is being said. if that happens, that is being said. if that happens, that could be something that holds up that could be something that holds up the process and if there is any legal challenge to the findings or people being included, that is something that could still delay this report further. downing street will be very keen to get it out as soon as possible in an attempt to draw something of a line underneath this. but that is the unknown. quite who will be named and implicated and in what way will be crucial and also the level of detail that is involved. we have heard talk of photographs, text messages, e—mail, whatsapp messages exchanges being rubbished in full. we don't yet know how much of that detail will be included and labour has said it should all be in there for everyone to see. president biden has arrived injapan from south korea on the latest leg of his asian tour. he was welcomed by the japanese foreign minister yoshimasa hayashi and the us ambassador to japan,
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rahm emanuel. mr biden is scheduled to meet japan's prime minister, fumio kishida, and emperor naruhito ahead of tuesday's quad summit, which brings together the leaders of australia, india, japan and the united states. i'm joined now by kyoko hatakeyama, professor of international relations at the university of niigata prefecture, and co—author of snow on the pine: japan's evolving security policy. welcome, thank you very much indeed forjoining us. what is the message that the countries will be looking to hear from that the countries will be looking to hearfrom president biden? that the countries will be looking to hear from president biden? sorry? what is the message _ to hear from president biden? sorry? what is the message countries - to hear from president biden? sorry? what is the message countries will i what is the message countries will be looking to hear from what is the message countries will be looking to hearfrom president biden? be looking to hear from president biden? ., , ., , ., ., biden? the aim is to share common understanding _ biden? the aim is to share common understanding as _ biden? the aim is to share common understanding as to _ biden? the aim is to share common understanding as to how _ biden? the aim is to share common understanding as to how to - biden? the aim is to share common understanding as to how to deal - biden? the aim is to share common| understanding as to how to deal with china in the region. we expect the united states —— united states two increase its presence in the region to counterbalance china's increasing
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influence. ~ . to counterbalance china's increasing influence. ., ., , ., , influence. what are the strategies bein: influence. what are the strategies being looked _ influence. what are the strategies being looked at? _ influence. what are the strategies being looked at? actually, - influence. what are the strategies being looked at? actually, it - influence. what are the strategies being looked at? actually, it is . influence. what are the strategies being looked at? actually, it is a i being looked at? actually, it is a difficult question _ being looked at? actually, it is a difficult question because - being looked at? actually, it is a difficult question because chinal being looked at? actually, it is a i difficult question because china has already changed the status quo by forcing the south china sea and also china has increased its influence by using economic means. the impact of chinese behaviour is much smaller than that of russia, however they are quite similar in that both of them ignores the international law. so noticing such chinese assertiveness, also deep in the relationship with the regional states, however we thought because of russia's invasion of ukraine, we need to send a stronger message to
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china that japan need to send a stronger message to china thatjapan and united need to send a stronger message to china that japan and united states would not accept china's expansionism and would not accept the annexation of taiwan by force. sending a clear message is a strategy. sending a clear message is a strate: . r . sending a clear message is a strate: . . ., , . strategy. and what is the evidence that china might _ strategy. and what is the evidence that china might be _ strategy. and what is the evidence that china might be planning i that china might be planning something?— that china might be planning something? that china might be planning somethinu? ~ . ., , , ., something? actually, there is no clear evidence. _ something? actually, there is no clear evidence. china _ something? actually, there is no clear evidence. china adapted i clear evidence. china adapted domestic law to enable chinese use of force to annex taiwan in 2005 and also china has increased its strength. we actually are concerned if a crisis happens in asia as well. and wrapped up in all of the
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military concerns are also the global roles in terms of trade and investment and how does america sit investment and how does america sit in that picture?— in that picture? actually, china has been increasing _ in that picture? actually, china has been increasing its _ in that picture? actually, china has been increasing its economic i been increasing its economic influence in the world and it plays a very big role and we expect the united states to play a big role as well. that is a shame that united states has decided to withdraw during the trump administration and now a new framework is proposed in trade areas. and i hope that works. but we have to see how it goes. thank you very much forjoining us. the ukrainian government says it will not agree a ceasefire deal with moscow that involves ceding territory in an apparent hardening of its position. a presidential adviser said making concessions would backfire on ukraine because russia
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would immediately escalate the war after any break in fighting. 0ur correspondent, joe inwood, is in the capital kyiv and has been giving us the latest. i think what we have seen here is a restating of a position that has sort of been implicit throughout. president zelensky has always maintained that negotiations are an option, that diplomacy is the preferred way forward but also they have said that their precondition would be getting all their territory back. i think what we have always seen is the public statement that they would like to talk but actually an acknowledgement that the positions compared to that of the russians are miles apart. essentially what the ukrainians have always wanted is all of their territory back. what the russians have said since the start, they want to take large parts of the south. there is not really an overlap. what we saw from the presidential adviser was stating that reality and explaining what i think most analysts would have seen from the start that the only way you will
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have a diplomatic solution to this is after a significant amount of fighting and i think probably that was a reality that we have always known. ~ . , was a reality that we have always known. ~ ., , , . , ., known. we are seeing pictures of president zelensky _ known. we are seeing pictures of president zelensky meeting i known. we are seeing pictures of president zelensky meeting the i president zelensky meeting the portuguese prime minister and they have been a number of meetings like this and many pledges of support, military support, financial support, how much of a difference is that now making on the battlefield? i how much of a difference is that now making on the battlefield?— making on the battlefield? i think an increasing _ making on the battlefield? i think an increasing amount. _ making on the battlefield? i think an increasing amount. at- making on the battlefield? i think an increasing amount. at the i making on the battlefield? i think| an increasing amount. at the start of this war, president zelensky was saying they needed more, they needed it faster and he has gradually... his position has shifted to kind of acknowledging they are getting the support they need and that people are giving it to them with the urgency which they need it. i think the big missing picture, the missing piece in the puzzle here in terms of their military support is still air defences. they are being given some air defence systems but they —— what they really don't we saw this yesterday in a statement from the russians saying they had destroyed a
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shipment of military aid, they are getting the very latest in a defence systems. that is what they are really not getting enough of but on every other front, really not getting enough of but on every otherfront, i really not getting enough of but on every other front, i think the equipment is starting to come through. i have seen personally modern western equipment being sent to the front lines. i think they will always need more, especially given the increased russian action. there have been a number of reports of life starting to slowly return to areas where people had left obviously because of what was happening. how much are you hearing about that? i happening. how much are you hearing about that? ~ , , about that? i think it depends where ou co. about that? i think it depends where ou no. i about that? i think it depends where you go- i have _ about that? i think it depends where you go. i have actually _ about that? i think it depends where you go. i have actuallyjust - you go. i have actuallyjust yesterday travelled from lviv and there, honest truth is it feels pretty normal, life is returning. there is still a curfew and aerate silence but life feels normal. downing desa, it feels quite normal. in the capital, it is returning to normality. it is the occupied areas
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where we are seeing that return to normality take a lot more time because people are scheduled return and also because of the level of destruction. i have been looking at some of the pictures of some people coming back and starting to clear up but it is an absolute scene of devastation. we are also hearing reports of people coming out of the shelters where they have been living a long time but the speed with which things return to normal is very much going to depend on the level of destruction and the number of people that have been forced from their homes. presidentjoe biden has said that everyone should be concerned about a rare outbreak of monkeypox that has been detected in at least a dozen countries around the world. speaking in south korea before boarding a plane tojapan, mr biden said that us health officials were working hard to find a cure. this is a new infectious disease spreading in our community that we have not seen in our communities
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before. we will need to learn a lot about it here and in other countries over the coming weeks. we do know from reports from africa where this disease has circulated and outbreaks over many years, that there are certain individuals more at risk of severe disease, especially immuno implants —— immunosuppressed young people full stop in adults, we think it is relatively mild but we will learn more. the risk to the general operation remains low at the moment. but people need to be alert to it and we need clinicians to be alert to a closed i think the important things we talk about regularly, if we are —— if you are feeling unwell, stay—at—home, if you develop a rash, immediately seek medical care. but we are saying to people, if you have symptoms, avoid close contact with others and seek medical attention.
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that was doctor susan hopkins. today marks the fifth anniversary of the manchester arena bombing, in which 22 people were killed at a concert, with many more injured. the city will come together to remember those that lost their lives. teenager nelljones was one of the victims. 0ur north of england correspondent, judith moritz, has been speaking with her family. nell, what you laughing at? watch this! nelljones loved having a laugh. she was popular and lively. her murder at manchester arena devastated herfriends and left a void her family will never fill. they can't believe it is five years since they last saw her. your life is still, you know, trapped in what happened. but outside that bubble, life is carrying on, and suddenly you think, heck, it's five years, you know? it's strange. it seems like a long time ago, but no time at all, all in the same breath. it is a surreal experience.
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22 people were killed and hundreds injured when a bomb exploded at the end of an ariana grande concert in 2017. manchester arena had been full of children and parents. the city became the focal point for an outpouring of grief and support. you know, it is going to be a moment for everybody, isn't it, just to think back on those five years and what we've all been through together. we saw the worst of humanity, and then we've seen the best, haven't we? and i'm proud to lead a place that is such a place, that has the very best of people always on show. the new memorial to those who died opened earlier this month, and later this year the manchester arena inquiry will publish its next report. but today the focus will be on remembering, as the impact of that terrible night
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continues to be felt. thank you for your company. you can get in touch with me on twitter. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello, sunshine on the way for many parts of the uk this afternoon, but for some it will be accompanied by a serving of showers. driest, brightest closest to this area of high pressure, so across southern and eastern most counties of england. low pressure to the northwest feeding in more in the way of cloud. the sun is going to have a pretty good go at breaking that cloud up in many areas, but it is likely to produce some showers i think across western wales and northern england into the afternoon and potentially some thunderstorms for southern scotland and northern ireland. up to 23 degrees, though, in the sunshine towards the southeast. just 13 or 1a where we have a band of more persistent rain across northwestern scotland stretching up to the northern isles. and more rain to come out of that through the course of the night
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for northern—most scotland. elsewhere, we are looking at an essentially dry night and a mild night, with temperatures widely in double figures. for monday, it's a bit of a two—pronged attack in terms of our weather. we've got weather fronts trying to push down from the north and we've got an area of low pressure trying to push in from the south. the theme, really, for the week ahead is that it's going to be unsettled and it will also turn cooler. this area of low pressure could make for some pretty intense rain across eastern—most counties of england through monday and then fronts heading south i think will start to produce some showers that lump together into longer spells of rain, particularly for wales and the south west come monday afternoon. we are having some questions around exactly where this rain sits across eastern england through monday and how heavy it is. so just keep that in the back of your mind through the course of the day. but cooler as you can see for everyone. temperatures no longer in the low 20s, mid—teens very typically. tuesday, low pressure to the east of the uk means i think many
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eastern areas will see some quite heavy showers. there'll be strong winds along the length of the north sea and some of this rain could also be fairly persistent before the low drifts away. towards the west, a very different story, actually. light winds, sunshine and a pretty pleasant and quiet day. but by midweek we've got an area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic and all areas that will turn it windy and bring a chance of showers just about anywhere. it does look like things will start to settle down, though, again towards the end of the week and we might see some warmth creeping back in by then, too.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... australia's prime minister—elect gets ready to take
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to the world stage — promising a new approach on climate change. there is a change of government, there will be some changes in policy, particularly with regard to climate change and our engagement with the world. deadline day for the report into lockdown breaches in downing street — those named have until 5pm to respond ahead of its long awaited publication. the ukrainian government says it won't agree to a ceasefire with russia that involves giving up territory — in an apparent hardening of its position a city remembers — five years on from the manchester arena bomb that killed 22 people. now on bbc news, dateline london.

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