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tv   Newsday  BBC News  May 26, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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welcome to newsday, we are reporting live from singapore, i'm arunoday mukharji. lets get you the headlines. the texas police now being blamed for being slow in responding to the ross elementary school shooting, 19 children and two teachers were killed by an 18 year old gunman two days ago. £15bn billion in support from the uk chancellor to help with the cost of living and some of that will be paid for, by a windfall tax on the profits of the oil and gas companies. as russian forces make progress in eastern ukraine — saying the situation in the donbas region are worse than people understand.
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the us says that china remains the biggest challenge to the international order despite the immediate threat posed by russia. this is bbc news. it's newsday. it's newsday. welcome to bbc news — broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. we begin tonight in texas where the police are facing criticism for how they responded to the mass school shooting in uvalde on tuesday. some parents say officers appeared hesitant to confront the teenage gunman after he barricaded himself inside a classroom, and that led to a delay in tackling the assaulter. but at a news conference a texas police official said special equipment and negotiators were required, and officers also had to evacuate the rest of the school. the attacker killed 19 children and two teachers in the space
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of up to an hour before he was himself shot dead. our north america editor sarah smith sent us this report. all of the 19 children who were killed in the same school class. this boys family had to wait 12 hours before they were told he was dead. this girl had been given a phone for her tenth birthday and she used it to try to call the police. jackie had just celebrated herfirst communion and she died alongside her cousin, annabel. these pictures show the scene outside the school on tuesday. "there's a shooting," one man yells. distraught parents pleading with police officers, being told to stay back. get back! holding on to each other, desperate to know what is happening inside. questions are now being raised
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about how long it took for the police to go into the school and tackle the gunman. it was 90 minutes after the first emergency call that he was shot and killed. we are now learning more details about what was happening inside the school, the two teachers who were killed as they threw themselves in front of their students to try to save them from the gunman, and what the terrified children saw as he burst into their classroom. he shot our legs and we have a door in the middle and he opened it and then he came in and he said, "it's time to die. " "it's time to die," is what the gunman told the children. according to this boy. he says one girl was shot after the police were on the scene. the cop said, help if you need help and they got one of the persons in my class said help. he overheard and he came in and shot her.
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right across america, students walked out of their schools in protest, demanding action to keep schools safe. not later, now! in washington, democratic politicians pledged to try to work with their opponents to find a compromise on gun control. we are not going to allow this to become the new normal. we are not prepared to allow our schools to continue as killing fields. we are not prepared to allow the gun lobby and the gun industry to continue to run this town and this place. in uvalde, a small, grief stricken town, 21 bereaved families are now starting to plan 21 funerals. i'm joined now byjames densley, a professor of criminaljustice at metropolitan state university in minnesota
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and co—author of a book called "the violence project — how to stop a mass shooting epidemic." we've shooting epidemic." heard a lot of strong state m e nts we've heard a lot of strong statements of condemnation, were also hearing demands growing for tighter gun control laws. do you see this going beyond and actually culminating in proper action? i culminating in properaction? i sincerely hope so. if the slaughter of 19 children and two teachers isn't enough to compel our lawmakers to action that i don't know what would be. it's hard not to lose hope in situations like this because it is a recurring theme for american history. we've studied over time going all the way back to 1966, there and mass shootings in our project. but i'm optimistic that we might finally get some movement here. people are realising enough is
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enough. here. people are realising enough is enou:h. ., ., , . here. people are realising enough is enouuh. ., ., , . , , enough. you are optimistic but help us understand _ enough. you are optimistic but help us understand how _ enough. you are optimistic but help us understand how this _ enough. you are optimistic but help us understand how this will - enough. you are optimistic but help us understand how this will go - enough. you are optimistic but help us understand how this will go from j us understand how this will go from this point onwards as i understand, the democrats are in control of both houses does that make it easier for them to go ahead with some sort of direction? the them to go ahead with some sort of direction? . ., ., , direction? the challenge that is often the case _ direction? the challenge that is often the case is _ direction? the challenge that is often the case is in _ direction? the challenge that is often the case is in the - direction? the challenge that is often the case is in the senate, j direction? the challenge that is - often the case is in the senate, the senate is not necessarily representative of the american people. you've got two senators for each day, that means the smaller states have an undue influence on the voting and decision—making. you've got to convince enough people to side with the legislation. at the moment when you've got politicians who are really thinking about the real action in the position and power more than they are thinking about the safety of our children, it's hard not to despair that this won't move. but the one think that is very important is they've always pointed to the american constitution as if that's the issue here. for 200
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years the interpretation of the constitution was this was a collective right to bear arms around a well regulated militia. 0nly collective right to bear arms around a well regulated militia. only in the past decade or so after the decision in 2008 it's become a focus on individual right to bear arms. this is a new interpretation of that old document. if it can be reinterpreted like that, just in the last few years, why can't we look at this again more strategically and think, perhaps we could re—evaluate this. the constitution is not the issue here. this. the constitution is not the issue here-— issue here. speaking about reevaluation, _ issue here. speaking about reevaluation, what - issue here. speaking about reevaluation, what about i issue here. speaking about - reevaluation, what about specific states like texas, do you see them having a relook at the current laws? texasis having a relook at the current laws? texas is one of those days that have extremely permissive gun laws. in fact, they've taken steps in recent years to make it easier to openly
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carry firearms in public and to get access to firearms. texas is a tough case put up the key thing to remember here is america is a patchwork of gun laws. you have federal laws as the flaw two floor not the ceiling when it comes to restriction on firearms. so often the action is at the state level where you can actually get things done. so we would hope now that states are going to start moving on this. but in the end we still need federal law to so this together. you can't have one law in one place and one and another. thatjust doesn't make sense. guns are durable goods, they can travel over state lines. you have to ensure there's a consistent rule being followed that's why things like universal background checks are so important. if i can get moved here that could make a big difference. we if i can get moved here that could make a big difference.— if i can get moved here that could make a big difference. we will leave it there. thank _ make a big difference. we will leave it there. thank you _ make a big difference. we will leave it there. thank you for _ make a big difference. we will leave it there. thank you for your - make a big difference. we will leave it there. thank you for your time - it there. thank you for your time and input on newsday.
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in the uk — the chancellor rishi sunak has said his £15—billion or about $19—billion package of support for energy bills is about keeping a promise to stand by the british people. every uk household will get £1100, that's around $504 with those on the lowest incomes and pensioners getting hundreds of pounds more. mr sunak said a third of the cost would be met by a new temporary profits' tax on oil and gas companies. 0ur political editor chris mason has the details. it's the one thing that everybody�*s talking about. leila tells me the customers at her coffee and vinyl shop in watford talk of little else but spiralling prices. are you going to cope as a business? the magic question. i mean, everan optimist, i'm going to say, yes, absolutely, we will still be here. we faced brexit, a global pandemic
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and now this unimaginable inflation. it's asking us to just re—evaluate our business, almost constantly at the moment. are the tories taxing business? for weeks and weeks, plenty have demanded the government do more. enter today, the chancellor. no government can solve every problem, particularly the complex and global challenge of inflation. but this government will never stop trying to help people. 0pposition parties had already demanded oil and gas companies faced a new tax. we pushed for a windfall tax, they adopted it. this government is out of ideas, out of touch, and out of time. when it comes to the big issues facing this country, the position is now clear. we lead, they follow. it's not enough, madam deputy speaker.
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what he has announced fails to uprate benefits, it fails to account for the fact that the energy price cap that's coming in in october will still be in place next year. later, i sat down with the chancellor, who was on a visit to a diy shop. we've announced £15 billion of new support to help with the cost of living, with a third of all households, the most vulnerable, receiving around £1,200 of help. there's also support for everyone. let's talk about the windfall tax. the prime minister has said, i don't like them, the business secretary has said he's never been a supporter. i put it to you that you were ideologically opposed to this idea. i've always been pragmatic about it and that's what i've said. i think it's entirely fair that we look at the extraordinary profits these companies are making at the moment and when prices return to historically more normal levels, the energy profits levy will be removed. i notice you don't want to call it a windfall tax.
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it's a very specific levy that we've designed, which contains in it a very generous investment incentive. come on, chancellor, it's a windfall tax, isn't it? people can call it what they want. what i want people to get across is. but you won't call it a windfall tax? these are windfall profits, or they are extraordinary profits, and they will be taxed. millions of families are deeply worried about the economy. how worried are you? i am concerned about the inflationary pressures that we're facing, because i know they're having an enormous impact on families up and down the country. could we face recession? i'm more confident about the future of our economy. back in the lp cafe, leila welcomes help, but knows that things will still be tough. if i break my leg, thank you for my crutch but we need the surgery. we need to get that bone fixed and that's an announcement i'd like to hear. that is the soundtrack of this colossal problem.
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even a big government intervention can't turn off the crackle of prices spinning upwards. chris mason, bbc news, in watford. ukraine says it's in desperate need of more heavy weaponry to defeat a major russian attack in the east of the country. the foreign minister said the situation in donbass is worse than people understood — others have said that moscow has thrown all its resources into the assault. two key cities — severodonetsk and lysychansk have come under bombardment and there's heavy fighting for control of roads connecting ukranian territory. 0ur ukraine correspondent james waterhouse reports from kyiv. ukraine's government are warning that they are seeing a maximum intensity of fighting in the eastern donbas region. from the russian side we are seeing very slow, very deliberate and very familiar tactics when they are trying to encircle increasing number of locations.
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checked tanya ask, strategically significant, a single bridge allowing people to escape and supplies to come in. that's been targeted today by the russians as they continue to use their artillery and the area. there is ukraine's second largest city park eve which is been left alone for a couple of weeks. 0nce is been left alone for a couple of weeks. once again rockets have landed on that city killing at least several pho we are told by authorities. this is part of the country where the fighting is concentrated at where the war could be determined, where the outcome could be decided. but the russians don't seem to want to be stopping on the 20% that they've made in ukraine. they are consolidating, we seen an increase of land sea and air forces to the salves which have already been taken. and the debate continues from psalm as to whether ukraine should see territory to agree to a cease—fire. and if they
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agree to a cease—fire. and if they agree to a cease—fire. and if they agree to that, how much? but the argument from keith is what point does it stop? —— key you. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme... the actor kevin spacey is facing charges on four counts of sexual assault against three men the allegations date back to when he was in the uk. in the biggest international sporting spectacle ever seen, up to 30 million people have taken part in sponsored athletics events to aid famine relief in africa. the first of what the makers of star wars hope will be thousands of queues started forming at 7am. taunting which led to scuffles, scuffles to fighting, fighting to full—scale riot, as the liverpool fans broke out of their area and into the juventus enclosure. the belgian police had lost control. the whole world will mourn - the tragic death of mr nehru today.
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he was the father of the indian - people from the day of independence. the oprah winfrey show comes to an end after 25 years and more than four and a half thousand episodes. the chat show has made her one of the richest people on the planet. geri halliwell, otherwise known as ginger spice, has announced she's left the spice girls. argh, i don't believe it! she's the one with the bounce, the go, the girl power. not geri, why? this is newsday on the bbc. i'm arunoday mukharji in singapore. lets take a quick look at our top stories again. the at our top stories again. police in texas are facing mounting the police in texas are facing mounting anger over the way they dealt with the shooting at an interview elementary school. when 18—year—old gunman storm the building.
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the us secretary of state anthony blinken has said that china remains the most serious threat to the international order, despite russia's invasion of ukraine. in a speech in washington, he said that, under xijinping, china's ruling communist party had become more repressive at home and more aggressive abroad. become more repressive at home here he was speaking earlier. become more repressive at home china's the only country with both the intent to reshape the international order and increasingly, the economic, diplomatic, military and technological power to do it. beijing's vision would move us away from the universal values that has sustained so much of the worlds progress over the past 75 years. let's now speak to the author and commentator based in the us. a long term adviser to china's leaders and multinational corporations. he was awarded the china friendship reform medal by xi jinping in 2018. what do you expect the reaction to be from the chinese leadership on mr blinken comments?—
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blinken comments? overtly they will of course criticise _ blinken comments? overtly they will of course criticise him _ blinken comments? overtly they will of course criticise him severely. - blinken comments? overtly they will of course criticise him severely. i - of course criticise him severely. i think privately they will appreciate that at least a coherence in the predictability and for chinese leadership, that's very important for them under the prior administration there was a chaos and unpredictability which actually becomes more dangerous. the downside of course is that the coherence of the biden policy, which secretary blinken articulated today, which people on both sides of the aisle have been clamouring for since the biden administration took office. this was a very clear articulation of that and it not only set the guidelines for the us china competition and distinct differences on the world scene but also framed the possibility of cooperation, particularly in climate control. it
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set very clear boundaries about taiwan, which is probably the most sensitive issue. in that sense the predictability is good although the effort of the biden administration to rally allies around the world, not only in europe but in asia given a boon by the horrific russian invasion of ukraine, which gave unity to the west and most of the developed world, that is definitely a negative from china's point of view. as they would see it it's a competition between blocks of alliances and not do any good. but thatis alliances and not do any good. but that is the heart of the biden policy. but it is coherent and it is predictable and at least that's a good sign. predictable and at least that's a aood sin. ., . predictable and at least that's a uaoodsin. ., . , ,, good sign. how much pressure will china be feeling _ good sign. how much pressure will china be feeling at _ good sign. how much pressure will china be feeling at the _ good sign. how much pressure will china be feeling at the moment. china be feeling at the moment considering we had the quad beaning earlier, we had president biden
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statements on taiwan and our statements on taiwan and our statement coming from mr blinken? clearly this is a time when the west is more unified then recent memory. again, triggered by the ukraine situation. but also recognition of china's awkward position of ukraine. they say they are neutral but they definitely pro—russian. that is given a very bad flavour to many people in the developed world at this point. but there is opportunity. blinken tried to make a distinction between the chinese people, who he gave credit for further culture, history, achievement and the us is not trying to stop china from its rightful place in the world. not trying to stop the development of china for the benefit of the people. so that's good, he was distinguishing between the government and the party, communist party and the people. i
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thought it could be more nuanced because he presented it all in a very negative way. and to the chinese people that is not the case. chinese people that is not the case. chinese people that is not the case. chinese people see that the government and the party has eliminated extreme poverty in china, a remarkable development. xijinping said that was his most important piece of business over a period of time. there could have been more nuanced in terms of understanding the relationship between the people and the government. because we don't want to inflame nationalism, which is a disease which most countries have. , . ~ , is a disease which most countries have. , a , ., ., is a disease which most countries have. , , ., ., i. is a disease which most countries have. , ., , have. very quickly, how do you see this playing — have. very quickly, how do you see this playing out. — have. very quickly, how do you see this playing out, do _ have. very quickly, how do you see this playing out, do you _ have. very quickly, how do you see this playing out, do you see - have. very quickly, how do you see this playing out, do you see any - this playing out, do you see any common ground?— this playing out, do you see any common ground? this playing out, do you see any common round? , ., , , common ground? yes, of course i see common ground? yes, of course i see common ground- _ common ground? yes, of course i see common ground. john _ common ground? yes, of course i see common ground. john kerry _ common ground? yes, of course i see common ground. john kerry and - common ground. john kerry and chinese climate representative have good relationships and have sent a signal very recently, i'm sure was no accident that there is cooperation. there will be efforts
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to make cooperation, recognising the big picture that there is competition in the future. appreciate you joining us. thank you for your comments. appreciate you joining us. thank you foryour comments. 0ther appreciate you joining us. thank you for your comments. other stories were tracking in the headlines. japan announced it will be reopening ford taurus from 36 country started from the 10th ofjune but travellers will only be allowed in with tour groups. the year two move ends a two—year ban japan groups. the year two move ends a two—year banjapan has banned all except citizens even the letter had periodically been shut out. ray leota made his name in martin scorsese is goodfellas has passed away. he was 67. the actor died in his sleep in the dominican republic where he was filming a movie. the causes yet to be made clear. he was
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born in newjersey, he later moved to new york and in los angeles followed his dream of acting. twitter shareholders are taking the billionaire elon musk to the court accusing him of manipulating company share prices to reduce the cost of his plan to take the social media platform over. they shareholder saying mr musk failed to produce his twitter stock and this is seen over a there's been no response from mr musk so far and twitter has refused to comment. musk so far and twitter has refused to comment. actor kevin spacey has been charged with four sexual offences against three men by the crown prosecution service in the uk. the allegations relate to incidents in london and gloucestershire between 2005 and 2013. our special correspondent, lucy manning, has the atest details. kevin spacey is facing five charges. just go to those allegations by
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three victims. two counts of assault by one man, that man out in his 40s. that's alleged that you counts have taken place in london in 2005. another man has made in allegation, to allegations, 1's sexual assault in london and 2008. and also in 2008 saying that the allegation is that kevin spacey because a person to engage in sexual activity without consent. there is a further allegation of sexual assault from another man, that man now in his 30s but that's alleged to have happened in 2013 in gloucestershire. these allegations all relate to a period of time when kevin spacey was the head, the artistic director at the famous old vic theatre in london. he has in the past always denied any
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allegations of sexual assault. we are not sure as normally happens when he's due to appear in court, normally when somebody is latent charges we are told they will appear in court the following day but we understand that kevin spacey is not in the country and so either he will have to return to the country to face those charges in court or potentially in the past, people have had to be extradited and just don't know what that situation is but he is placing those charges from the prosecutors in london after an investigation by the metropolitan police. they are incidents that are alleged to have happened in happened in london in gloucestershire, they spent a time. from 2005, including 2008 and 2013 so quite a long time span and the allegations, three separate men making those allegations against him.
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that story and more on our website. that's it for this edition of newsday. hello there. we'll be developing a north—south split across the country into friday but that's because we got high pressure building and across southern areas that will bring quite a long sunshine, far more sunshine that we had on thursday but we maintain the windy, blustery theme across the north with further showers. that's because closer to this area of low pressure. this area of high pressure will continue to push its way northwards dominating the weather seen across much of the midlands, southwards and in towards wales. there will be some sunshine for northern ireland, some in scotland, will be windier times could see a few light showers. but most of the showers will be across the north and west of scotland, some will be quite heavy and they will be blustery as the winds will be quite a feature here once again. the winds will be lighter further south with more sunshine, could
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see 21 degrees again. otherwise, it's the low to mid teens across the north. through friday night the showers continue for a while across scotland, the winds begin to back more northerly as we head through the night. that will feed in a few more showers across a far more north of scotland but much of the country will be dry. it will be a cooler air mass, temperatures in the single digits for most places. so it's a cooler feel into the weekend, it will be turning cooler still thanks to these northerly winds. by sunday we could even see a few showers around with limited spells of sunshine. saturday probably looking like the brightest day of the weekend. even then to be quite a bit of cloud being pushed down on this northerly wind across all ggiirrll in northern easton areas. i think the best of the sunshine southwest england and wales, northern ireland, it's here will receive the best temperatures, perhaps 20 degrees in cardiff, otherwise it's cooler across more northern and eastern areas where we will have more cloud. as we move into sunday you could see the blue
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hue trickling further southwards across the country, will be turning cooler as her area of high pressure begins to drift in towards iceland. so northerly winds, quite a lot of cloud around on sunday, that wind will be quite stiff across northern and eastern areas so sunshine will be pretty limited. probably the best will be at the southwest we could see 60 or 70 degrees. -- 17. —— 17. distinctly chilly for this time a year across more northern and eastern areas where we hold onto the cloud as well put up into next week i think we will have a very weak area of low pressure nearby. that will bring for the sunshine but also the risk of some showers, some of which will be on the heavy side.
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this is bbc news, the headlines police in texas have been accused of being too slow to confront the gunman who killed 19 children and 2 teachers in an elementary school in uvalde. the gunman was inside the school for at least a0 minutes. russia has stepped up its attacks on more than a0 towns in the eastern regions of donetsk and luhansk. ukraine says fighting in the region has reached maximum intensity. every household in the uk will receive at least four—hundred pounds — that's around 500 us dollars — to help pay their energy bills. the support package will be funded in part by a temporary tax on the profits of oil and gas companies. actor kevin spacey has been charged with sexual assault against three men. the crown prosecution service
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in the uk says the allegations relate to incidents in london and gloucestershire

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