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Apprenticeship and industry Training 


Recreation Vehicle Service Technician 
Apprenticeship Course Outline 



ALBERTA ADVANCED EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY CATALOGUING IN 
PUBLICATION DATA 


Alberta. Alberta Advaneed Edueation and Teehnology. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 
Recreation Vehicle Service Technician : apprenticeship course outline. 

ISBN 978-0-7785-6466-9 

1. Recreational vehicles - Maintenance and repair - Study and teaching - Alberta. 

2. Apprenticeship programs - Alberta. 3. Apprentices - Alberta. 

4. Occupational training - Alberta. I. Title. 

HD4885.C2.R43.A333 2008 373.27 


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED: 

© 2007, Her Majesty the Queen in right of the Province of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Aiberta Advanced 
Education and Technoiogy, 10th fioor. Commerce Piace, Edmonton, Aiberta, Canada, T5J 4L5. AN rights reserved. No part 
of this materiai may be reproduced in any form or by any means, without the prior written consent of the Minister of Advanced 
Education and Technology Province of Aiberta, Canada. Revised 201 1 . 


Recreational Vehicle Service Technician 
Table of Contents 


Apprenticeship 

Apprenticeship and Industry Training System 

Apprenticeship Safety 

Technicai Training 

Procedures for Recommending Revisions to the Course Outiine 

Apprenticehsip Route toward Certification 

Recreational Vehicle Service Technician Training Profile 

Course Outline 


2 

2 

Error! Bookmark not defined. 

6 

6 

7 

8 


First Period Technical Training 11 

Second Period Technical Training 17 

Third Period Technicai Training 22 


- 1 - 


Apprenticeship 


Apprenticeship is post-secondary education with a difference. Apprenticeship begins with finding an empioyer. 
Empioyers hire apprentices, pay their wages and provide on-the-job training and work experience. Approximateiy 
80 per cent of an apprentice’s time is spent on the job under the supervision of a certified journeyperson or 
quaiified tradesperson. The other 20 per cent invoives technicai training provided at, or through, a post- 
secondary institution - usuaiiy a coiiege or technicai institute. 

To become certified journeypersons, apprentices must iearn theory and skiiis, and they must pass examinations. 
Requirements for certification — inciuding the content and deiivery of technicai training — are deveioped and 
updated by the Aiberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board on the recommendation of the Recreationai 
Vehicie Service Technician Provincial Apprenticeship Committee. 

The graduate of the Recreational Vehicle Service Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson 
who will be able to; 

• know the standards and regulations that relate to recreation vehicles 

• install, repair and maintain LP gas distribution systems and appliances 

• install, repair and maintain plumbing and electrical systems 

• be proficient in the use and maintenance of shop tools, instruments and equipment 

• install, repair & maintain exterior structural components, coverings and fixtures 

• install, repair & maintain interior components and fixtures 

• install, repair & maintain interior and exterior accessories 

• understand workplace etiquette and productivity objectives 

• know the OH&S and dangerous goods regulations as they relate to the RV Industry 

• perform assigned tasks in accordance with quality and production standards required by industry 

Apprenticeship and industry Training System 


industry-Driven 

Alberta’s apprenticeship and industry training system is an industry-driven system that ensures a highly skilled, 
internationally competitive workforce in more than 50 designated trades and occupations. This workforce supports 
the economic progress of Alberta and its competitive role in the global market. Industry (employers and 
employees) establishes training and certification standards and provides direction to the system through an 
industry committee network and the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board. The Alberta government 
provides the legislative framework and administrative support for the apprenticeship and industry training system. 

Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board 

The Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board provides a leadership role in developing Alberta’s highly 
skilled and trained workforce. The board’s primary responsibility is to establish the standards and requirements 
for training and certification in programs under the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act. The board also 
provides advice to the Minister of Advanced Education and Technology on the needs of Alberta’s labour market 
for skilled and trained workers, and the designation of trades and occupations. 

The thirteen-member board consists of a chair, eight members representing trades and four members 
representing other industries. There are equal numbers of employer and employee representatives. 

Industry Committee Network 

Alberta’s apprenticeship and industry training system relies on a network of industry committees, including local 
and provincial apprenticeship committees in the designated trades, and occupational committees in the 
designated occupations. The network also includes other committees such as provisional committees that are 
established before the designation of a new trade or occupation comes into effect. All trade committees are 
composed of equal numbers of employer and employee representatives. The industry committee network is the 
foundation of Alberta’s apprenticeship and industry training system. 


- 2 - 


Local Apprenticeship Committees (LAC) 

Wherever there is activity in a trade, the board can set up a iocai apprenticeship committee. The board appoints 
equai numbers of empioyee and empioyer representatives for terms of up to three years. The committee 
appoints a member as presiding officer. Locai apprenticeship committees; 

• monitor apprenticeship programs and the progress of apprentices in their trade, at the iocai ievei 

• make recommendations to their trade’s provinciai apprenticeship committee (PAG) about apprenticeship 
and certification in their trade 

• promote apprenticeship programs and training and the pursuit of careers in their trade 

• make recommendations to the board about the appointment of members to their trade’s PAG 

• heip settie certain kinds of disagreements between apprentices and their empioyers 

• carry out functions assigned by their trade’s PAG or the board 

Provincial Apprenticeship Committees (PAC) 

The board estabiishes a provinciai apprenticeship committee for each trade. It appoints an equai number of 
empioyer and empioyee representatives, and, on the PAG’s recommendation, a presiding officer - each for a 
maximum of two terms of up to three years. Most PAGs have nine members but can have as many as twenty- 
one. Provinciai apprenticeship committees; 

• Make recommendations to the board about; 

• standards and requirements for training and certification in their trade 

• courses and examinations in their trade 

• apprenticeship and certification 

• designation of trades and occupations 

• reguiations and orders under the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act 

• monitor the activities of iocai apprenticeship committees in their trade 

• determine whether training of various kinds is equivaient to training provided in an apprenticeship 
program in their trade 

• promote apprenticeship programs and training and the pursuit of careers in their trade 

• consuit with other committees under the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act about apprenticeship 
programs, training and certification and faciiitate cooperation between different trades and occupations 

• consuit with organizations, associations and peopie who have an interest in their trade and with 
empioyers and empioyees in their trade 

• may participate in receiving certain disagreements between empioyers and empioyees 

• carry out functions assigned by the board 

Recreational Vehicle Service Technician PAC Members at the Time of Publication 


Mr. W. Hammermeister.... 

....Edmonton 

Presiding Officer 

Mr. K. Hutton 

....Gaigary 

Empioyer 

Mr. B. Roberts 

....Gaigary 

Empioyer 

Mr. A. Garon 

....Edmonton 

Empioyer 

Mr. A. Dack 

....Edmonton 

Empioyer 

Mr. T. Burns 

....Red Deer 

Empioyee 

Mr. D. Maianiuk 

....Edmonton 

Empioyee 


Alberta Government 

Aiberta Advanced Education and Technoiogy works with industry, empioyer and empioyee organizations and 
technicai training providers to; 

• faciiitate industry’s deveiopment and maintenance of training and certification standards 

• provide registration and counseiiing services to apprentices and empioyers 

• coordinate technicai training in coiiaboration with training providers 

• certify apprentices and others who meet industry standards 


- 3 - 


Technical Institutes and Colleges 

The technical institutes and colleges are key participants in Alberta’s apprenticeship and industry training system. 
They work with the board, industry committees and Alberta Advanced Education and Technology to enhance 
access and responsiveness to industry needs through the delivery of the technical training component of 
apprenticeship programs. They develop lesson plans from the course outlines established by industry and provide 
technical training to apprentices. 


Apprenticeship Safety 

Safe working procedures and conditions, incident/injury prevention, and the preservation of health are of primary 
importance in apprenticeship programs in Alberta. These responsibilities are shared and require the joint efforts 
of government, employers, employees, apprentices and the public. Therefore, it is imperative that all parties are 
aware of circumstances that may lead to injury or harm. 

Safe learning experiences and healthy environments can be created by controlling the variables and behaviours 
that may contribute to or cause an incident or injury. By practicing a safe and healthy attitude, everyone can 
enjoy the benefit of an incident and injury free environment. 

Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board Safety Policy 

The Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board (board) fully supports safe learning and working 
environments and emphasizes the importance of safety awareness and education throughout apprenticeship 
training- in both on-the-job training and technical training. The board also recognizes that safety awareness and 
education begins on the first day of on-the-job training and thereby is the initial and ongoing responsibility of the 
employer and the apprentice as required under workplace health and safety training. However the board 
encourages that safe workplace behaviour is modeled not only during on-the-job training but also during all 
aspects of technical training, in particular, shop or lab instruction. Therefore the board recognizes that safety 
awareness and training in apprenticeship technical training reinforces, but does not replace, employer safety 
training that is required under workplace health and safety legislation. 

The board has established a policy with respect to safety awareness and training; 

The board promotes and supports safe workplaces, which embody a culture of safety for 
all apprentices, employers and employees. Employer required safety training is the 
responsibility of the employer and the apprentice, as required under legislation other than 
the Apprenticeship and industry Training Act. 

The board’s complete document on its ‘Apprenticeship Safety Training Policy’ is available at 
www.tradesecrets.qov.ab.ca ; access the website and conduct a search for ‘safety training policy’. 

Implementation of the policy includes three common safety learning outcomes and objectives for all trade course 
outlines. These common learning outcomes ensure that each course outline utilizes common language consistent 
with workplace health and safety terminology. Under the title of ‘Standard Workplace Safety’, this first section of 
each trade course outline enables the delivery of generic safety training; technical training providers will provide 
trade specific examples related to the content delivery of course outline safety training. 


- 4 - 


Addendum 

As immediate impiementation of the board’s safety poiicy inciudes common safety iearning outcomes and 
objectives for aii course outiines, this trade’s PAG wiii be inserting these safety outcomes into the main body of 
their course outiine at a iater date. In the meantime the addendum beiow immediateiy piaces the safety outcomes 
and their objectives into this course outiine thereby enabiing technicai training providers to deiiver the content of 
these safety outcomes. 


STANDARD WORKPLACE SAFETY 


A. Safety Legislation, Regulations & Industry Policy in the Trades 


Outcome: Describe legislation, regulations and practices intended to ensure a safe work place in this 

trade. 


1 . Demonstrate the abiiity to appiy the Occupationai Heaith and Safety Act, Reguiation and Code. 

2. Expiain the roie of the empioyer and empioyee in regard to Occupationai Heaith and Safety 
(OH&S) reguiations, Worksite Hazardous Materiais Information Systems (WHMIS), fire 
reguiations, Workers Compensation Board reguiations, and reiated advisory bodies and agencies. 

3. Expiain industry practices for hazard assessment and controi procedures. 

4. Describe the responsibiiities of workers and empioyers to appiy emergency procedures. 

5. Describe positive tradesperson attitudes with respect to housekeeping, personai protective 
equipment and emergency procedures. 

6. Describe the roies and responsibiiities of empioyers and empioyees with respect to the seiection 
and use of personai protective equipment (PPE). 

7. Seiect, use and maintain appropriate PPE for worksite appiications. 


B. Climbing, Lifting, Rigging and Hoisting 


Outcome: 

1 . 

2 . 

3. 

4. 

5. 


Describe the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and safe practices for climbing, 
lifting, rigging and hoisting in this trade. 

Seiect, use and maintain speciaiized PPE for ciimbing, iifting and ioad moving equipment. 
Describe manuai iifting procedures using correct body mechanics. 

Describe rigging hardware and the safety factor associated with each item. 

Seiect the correct equipment for rigging typicai ioads. 

Describe hoisting and ioad moving procedures. 


C. Hazardous Materials & Fire Protection 


Outcome: 

1 . 

2 . 

3. 

4. 

5. 


Describe the safety practices for hazardous materials and fire protection in this trade. 

Describe the roies, responsibiiities features and practices reiated to the workpiace hazardous 
materiais information system (WHMIS) program. 

Describe the three key eiements of WHMIS. 

Describe handiing, storing and transporting procedures when deaiing with hazardous materiai. 
Describe safe venting procedures when working with hazardous materiais. 

Describe fire hazards, ciasses, procedures and equipment reiated to fire protection. 


- 5 - 


Workplace Health and Safety 

A tradesperson is often exposed to more hazards than any other person in the work force and therefore shouid be 
famiiiar with and appiy the Occupationai Heaith and Safety Act, Reguiations and Code when deaiing with 
personai safety and the speciai safety ruies that appiy to aii daiiy tasks. 

Workpiace Heaith and Safety (Aiberta Empioyment, Immigration and Industry) conducts periodic inspections of 
workpiaces to ensure that safety reguiations for industry are being observed. 

Additionai information is avaiiabie at www.worksafeiy.org 

Technical Training 

Apprenticeship technicai training is deiivered by the technicai institutes and many coiieges in the pubiic post- 
secondary system throughout Aiberta. The coiieges and institutes are committed to deiivering the technicai 
training component of Aiberta apprenticeship programs in a safe, efficient and effective manner. Aii training 
providers piace great emphasis on safe technicai practices that compiement safe workpiace practices and heip to 
deveiop a skiiied, safe workforce. 

The foiiowing institutions deiiver Recreationai Vehicie Service Technician apprenticeship technicai training: 


Southern Aiberta Institute of Technoiogy (Mayiand Heights Campus) 

Procedures for Recommending Revisions to the Course Outiine 

Advanced Education and Technoiogy has prepared this course outiine in partnership with the Recreationai 
Vehicie Service Technician Provinciai Apprenticeship Committee. 

This course outiine was approved on June 22, 2007 by the Aiberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board on 
a recommendation from the Provinciai Apprenticeship Committee. The vaiuabie input provided by 
representatives of industry and the institutions that provide the technicai training is acknowiedged. 

Any concerned individuai or group in the province of Aiberta may make recommendations for change by writing 
to: 

Recreationai Vehicie Service Technician Provinciai Apprenticeship Committee 

do Industry Programs and Standards 

Apprenticeship and Industry Training 

Advanced Education and Technoiogy 

10th fioor. Commerce Piace 

10155 102 Street NW 

Edmonton AB T5J 4L5 

It is requested that recommendations for change refer to specific areas and state references used. 
Recommendations for change wiii be piaced on the agenda for reguiar meetings of the Recreationai Vehicie 
Service Technician Provinciai Apprenticeship Committee. 


- 6 - 


Apprenticeship Route toward Certification 



SECOND PERIOD 

1600 HOURS - AND SUCCESSFULLY 
COMPLETE TECHNICAL TRAINING 



r 




JOURNEYMAN CERTIFICATE 


lINTERPROVINCIAL EXAMINATION FOR RED 
SEAL 

V 


-1 - 


Recreational Vehicle Service Technician Training Profile 
First Period 

(8 Weeks 30 Hours per Week - Total of 240 Hours) 


SECTION ONE 


A 

B 

SAFETY, TOOLS AND SHOP 
EQUIPMENT 


Apprenticeship Orientation 


Workshop Safety 

30 HOURS 


2 Hours 


10 Hours 



D 




Hand and Power Tools 




10 Hours 


SECTION TWO 


A 

B 

TRAILER AND TOWING 
SYSTEMS 


Undercarriage 


Hitch Systems 

42 HOURS 


18 Hours 


12 Hours 

SECTION THREE 


A 

B 

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS - 12 
VOLT 


Basic Electricity 


Battery 

45 HOURS 


35 Hours 


10 Hours 

SECTION FOUR 


A 

B 

FUEL SYSTEMS 


Propane Systems 


Auxiliary Gasoline Fuelling 
Systems 

60 HOURS 


50 Hours 


10 Hours 

SECTION FIVE 


A 


APPLIANCES 


Appliances 


10 HOURS 

10 Hours 


SECTION SIX 


A 

B 

PRE-DELIVERY INSPECTION 


Checks Prior to Delivery 


Clean for Delivery 

12 HOURS 

8 Hours 


4 Hours 

SECTION SEVEN 


A 


CUTTING AND HEATING 


Cutting and Heating with 
Oxyacetylene 


10 HOURS 


10 Hours 


SECTION EIGHT 


A 

B 

PLUMBING 


Fresh Water Systems 


Waste Water Systems 

31 HOURS 


16 Hours 


12 Hours 


c 

Mathematics 

8 Hours 


C 

Tow Vehicle 

12 Hours 


C 

Winterizing 

3 Hours 


- 8 - 


SECTION ONE 

EXTERIOR STRUCTURE AND 
COMPONENTS 

90 HOURS 


SECTION TWO 
RV APPLICATIONS 

40 HOURS 


SECTION THREE 

LP GAS APPLIANCES 

45 HOURS 

SECTION FOUR 

ELECTRICAL 

55 HOURS 


SECTION FIVE 
ADMINISTRATION 

10 HOURS 


Second Period 


(8 Weeks 30 Hours per Week 


Total of 240 Hours) 



A 

B 

C 


Body Construction and 
Fixtures 


Estimating 


Exterior Accessories 


54 Hours 


10 Hours 


1 1 Hours 


D 




Body Panel Repair 




15 Hours 




A 

B 

C 


Truck Campers 


Motor Homes 


Expandable/Fold-Down Units 

7 Hours 


7 Hours 


1 0 Hours 


D 

E 



Interior Accessories 


Specialty Haulers 



12 Hours 


4 Hours 



A 

B 

c 


Furnaces and Heating 
Systems 


Water Heaters 


Stoves, Ranges and Portable 
BBQ’s 


30 Hours 


10 Hours 


5 Hours 


A 

B 

c 


AC Current 


Generators 


Power Converters and 
Charging Systems 


15 Hours 


15 Hours 


20 Hours 




Appliance Circuitry 

5 Hours 

A 

Parts Management 

5 Hours 


B C 


Work Orders 


Customer Relations 

3 Hours 


2 Hours 


- 9 - 


Third Period 

(8 Weeks 30 Hours per Week - Totai of 240 Hours) 


ABC 
SECTION THREE ABC 

D 

Inverters 

15 Hours 

ABC 
A B 

SECTION SIX A 

SECTION SEVEN A 


NOTE: The hours stated are for guidance and should be adhered to as closely as possible. However, 
adjustments must be made for rate of apprentice learning, statutory holidays, registration and examinations for 
the training establishment and Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 


Train the Trainer 

5 Hours 


TRAIN THE TRAINER 

5 HOURS 

SECTION EIGHT 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

10 HOURS 


MIG Welding of up to 1 2 
Gauge Material 

15 Hours 


WELDING 


15 HOURS 


Undercarriage 


Suspension Aids 

10 Hours 


5 Hours 


Refrigerators 


Air Conditioner and Heat 
Pumps 


Miscellaneous Appliances 

35 Hours 


15 Hours 


1 0 Hours 


SECTION FOUR 
APPLIANCES 

60 HOURS 

SECTION FIVE 

MOTORIZED VEHICLE 

15 HOURS 


Appliance Electrical Systems 


Electronics 


Solar Charging Systems 

15 Hours 


15 Hours 


1 5 Hours 


ELECTRICAL 


60 HOURS 


Hydraulics 


Slide Out Systems 


Levelling Systems 

15 Hours 


20 Hours 


15 Hours 


A 

Cabinets, Fixtures and 
Furnishings 

25 Hours 


SECTION ONE 

INTERIOR COMPONENTS 

25 HOURS 

SECTION TWO 

SLIDE-OUTS AND LEVELING 
SYSTEMS 

50 HOURS 


- 10 - 


FIRST PERIOD TECHNICAL TRAINING 
RECREATIONAL VEHICLE SERVICE TECHNICIAN TRADE 
COURSE OUTLINE 

Due to the nature of the work of the Recreation Vehicle Service Technician, it is imperative that safety be taught 
on a continuous basis throughout the entirety of this course. 

The hours listed are suggested times and include lab and shop time for practical application of the theory. 

Upon successful completion of this program the apprentice should be able to perform the following outcomes 
and objectives. 

SECTION ONE: SAFETY, TOOLS AND SHOP EQUIPMENT 30 HOURS 

A. Apprenticeship Orientation 2 Hours 

Outcome: Understand the role of the tradespersons, employers, Local Apprenticeship 

Committees, the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee and Alberta Apprenticeship 
and Industry Training In the development and maintenance of the Recreation 
Vehicle Service Technician trade In Alberta. 

1 . Describe the apprenticeship training system in Alberta. 

2. Study the training profile of the recreation vehicle service technician apprenticeship in Alberta. 

3. Describe the recreation vehicle service technician program outline learning outcomes and 
objectives. 

4. Describe the responsibilities for the Contract of Apprenticeship by the apprentice, employer 
and Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 

5. Describe a variety of employment opportunities for recreation vehicle service technicians. 

6. Become familiar with the contents of the apprenticeship training record book. 

B. Workshop Safety 10 Hours 

Outcome: Identify and understand health and safety Issues. 

1 . Understand Occupational Health and Safety Regulations. 

2. Ability to handle and store flammable and toxic materials. 

3. Identify proper ventilation and exhaust system regulations. 

4. Use proper personal protection (i.e. gloves and boots). 

5. Understand fall protection devices. 

6. Identify and demonstrate the use of various fire extinguishers. 

C. Mathematics 8 Hours 

Outcome: Solve trade-related problems using basic mathematical skills. 

1 . Calculate linear dimensions, area, and volume using both the S.l. Metric and Imperial units. 

2. Add, subtract, multiply and divide using the appropriate units. 

3. Convert linear dimensions, area, and volume between the S.l. Metric and Imperial units. 


- 11 - 


FIRST PERIOD 


D. Hand and Power Tools 10 Hours 

Outcome: Demonstrate the ability to use tools. 

1 . Demonstrate the safe use and handling. 

2. Perform minor repairs and adjustments. 

3. Demonstrate maintenance procedures. 

SECTION TWO: TRAILER AND TOWING SYSTEMS 42 HOURS 

A. Undercarriage 18 Hours 

Outcome: Describe and perform undercarriage maintenance and repair procedures. 

1 . Describe the construction of the trailer and fifth wheel trailer frames. 

2. Identify various trailer axle types and weight ratings. 

3. Describe alignment procedures. 

4. Distinguish between different suspension systems, their ratings and applications. 

5. Describe different wheel types and their coding. 

6. Service and repair wheel bearings and seals. 

7. Identify the components of electric and hydraulic braking systems. 

8. Service, repair and maintain electric braking systems. 

9. Service, repair and maintain electric hydraulic braking systems. 

10. Describe tire construction, sizing and load ratings. 

1 1 . Identify various tire wear patterns and their cause. 

12. Describe problems created by unbalanced wheels. 

13. Describe breakaway switch installation and application. 

14. Understand applicable codes and regulations. 

1 5. Describe and service different types of fifth wheel landing gear and trailer tongue jacks. 

B. Hitch Systems 12 Hours 

Outcome: Identify and install various types of hitches. 

1 . Describe weight distributing hitches and their installation and application. 

2. Describe sway control devices and their application. 

3. Describe the importance and proper use of safety chains. 

4. Describe fifth wheel, goose neck hitches and their installation and application. 

5. Describe how to adjust 5th wheel goose necks and hitches to ensure proper height alignment. 

6. Describe methods, regulations and applications used for towing automobiles; 

a) tow bar 

b) car dolly 

c) other related items 


- 12 - 


FIRST PERIOD 


C. Tow Vehicle 12 Hours 

Outcome: Prepare vehicle for towing applications. 


1 . Wire a tow vehicle to applicable codes. 

2. Describe braking system installation and applications. 

3. Describe the application and installation of charging system isolators and relays. 

4. Identify and install brake controllers and their components. 

5. Describe the installation of an electronic brake controller. 

6. Troubleshoot an electronic brake controller. 

7. Awareness of SIR (Supplemental Inflated Restraint) systems. 

SECTION THREE: ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS - 12 VOLT 

A. Basic Electricity 

Outcome: Understand the principles of direct current. 

1 . Define basic electricity. 

2. Classify basic electrical circuits. 

3. Describe the function of components in an electrical circuit. 

4. Diagnose and repair 12 volt electric circuits and components. 

5. Perform the installation of 12 volt components. 

6. Apply the current code (CSA Z-240) as it relates to the 12 volt electrical system 

7. Identify different wire types, gauge sizes and their application. 

8. Calculate wire gauge sizes relative to various loads. 

9. Calculate circuit protection requirements. 

B. Battery 

Outcome: Understand batteries and their application. 

1 . Identify the various types of batteries and their application. 

2. Describe the maintenance, storage and installation of a battery. 

3. Describe the procedures for recharging a battery. 

4. Describe the procedures for boosting a battery. 

5. Describe the procedures for testing a battery. 

6. Identify different types of battery disconnect devices. 

SECTION FOUR: FUEL SYSTEMS 

A. Propane Systems 

Outcome: Understand the principles and characteristics of propane systems. 

1 . Describe the nature and properties of propane. 

2. Describe the procedures of handling propane. 

3. List the proper storage vessels for propane. 


60 HOURS 
...50 Hours 


45 HOURS 
...35 Hours 


10 Hours 


- 13 - 


FIRST PERIOD 


4. List the steps required for inspection and re-certification of propane storage vesseis. 

5. Identify approved propane suppiy components. 

6. Identify approved barbecue connections. 

7. Describe the procedure used to adjust a propane reguiator. 

8. Describe the purpose of a reiief vaive. 

9. Identify various propane ieak detectors and their instaiiation. 

1 0. Identify appiicabie codes that appiy to propane systems. 

1 1 . Perform a L.P.G. ieak test using different instruments. 

12. Instaii/service/repair a propane system. 

13. Determine vessei requirements to meet system demands at various temperatures. 

1 4. Identify contamination causes, symptoms and repair procedures. 

B. Auxiliary Gasoline Fueling Systems 10 Hours 

Outcome: Install, service and repair auxiliary gasoline systems. 

1 . Describe the nature and properties of gasoiine. 

2. Describe the procedures of handiing gasoiine. 

3. List the proper storage vesseis for gasoiine. 

4. Expiain the procedure for dispensing gasoiine. 

5. Identify approved gasoiine storage, distribution and suppiy components. 

6. Identify appiicabie codes that appiy to gasoiine systems. 

SECTION FIVE: APPLIANCES 10 HOURS 

A. Appliances 10 Hours 

Outcome: Understand the removal, installation and operation of appliances. 

1 . Describe the removai and instaiiation procedures of the foiiowing appiiances and accessories: 

a) counter top stoves 

b) ranges 

c) range hoods 

d) refrigerators 

e) furnaces 

f) fans 

g) air conditioners 

h) microwave ovens 

i) water heaters 

2. Expiain the operation of the above RV appiiances and accessories to the customer. 


- 14 - 


FIRST PERIOD 


SECTION SIX: PRE-DELIVERY INSPECTION 12 HOURS 

A. Checks Prior to Delivery 8 Hours 

Outcome: Perform pre-delivery inspections. 

1 . Leak test propane systems and adjust regulators. 

2. Test all appliances. 

3. Test electrical systems. 

4. Test all safety related items. 

5. Test plumbing systems. 

6. Check accessories and other systems. 

7. Utilize pre-delivery inspection sheets. 

8. Check all fluids in power train (coolant, oil, etc.). 

9. Perform overall interior and exterior inspection. 

B. Clean For Delivery 4 Hours 

Outcome: Perform cleaning procedures. 

1 . Identify the appropriate cleaners used to clean the interior and exterior of a unit. 

2. Identify the hazards associated with some cleaners and polishes. 

SECTION SEVEN: CUTTING AND HEATING 10 HOURS 

The instruction under this section shall not be to the level of proficiency of a skilled Welder. The intent is to train 
the apprentice to a level where he may operate the required equipment in a safe manner, and perform cutting 
and heating operations. 

A. Cutting and Heating with Oxyacetylene 10 Hours 

Outcome: Describe and demonstrate cutting and heating techniques. 

1 . Explain the characteristics and handling procedures of oxygen and acetylene. 

2. Identify the various cylinders and fittings by thread design and sizes. 

3. Explain the design of cylinders and procedures for handling, storage and transport. 

4. Recognise the construction and function of regulators and hoses. 

5. Explain handling precautions for regulators and hoses. 

6. Detect and repair gas leaks. 

7. Explain the construction and function of torch tips. 

8. Demonstrate how to clean, store and maintain torch tips. 

9. Explain torch malfunctions and how to correct them. 

1 0. Select the attachments required for cutting and know the required safety precautions. 

1 1 . Perform basic cutting operations. 

12. Use the required protective equipment. 


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FIRST PERIOD 


SECTION EIGHT: PLUMBING 31 HOURS 

A. Fresh Water Systems 16 Hours 

Outcome: Understand potable water systems, repair, and installation procedures. 

1 . Identify and repair pumps and suppiy systems (inciudes muitipie switching). 

2. Identify water storage systems and the maintenance/repair requirements. 

3. Identify components and their repair and repiacement procedures. 

4. Describe instaiiation and repair procedures of: 

a) showers and shower staiis 

b) sinks 

c) taps 

d) bath tubs and tub surrounds 

e) toiiets (fixed and portabie) 

f) other fixtures 

5. Test, troubieshoot and repair/repiace monitor paneis and sensors. 

B. Waste Water Systems 12 Hours 

Outcome: Understand ivasteivafer systems, repair, and installation procedures. 

1 . Identify types of storage and drain systems. 

2. Describe the construction, repair, and instaiiation procedures. 

3. Identify code requirements. 

C. Winterizing 3 Hours 

Outcome: Perform winterizing and de-winterizing of water systems. 

1 . Describe the type of antifreeze (non toxic) used to prevent damage from freezing. 

2. Describe how to winterize piumbing systems. 

3. Describe how to de-winterize piumbing systems. 

4. Describe methods of sanitizing water systems. 


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SECOND PERIOD TECHNICAL TRAINING 
RECREATIONAL VEHICLE SERVICE TECHNICIAN TRADE 
COURSE OUTLINE 

Due to the nature of the work of the Recreation Vehicle Service Technician, it is imperative that safety be taught 
on a continuous basis throughout the entirety of this course. 

The hours listed are suggested times and include lab and shop time for practical application of the theory. 

Upon successful completion of this program the apprentice should be able to perform the following outcomes and 
objectives. 


SECTION ONE: EXTERIOR, STRUCTURE AND COMPONENTS 90 HOURS 

A. Body Construction and Fixtures 54 Hours 

Outcome: Maintain and repair the exterior and reiated components. 

1 . Describe wood frame construction. 

2. Describe laminated construction. 

3. Describe aluminum construction. 

4. Identify various types and profiles of siding. 

5. Replace metal siding. 

6. Describe aircraft type construction. 

7. Replace fibreglass or filon panels. 

8. State types of glass used in windows and the applicable codes. 

9. Describe the repair and replacement of doors, windows, vents, and related hardware. 

1 0. Describe the installation of roof vents and fixtures. 

1 1 . Repair dust and water leaks. 

1 2. Describe different types of insulation and their application. 

13. Replace interior wall and ceiling coverings and panels. 

1 4. Describe different types of roof construction. 

15. Describe roof repair, maintenance and replacement procedures. 

1 6. Describe products and methods to aid cold weather use; 

a) storm windows 

b) insulation 

c) heat tapes 

d) plumbing system 

1 7. Describe construction types of slide-out rooms. 


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SECOND PERIOD 


B. Estimating 10 Hours 

Outcome: Write an estimate. 

1. Define an estimate. 

2. Describe estimating procedures. 

3. Understand competitive estimating. 

4. Write an itemized estimate. 

C. Exterior Accessories 11 Hours 

Outcome: instaii and repair exterior accessories. 

1 . Describe the instaiiation and repair of awnings: 

a) roiier drives 

b) fabric repiacement 

c) adjustment and aiignment 

2. Describe instaiiation of screen rooms. 

3. Describe the instaiiation of wind defiectors. 

4. Describe the proper instaiiation of cargo racks and iadders. 

5. Describe the instaiiation and repiacement of back-up aiarms and back-up monitoring devices. 

6. Describe instaiiation, diagnostics and repairs of eiectric steps. 

D. Body Panel Repair 15 Hours 

Outcome: Repair/repiace body paneis. 

1 . Describe the repair of fibregiass/fiion paneis and components. 

2. Describe the repair of giass reinforced piastic paneis and components. 

3. Describe the repair of piastic components. 

4. Recognize the hazards associated with paints and chemicais. 

5. Repiace or instaii decais and graphics. 

SECTION TWO: RV APPLICATIONS 40 HOURS 

A. Truck Campers 7 Hours 

Outcome: instaii and repair camper tie downs and jacks. 

1 . Describe the types of tie downs. 

2. Describe the ioad capacity of camper tie downs. 

3. State types of truck camper jacks and their capacity. 

4. Repair truck camper jacks. 

5. Instaii truck camper jacks. 


- 18 - 


SECOND PERIOD 


B. Motor Homes 7 Hours 

Outcome: Understand motor home chassis controls. 

1 . Describe motor home operator controls. 

2. Describe operation of remote starters and anti-theft devices. 

3. Describe motor home safety equipment and features. 

4. Understand codes and regulations as they apply to motor homes. 

5. Describe diesel engine start up procedures and air systems. 

C. Expandable/Fold-Down Units 10 Hours 

Outcome: Maintain, service and repair lift and wall systems. 

1 . Describe types of lift systems. 

2. Describe operation of lift systems. 

3. Describe the repair and adjustment of lift systems. 

4. Repair and maintain canvas and hard wall systems. 

D. Interior Accessories 12 Hours 

Outcome: Install accessories and safety components. 

1. Describe the installation of antennas, receptacles, cable hook-ups and distribution systems. 

2. Describe the installation of security systems. 

3. Describe the installation of an entertainment system. 

4. Describe the installation and testing procedures of carbon monoxide, propane, and smoke 

detectors. 

E. Specialty Haulers 4 Hours 

Outcome: Identify types of haulers and components. 

1. Describe ramps, gates, hinges, spring assemblies and cargo tie-downs. 

2. Describe construction materials, flooring, and ventilation requirements. 

3. Understand applicable codes and safety standards. 

SECTION THREE: LP GAS APPLIANCES 

A. Furnaces and Heating Systems 

Outcome: Install, service and repair various heating systems. 

1 . Describe the various types and their operation (includes hot water boiler systems) 

2. Describe the components and their operation. 

3. Identify the related types of thermostats and climate controls. 

4. Test and repair furnaces and related items. 

5. Describe ventilation, installation and air flow requirements. 

6. Describe maintenance procedures. 


45 HOURS 
...30 Hours 


- 19 - 


SECOND PERIOD 


B. Water Heaters 

Outcome: Install, service and repair various water heating systems. 

1 . Describe the various types and their operation. 

2. Describe components and their operation. 

3. Identify the reiated types of thermostats. 

4. Test and repair water heaters and reiated items. 

5. Describe ventiiation and instaiiation requirements. 

6. Describe maintenance procedures. 

C. Stoves, Ranges and Portable BBQ’s 

Outcome: Service and repair cooking equipment. 

1 . Describe the various types and their operation. 

2. Describe components and their operation. 

3. Test and repair stoves, ranges, portabie BBQ’s and reiated items. 

4. Describe ventiiation and instaiiation requirements. 

5. Describe maintenance procedures. 

SECTION FOUR: ELECTRICAL 55 HOURS 

A. AC Current 15 Hours 

Outcome: Identify and diagnose AC electrical systems. 

1 . State safety precautions when repairing AC eiectricai systems. 

2. State the difference between AC and DC current. 

3. Describe procedures used to instaii or repair eiectricai systems according to appiicabie codes. 

4. Test a 120 V AC eiectricai system. 

5. Identify and test various types of AC circuit protection devices. 

6. Describe high pot tests. 

7. Perform hot skin and poiarity tests. 

8. Describe various transfer switches used in Energy Management Systems: 


a) manuai 

b) eiectronic 

c) automatic 

B. Generators 15 Hours 

Outcome: Install and service generators. 


1 . Identify safety hazards. 

2. Caicuiate output requirements. 

3. Troubieshoot fauits. 

4. Describe instaiiation procedures reiative to appiicabie codes and reguiations. 

5. Wire 12 voit and 120 voit connections to appiicabie codes and reguiations. 


10 Hours 


5 Hours 


- 20 - 


SECOND PERIOD 


6. Describe and perform maintenance and adjustment procedures. 

7. Test and adjust eiectricai outputs. 

C. Power Converters and Charging Systems 20 Hours 

Outcome: Identify and repair power converters. 

1. State the function. 

2. Describe the operation. 

3. Describe the various types. 

4. Describe ventiiation and instaiiation requirements. 

5. Diagnose and repair. 

D. Appliance Circuitry 5 Hours 

Outcome: Interpret and use diagrams. 

1 . Use manufacturer’s diagrams to trace the circuitry of appiiances. 

2. Draw iadder diagrams of appiiance eiectricai circuits. 

3. Use diagrams to diagnose eiectricai probiems. 

SECTION FIVE: ADMINISTRATION 10 HOURS 

A. Parts Management 5 Hours 

Outcome: Identify various parts catalogue systems. 

1 . Use cross reference cataiogues. 

2. Identify various types of computer parts cataiogues. 

3. Expiain the use of the “internet” for parts ordering and information. 

B. Work Orders 3 Hours 

Outcome: Prepare a work order. 

1 . State work order requirements. 

2. Describe types of work orders. 

3. Describe procedures for documenting time. 

4. Describe procedures for documenting parts. 

C. Customer Relations 2 Hours 

Outcome: Communicate with customers. 

1 . Define proper customer courtesy and personai conduct. 

2. Understand customer needs and expectations. 


-21 - 


THIRD PERIOD TECHNICAL TRAINING 
RECREATIONAL VEHICLE SERVICE TECHNICIAN TRADE 
COURSE OUTLINE 


Due to the nature of the work of the Recreation Vehicle Service Technician, it is imperative that safety be taught 
on a continuous basis throughout the entirety of this course. 

The hours listed are suggested times and include lab and shop time for practical application of the theory. 

Upon successful completion of this program the apprentice should be able to perform the following outcomes and 
objectives. 


SECTION ONE: INTERIOR COMPONENTS 25 HOURS 

A. Cabinets, Fixtures and Furnishings 25 Hours 

Outcome: Repair cabinets, furnishings and fiooring. 

1 . Describe counter top construction and repair. 

2. Describe repair procedures for cabinets. 

3. Describe repair procedures for cabinet doors and hardware. 

4. Describe repair procedures for drawers and hardware. 

5. Describe methods of repairing upholstery. 

6. Describe repair or replacement procedures for window coverings, blinds and valances. 

7. Describe repair or replacement procedures for floor coverings: 

a) lino 

b) carpet 

c) hardwood 

d) ceramic tile 

e) laminate 


SECTION TWO: SLIDE-OUT AND LEVELING SYSTEMS 50 HOURS 

A. Hydraulics 15 Hours 

Outcome: Service and repair hydrauiic systems. 

1. Define hydraulics. 

2. State hydraulic system applications. 

3. Identify the components of a hydraulic system. 

4. Repair or replace hydraulic pumps, hoses, and components. 

5. Test a hydraulic system. 

6. Describe adjustment/balance procedures. 


- 22 - 


THIRD PERIOD 


B. Slide Out Systems 20 Hours 

Outcome: Service, repair and maintain siide out systems. 

1 . Identify the various mechanisms used to operate siide outs (gear, cabie, hydrauiic, manuai). 

2. Repair siide out mechanisms. 

3. Adjust and aiign siide outs. 

4. Describe maintenance procedures. 

5. Describe procedures for room removai. 

C. Leveling Systems 15 Hours 

Outcome: instaii, service, repair and maintain ieveiing systems. 

1 . Describe the types of ieveiiing systems. 

2. Identify the components of a ieveiiing system. 

3. Describe the instaiiation of ieveiiing systems. 

4. Adjust ieveiiing systems. 

5. Diagnose and repair ieveiiing systems. 

6. Describe maintenance procedures. 

SECTION THREE: ELECTRICAL 60 HOURS 

A. Appliance Electrical Systems 15 Hours 

Outcome: interpret and use formuias and diagrams. 

1 . Use manufacturer’s diagrams to trace and repair eiectricai probiems. 

2. Draw iadder diagrams of given appiiance eiectricai circuits. 

3. Caicuiate ioad ratings using ohms iaw. 

B. Electronics 15 Hours 

Outcome: identify, diagnose and repair eiectronic components. 

1 . Identify eiectronic components and their appiication. 

2. List the precautions required when handiing and using eiectronic components. 

3. Make repairs to the wiring of circuits up to an eiectronic component. 

4. Diagnose eiectronic component faiiure. 

5. Test eiectronic circuit boards. 

6. Repiace circuit boards. 

C. Solar Charging Systems 15 Hours 

Outcome: identify, instaff and diagnose sofar systems. 

1 . Identify the components of soiar charging systems. 

2. Describe the operation and appiication of soiar charging systems. 

3. Describe instaiiation procedures. 

4. State the purpose of voitage reguiators. 


- 23 - 


THIRD PERIOD 


5. State the purpose of diodes. 

6. Size a soiar charging/battery system to meet customer requirements. 

7. Expiain how a system can be expanded. 

8. Troubieshoot/repair a soiar charging system. 

D. Inverters 15 Hours 

Outcome: Identify, install and diagnose inverters. 

1 . State the function of an inverter. 

2. Identify the various types of inverters. 

3. Describe the instaiiation of an inverter. 

4. Identify and caicuiate power draws, cabie sizes and ioad protection devices. 

5. Troubieshoot inverter systems. 

6. Size an inverter/battery system. 

7. Identify various types of inverter remote controi paneis. 

SECTION FOUR: APPLIANCES 60 HOURS 

A. Refrigerators 35 Hours 

Outcome: Service, install and repair refrigerators. 

1 . Identify the various types. 

2. Describe the operation of an absorption refrigerator. 

3. Describe the operation of a compressor refrigerator. 

4. Identify components and their operation. 

5. Diagnose and repair absorption refrigerators. 

6. Diagnose and repair compressor refrigerators. 

7. Describe maintenance procedures. 

8. Describe ventiiation and instaiiation requirements. 

B. Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps 15 Hours 

Outcome: Maintain, install and diagnose air conditioners and heat pumps. 

1 . Describe the various types and their operation. 

2. Describe components and their operation. 

3. Describe heat strips. 

4. Identify the various types of thermostats and ciimate controis. 

5. Diagnose air conditioners/heat pumps and reiated systems. 

6. State ventiiation, instaiiation and air fiow requirements. 

7. Describe maintenance procedures. 

8. Awareness of the disposai, reciaiming and recyciing of refrigerants. 


- 24 - 


THIRD PERIOD 


C. Miscellaneous Appliances 10 Hours 

Outcome: Identify maintenance and installation requirements. 

1 . Describe types, maintenance and instaiiation requirements of the foiiowing: 

a) washers and dryers 

b) dishwashers 

c) microwave ovens 

d) icemakers 

e) range hoods 

f) centrai vacuum cieaners 

g) firepiaces 

h) other appiiances 

SECTION FIVE: MOTORIZED VEHICLE 15 HOURS 

A. Undercarriage 10 Hours 

Outcome: Understand undercarriage and suspension system applications. 

1 . Identify various ioad ratings (GVW, etc.). 

2. Describe the construction of vehicie frames (car, truck, van, motorhome). 

3. Distinguish between different suspension systems. 

4. Describe the effect of add-on suspension aids reiative to: 

a) ABS braking systems 

b) ioad sensing proportioning vaives 

c) automatic ioad ieveiing systems 

d) wheei aiignment angies 

e) drive iine working angies 

f) ioad ratings 

5. Determine from manufacturers’ specifications the difference between standard vehicie and 
vehicie with towing package. 

6. Describe how different tire sizes affect the power train: 

a) RPM to road speed 

b) ABS and other computer controiied systems 

B. Suspension Aids 5 Hours 

Outcome: Install, diagnose and repair suspension aids. 

1 . Seiect and instaii suspension aids as per manufacturers specifications: 

a) overioads 

b) air bags 

c) iift kits 

2. Describe adjustment procedures. 

3. Diagnose and repair suspension aids. 


- 25 - 


THIRD PERIOD 


SECTION SIX: WELDING 15 HOURS 

The instruction under this section shaii not be to the ievei of proficiency of a skiiied Weider. The intent is to train 
the apprentice to a ievei where he may operate the required equipment in a safe manner, and perform tack weids 
to make temporary attachment of component parts prior to the finish weiding performed by a certified journeyman 
weider. 

A. MIG (GMAW) Welding of Up to 12 Gauge Material 15 Hours 

Outcome: Perform basic welding procedures. 

1 . Describe the operation of a MIG weider. 

2. Describe and demonstrate the preparation of materiai. 

3. List the purpose of shieiding gas. 

4. Describe and demonstrate the proper sequence of start up and shut down of a MIG welder. 

5. Demonstrate the ability to perform tack welds. 

SECTION SEVEN: TRAIN THE TRAINER 5 HOURS 

1 . Understand the requirements of training apprentices. 

SECTION EIGHT: NEW DEVELOPMENTS 10 HOURS 

This section is to cover any new technological developments in the Recreation Vehicle Service Technician trade 
until it can be included in the next curriculum revision. 


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Excellence through training and experience 


4507.1