Skip to main content

Full text of "History, economics, public law, and social science : courses offered by the Faculty of Political Science ."

See other formats


o 



Columbia College 
in the Cits of Bern lark 




COURSES 



School of Political Science 



IN 



HISTORY, ECONOMICS, AND PUBLIC LAW 



UNDER THE CHARGE OF 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



I894-95 



NOTE 



In addition to the courses offered by the Faculty of Political 
Science, Columbia College offers the following: 

In School of Arts a 4-years' course . . . leading to degree of A.B. 



" Law " 3 " " ... " " " " LL.B. 

" Mines" 4 " " in Chemistry " " " " B.S. 

11 11 tt c< <i Geology " <• i« 11 B g 

" " Architecture" " 41 " B.S. 

i< << 11 11 1. i< i« Mj n i ng " " • « " M.E. 

" " " " " " "Engineering" " " " C.E. 

" " " " " " " " " " " " E.E. 

" " " " "Metallurgy " " " "Met.E. 



" " " Medicine (College of Physicians and Surgeons) a 4- 

years' course in Medicine leading to the degree of M.D. 

The courses detailed in this pamphlet may be taken as major 
or minor subjects for the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D., and some 
of them for the degree of A.B. All of them are elective 
as part of the requirements for the degree of LL.M. Other 
courses leading to the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. are given under 
the various university faculties, especially the Faculty of Philoso- 
phy and the Faculty of Pure Science. 

Information as to any of the above courses may be had by 
addressing the Secretary of the President, Columbia College. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

University Faculty of Political Science i 

Other Officers . i 

General Statement 3 

Purposes of the School 3 

Admission and Attendance 4 

Matriculation and Registration 5 

Fees 5 

Admission to Other Courses ...... 6 

Degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 7 

Regulations of the University Council .... 7 

Supplemental Regulations of the Faculty of Political 

Science . . 9 

Specific Requirements of Study . ' . . . .12 

Political Science and Law 13 

In General 13 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Laws . . 14 

Course of Study and Research 16 

Seminaria 16 

History and Political Philosophy ..... 16 

Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence . . . 23 
Economics and Social Science . . . . .26 

Order of Studies 33 

University Fellowships 35 

Prizes 36 

Prize in Political Economy ...... 36 

James Gordon Bennet Prize 36 

Academy of Political Science 37 

Prize Lectureships ........ 37 

Library 38 

Hours of Lectures 39 

Calendar 42 



iii 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2015 



https://archive.org/details/historyeconomics1894colu 



UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Seth Low, LL.D., President 
John W. Burgess, Ph.D., LL.D 323 West 57th St. 

Professor of History, Political Science, and Constitutional Law 
Dean of the Faculty 

Richmond Mayo-Smith, Ph.D., 144 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn 

Professor of Political Economy and Social Science 

Munroe Smith, A.M., J.U.D. . . . 115th St., near Riverside Drive 
Professor of Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Frank J. Goodnow, A.M., LL.B 25 West 74th St. 

Professor of Administrative Law 

Edwin R. A. Seligman, LL.B., Ph.D 40 West 71st St. 

Professor of Political Economy and Finance 
Secretary of the Faculty 

Herbert L. Osgood, Ph.D 194 Joralemon St., Brooklyn 

Adjunct Professor of History 

William A. Dunning, Ph.D 70 Hanson Place, Brooklyn 

Adjunct Professor of History and Political Philosophy 

John Bassett Moore, A.B Columbia College 

Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law and Diplomacy 

Franklin H. Giddings, A.M Columbia College 

Professor of Sociology 



OTHER OFFICERS. 

A. C. Bernheim, LL.B., Ph.D 12 East 65th St. 

Prize-Lecturer, 1891-1894, on New York State and City Politics 

Frederic Bancroft, Ph.D., Metropolitan Club, Washington, D.C. 
Prize Lecturer, 1892-95, on American History 

William Z. Ripley, Ph.D Columbia College 

Prize Lecturer 1893-96, on Physical Geography and Anthropology 

Stephen F. Weston, A.M 36 Lee Ave., Brooklyn 

Assistant in Economics 

Robert Senftner Columbia College 

Registrar 



I 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Purposes of the School 

The School of Political Science is under the direction of the 
University Faculty of Political Science, and has charge of the 
university courses of study and research in history, economics, 
and public law. 

The School of Political Science was opened on Monday, the 
fourth day of October, 1880. 

In its course of instruction it undertakes to give a complete 
general view of all the subjects of public polity, both internal 
and external, from the threefold point of view of history, law, 
and philosophy. The prime aim is therefore the development 
of all the branches of the political and social sciences. The 
secondary and practical objects are : 

a To fit young men for all the political branches of the public 
service. 

b To give an adequate economic and legal training to those who 
intend to make journalism their profession. 

c To supplement, by courses in public law and comparative 
jurisprudence, the instruction in private municipal law offered by 
the Faculty of Law. 

d To educate teachers of political and social science. 

To these ends courses of study are offered of sufficient duration 
to enable the student not only to attend the lectures and recita- 
tions with the professors, but also to consult the most approved 
treatises upon the political sciences and to study the sources of 
the same. 

Young men who wish to obtain positions in the United States 
Civil Service — especially in those positions in the Department of 
State for which special examinations are held — will find it advan- 

3 



4 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



tageous to follow many of the courses under the Faculty of Political 
Science. Some of the subjects upon which applicants for these 
positions are examined are treated very fully in the curriculum of 
the school. Thus, extended courses of lectures are given on politi- 
cal geography and history, diplomatic history and international 
law, government, finance, and administration. 

Admission and Attendance 

Students are received either as candidates for the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Master of Laws, or Doctor of Phi- 
losophy, or to pursue special or partial courses. The lectures are 
open to the public, on payment of an auditor's fee. No auditor 
will be admitted to any course without the consent of the instruc- 
tor, previously obtained. Auditors do not have and cannot receive 
any university recognition whatever. 

Students desiring to pursue their studies under the direction of 
the Faculty of Political Science as candidates for a degree, must 
have completed the curriculum of some college in good standing 
at least to the close of the junior year. Certificates of graduation 
or dismission from institutions of learning in foreign countries are 
also accepted. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are required to 
pursue courses of instruction amounting in all to not less than 
fifteen hours of attendance per week for one year, and must con- 
form to such requirements regarding a graduation thesis as are 
established for members of the senior class in the School of Arts. 
Their selection of studies is not confined to those in this faculty. 
Students may pursue courses offered by the Faculty of Philosophy 
or the Faculty of Pure Science, or the first-year course in the 
School of Law or the School of Medicine, and count the same as 
part of the requirement for the bachelor's degree. Law students, 
for example, may thus take their bachelor's degree and so shorten 
by one year the time which otherwise would be necessary for the 
attainment of degrees in both arts and law. 

Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy must hold a bachelor's degree from some college in good 
standing and continue their studies for not less than one and two 
years respectively. They are required to pursue courses of study 
and research in one major and two minor subjects. For specific 



FEES 



5 



regulations, see pages 7 to 13. The period of study above indi- 
cated for the attainment of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is 
a minimum period. In most cases candidates for this degree have 
found it necessary to devote three years after the attainment of 
the baccalaureate degree to the work required for the doctorate. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who have 
been in residence at other universities are given credit for the 
same. But no student can be a candidate for any degree unless 
he has been in residence at least one session. 

For the degree of Master of Laws, see pages 14 to 16. 

Students who are not candidates for a degree are admitted to any 
courses which they are found competent to undertake. 

There are no examinations for admission, either as candidates 
for a degree or as special students. Students are admitted at any 
time during the year, and may present themselves for examination 
for a degree whenever the requirements as to residence and an 
essay or dissertation have been complied with. 

Matriculation and Registration 

Each student on first connecting himself with Columbia College 
is required to sign the matriculation book in the office of the 
President, and pay a fee of $5.00. Immediately after matricula- 
tion, and before entering upon his studies each year thereafter, 
every student who desires to pursue his studies, either wholly or 
in part, under the direction of the Faculty of Political Science, 
must register himself in the office of the dean of that faculty and 
receive a registration book. Until his matriculation and registra- 
tion are completed, no student is entitled to attend any university 
exercises whatever, nor will any attendance previous to matricula- 
tion and registration be counted as part of the residence required 
for a degree. 

Students proposing to study under this faculty are desired to 
present themselves for registration on the Wednesday next before 
the first Monday in October. 

Fees 

The annual fee for every candidate for a degree is $150, pay- 
able in two equal instalments in October and February. The fee 
for students not candidates for a degree is calculated at the rate 



6 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



of $15 a year for each hour of attendance per week upon univer- 
sity exercises with a maximum fee of $150. In every case the 
fee covers the specified number of hours throughout the year — 
no student being received for a less period than one year. Such 
fees, when not more than one hundred dollars, are payable in 
advance ; otherwise, in half-yearly instalments at the same time 
as regular fees. 

The fee for auditors is calculated at the rate of $20 a year for 
each hour of attendance per week, upon university exercises with 
a maximum fee of $200. Auditors are permitted, at their option, 
to enroll themselves for a single term only, at one half of the 
above-mentioned fee. 

Holders of university and other fellowships are exempt from 
all charges for tuition. 

A limited number of students who have been connected with 
the College for at least one year, and whose academic record and 
pecuniary circumstances warrant it, may be granted free or 
reduced tuition by the faculty. Application for free or reduced 
tuition should be made in writing to the dean. 

Examination fees are as follows : for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, fifteen dollars ; for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of 
Laws, twenty-five dollars ; for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
thirty-five dollars ; for examinations at unusual times, such as 
second examinations, five dollars additional. The examina- 
tion fee must in each case be paid before the candidate presents 
himself for examination for the degree. 

Admission to other Courses. 

Any duly matriculated university student is at liberty to com- 
bine courses of study and investigation under this faculty with 
courses offered by the School of Arts or by the University Facul- 
ties of Philosophy, Law, Medicine, Mines (Applied Science), and 
Pure Science without any additional fee. 

Among the cognate courses given by the Faculty of Philoso- 
phy are : 

History of philosophy ; ethics ; biological anthropology ; read- 
ings in Gaius and Ulpian ; readings in Anglo-Saxon law ; courses 
in the various modern languages, and others. 

Students enrolled either in the General, the Union, or the Jew- 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. f 

ish Theological Seminary, in the city of New York, who may be 
designated for the privilege by the authorities of those institutions 
and accepted by the President of Columbia College, are admitted 
to the courses offered by the Faculty of Political Science free of 
any charge for tuition. 

By the terms of an alliance between Columbia College and the 
Teachers College, at 9 University Place, duly qualified students 
of the Teachers College are permitted to enter courses offered by 
the Faculty of Political Science either as candidates for degrees 
or as special students. 

All of these institutions offer reciprocal privileges to students 
of Columbia College. 

DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR 
OF PHILOSOPHY. 



Regulations as to the Degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy Established by the 
University Council. 

1 Any student who has taken his baccalaureate degree either 
in Columbia College or in some other college maintaining an 
equivalent curriculum (every such case of equivalence to be con- 
sidered on its own merits) shall be entitled, with the approval of 
the President, to become a candidate for the degrees of Master of 
Arts or Doctor of Philosophy, or either of them. 

2 Each student who declares himself a candidate for the 
degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, or either of 
them, shall, immediately upon registration, designate one principal 
or major subject and two subordinate or minor subjects, which, 
when approved by the proper faculty, shall be the studies of his 
university course. Should the subjects designated by the candi- 
date fall within the jurisdiction of more than one University 
Faculty, the candidate's selection must receive the sanction of the 
President before it is recorded. 

3 Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy, or either of them, must pursue their studies under the 
direction of the professors and other officers of instruction in 



3 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



charge of the subjects selected by the candidates as major and 
minor, attending such lectures as may be designated, and per- 
forming faithfully such other work in connection therewith as 
may from time to time be prescribed. 

4 Students desiring to be examined as candidates for any 
degree must make written application for such examination to the 
dean of the proper faculty, on blank forms provided for the 
purpose. 

5 Each candidate for the degree of Master of Arts, in addition 
to passing satisfactory examinations on prescribed portions of the 
subject selected by him as major and minor, shall present an 
essay on some topic previously approved by the professor in 
charge of his major subject. Before the candidate is admitted to 
examination, the professor in charge of his major subject must 
have signified his approval of such essay. 

6 Each candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in 
addition to passing satisfactory examinations on the subjects 
selected by him as major and minor, shall present a dissertation 
embodying the result of original investigation and research, on 
some topic previously approved by the faculty. When such dis- 
sertation has been approved by the faculty, it shall be printed by 
the candidate and one hundred and fifty copies shall be delivered 
to the faculty. On the title-page of every such dissertation shall 
be printed the words : " Submitted in partial fulfilment of the 
requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in the 

University Faculty of , Columbia College." There shall 

be appended to each dissertation a statement of the educational 
institutions that the author has attended, a list of the degrees 
and honors conferred upon him, as well as the titles of any 
previous publications. 

7 Every candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in 
addition to passing such other examinations as may be required 
by the faculty, shall be subjected to an oral examination on his 
major subject and shall defend his dissertation, in the presence of 
the entire faculty or of so many of its members as may desire to 
attend. The ability to read at sight two or all of the following 
languages— Latin, French, and German — as each faculty may 
determine, will also be required. 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 9 

8 Students holding college degrees, who shall have completed 
with marked distinction the entire course of the School of Law, 
the School of Medicine, or the School of Mines, may be recom- 
mended, by the faculty of the school in which they have studied, 
for the degree of Master of Arts ; provided that in each case the 
candidate present a satisfactory dissertation, and that at least a 
part of the extra work required of him for the degree of Master 
of Arts be taken under the direction of either the Faculty of 
Philosophy or the Faculty of Political Science to the extent of a 
minor course for not less than one year. 

9 The degree of Doctor of Philosophy, when taken in science 
and based upon a preparatory scientific training only, is subject 
to the same conditions as those imposed by section 8 upon candi- 
dates for the degree of Master of Arts in the schools of Law, 
Medicine, and Mines. 

Supplemental Regulations of the University Faculty of 
Political Science 

1 Candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of 
Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy, or any of them, will be admitted 
to the courses under the control of the Faculty of Political 
Science, subject to the conditions prescribed by the statutes of the 
college and by this faculty. 

2 Candidates for a degree who desire to take all or a part of 
their studies under the direction of this faculty, must have suc- 
cessfully pursued a course of undergraduate study in the School 
of Arts, or in some other college maintaining an equivalent course 
of study, to the close of the junior year. Every such case of 
equivalence shall be considered on its own merits. 

3 The course of study shall embrace instruction in the follow- 
ing groups of subjects : 

Group I — History and Political Philosophy 

A. European History ; B. American History ; C. Political 
Philosophy. 

Group II — Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

A. Constitutional Law ; B. International Law ; C. Criminal 
Law ; D. Administrative Law ; E. Comparative Jurisprudence. 



10 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Group III — Economics and Social Science 

A. Political Economy and Finance ; B. Sociology and 
Statistics. 

4 Members of the senior class in the School of Arts shall be 
entitled to elect any of the courses offered by this faculty year 
by year, subject to the regulations prescribed by the faculty of 
that school. 

5 Students who shall satisfactorily complete a selection of the 
courses referred to in section 4, amounting in all to fifteen hours 
per week, shall be qualified, on examination and the recommenda- 
tion of the faculty with the concurrence of the Faculty of Arts 
to receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

6 Students who shall satisfactorily complete a selection of the 
courses referred to in section 4, amounting in all to less than 
fifteen hours per week (the remaining portion of the prescribed 
number of hours having been taken under the direction of another 
faculty), shall, after examination, be entitled, with the concur- 
rence of such other faculty or faculties, with the consent of the 
President, and with the further consent of the Faculty of Arts, to 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

7 Referring to section 2 of the regulations prescribed by the 
University Council — 

In the Faculty of Political Science the term " subject " shall be 
held to mean any one of the several subjects of instruction speci- 
fied under groups I., II., and III. in section 3. No candidate for 
a degree may select more than two of his subjects from any one 
group, and he must attend at least one seminarium. The selec- 
tion of subjects made by any candidate for a degree shall be 
approved by the dean on behalf of the faculty. 

8 Immediately on registration each student shall be given a 
registration book, on which shall be inscribed the name of the 
student and the date of his enrolment or registration. In this 
registration book the student shall enter, at the beginning of each 
academic year or session, the subjects or titles of the several 
courses of lectures or seminarium work which he proposes to follow. 
At the opening exercise of every such course, or so soon there- 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY II 



after as may be possible, the student shall present to the professor 
or instructor in charge his registration book, in order that such 
professor or instructor may enter therein his name and the date 
of the opening of the course. At the close of every such course 
followed by the student, the professor or instructor in charge shall 
again enter in the registration book his name and the date of the 
closing of the course, if the student has faithfully attended the 
same and performed all the duties required of him in connection 
therewith. At the time of filing his application to be examined 
for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, or 
either of them, every candidate must present to the dean his 
registration book properly signed and dated, as above prescribed, 
by the professors or instructors in charge of the several courses 
which he may have attended, as evidence that he is properly 
entitled to examination for a degree. 

9 Referring to section 4 of the regulations prescribed by the 
University Council — 

Applications to be examined for the degrees of Master of Arts 
or Doctor of Philosophy must be made on or before April 1 of 
the academic year in which the examination is desired. 

10 Referring to section 5 of the regulations prescribed by the 
University Council — 

The essay required of every candidate for the degree of Master 
of Arts must be in the form of a paper read during the year be- 
fore the seminarium of which he is a member. 

11 Referring to section 6 of the regulations prescribed by the 
University Council — 

In the Faculty of Political Science the power to approve the 
subjects chosen for his dissertation by any candidate for the de- 
gree of Doctor of Philosophy, as well as the power to approve the 
dissertation itself, shall be delegated to the professor in charge of 
the candidate's major subject. The dissertation must be sub- 
mitted not later than April 1st of the academic year in which the 
examination for the degree is desired. 

12 Referring to section 7 of the regulations prescribed by the 
University Council — 

The oral examination of the candidate in presence of the fac- 
ulty shall include the minor subjects as well as the major subject ; 



12 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



and the examinations upon all these subjects shall be held at the 
same time. The candidates shall also be required to read at sight 
Latin, French, and German. These examinations may be held 
with the consent of the dean and the professor in charge of 
the candidate's major subject before the printed dissertation is 
submitted. 

13 Students who are not candidates for a degree shall be per- 
mitted to pursue such selection of courses, from among those 
offered by the Faculty of Political Science, as they may be found 
qualified to enter upon, and the Faculty may approve. The quali- 
fications of such students shall be determined by the professors 
in charge of the courses selected by them. 

14 All applications to pursue courses of study, whether as can- 
didates for a degree or otherwise, either wholly or in part under 
the direction of this faculty, shall be made in writing to the dean 
on blank forms prepared for the purpose. 

Specific Requirement of Study for the Degrees of Mas- 
ter of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of 
Philosophy must take the following courses : 

For A.M. minor. Any course or courses aggregating two hours 
per week through the year, which has not already been 
taken for the bachelor's degree. 

For A.M. major. Any courses aggregating two hours per week 
which has not already been taken for the bachelor's de- 
gree ; together with the seminarium. 

For Ph.D. minor. In addition to the requirements for the A.M. 
minor, courses aggregating two hours per week. 

For Ph.D. major. All the courses and the seminaria in the major 
subject. 

Candidates offering European History as the major subject 
must offer American History as a minor, and vice versa. 

Candidates offering Political Economy and Finance as the 
major subject, must offer Sociology and Statistics as a minor, and 
vice versa. 

Candidates will not be permitted to offer Constitutional Law 
alone as the Ph.D. major, but must combine with it the course on 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW 



13 



General International Law, or on Comparative Administrative 
Law. 

Candidates offering International Law, or Criminal Law, or 
Administrative Law as the major subject must take Constitu- 
tional Law as a minor. 

Candidates will not be permitted to offer Criminal Law alone as 
the Ph.D. major, but must combine with it the course on General 
International Law. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW 
In General 

The instruction offered by the Faculty of Political Science 
upon constitutional, administrative, international, and criminal 
law, and upon Roman law and comparative jurisprudence, fur- 
nishes the natural and necessary complement to the courses 
offered by the Faculty of Law. Law is, with us, the chief avenue 
into politics ; and for this reason, if for no other, a complete legal 
education should include the science of politics. But the im- 
portance to the lawyer of the subjects above mentioned does not 
depend simply on the prospect of a political career. To become 
a thorough practitioner the student must acquire a considerable 
knowledge of public law ; and if he wishes to be anything more 
than a practitioner, if he wishes to know law as a science, some 
knowledge of other systems than our own becomes imperative. 
From this point of view the Roman law is of paramount import- 
ance, not merely by reason of its scientific structure, but because 
it is the basis of all modern systems except the English. 

The courses on constitutional and diplomatic history constitute 
the indispensable introduction to those in public law ; and the 
courses on economics and finance will be found of great value 
by students of both public and private law. 

Of these subjects, criminal law is required as part of the Bache- 
lor of Laws degree in the Law School, and Roman law, history of 
European law, comparative jurisprudence, comparative constitu- 
tional law, administrative law, law of municipal corporations, law 
of taxation, and international law are elective for the same de- 
gree. The Faculty of Law also recommends that students who 
have not had an adequate training in history economics, and 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



finance shall so prolong their course of study that they may avail 
themselves of the opportunity offered in the School of Political 
Science for studying these subjects. 

For the greater encouragement of such a combination of 
studies, and to meet the increasing demand for a broader legal 
training that shall not be exclusively professional in its purpose, 
a course of university study has been established leading to the 
degree of Master of Laws. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Laws 

Preliminary Education. — The candidate must have completed 
the curriculum of some college in good standing at least to the 
close of the Junior year. 

Course of Study. — The candidate must pursue his studies under 
the direction of the Faculties of Law and Political Science for 
four years, electing from the subjects offered by these faculties 
courses aggregating, in the four years, fifty-two hours a week, 1 
provided that not more than thirty-four hours of work may be 
elected either in the field of private law or in that of public law, 
social ethics, history, and economics. 

Allowance for Studies Prosecuted Elsewhere. — The student who 
has satisfactorily completed at other universities, colleges, or law 
schools any considerable portion of the subjects offered by the 
Faculties of Law and Political Science (viz., not less than the 
equivalent of one term's work of thirteen hours a week), may be 
excused from a corresponding portion of the four years' residence 
required at Columbia. Under this rule a student who holds the 
bachelor's degree from a college having a curriculum substantially 
equivalent to that of the School of Arts of Columbia College, and 
who has pursued graduate courses in history and economics 
amounting to one year's work of thirteen hours a week, may com- 
plete the Master of Laws' course at Columbia College in three 
years : and the student who has completed a two or three years' 
law course at another law school may similarly receive credit for 
courses equivalent to those offered in Columbia College. In no 
case, however, shall any one receive the degree of Master of Laws 

1 The courses offered by the two Faculties, from which the student is to elect 
fifty-two hours, aggregate at present more than one hundred and ten hours 
per week. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW 



15 



who has not spent four years in the study of history, economics, 
and public and private law in some university, college, or law 
school, including a residence of at least one term at Columbia 
College ; and the decision whether work performed at another 
institution shall be accepted as equivalent to work at Columbia 
rests, as regards each subject, with the Faculty in whose jurisdic- 
tion that subject falls. 

Master of Laws' Course for Students Holding the Degree of 
Bachelor of Laws from Columbia College. — Students who have 
completed the junior year in the School of Arts of Columbia Col- 
lege or in some other institution maintaining an equivalent cur- 
riculum, and who have obtained the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
from Columbia College after pursuing the full three years' course 
of study, shall be entitled, upon pursuing for an additional year 
a course of study of at least thirteen hours a week under the 
Faculty of Law or the Faculty of Political Science, or under both 
of these Faculties, and passing satisfactory examinations, to 
receive the degree of Master of Laws ; provided that no student 
shall receive the degree who has not studied and passed satisfac- 
tory examinations in comparative constitutional law, administra- 
tive law, Roman law, international law, and in the three courses 
offered on equity, and who has not pursued at Columbia or else- 
where courses of instruction satisfactory to the Faculty of Politi- 
cal Science in history, social ethics, and economics. 

Arrangement of Studies. — Under the above regulations the 
student may choose either of two courses leading to the degree 
of Master of Laws. He may study primarily for the Bachelor of 
Laws' degree, and after obtaining this, prosecute his studies a year 
longer for the master's degree ; or he may register himself from 
the outset as a candidate for the master's degree without attempt- 
ing to take the bachelor's degree. Those students who believe 
that they will be able to devote the necessary time to their legal 
studies are strongly recommended to take the latter course. Such 
students will find it to their advantage to make their elections 
for the first year largely in the field of social ethics, political 
philosophy, constitutional history, and economics, combining with 
these subjects courses in the elements of jurisprudence and the 
general principles of contracts and torts, and to divide the subse- 
quent years between public and private law. 

The student who has completed his junior year in the School 



i6 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



of Arts of Columbia College, or in some other college maintain- 
ing an equivalent curriculum, may obtain the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from Columbia College upon such a combination of legal 
and political courses aggregating not less than fifteen hours a 
week for one year ; and such courses will also be counted as 
a part of the fifty-two hours a week required for the degree of 
Master of Laws. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH FOR 
1894-95 1 

The course of study embraces instruction and research in three 
groups of subjects : 

I History and Political Philosophy. 

II Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence. 

III Economics and Social Science. 

Seminaria 

Outside of the regular instruction in the various subjects by 
lecture, it is the intention to furnish the students an opportunity 
for special investigation of historical, legal, economic and social 
questions under the direction of the professors. This is done by 
means of original papers prepared by the students. The papers 
are read before the professor and the students, and are then criti- 
cised and discussed. There will be at least one seminarium in 
each subject. The number of meetings and the topics to be dis- 
cussed are determined each year. Attendance at a seminarium 
in the major subject is necessary on the part of candidates for 
the degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 

There are also preliminary seminaria in history and political 
economy designed primarily for those that are not fully prepared 
for the more advanced work. A preliminary seminarium taken 
by a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts will count for 
one hour toward the fifteen hours necessary for a degree. 

Group 1— History and Political Philosophy 

The student is supposed to be familiar with the outlines of 
European history, ancient and modern, as well as of American 
1 Subject to revision in details in case of need. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



17 



history. Students who are not thus prepared are recommended 
to take the undergraduate courses in history in the School of 
Arts. These are as follows 1 : 

1 (A) Outline of Medieval and Modern History. — Two hours a 
week : Mr. Colby. 

2 (B) Outline of European History since 1815. — Two hours a 
week, first session : Prof. Dunning. 

3 Roman History. — Two hours a week, first session : Prof. 
Munroe Smith. 

4 English History. — One hour a week : Prof. Osgood. 

5 American History. — One hour a week : Prof. Dunning. 

6 Historical and Political Geography. — The purpose of this 
course is to give a description of the physical geography of 
Europe, to point out the various sections into which it is naturally 
divided, to trace the territorial growth of modern European states, 
and to describe the geographical and ethnic conditions of the 
present states of the European continent. One hour a week : 
Prof. Goodnow. 

Subject A — European History 

7 General Political and Constitutional History of Europe, com- 
prehending in detail : a view of the political situation of imperial 
Rome ; the history of the development of the government of the 
Christian church into the form of papal monarchy ; the overthrow 
of the Roman imperial system and the establishment of German 
kingdoms throughout middle, western, and southern Europe ; the 
character and constitution of these kingdoms ; the conversion of 
the Germans to the Christian church, and the relations which the 
Christian church assumed towards the Germanic states ; consoli- 
dation of the German kingdoms into the European empire of 
Charlemagne ; character and constitution of the Carolingian state ; 
its disruption through the development of the feudal system and 
the independent hierarchic church, and division into the kingdoms 
of Germany, France, and Italy ; character and history of the 
feudal system as a state form ; re-establishment of the imperial 
authority by the re-connection of Germany with Italy ; conflict 
of the middle ages between church and state ; the political disor- 
ganization and papal despotism resulting from the same ; the 

1 The lettered courses are required for undergraduates. 



iS 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



development of the absolute monarchy and the reformation ; the 
limitation of absolute kingly power and the development of con- 
stitutionalism ; and lastly, the realization of the constitutional 
idea of the nineteenth century. — Four hours a week, first session : 
Prof. Osgood. 

8 The Political and Constitutional History of England. — The ob- 
ject of this course of lectures is to trace the growth of the English 
constitution from the earliest to the present times, dwelling upon 
foreign relations during periods when they had an important in- 
fluence. Particular attention is paid to the administrative system 
developed by the Norman monarchs, and to the struggle of the 
thirteenth century, which culminated in the legislative work of 
Edward I. The political results of the reformation are described. 
Under the Stuarts, the conflict between the crown and parliament, 
which had been interrupted at the close of the fourteenth century, 
was resumed, owing chiefly to the rise of Puritanism. The House 
of Commons now leads the opposition. The history of the strug- 
gle between the two is detailed till the most important questions 
in dispute were settled by the events of 1688-89. The develop- 
ment of parliamentary government under the aristocratic regime 
is then outlined. About the beginning of this century, and largely 
in consequence of the industrial revolution, the democratizing of 
the constitution began. The account given of the development 
of this tendency closes with the Reform Bill of 1884. The work 
of the first session will close at 1640. The history subsequent to 
that date will be treated during the second session. — Two hours a 
week: Prof. Osgood. 

9 The Relations of England and Ireland. — In a general way, the 
Irish question has been the question of imposing upon the last 
and most persistent remnant of the old Celtic race the Teutonic 
ideas and institutions that have developed in England. Three 
phases of the process are clearly distinguishable in history — the 
political, the religious, and the economic. It is designed in the 
lectures to follow out in some detail the modifications in the rela- 
tions of the two islands affected by the varying prominence of 
these different phases. The long struggle for English political 
supremacy over all Ireland from the twelfth to the seventeenth 
century, the religious wars, and the ruthless suppression of the 
Catholic population during the two succeeding centuries, and the 
origin and development of the land question out of the circum- 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



I 9 



stances of both these periods, are described with special reference 
to their influence on the modern state of Irish affairs. Inciden- 
tally to these leading topics, the questions of governmental 
organization that have been prominent from time to time since the 
conquest are discussed, and the history of the Irish parliament is 
followed out in such a way as to illustrate the nature and im- 
portance of the agitation for home rule. — One hour a week, first 
session (1895-96) : Prof. Dunning. 

10 History of European Law. — See post., p. 26. Two hours a 
week : Prof. Munroe Smith. 

11 History of Diplomacy. — Seepost.,p. 23. — Two hours a week 
first session : Prof. Moore. 

12 Early Church History. — The ante-Nicene period, a.d. 100- 
311 ; spread and persecution ; literary conflict with heathenism 
and heresy ; conversion of the Roman empire ; development of 
Christian doctrine and discipline. — Two hours a week : 

13 Mediozval Church History. — From the time of Constantine 
to the Reformation. Nicene and post-Nicene periods : monasti- 
cism ; rise of the papacy ; development of doctrine ; mediaeval 
Christianity ; conversion of the barbarians ; separation of the 
Greek and Latin churches ; the papacy and the empire ; the 
crusades ; preparation for the reformation. — Two hours a week : 



14 Modern Church History. — The reformation on the continent, 
in England and Scotland ; the Roman Catholic counter-reforma- 
tion ; history of the Lutheran and Reformed churches. — Two 
hours a week : 

15 Seminarium in European History. — Two hours a week : 
Prof. Osgood. 

Subject B— American History 

16 Political and Constitutional History of the United States. — This 
course of lectures covers the history of the colonies and of the 
revolutionary war ; the formation and dissolution of the confed- 
erate constitution of 1787, and its application down to the civil 
war ; the changes wrought in the constitution by the civil war, 
and the resulting transformation of the public law of the United 
States. — Four hours a week, second session : Prof. Burgess. 

17 Political History of the Colonies and of the American Revolu- 
tion. — This is an investigation course, extending through two years. 



20 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



During the first year attention will be devoted to the settlement 
of the colonies and their development in the seventeenth century. 
During the second year the growth of the system of colonial 
administration, the conflict with the French, and the revolt of the 
colonies will be investigated. The object of the course is two- 
fold : first, to acquaint the student as thoroughly as possible with 
the history of the period ; second, to teach him how to investi- 
gate and how to do the constructive work of the historian. The 
subject is taken up topically, and the titles of the chief original 
authorities bearing upon each topic are given by the instructor. 
These works the student must read, compare, and criticise. The 
result of his study must appear in the form of a consistent and 
truthful account of the event of which he is treating. It is in- 
tended that attention shall be fixed as exclusively as possible upon 
original sources. When secondary material is used, it must be 
examined and criticised in the light of the original. When neces- 
sary, an analytical study of the histories, relations, or other authori- 
ties is undertaken for the purpose of ascertaining the degree of 
their credibility. Attention is also called to the character of his- 
torical writing in each period under investigation. Students are 
brought, as far as possible, to view the world from the standpoint 
of the men whose works they are studying. It is intended that a 
class taking the full course shall have discussed before it all the 
most important original authorities bearing upon the history of 
the American colonies and revolution. — Two hours per week for 
two years : Prof. Osgood. 

1 8 The United States during Civil War and Reconstruction. — The 
object of this course is to describe the constitutional principles 
which came into play during the period from i860 to 1877. 
Among the topics discussed in more or less detail are : The prin- 
ciples of the appeal to arms ; the nature and scope of the " war 
power " ; the status of the negro as affected by the war ; the 
various theories of reconstruction ; the adoption of the last three 
amendments to the constitution ; the actual process of recon- 
struction ; the so-called " force legislation " ; and the circum- 
stances attending the final cessation of national interference in 
the Southern States. — Two hours a week, second session : Prof. 
Dunning. 

19 History of American Diplomacy. — See post, p. 23. Two hours 
a week, second session : Prof. Moore. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



21 



20 American Church History. — Two hours a week : 

21 New York State and Federal Politics, 1820-1860. — Among the 
chief topics treated in this course are : Anti-masonry, rise of the 
Whig party, internal improvements, agrarian insurrections, Mc- 
Leod case, anti-slavery ideas before 1845, Texas and the Mexican 
war, compromise of 1850, election of 1852, Kansas-Nebraska bill, 
Dred Scott case, Lincoln-Douglas debate, election of i860, efforts 
at compromise. — Two hours a week, second session : Dr. Ban- 
croft. 

22 Charter and Political History of New York City. — This course 
treats of the relations of the city to the state, showing the growth 
of municipal independence. The early charters conferred but 
few rights on the city, the selection of the most important city 
officials being made at Albany. Tammany Hall has been the most 
important and" powerful party organization. A brief history of 
the Tammany organization, its rulers, and its method of nominat- 
ing public officers, will be given. The " Tweed Ring " and the 
efforts of purifying city politics since its downfall will be described, 
including the reform charter of 1873, the amendments of 1884, 
the report of the Tilden Committee in 1875, and of the Roosevelt 
and Gibbs investigating committees. — Two hours a week, first ses- 
sion : Dr. Bernheim. 

25 Seminarium in Early American History. — The subjects dis- 
cussed in 1893-4 were : Topics on the history of the American 
colonies during the period of the restoration, 1660-1690. One 
hour a week : Prof. Osgood. 

Subject C— Political Philosophy 

26 General History of Political Theories. — Every people known 
to history has possessed some form, however vague and primitive, 
of political government. Every people which has attained a 
degree of enlightenment above the very lowest has been per- 
meated by some ideas, more or less systematic, as to the origin, 
nature, and limitations of governmental authority. It is the 
purpose of this course to trace historically the development of 
these ideas, from the primitive notions of primitive people to the 
complex and elaborate philosophical theories that have charac- 
terized the ages of highest intellectual refinement. 



22 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Book I., after a short survey of the theocratic system of the 
Brahmans, treats mainly of the political philosophy of Greece 
and Rome, with especial attention to the profound specula- 
tions of Plato and Aristotle. 
Book II. discusses the political doctrines of early Christianity and 
the Christian church, with the controversy of Papacy and 
Empire, and the elaborate systems of St. Thomas Aquinas 
and his adversaries. 
Book III. treats of that age of renaissance and reformation 
in which Machiavelli and Bodin, Suarez and Bellarmino, 
Luther and Calvin worked out their various solutions of the 
great problem, how to reconcile the conflicting doctrines 
of theology, ethics, and politics. 
Book IV. covers the period during which the theories were 
worked out which found realization in the English and 
French revolutions. Here are examined the doctrine of 
natural law, as developed by Grotius and Puffendorf, the 
doctrine of divine right of kings with its corollary of passive 
obedience, as in Filmer and Bossuet, the theory of the 
constitutionalists, Locke and Montesquieu, and the idea of 
social contract, made most famous by Rousseau. 
Book V. traces the various currents of thought since Rousseau : 
the idealism of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel, the reactionary 
philosophy which sought to overcome the tendencies of the 
revolution, the historical school of Burke and Savigny, and 
the English individualists like Bentham, Mill, and Spencer. 
— Three hours a week : Prof. Dunning. 

27 American Political Philosophy. — As the first nation to 
realize in practice many of the principles that characterize the 
modern state, the United States offers special opportunities for 
research to the student of political philosophy. In this course a 
twofold line of discussion is followed : First, by a study of the 
various documents of the revolutionary era, the Declaration of 
Independence, the constitutions, national and commonwealth, and 
other state papers, the dominant ideas of the people are derived 
from their official records. Second, the writings of the leading 
statesmen, like Hamilton, Jefferson, Calhoun, and Webster, as 
well as the more systematic and philosophical works of Lieber, 
Mulford, Brownson, Jameson, and others, are analyzed and 
subjected to critical comment. — One hour a week : Prof. Dunning. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



23 



30 Seminarium in Political Philosophy. — One hour a week : 
Prof. Dunning. 

Group II. — Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Subject A — Constitutional Law 

1 Comparative Constitutional Law of the Principal European States 
and of the United States j comprehending a comparison of the 
provisions of the constitutions of England, United States, France, 
and Germany, the interpretation of the same by the legislative 
enactments and judicial decisions of the states, and the generali- 
zation from them of the fundamental principles of public law- 
common to them all. — Three hours a week, December to May : 
Prof. Burgess. 

2 Comparative Constitutional Law of the Several Commonwealths 
of the American Union. — In this course of lectures comparison is 
made in the same manner of the constitutions of the forty-four 
commonwealths of the Union. — One hour a week, second session: 
Dr. Bernheim. 

5 Seminarium in Constitutional Law. — The subject discussed 
in 1893-94 was the power of Congress over the Territories. — Two 
hours a week : Prof. Burgess. 

Subject B — International Law 

6 History of Diplomacy. — The object of this course is to exhibit 
the evolution of the relations between independent states and the 
manner in which those relations are conducted. The history of 
the diplomatic system of Europe is traced from its beginnings to 
the present time, and an exposition is given of the religious, 
dynastic, territorial, and commercial struggles of which that 
system is the result. The first part of the course relates to the 
development of the European concert prior to the Peace of 
Westphalia. This is followed by an examination of the most 
important of the general European treaties, beginning with those 
concluded at the Congress of Westphalia in 1648, and ending 
with the Treaty of Berlin of 1878. — Two hours a week, first 
session : Prof. Moore. 

7 History of American Diplomacy. — In the study of American 
diplomacy special attention will be given to the history and 
method of the diplomacy of the United States. The course will 



2 4 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



comprehend (i) the diplomacy of the Revolution ; (2) the period 
from the Treaty of Peace of 1783 to the termination of the war 
of 181 2 ; (3) from the termination of that war to the civil war ; 
(4) from the outbreak of the latter war to the present time. — Two 
hours a week, second session : Prof. Moore. 

8 International Law. — This course treats of the general prin- 
ciples of international law, as it has been developed by positive 
agreement, in the form of treaties and conventions, and by 
common usage, as shown in legislation, in the decisions of inter- 
national tribunals and of municipal courts, and in the conduct of 
nations. The rules thus discovered are discussed in the light of 
the principles of reason and justice, as scientifically presented by 
writers on international law, and an effort is made to trace the 
systematic establishment of the rules which govern intercourse 
among nations at the present day. — Two hours a week : Prof. 
Moore. 

10 Seminarium in International Law. — 2 hours a week : Prof. 
Moore. 

Subject C — Criminal Law 

11 Criminal Law, including the Conflict of Penal Laws and Ex- 
tradition. — This course embraces (1) the general principles of 
criminal law, defining the relation of the individual to the state, 
as regards the maintenance of public order ; (2) the conflict of 
penal laws, and the punishment of extra-territorial crime ; (3) 
extradition, including (a) the delivery up of fugitives from justice 
as between nations, and (b) the delivery of such fugitives as 
between the states of the American Union, or interstate rendi- 
tion. — Two hours a week : Prof. Moore. 

Subject D — Administrative Law 

16 Comparative Administrative Law of the United States and the 
principal European States. — The purpose of this course is to 
present the general principles of the administrative law of the 
United States, both in the nation and in the commonwealths, and to 
compare them with the law of England, France, and Germany. 
The following list of topics will give a general idea of the particu- 
lar subjects discussed : The principle of the separation or distri- 
bution of powers ; the executive power ; administrative councils ; 
heads of departments, their tenure of office, their powers and 
duties ; local (including municipal) government ; officers, their 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 2$ 



appointment or election, their duties, their rights, removal from 
office ; the administration in action ; the control over the admin- 
istration possessed by the higher administrative officers, the 
courts, and the legislature. Special attention will here be paid to 
the writs of mandamus, quo warranto, certiorari, habeas corpus, and 
prohibition, and their statutory substitutes, by means of which 
the courts exercise their control over the administration. The 
new courts will also be examined, which have been established in 
France and Germany during this century, and to which the name 
of administrative courts has been given. — Two hours a week : 
Prof. Goodnow. 

17 The Law of Municipal Corporations. — This course treats of 
the development of the American municipal corporation and the 
differences between it and the modern English municipal cor- 
poration ; the creation of municipal corporations ; the control 
over American municipal corporations possessed by the com- 
monwealth legislature, and its constitutional limitations both 
national and commonwealth ; the dissolution of municipal cor- 
porations, and its effect ; the organization of municipal cor- 
porations together with a detailed discussion of their powers 
and liabilities both as governmental agencies and as corporate 
bodies, subjects of private law. — Two hours a week, first session : 
Prof. Goodnow. 

18 The Law of Taxation. — The subjects treated in this course 
are : The nature of taxes and the taxing power ; the limitations 
placed by the constitutions, both national and commonwealth, 
upon the taxing power ; the construction of tax proceedings ; the 
rules of law relative to the particular taxes, both national and 
commonwealth, levied in the United States ; the methods of 
assessment and collection ; the remedies open to the individua. 
against arbitrary, unjust, and illegal taxation ; and the law of 
assessments for local improvements of property specially bene- 
fited. — Two hours a week, second session : Prof. Goodnow. 

20 Seminarium in Administrative Law. — Two hours a week : 
Prof. Goodnow. 

Subject E — Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

21 Roman Law L. — The history and institutions of the classical 
and Justinian law. Sohm's Lnstitutes, supplemented by lectures. 
— Two hours a week, first session : Prof. Munroe Smith. 



26 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



22 Roman Law II. — Cases from the Digest, principally in con- 
tracts. — Two hours a week, second session : Prof. Munroe Smith. 

23 History of European Law. — This course treats (1) of primi- 
tive law, with especial reference to the usages and ideas of the 
Indo-Germanic races ; (2) of early German law, including a com- 
parison of Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, and continental German 
customs ; (3) of mediaeval European law, including feudal and 
canon law ; (4) of the " reception " of Justinian civil law ; and 
(5) of the genesis and character of the great modern codes. — Two 
hours a week (1895-96) : Prof. Munroe Smith. 

24 Comparative Jurisprudence. — This course, based mainly on a 
comparison of the modern Roman and the English common law, 
aims to present the leading principles of modern property law 
and family law. — Two hours a week : Prof. Munroe Smith. 

25 International Private Law. — In this course the theories of the 
foreign authorities and the practice of the foreign courts in the 
so-called " conflicts of law " are compared with the solution given 
to these questions by our own courts. — One hour a week : Prof. 
Munroe Smith. 

29 Seminarium in Legal History. — One hour a week : Prof. 
Munroe Smith. 

30 Seminarium in Comparative Legislation. — One hour a week : 
Prof. Munroe Smith. 

Group III — Economics and Social Science 

It is presumed that students before entering the school possess 
a knowledge of the general principles of political economy as laid 
down in the ordinary manuals by Walker or Mill, and also a 
knowledge of the general facts of economic history. Students 
who are not thus prepared are recommended to take the under- 
graduate courses in the School of Arts. These are 1 : 

1 (A) Elements of Political Economy. — Two hours a week, 
second session : Prof. Mayo-Smith and Mr. Weston. 

2 Economic History of Europe and America. — Two hours a 
week, second session : Prof. Seligman and Mr. Weston. 

Subject A — Political Economy and Finance 

3 Historical and Practical Political Economy. — This course is in- 

1 The lettered course is required for undergraduates. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



27 



tended to give the student a knowledge of the economic develop- 
ment of the world, in order that he may understand present eco- 
nomic institutions and solve present economic problems. The 
principal topics are : the study of political economy and 
its relation to political science ; general sketch of the eco- 
nomic development of the world ; the institutions of private 
property, bequest, and inheritance, and the principle of per- 
sonal liberty as affecting the economic condition of the world ; 
the problems of production, such as land tenure, population, capi- 
tal, different forms of productive enterprise, statistics of production, 
particularly the natural resources of the United States ; problems 
of exchange, such as free trade and protection, railroads, money, 
bimetallism, paper-money, banking, commercial crises, etc. ; 
problems of distribution, such as wages, trades-unions, co-opera- 
tion, poor relief, factory laws, profit and interest, rent, progress 
and poverty ; and finally a consideration of the function of the 
state in economic affairs. — Three hours a week : Prof. Mayo- 
Smith. 

4 History of Political Eco?iomy. — In this course the various sys- 
tems of political economy are discussed in their historical devel- 
opment. The chief exponents of the different schools are taken 
up in their order, but especial attention is directed to the wider 
aspects of the connection between the theories and the organiza- 
tion of the existing industrial society. The chief writers discussed 
are : 

I Antiquity : Orient, Greece, and Rome. 
II Middle ages : Aquinas, Glossators, writers on money, the 
usury question, etc. 

III Mercantilists : Stafford, Mun, Petty, North, Locke ; 

Bodin, Vauban, Forbonnais ; Serra, Galiani, Justi, etc. 

IV Physiocrats : Quesnay, Gournay, Turgot, etc. 

V Adam Smith and precursors : Tucker, Hume, Cantillon, 
Steuart. 

VI English school: Malthus, Ricardo, Senior, McCulloch, 

Chalmers, Jones, Mill, etc. 
VII The continent : Say, Sismondi, Hermann, List, Cournot, 
Bastiat, etc. 

VIII German historical school : Roscher, Knies, Hildebrand, etc. 
IX Recent development : Rogers, Jevons, Cairnes, Bagehot, 



28 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Leslie, Toynbee, Marshall ; Wagner, Schmoller, Held, 
Brentano, Cohn ; Menger, Sax, Bohm-Bawerk, Wieser ; 
Leroy-Beaulieu, De Laveleye, Gide ; Cossa, Nazzani, 
Loria, Ricca-Salerno, Pantaleoni ; Carey, George, 
Walker, Clark, Patten, Adams, etc. 
— Two hours a week : Prof. Seligman. 

5 Science of Finance. — This course is historical as well as com- 
parative and critical. It treats of the various rules of public ex- 
penditures and the methods of meeting the same among different 
civilized nations. It describes the different kinds of public 
revenue, including the public domain and public property, public 
works and industrial undertakings, special assessments, fees and 
taxes. It is in great part a course on the history, theories, and 
methods of taxation in all civilized countries. It considers also 
public debt, methods of borrowing, redemption, refunding, repu- 
diation, etc. Finally it describes the financial organization of the 
state, by which the revenue is collected and expended, and dis- 
cusses the budget, national, state, and local. Students are fur- 
nished with the current public documents of the United States 
treasury, and the chief financial reports of the leading common- 
wealths, and are expected to understand all the facts in regard to 
public debt, currency, and revenue therein contained. — Two hours 
a week : Prof. Seligman. 

6 Financial History of the United States. — This course endeav- 
ors to present a complete survey of American legislation on 
currency, finance, and taxation, as well as its connection with the 
state of industry and commerce. Attention is called especially 
to the financial history of the colonies (colonial currency and 
taxation) ; to the financial methods of the revolution and the 
confederation ; to the financial policy of the Federalists and the 
Republicans up to the war of 1812, including the refunding and 
payment of the debt, the internal revenue, and the banking and 
currency problems ; to the financial history of the war with Eng- 
land ; to the changes in the methods of taxation, and the crises 
of 1819, 1825, 1837 ; to the distribution of the surplus and the 
United States bank ; to the currency problems up to the civil 
war ; to the financial management of the war ; to the methods 
of resumption, payment of the debt, national banks, currency 
questions, and problems of taxation ; and finally to the recent 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



2 9 



development in national, state, and municipal finance and taxation. 
— Two hours a week, second session (1895-96) : Prof. Seligman. 

7 Industrial and Tariff History of the United States. — The argu- 
ments of extreme free-traders, as of extreme protectionists, are 
often so one-sided that an impartial judgment can be formed only- 
through a knowledge of the actual effects of the tariffs. It is the 
object of this course to give a detailed history of each customs 
tariff of the United States from the very beginning ; to describe 
the arguments of its advocates and of its opponents in each case ; 
to trace as far as possible the position of each of the leading in- 
dustries before and after the passage of the chief tariff acts, and 
thus to determine how far the legislation of the United States has 
developed or hampered the progress of industry and the pros- 
perity of the whole country. Attention is called especially to 
the industrial history of the colonies ; to the genesis of the pro- 
tective idea and to Hamilton's report ; to the tariffs from 1789 to 
1808 ; to the restriction and the war with England ; to the tariffs 
of 1816, 1824, and the "tariff of abominations" of 1828 ; to the 
infant-industry argument ; to the compromise and its effect on 
manufacturers ; to the area of moderate free trade ; to the tariff 
of 1857 ; to the war tariffs ; to their continuance, and to the 
pauper-labor argument ; to the McKinley act, and the changes 
up to the present time. — Two hours a week, second session 
(1895-96) : Prof. Seligman. 

8 Railroad Problems ; Economic, Social and Legal. — These lec- 
tures treat of railroads in the fourfold aspect of their relation to 
the investors, the employees, the public, and the state respectively. 
A history of railways and railway policy in America and Europe 
forms the preliminary part of the course. All the problems of 
railway management, in so far as they are of economic import- 
ance, come up for discussion. Among the subjects treated are : 
financial methods, railway construction, speculation profits, fail- 
ures, accounts and reports, expenses, tariffs, principles of rates, 
classification and discrimination, competition and pooling, acci- 
dents, employers' liability, etc. Especial attention is paid to the 
methods of regulation and legislation in the United States as com- 
pared with European methods, and the course closes with a gen- 
eral discussion of state versus private management. — Two hours 
a week, first session (1895-96) : Prof. Seligman. 



30 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



14 Preliminary Seminar ium in Political Economy. — Primarily for 
those that have already studied economics for only a year. The 
subject in 1893-94 was bimetallism and the monetary situation. — 
Two hours a week : Professors Mayo-Smith and Seligman, and 
Mr. Weston. 

15 Seminarium in Political Economy and Finance. — For advanced 
students. The subjects in 1893-94 were (1) Origin and develop- 
ment of the differential theory of distribution. (2) The income 
tax in theory and practice. — Two hours, bi-weekly : Prof. 
Seligman. 

Subject B— Sociology and Statistics 1 

16 Physical Geography, Anthropology, and Ethnology. — This 
course will treat of the following subjects : 

I Physical Geography in its relation to the development 
of culture : a) areas of characterization, acclimatiza- 
tion, etc. ; b) theories of distribution. 
II History of the Science of Anthropology. 

III Prehistoric Archceology, including earliest evidences of 

human life, theories of migration, etc. 

IV Ethnology : a) language ; b) manners and customs ; c) 

classification of races ; d) 2 race problems biologically 
considered, including variation, intermingling, and 
extermination. 
V Anthropometry* . 
VI Comparative Mythology? — Two hours a week : Dr. Ripley. 

17 Practical Statistics. — This course is a series of talks about 
the use of statistics in political economy and social science, with 
use of the current statistical publications of the United States, 
and explanation of their value as sources of information and 
illustrations of statistical methods, fallacies, graphical representa- 
tion, etc. The topics are : population in its economic relation, 
emigration and immigration, production of wealth, money, com- 
merce, wages, banking, finance, etc. — Two hours, first session : 
Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

1 For a fuller statement of the work in Sociology and the allied courses and 
equipment, see the separate announcement of the Courses in Sociology. 

2 This course will be given in the University Faculty of Philosophy by Dr. 
Livingston Farrand. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



31 



18 Statistical Science : Methods and Results. — This course is in- 
tended to furnish a basis for social science by supplementing the 
historical, legal and economic knowledge already gained by such 
a knowledge of social phenomena as can be gained only by statis- 
tical observation. Under the head of statistics of population 
are considered : race and ethnological distinctions, nationality, 
density, city and country, sex, age, occupation, religion, education, 
births, deaths, marriages, mortality tables, emigration, etc. 
Under economic statistics : land, production of food, raw mate- 
rial, labor, wages, capital, means of transportation, shipping, 
prices, etc. Under the head of moral statistics are considered : 
statistics of suicide, vice, crime of all kinds, causes of crime, 
condition of criminals, repression of crime, penalties and effect 
of penalties, etc. Finally is considered the method of statistical 
observations, the value of the results obtained, the doctrine of 
the will, and the possibility of discovering social laws. — Two 
hours a week : Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

19 Communistic and Socialistic Theories. — The present organiza- 
tion of society is attacked by socialistic writers, who demand 
many changes, especially in the institution of private property 
and the system of free competition. It is the object of this 
course to describe what these attacks are, what changes are pro- 
posed, and how far these changes seem desirable or possible. 
At the same time an account is given of actual socialistic move- 
ments, such as the international, social democracy, etc. Advan- 
tage is taken of these discussions to make the course really one 
on social science, by describing modern social institutions, such 
as private property, in their historical origin and development, and 
their present justification. — Two hours a week (1895-96) : Prof. 
Mayo-Smith. 

20 General Sociology. — This course includes a systematic study 
of general sociology. The attempts that have been made since 
Comte to construct a science of society are explained in a review 
of the literature, which is brought down to the present time. A 
society is described in ethnographic terms, as a subdivision of the 
population of the earth, which has a territorial or ethnical ground 
of unity and develops its own distinctive culture and organization. 
The causes and laws of its natural evolution, so far as they are yet 
apparent, are presented. Particular attention is given to the 



32 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



economic causes of social development. The modern theories of 
utility, subjective value, and wealth-consumption are shown to 
have important sociological bearings. They enter into our inter- 
pretations of legal traditions and political forms, as well as into 
our explanations of industrial customs, the division of labor, and 
public policy. Economic and sociological theory are thus brought 
into close relations to each other. The latter part of the course 
deals largely with the causes and consequences of the rapid 
growth of modern populations and their concentration in cities. — 
Two hours a week, first session : Prof. Giddings. 

2 1 The Evolution of the Family. — The family is the unitary group 
in human society. The study of its organization and history is 
of the same importance for the sociologist that the study of cell 
structure and differentiation is for the biologist. The investigations 
of Bachofen, Morgan, Maine, and MacLennan into the origins of 
marriage, kinship, household organization, and clan relationships, 
stimulated sociological research as nothing else has ever done. 
The course on the evolution of the family presents the results of 
these researches, reviewing the literature and discussing some of 
the more important problems, such as those of the early forms of 
marriage, the relation of the family to the clan and the tribe, the 
status of women and children, etc. These studies lead up to an 
examination of the family in modern society, in country and city, 
under various conditions of nationality, residence, occupation, 
density of population, sanitary surroundings, education, religion, 
etc. In conclusion, the increase of divorce is considered, in its 
causes and consequences, and in its relation to public opinion and 
legislation. — Two hours a week, second session : Prof. Giddings. 

22 Pauperism, Poor Laws, and Charities. — The foundation of 
this course is a careful study of the English poor law ; its history, 
practical working, and consequences. On this foundation is built 
a study of pauperism in general, but especially as it may be now 
observed in great cities. The laws of the different common- 
wealths in regard to paupers, out-relief, alms-houses, dependent 
children, etc., are compared. Finally the special modern methods 
of public and private philanthropy are considered, with particular 
attention to charity organization, the restriction of out-door alms, 
and the reclamation of children. — Two hours a week, first session : 
Prof. Giddings. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



33 



23 Crime and Penology. — This course comprises a special study 
of the sociological problems of crime and penology. It takes up 
in order the nature and definitions of crime, the increase of crime 
and its modern forms, criminal anthropology — the physical and 
psychological characteristics of the criminal type, — the social 
causes of crime, surroundings, parental neglect, education, the 
question of responsibility, historical methods of punishment, the 
history of efforts to reform prison methods, modern methods, the 
solitary system, the Elmira system, classification of criminals, 
classes of prisons, reformatories, and jails. — Two hours a week, 
second session : Prof. Giddings. 

24 Ethnology and the Population of the United States. — This 
course studies the origin of the population of the United States, 
the history of immigration, the ethnical elements and their influ- 
ence on institutions and social progress. — Two hours a week, sec- 
ond session : Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

29 Seminarium in Statistics. — Work in the statistical laboratory 
— Four hours, weekly : Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

30 Seminarium in Social Science. — Two hours, bi-weekly : Prof. 
Giddings. 



ORDER OF STUDIES 



It is recommended by the faculty that students, who intend to 
devote their whole time to the courses of study offered by this 
faculty, take them in the following order : 



FIRST YEAR 

Constitutional History of Europe, United States 

and England . 
Political Economy . 
Science of Finance . 
Practical Statistics (1st session) 
History of Political Theories . 
Relations of England and Ireland (1st session) 



Hours per week 



34 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Roman Law 2 

Physical Geography and Anthropology (1st session) . . 2 

Financial History of the United States (2d session) . . 2 
Tariff History of the United States (2d session) . . .2 

SECOND YEAR 

Comparative Constitutional Law of the principal 
European states and of the United States, Dec. 

1 st to end of year 3 

History of European Law 2 

Comparative Administrative Law of the United 

States, and of the principal European states . . .2 

History of Political Economy 2 

Social Science : Communistic and Socialistic Theories . . 2 

Colonial History of the United States 2 

History of Diplomacy (1st session) 2 

History of American Diplomacy (2d session) .... 2 

American Political Philosophy 1 

Sociology (1st session) ........ 2 

Evolution of the Family (2d session) . . . . .2 

New York State and Federal Politics (2d session) . . .2 

Early and Mediaeval Church History 4 

THIRD YEAR 

Comparative Jurisprudence .2 

International Law 2 

Criminal Law 2 

International Private Law 1 

Law of Municipal Corporations (1st session) . ... 2 

Law of Taxation (2d session) 2 

History of the United States, 1860-1877 . 1 

New York City Politics (1st session) 2 

Statistics, Methods, and Results 2 

Railroad Problems 2 

Pauperism and Poor Relief (1st session) .... 2 

Crime and Penology (2d session) 2 

Ethnology (2d session) 2 

Modern and American Church History 4 



UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 



35 



UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 

Twenty-four university fellowships have been established, ten- 
able for one year, with a possibility of reappointment for reasons 
of weight. Applications for fellowships should be addressed to 
the President of Columbia College on blank forms provided for 
the purpose. The following rules regarding the fellowships have 
been established by the University Council : 

1 The application shall be made prior to March i, in writing, 
addressed to the President of Columbia College. Applications 
received later than March i may fail of consideration. The 
term of the fellowship is one year, dating from July i. Residence 
should begin October i. 

2 The candidate must give evidence 

(a) Of a liberal education, such as a diploma already 
granted, or about to be received, from a college or scientific 
school of good repute ; 

(b) Of decided fitness for a special line of study, such as 
an example of some scientific or literary work already per- 
formed ; 

(c) Of upright character, such as testimonial from some 
instructor. 

3 The value of each fellowship is five hundred dollars. Pay- 
ments will be based on the time during which the fellow shall 
have been in residence. The holder of a fellowship is exempt 
from the charges for tuition. 

4 Every holder of a fellowship will be expected to perform 
such duties as may be allotted to him in connection with his 
course of study, which course will be such as to lead to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He will be expected to devote 
his time to the prosecution of special studies under the direction 
of the head of the department to which he belongs, and before 
the close of the academic year to give evidence of progress by 
the preparation of a thesis, the completion of a research, the 
delivery of a lecture, or by some other method. He must reside 
in New York or vicinity during the academic year. 

5 No holder of a fellowship shall be permitted to pursue a 
profession or technical course of study during his term. With 
the written approval of the President, but not otherwise, he may 



36 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



give instruction or assistance in any department of the Uni- 
versity. 

6 No fellow shall be allowed to accept remunerative employ- 
ment except by written permission of the President, and the 
acceptance of any such employment, without such permission, 
shall operate to vacate the fellowship. 

7 A fellow may be reappointed at the end of the year for rea- 
sons of weight. No fellow may be reappointed for more than 
two terms of one year each. 

8 As these fellowships are awarded as honors, those who are 
disposed, for the benefit of others or for any other reason, to 
waive the pecuniary emolument, may do so, and still have their 
names retained on the list of fellows. 



PRIZES 



Prize in Political Economy 

An annual prize of $150 for the best essay on some subject 
in political economy has been established by Mr. Edwin 
R. A. Seligman, of the class of 1879 of the School of Arts. 
Competition for the prize is open to all members of the School 
of Political Science. The topic selected must be approved 
by the faculty, and the essay itself must be not less than twenty 
thousand words in length. 

James Gordon Bennett Prize in Political Science 

A prize of $50, to be given on Commencement Day, has been 
established by Mr. James Gordon Bennett. The prize is to be 
awarded by the Faculty of Political Science for the best essay in 
English prose upon some subject of contemporaneous interest in 
the domestic or foreign policy of the United States. The subject 
is assigned each year by the Faculty. The competition is open 
to Seniors in the School of Arts, whether regular or special 
students, and to all students under any of the University Faculties 
who have not yet taken the baccalaureate degree in arts, letters, 
or philosophy, provided that they take courses amounting to six 
hours a week throughout the year in the School of Political 
Science. Essays must be submitted to the President on or before 



ACADEMY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. 



37 



May i, 1894. If no satisfactory essay is received, no award will 
be made. No award will be made for any essay that is defective 
in English composition. 



ACADEMY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. 



This institution is devoted to the cultivation and advancement 
of the political sciences. It is composed mainly of graduates of 
Columbia College in the Schools of Law and Political Science, 
but any person whose previous studies have fitted him to partici- 
pate in the work of the academy is eligible to membership. 

Meetings of the academy are held on the first Mondays of each 
month. At these meetings papers are read by members present- 
ing the results of original investigation by the writers in some 
department of political science. 

Prize Lectureships 

The trustees have established in the School of Political Science 
three prize lectureships of the annual value of five hundred dol- 
lars each, tenable for three years. The power of appointment is 
vested in the faculty. One of these three lectureships becomes 
vacant at the close of each academic year. The previous holder 
may be reappointed. The conditions of competition are as 
follows : 

1 The candidate must be a graduate of Columbia College in 
the School of Political Science or the School of Law. In the 
latter case he must have pursued the curriculum of the School of 
Political Science for at least two years. 

2 He must be an active member of the Academy of Political 
Science. 

3 He must have read at least one paper before the Academy 
of Political Science during the year next preceding the appoint- 
ment. 

The duty of the lecturer is to deliver annually, before the stu- 
dents of political science, a series of at least twenty lectures, the 
result of original investigation. 

These prize lectureships will be found especially useful and 
welcome to graduates of the school who propose to devote them- 
selves to an academic career, and who in this way may acquire 



33 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



the experience and acquaintance with university methods of 
teaching which will stand them in good stead in their future 
career. 



LIBRARY 



The students of the School of Political Science are entitled to 
the use, subject to the rules established by the library committee, 
of the entire university library. The library is open from 8:30 
a.m. to 11 p.m. during term time, and from 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
during the summer vacation. Information concerning the sources 
and literature of the political sciences is given in the various courses 
of lectures held in the schools. 

The special library of political science was begun in 1877, and 
it was intended to include the most recent and most valuable 
European and American works in this department. Particular 
attention is given to providing the material needed for original 
investigation. Every journal of importance, American or foreign, 
is taken regularly by the library. Any book needed by advanced 
students can usually be bought at once. 

The library contains at present (March, 1894) about 170,000 
volumes. In the department of Political Science there are about 
65,000 volumes. The collection is particularly rich in works on 
international, constitutional, and administrative law, Roman law 
and foreign law, and is growing in these departments at the rate 
of several thousand volumes yearly. Another feature is the full 
collection of national, state, and local governmental reports and 
statistics in the various domains of economic inquiry, especially 
labor, finance, charity, poor law, and transportation reports. 

Students of history, economics, and public law will find New 
York to be a centre of library facilities absolutely unrivalled else- 
where in this country. In addition to the University library there 
are rich treasures at the Astor Library, Lenox Library, New York 
Historical Library, Long Island Historical Library, Library of 
the Charity Organization Society, the Bar Association Library, 
and the Law Institute Library, to each of which students have 
access under favorable conditions. Advanced students of eco- 
nomics also have at their disposal the library of the professor of 
Political Economy and Finance, which contains the most com- 
plete collection of works on political economy to be found in the 
United States. 



FRIDAY. 


History of Political 
Theories, 
Prof. Dunning. 


Historical and Practical 
Political Economy, 
Prof. Mayo-Smith. 


Seminarium in Political 
Economy, 
Profs. Mayo-Smith 
and Seligman. 


Seminarium in Political 
Economy, 
Profs. Mayo-Smith 
and Seligman. 




THURSDAY. 




Constitutional History 
of Europe and the 
United States, 
Prof. Osgood. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Constitutional History 
of England, 
Prof. Osgood. 


Taxation and 
Finance, 
Prof. Seligman. 


WEDNESDAY. 


History of Political 
Theories, 
Prof. Dunning. 


Constitutional History 
of Europe and the 
United States, 
Prof. Osgood. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Historical and Practical 
Political Economy, 
Prof. Mayo-Smith. 




TUESDAY. 


History of Political 
Theories, 
Prof. Dunning. 


Constitutional History 
of Europe and the 
United States, 
Prof. Osgood. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Constitutional History 
of England, 
Prof. Osgood. 


Taxation and 
Finance, 
Prof. Seligman. 


MONDAY. 


Physical Geography and 
Anthropology, 
Dr. Ripley. 


Constitutional History 
of Europe and the 
United States, 
Prof. Osgood. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Historical and Practical 
Political Economy, 
Prof. Mayo-Smith. 






oo 

CO CO 

6 m" 


o o 

co co 
hi <N 


oo 

CO CO 

ci co 


o o 

CO CO 
CO 


o o 

CO CO 
XT) 



39 



FRIDAY. 




Roman Law, 
Prof. Munroe Smith. 


History of Diplomacy, 
Prof. Moore. 

Sociology, 
The Family, 
Prof. GiDDINGS. 


Sociology, 
The Family, 
Prof. GiDDINGS. 








[TH. 


o 
cti 


13 




THURSDAY. 




Roman Law, 
Prof. Munroe Sm] 


History of Diplom; 
Prof. Moore. 


History of Politic 
Economy, 
Prof. Seligma> 




WEDNESDAY. 


United States during 
Civil War and Recon- 
struction, 
Prof. Dunning. 




Comparative Constitu- 
tional Law, 
Dec. to May, 
Prof. Burgess. 


United States Colonial 
History, 
Prof. Osgood. 


Administrative Law, 
Prof. Goodnow. 


TUESDAY. 


United States during 
Civil War and Recon- 
struction, 
Prof. Dunning. 




Comparative Constitu- 
tional Law, 
Dec. to May, 
Prof. Burgess. 


History of Political 
Economy, 
Prof. Seligman. 




MONDAY. 






Comparative Constitu- 
tional Law, 
Dec. to May, 
Prof. Burgess. 


United States Colonial 
History, 
Prof. Osgood. 


Administrative Law, 
Prof. Goodnow. 




Ao 

CO CO 


Ao 

CO CO 


A o 

CO CO 


Ao 

CO CO 


Ao 

CO CO 




M <N 


H N 


ci co 


co rj- 


rf in 



40 



i 6 


rispri 


1-1 O 






ve 


So' 


mparati 


5* 



H 
% 

org 

a O 
c g 



a 

.2 fl - 

o 



O pj 2 

Oh X Q 

cj o 

•H ffi." 



^ o 
_ o 



W O h 

cl °Q 
S £ 



g w 

o, & 

■3 s 

(U o O 
> S3 g 

Sh *H 
Oh 

O *H 

CJ Ph 



CO 

.52 Q 

»-* ,-5 C 

<u 'o P 

* s 

P4 



a 

o 

>^ o 

w k o 

4j O M 

^ s 
s 



+3 O 
.52 >< 

-2 ^ 
-/I ^ 



111 

Oc42 
Oh X Q 

cj O 

'o ^ O 
■~ rt ^ 




.2 «~3 
O >»ffl 



o 
c 



h 

.2 6 

O >. 



G O 

1-1 S-, 

«2 Ph 



C O Q 

9 "3 P 



o 



«! >H O 

<U O C/2 

*S 



•j3 o 



I 

o o 



Ao 

co CO 



CO CO 



41 



42 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



CALENDAR 



1894 — Feb. 12 — Second term begins, Monday. 
Feb. 22 — Washington's birthday, Thursday, holiday. 
March 23 — Good-Friday, holiday. 
May 21 — Concluding examinations begin, Monday. 
May 30 — Memorial day, Wednesday, holiday. 
June 13 — Commencement, Wednesday. 
Sept. 26 — Matriculation and Registration of students 

begin, Wednesday. 

Oct. 1 — First term, 141st year, begins, Monday. 
Nov. 6 — Election day, Tuesday, holiday. 

Nov. 29 — Thanksgiving day, Thursday, holiday. 

Dec. 24 — Christmas holidays begin, Monday. 

1895 — Jan. 5 — Christmas holidays end, Saturday. 
Jan. 28 — Mid-year examinations begin, Monday. 
Feb. 9 — First term ends, Saturday. 

Feb. 11 — Second term begins, Monday. 

Feb. 22 — Washington's birthday, Thursday, holiday. 

Feb. 27 — Ash-Wednesday, holiday. 

April 12 — Good-Friday, holiday. 

May 20 — Concluding examinations begin, Monday. 

May 30 — Memorial day, Thursday, holiday. 

June 12 — Commencement, Wednesday. 

Oct. 2 — Matriculation day, Wednesday. 

Oct. 7 — First term, i42d year begins, Monday. 




in flue mt% of W>w 



COURSES 



IN THE 



School of Political Science 



in 



HISTORY, ECONOMICS, AND PUBLIC LAW 



UNDER THE CHARGE OF 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



NOTE 



In addition to the courses offered by the Faculty of Polit- 
ical Science, Columbia College offers the following: 

In the School of Arts : 

A four-years' course leading to the degree of A.B. 

In the School of Law : 

A three-years' course leading to the degree of LL.B. 

In the School of Medicine (College of Physicians and Surgeons) : 

A four-years' course leading to the degree of M.D. 

In the School of Mines : 

A four-years' course in Mining Engineering leading to the degree of . M.E. 

" " Civil Engineering " " C.E. 

" " Electrical Engineering " " E.E. 

" " Metallurgy « " Met.E. 

" " Geology and Palaeontology " " B.S. 
i( (( Analytical and Applied 

Chemistry " " B.S. 

" " Architecture « " B.S. 

The courses detailed in this pamphlet may be taken as 
major or minor subjects for the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D., 
and some of them for the degree of A.B. All of them are 
elective as part of the requirements for the degree of LL.M. 
Other courses leading to the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. are 
given under the various university faculties, especially the 
Faculty of Philosophy and the Faculty of Pure Science. 

The first-year courses of the School of Law, the School of 
Mines, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons are open, 
as electives y to Seniors in the School of Arts. Consequently, 
such Seniors as may desire to do so can prepare themselves 
for advanced standing in these schools by electing these 
first-year courses and counting them for the degree of A.B. 

Information as to any of the above courses may be had by 
addressing the Secretary of the President, Columbia College. 



All the schools and departments of Columbia College are 
at Madison Avenue and 49th St., with the exception of the 
Department of Biology and the Medical School, which are at 
Tenth Avenue and 59th St. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

University Faculty of Political Science i 

Other Officers i 

General Statement 3 

Purposes of the School 3 

Admission and Registration 4 

Admission to Other Courses 5 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree ... 6 

Fees 8 

Committee on Aid for Students .... 8 
Degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 9 
Regulations of the University Council ... 9 
Supplemental Regulations of the Faculty of Political 

Science 13 

Specific Requirements of Study . . . .16 
Political Science and Law . . . . . .17 

In General 17 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Laws . 18 

Social Science 20 

Course of Study and Research . . . . .20 

Seminaria 20 

History and Political Philosophy . . . .21 
Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence . .27 
Economics and Social Science . . . . .32 
Order of Studies ........ 40 

University Fellowships 42 

Prizes .......... 43 

Prize in Political Economy . .... .43 

James Gordon Bennett Prize 43 

Medal of the National Society ... . 44 

Academy of Political Science 45 

Prize Lectureships 45 

Library .......... 46 

Hours of Lectures 48 

Calendar . . . . . , . , . 51 

iii 



UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Seth Low, LL.D., President 
John W. Burgess, Ph.D., LL.D 323 West 57th St. 

Professor of History, Political Science, and Constitutional Law 
Dean of the Faculty 

Richmond Mayo-Smith, Ph.D 305 West 77th St. 

Professor of Political Economy and Social Science 

Munroe Smith, A.M., J.U.D. 115th St., near Riverside Drive 

Professor of Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Frank J. Goodnow, A.M., LL.B 25 West 74th St. 

Professor of Administrative Law 
Secretary of the Faculty 

Edwin R. A. Seligman, LL.B., Ph.D.* 40 West 71st St. 

Professor of Political Economy and Finance 

Herbert L. Osgood, Ph.D 545 West 149th St. 

Adjunct Professor of History 

William A. Dunning, Ph.D 70 Hanson Place, Brooklyn 

Adjunct Professor of History and Political Philosophy 

John Basset Moore, A.B 24 Locust St., Flushing, L. I. 

Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law and Diplomacy 

Franklin H. Giddings, A.M 150 West 79th St. 

Professor of Sociology 

John B. Clark, Ph.D Columbia College 

Professor of Political Economy 

A. C. Bernheim, LL.B., Ph.D 12 East 65th St. 

Lecturer on the Political History of the State and City of New York 



OTHER OFFICERS. 

Frederic Bancroft, Ph.D., Metropolitan Club, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Prize Lecturer, 1892-95, on American History. 

* Professor Seligman will probably be absent on leave during 1 895-96. Pro- 
vision, however, will be made in that case for his courses. 

1 



William Z. Ripley, Ph.D Columbia College 

Prize Lecturer 1893-96, on Physical Geography and Anthropology 

George Louis Beer, A.M 38 Manhattan Square, South 

Prize Lecturer 1894-97, on European History 

Arthur M. Day, A.M. .East Side House, Foot East 76th St. 

Assistant in Economics 

Robert Senftner Columbia College 

Registrar 



2 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Purposes of the School 

The School of Political Science is under the direction of 
the University Faculty of Political Science, and has charge 
of the university courses of study and research in history, 
economics, and public law. 

The School of Political Science was opened on Monday, 
the fourth day of October, 1880. 

In its course of instruction it undertakes to give a com- 
plete general view of all the subjects of public polity, both 
internal and external, from the threefold point of view of 
history, law, and philosophy. The prime aim is therefore 
the development of all the branches of the political and 
social sciences. The secondary and practical objects are: 

a To fit young men for all the political branches of the 
public service. 

b To give an adequate economic and legal training to 
those who intend to make journalism their profession. 

c To supplement, by course in public law and compar- 
ative jurisprudence, the instruction in private municipal law 
offered by the Faculty of Law. 

d To educate teachers of political and social science. 

To these ends courses of study are offered of sufficient 
duration to enable the student not only to attend the lectures 
and recitations with the professors, but also to consult the 
most approved treatises upon the political sciences and to 
study the sources of the same. 

Young men who wish to obtain positions in the United 
States Civil Service — especially in those positions in the 

3 



4 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Department of State and the Department of the Interior for 
which special examinations are held — will find it advan- 
tageous to follow many of the courses under the Faculty of 
Political Science. Some of the subjects upon which appli- 
cants for these positions are examined are treated very fully 
in the curriculum of the school. Thus, extended courses of 
lectures are given on political geography and history, diplo- 
matic history and international law, government, statistics, 
finance, and administration. 

Admission and Registration 

Admission to the School of Political Science is ordinarily 
granted to students who have completed the curriculum of 
some college in good standing at least to the close of the 
Junior Year. Other persons of suitable age and attainments 
may also be admitted, to pursue special or partial courses 
with the consent of the dean and of the instructor. There 
are no formal examinations for admission. Applications for 
admission are received at any time by the Secretary; but it 
is generally advisable that they be presented, if possible, at 
the beginning of the academic year. 

An application for admission may be made by filling out 
and depositing a registration blank at the office of the dean 
of the Faculty of Political Science, or at such other place as 
may be designated, from time to time, for the purpose of 
registration. 

On depositing the registration blank, the student receives 
a certificate from the officer in charge of registration, and 
must present this certificate to the Treasurer, from whom 
he receives a matriculation card, after payment of the 
matriculation and tuition fees. This matriculation card 
must be shown to the officer in charge of registration, from 
whom the student then receives a registration book, which 
entitles him to attend the lectures in the School of Political 
Science, and which must be shown to each professor or 
other instructor at the beginning of each course of lectures. 

Every applicant for admission is expected to register at 
the beginning of each academic year of his membership in 



in tUt ©ittj of H^xxr ^jorfc 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 



Changes in the Announcements for 1895-96. 

James Harvey Robinson Ph. D. will become a member of the 
Faculty of Political Science as Professor of History. 

The following Courses will be given in addition to those an- 
nounced in the Circular of the School : 

Introduction to Modern European History: The Middle Ages 
or the Renaissance. Two hours a week, first session. Prof. 
Robinson. 

The Earlier Phases of the Reformation and the Beginning 
of the Catholic Reaction : The Sixteenth Century to the 
Peace of Augsburg. Two hours a week, second session. Prof. 
Robinson. 

Europe and the French Revolution, 1 789-1 801. Two hours 
a week, first session. Prof. Robinson. 

Europe and Napoleon , 1801-1815. Two hours a week , second 
session. Prof. Robinson. 

Europe from the Peace of Augsburg to the Peace of West- 
phalia (1555-1648) [1896-97]. 

The Period of Louis XIV and the Antecedents of the French 
Revolution [1896-97]. 

The Development of Prussia under the Hohenzollern Dynasty 
and the Unification of Germany (1416-1871) [1896-97]. 

The Sources of Eater Mediaeval and of Modern Continental 
History — Methods of Historical Study [1896-97]. 

History 6. The General Constitutional History of Europe, 
will be discontinued. 

The Seminarium in Modern European History will be given 
by Prof. Robinson. 

History 26. General History of Political Theories, will be 
given two hours a week instead of three. 



4-19-95-10000. 



in t\tt ©its of ^ovh 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS. 

There have been established by the Trustees of Columbia 
College thirty University Scholarships, to be awarded annually 
to students in the University Faculties of Political Science, 
Philosophy and Pure Science. These Scholarships are awarded 
under the following regulations, prepared by the authority of 
the University Council and with its approval : 

1. The University Scholarships are open to all graduates of 
colleges and scientific schools whose course of study has been 
such as to entitle them to be enrolled at Columbia as candidates 
for a university degree. (See Catalogue of 1894-5, pp. 119 and 
120). 

2. These Scholarships are tenable for one academic year, 
with a possibility of renewal for one year longer. They are of 
an annual value of $150 each. 

3. Payments will be made to University Scholars in two 
equal instalments ; one on October first, and one on February 
first. University Scholars will be required to pay all of the 
fees established for matriculation, tuition and graduation. 

4. Applications for University Scholarships should be made 
in writing, on blanks that will be furnished for the purpose, 
and addressed to the President of Columbia College. For the 
Scholarships to be awarded in the spring, applications should 
be filed not later than May first. No application for a Uni- 
versity Scholarship will be required from an applicant for a 
University Fellowship. Should a Scholarship be awarded to 
an unsuccessful applicant for a Fellowship, the only information 
required from the candidate will be that contained in the formal 
application for the latter honor. 

5. Not more than twenty of the University Scholarships 
will be awarded by the University Council at its regular meeting 
in May. The award will be made after applications have been 
examined and recommendations made by the standing com- 
mittee on University Fellowships. In making these recom- 
mendations the committee will give preference to those can- 
didates for University Fellowships who have failed of appoint- 
ment by the University Council after having been recommended 
for the same by any faculty or department. 

6. At least ten University Scholarships will be reserved to 
be filled in the autumn, and applications for the same will be 
received up to October first. 

7. University Scholars will be required to enroll themselves 
as candidates for a degree and to pursue a regular course of 
study leading thereto. 

4-19-95-10000. 



> 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



5 



the school, on the Wednesday preceding the first Monday in 
October. A student who enters on his studies after the be- 
ginning of the academic year must register at the office of 
the dean of the School of Political Science at the time of 
his entering on his studies. 

A student is counted as a full member of the School only 
from the date of issue of the registration book, and during 
the period of his being actually engaged in his studies as a 
resident in the school. 

Every student is required to file a list of his studies for 
the academic year at the time he registers, with the officer 
in charge of the registration, or within one week thereafter, 
at the office of the dean. If he subsequently wishes to 
make any change in his studies he must file written notice of 
his wish at the dean's office and must obtain the assent of 
the dean. 

Immediate written notice must be given to the dean of any 
change of address. 

Admission to the School of Political Science does not imply 
admission to candidacy for a degree. The conditions of 
candidacy for the several degrees are given below. 

Admission to Other Courses 

Any duly matriculated student in the School of Political 
Science is at liberty to attend courses offered by the School 
of Arts or by the University Faculties of Philosophy, Law, 
Medicine, Mines (Applied Science), and Pure Science with- 
out any additional fee. 

Undergraduate studies of particular value to students in 
this School are as follows : 

Hours per week 

Outline of Mediaeval History (ist term) ... 2 
Outline of Modern History (2d term) ... 2 

Outline of European History since 18 15 (ist term) . 2 

Roman History ( 1 st term) 2 

American History (ist term) 2 

English History (2d term) 2 

Elements of Political Economy (2d term) ... 2 
Economic History (ist term) 2 



6 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Among the cognate courses given by the Faculty of Phi- 
losophy are: 

History of philosophy, 2 hours a week; ethics, 2 hours a 
week; biological anthropology, 2 hours a week; readings in 
Gaius and Ulpian, 1 hour a week ; readings in Anglo-Saxon 
law; courses in Norman French, in the various modern 
languages, and others. 

Students enrolled either in the General, in the Union, or in 
the Jewish, Theological Seminary, in the City of New York, 
who may be designated for the privilege by the authorities 
of those institutions, and accepted by the President of Colum- 
bia College, are admitted to the courses offered by the 
Faculty of Political Science free of charge for tuition. 

By the terms of an alliance between Columbia College and 
the Teachers' College, at Morningside Heights, duly quali- 
fied students of the Teachers' College are permitted to enter 
courses offered by the Faculty of Political Science either as 
candidates for degrees or as special students. 

All of these institutions offer reciprocal privileges to 
students of Columbia College. 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree 

Students are received as candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Master of Laws or Doctor 
of Philosophy. 

If the applicant is a candidate for a degree, he must file a 
certificate of his completion of the Junior year in some col- 
lege of good standing, or if he holds a degree from any in- 
stitution he must file evidence of such degree. Blanks for 
this purpose may be secured at the dean's office. Certifi- 
cates of graduation or dismission from institutions of learn- 
ing in foreign countries are also accepted. The certificates 
should be accompanied by catalogues or calendars of the col- 
leges or other institutions of advanced grade at which the 
student has previously studied, which must be marked so as 
to show clearly his course of study there. This condition 
may be dispensed with in the case of those colleges and in- 
stitutions whose bachelor's degree is recognized by the 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



7 



University Council as a basis for the higher degree. For a 
list of such colleges see page 9, 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are required 
to pursue courses of instruction amounting in all to not less 
than fifteen hours of attendance per week for one year, and 
must conform to such requirements regarding a graduation 
thesis as are established for members of the Senior Class in 
the School of Arts. Their selection of studies is not confined 
to those in this faculty. Students may pursue courses 
offered by the Faculty of Philosophy or the Faculty of Pure 
Science, or the first year course in the School of Law or the 
School of Medicine, and count the same as part of the re- 
quirements for the bachelor's degree. Law students, for 
example, may thus take their bachelor's degree and so 
shorten by one year the time which otherwise would be 
necessary for the attainment of degrees in both arts and law. 

Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy must hold a bachelor's degree from some col- 
lege in good standing and continue their studies for not less 
than one and two years respectively. They are required to 
pursue courses of study and research in one major and two 
minor subjects. For a -further statement see the regulations 
for University Degrees, pages 11 to 16. 

The period of study above indicated for the attainment of 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is a minimum period. 
In most cases candidates for this degree have found it neces- 
sary to devote three years after the attainment of the bacca- 
laureate degree to the work required for the doctorate. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who 
have been in residence at other universities are given credit 
for the same. But no student can be a candidate for any 
degree unless he has been in residence at Columbia College 
at least one term. 

For the degree of Master of Laws see pages 18 to 20. 

Students may present themselves for examination for a 
degree at any time during the year whenever the require- 
ments as to residence and an essay or dissertation have been 
complied with. 



8 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Fees 

The matriculation fee is $5. This is not payable annually, 
but only at the commencement of the student's connection 
with the university. 

The annual tuition fee for every candidate for a degree is 
$150, payable in two equal instalments in October and Feb- 
ruary. For the degree of Master of Arts the maximum fee 
is $150; for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy the maxi- 
mum fee is $300. The fee for students not candidates for a 
degree is calculated at the rate of $15 a year for each hour 
of attendance per week upon university exercises with a 
maximum fee of $150. In every case the fee covers the 
specified number of hours throughout the year — no student 
being received for a less period than one year. Such fees, 
when • not more than one hundred dollars, are payable in 
advance; otherwise in half-yearly instalments at the same 
time as regular fees. 

Examination fees are as follows: for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, fifteen dollars; for the degree of Master 
of Arts or Master of Laws, twenty-five dollars; for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy, thirty-five dollars ; for exam- 
inations at unusual times, such as second examinations, five 
dollars. The examination fee must in each case be paid 
before the candidate presents himself for examination for 
the degree. 

Holders of university and other fellowships are exempt 
from the payment for all fees. 

Committee on Aid for Students 

The University Council has constituted a standing Com- 
mittee on Aid for Students. It is the design of the Commit- 
tee to put students desiring to work their way through col- 
lege, especially those coming from elsewhere than New York 
or the immediate vicinity, in the way of earning enough for 
their partial or complete support, or if possible to extend 
assistance to them in other ways, while they are pursuing 
their studies here. It is believed that many opportunities 
may be offered to students of this class if the fact of their 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 9 



desire to obtain employment is made known. Some of the 
openings likely to be available are : private tutoring, trans- 
lating, copying of various sorts, Reaching in evening schools, 
university extension lecturing, typewriting, selling text 
books. All communications should be addressed to the 
Committee. 



DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR 
OF PHILOSOPHY 



Regulations as to the Degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctors of Philosophy Established by the 
University Council 



:. Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy must 



either 




A. Hold the degree of Bachelor of Arts from one of the 


below : 




Allegheny, 


Cornell, 


Amherst, 


Cornell University 


Antioch, 


Cumberland University, 


Augustana, 


Dalhousie, 


Bates, 


Dartmouth, 


Beloit, 


Denison University, 


Boston University, 


De Pauw University, 


Bowdoin, 


Dickinson, 


Brown University, 


Doane, 


Bryn Mawr, 


Earlham, 


Buchtel, 


Franklin and Marshall, 


Bucknell, 


Georgia, University of, 


California, University of, 


Georgetown (D. C), 


Carleton, 


Hamilton, 


Centre, 


Harvard, 


Chicago, University of, 


Haverford, 


Cincinnati, University of, 


Hiram, 


Clark University, 


Hobart, 


Colby University, 


Holy Cross, 


Colgate University, 


Illinois, 


Colorado, University of, 


Illinois, University of, 


Columbia, 


Indiana, University of, 



io SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Iowa College, 


bmitn, 


Iowa, State University of, 


St. Francis Xavier, 


Johns Hopkins University 


St. Lawrence University, 


Kansas, University of, 


bt. Stephens, 


Kenyon, 


St. Xavier (Cincinnati), 


Knox, 


South, University of, 


Lafayette, 


Swarthmore, 


Lehigh University, 


Syracuse University, 


Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 


Texas, University of, 


Marietta, 


Toronto, University of, 


McGill University, 


Trinity, 


Miami University, 


1 UIlS, 


Michigan, University of, 


Tulane University of Louisiana! 


Middlebury, 


Union, 


Minnesota, University of, 


Ursinus, 


Mississippi, University of, 


Vanderbilt University, 


Missouri, University of, 


Vassar, 


Mt. Union, 


Vermont, University of, 


Nebraska, University of, 


Victoria, University of, 


New Brunswick, University of, 


Virginia, University of, 


New York, College of the City of, 


Washburn, 


New York, University of the City of, 


Washburn (Ind.), 


North Carolina, University of, 


Washington University (Mo.), 


North Dakota, University of, 


Washington and Jefferson, 


Northwestern University, 


Wellesley, 


Uberlm, 


Wesleyan University (Ct.), 


Ohio State University, 


Western Reserve University, 


Ohio Wesleyan University, 


Western University of Pennsylvania, 


Oregon, University of, 


Williams, 


Pennsylvania, University of, 


Wisconsin, University of, 


Princeton, 


Wittenberg, 


Radcliffe, 


Woman's College, Baltimore, 


Rochester, University of, 


Wooster, University of, 


Rutgers, 


Yale University, 


Seton Hall, 





or 

B. Hold the degree of Ph.B., B.S.. or B.L., from an institution which requires 
for that degree at least the following subjects of instruction : Latin to include at 
least the ability to read easy Latin at sight and to write easy Latin prose ; history 
and political economy, for at least two years ; logic and psychology, for at least one 
year ; English language and literature, for at least two years ; French and German, 
so far as the ability to read easy prose at sight. 

C. Candidates who are not able to meet the requirements mentioned under A 
or B, will only be admitted to candidacy for the degree of A.M., and Ph.D., by 
special vote of the University Council. 

It is further provided that candidates for these degrees, when they are taken in 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY II 

science and based upon a preparatory scientific training only, are required to pursue, 
for not less than one year, a minor subject under the direction of either the Faculty 
of Philosophy or the Faculty of Political Science. 

2 Each student who declares himself a candidate for the 
degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, or either 
of them, shall, immediately upon registration, designate one 
principal or major subject and two subordinate or minor sub- 
jects, which, when approved by the proper faculty, shall be 
the studies of his university course. Should the subjects 
designated by the candidate fall within the jurisdiction of 
more than one University Faculty, the candidate's selection 
must receive the sanction of the President before it is recorded. 

3 Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy, or either of them, must pursue their studies 
under the direction of the professors and other officers of 
instruction in charge of the subjects selected by the candi- 
dates as major and minor, attending such lectures as may be 
designated, and performing faithfully such other work in 
connection therewith as may from time to time be prescribed. 

4 Students desiring to be examined as candidates for any 
degree must make written application for such examination 
to the dean of the proper faculty, on blank forms provided 
for the purpose. 

5 Each candidate for the degree of Master of Arts, in 
addition to passing satisfactory examination on prescribed 
portions of the subject selected by him as major and minor, 
shall present an essay on some topic previously approved by 
the professor in charge of his major subject. Before the 
candidate is admitted to examination, the professor in charge 
of his major subject must have signified his approval of such 
essay. 

6 Each candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
in addition to passing satisfactory examinations on the sub- 
jects selected by him as major and minor, shall present a dis- 
sertation embodying the result of original investigation and 
research, on some topic previously approved by the faculty. 
When such dissertation has been approved by the faculty, it 
shall be printed by the candidate and one hundred and fifty 



12 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



copies shall be delivered to the faculty. On the title-page of 
every such dissertation shall be printed the words: " Sub- 
mitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in the University Faculty 

of , Columbia College." There shall be appended to 

each dissertation a statement of the educational institutions 
that the author has attended, a list of the degrees and honors 
conferred upon him, as well as the titles of any previous 
publications. 

7 Every candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
in addition to passing such other examinations as may be 
required by the faculty, shall be subjected to an oral exam- 
ination on his major subject and shall defend his disserta- 
tion, in the presence of the entire faculty or of so many of 
its members as may desire to attend. The ability to read at 
sight, to be certified by the Dean of the Faculty under which 
the candidate takes his major subject, two or all of the fol- 
lowing languages — Latin, French, and German — as such 
faculty may determine, will also be required. 

8 Students holding college degrees, who shall have com- 
pleted with marked distinction the entire course of the 
School of Law, the School of Medicine, or the School of 
Mines, may be recommended, by the faculty of the school in 
which they have studied, for the degree of Master of Arts; 
provided that in each case the candidate present a satisfac- 
tory dissertation, and that at least a part of the extra work 
required of him for the degree of Master of Arts be taken 
under the direction of either the Faculty of Philosophy or 
the Faculty of Political Science to the extent of a minor 
course for not less than one year. 

9 The degree of Doctor of Philosophy, when taken in 
science and based upon a preparatory scientific training only, 
is subject to the same conditions as those imposed by section 
8 upon candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in the 
schools of Law, Medicine, and Mines. 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 13 



Supplemental Regulations of the University Faculty of 
Political Science 

1 Candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master 
of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy, or any of them, will be 
admitted to the courses under the control of the Faculty of 
Political Science, subject to the conditions prescribed by the 
statutes of the college and by this faculty. 

2 Candidates for a degree who desire to take all or a part 
of their studies under the direction of this faculty, must 
have successfully pursued a course of undergraduate study 
in the School of Arts, or in some other college maintaining 
an equivalent course of study, to the close of the junior 
year. Every such case of equivalence shall be considered 
on its own merits. 

3 The course of study shall embrace instruction in the 
following groups of subjects: 

Group I — History and Political Philosophy 

A. European History; B. American History; C. Political 
Philosophy. 

Group II — Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 
A. Constitutional Law; B. International Law; C. Crim- 
inal Law; D. Administrative Law; E. Comparative Juris- 
prudence. 

Group III — Economics and Social Science 

A. Political Economy and Finance; B. Sociology and 
Statistics. 

4 Members of the senior class in the School of Arts shall 
be entitled to elect any of the courses offered by this faculty 
year by year, subject to the regulations prescribed by the 
faculty of that school. 

5 Students who shall satisfactorily complete a selection 
of the courses referred to in section 4, amounting in all to 
fifteen hours per week, shall be qualified, on examination 
and the recommendation of the faculty with the concurrence 
of the Faculty of Arts to receive the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. 



14 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



6 Students who shall satisfactorily complete a selection 
of the courses referred to in section 4, amounting in all to 
less than fifteen hours per week (the remaining portion of 
the prescribed number of hours having been taken under the 
direction of another faculty), shall, after examination, be en- 
titled, with the concurrence of such other faculty or facul- 
ties, with the consent of the President, and with the further 
consent of the Faculty of Arts, to receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. 

7 Referring to section 2 of the regulations prescribed by 
the University Council — 

In the Faculty of Political Science the term 1 'subject" 
shall be held to mean any one of the several subjects of in- 
struction specified under groups I., II., and III. in section 
3. No candidate for a degree may select more than two of 
his subjects from any one group, and he must attend at least 
one seminarium. The selection of subjects made by any 
candidate for a degree shall be approved by the dean on be- 
half of the faculty. 

8 Immediately on registration each student shall be 
given a registration book, on which shall be inscribed the 
name of the student and the date of his enrollment or regis- 
tration. In this registration book the student shall enter, at 
the beginning of each academic year or session, the subjects 
or titles of the several courses of lectures or seminarium 
work which he proposes to follow. At the opening exercise 
of every such course, or so soon thereafter as may be pos- 
sible, the student shall present to the professor or instructor 
in charge his registration book, in order that such professor 
or instructor may enter therein his name and the date of the 
opening of the course. At the close of every such course 
followed by the student, the professor or instructor in 
charge shall again enter in the registration book his name 
and the date of the closing of the course, if the student has 
faithfully attended the same and performed all the duties re- 
quired of him in connection therewith. At the time of fil- 
ing his application to be examined for the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, or either of them, every 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 15 

candidate must present to the dean his registration book 
properly signed and dated, as above prescribed, by the pro- 
fessors or instructors in charge of the several courses which 
he may have attended, as evidence that he is properly en- 
titled to examination for a degree. 

9 Referring to section 4 of the regulations prescribed by 
the University Council — 

Applications to be examined for the degrees of Master of 
Arts or Doctor of Philosophy must be made on or before 
April 1 of the academic year in which the examination is 
desired. 

10 Referring to section 5 of the regulations prescribed 
by the University Council — 

The essay required of every candidate for the degree of 
Master of Arts must be in the form of a paper read during 
the year before the seminarium of which he is a member. 

11 Referring to section 6 of the regulations prescribed 
by the University Council — ■ 

In the Faculty of Political Science the power to approve 
the subjects chosen for his dissertation by any candidate for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, as well as the power to 
approve the dissertation itself, shall be delegated to the pro- 
fessor in charge of the candidate's major subject. The dis- 
sertation must be submitted not later than April 1st of the 
academic year in which the examination for the degree is 
desired. 

12 Referring to section 7 of the regulations prescribed 
by the University Council — 

The oral examination of the candidate in presence of the 
faculty shall include the minor subjects as well as the major 
subject; and the examinations upon all these subjects shall 
be held at the same time. The candidates shall also be re- 
quired to read at sight Latin, French, and German. These 
examinations may be held with the consent of the dean and 
the professor in charge of the candidate's major subject be- 
fore the printed dissertation is submitted. 

13 Students who are not candidates for a degree shall be 
permitted to pursue such selection of courses, from among 



1 6 SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

those offered by the Faculty of Political Science, as they 
may be found qualified to enter upon, and the faculty may 
approve. The qualifications of such students shall be de- 
termined by the professors in charge of the courses selected 
by them. 

14 All applications to pursue courses of study, whether 
as candidates for a degree or otherwise, either wholly or in 
part under the direction of this faculty, shall be made in 
writing to the dean on blank forms prepared for the purpose. 

Specific Requirements of Study for the Degrees of Mas- 
ter of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 

Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of 
Philosophy must take the following courses: 

For A.M. minor. Any course or courses aggregating two 
hours per week through the year, which has not 
already been taken for the bachelor's degree. 

For AcM. major. Any courses aggregating two hours per 
week which has not already been taken for the 
bachelor's degree; together with the seminarium. 

For Ph.D. minor. In addition to the requirements for the 
A.M. minor, courses aggregating two hours per 
week. 

For Ph.D. major. All the courses and the seminaria in the 
major subject. 

Candidates offering European History as the major subject 
must offer American History as a minor, and vice versa. 

Candidates offering Political Economy and Finance as the 
major subject, must offer Sociology and Statistics as a minor, 
and vice versa. 

Candidates will not be permitted to offer Constitutional 
Law alone as the Ph.D. major, but must combine with it the 
course on General International Law, or on Comparative 
Administrative Law. 

Candidates offering International Law, or Criminal Law, 
or Administrative Law as the major subject must take Con- 
stitutional Law as a minor. 




UNLVERSITY FACULTY OF 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 



COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 

1895-I896 



mar-95-ioooo 



General Statement. 



It is becoming more and more apparent that industrial and 
social progress is bringing the modern community face to face 
with social questions of the greatest magnitude, the solution 
of which will demand the best scientific study and the most 
honest practical endeavor. The term sociology includes a 
large number of the subjects which are most seriously inter- 
esting men at the present time. The effective treatment of 
social problems demands that they be dealt with both theo- 
retically and concretely. A college located in the country 
must study these subjects in the abstract. Columbia deems 
it her duty, and her wisdom alike, to avail herself of the 
singular opportunities for practical work in this direction 
afforded to her by her location in the City of New York, and 
has, therefore, created ample facilities for University study 
in sociology, and for bringing it into connection with the 
practical social work of this city. 

The University Faculty of Political Science offers a wide 
range of instruction in the cognate branches of social science, 
such as Political Economy, Political Science, Statistics, Fi- 
nance, Administrative and Constitutional Law, and History. 
The Trustees have recently added to the staff a Professor of 
Sociology, whose function it is to develop the theoretical 
teaching of sociology, and to direct students in practical 
sociological work. This newly established chair provides 
for a thorough study of philosophical or general sociology 
and of practical or concrete social questions in their relation 
to sociological principles. General sociology is the natural 
history and natural philosophy of society. It is a scientific 

i 



2 



study of society as a whole, a search for its causes, for the 
laws of its structure and growth, and for a rational view of 
its purpose, function, meaning, or destiny. This leads up to 
the more particular study of the phenomena of modern popu- 
lations and of their concentration in great cities. Of such phe- 
nomena none are of greater concern from either the theoretical 
or the practical point of view than the growth and character- 
istics of the dependent, defective, and delinquent classes. 
Special courses of instruction are offered therefore on 
Pauperism, Poor Laws, Methods of Charity, Crime, Penology, 
and Social Ethics. 

It is in the city that the problems of poverty, of mendi- 
cancy, of intemperance, of unsanitary surroundings, and of 
debasing social influences are met in their most acute form. 
Hence the city is the natural laboratory of social science. 
Here also are to be found the most extensive and modern 
experiments and efforts towards controlling and remedying 
these evils. Here the student can observe how far vice, pov- 
erty, and crime are due to bad economic conditions, how far 
to neglected moral training, how far simply to the social 
struggle for life. He can observe also how far the remedial 
measures are efficient and in what respects they seem to fail. 
Such study emphasizes all that is taught by theory, and like 
"field work" in natural science it trains the faculties of ob- 
servation and makes the subject "real." While, therefore, 
the University now offers extensive courses of instruction 
covering the whole field of social science, the student at the 
same time is afforded valuable opportunities for practical work 
and observation under the auspices of science and the best 
practice. One side will be used to aid and supplement the 
other. All practical work should afford material for science; 
all scientific work should enlighten practice. 



Officers of Instruction. 

The teaching of sociology is assigned to the University 
Faculty of Political Science. All the subjects taught by this 
Faculty have a direct interest, for the student of sociology. 



3 



The officers of instruction particularly concerned in the work 
of sociology are as follows: 

Richmond Mayo-Smith, Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Economy and Social Science. 
Edwin R. A. Seligman, Ph.D.* 

Professor of Political Economy and Finance. 
Franklin H. Giddings, A.M. 

Professor of Sociology. 
John B. Clark, Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Economy. 
Arthur M. Day, A.M. 

Assistant in Political Economy. 
William Z. Ripley, Ph.D. 

Lecturer on Physical Geography and Anthropology. 

♦Professor Seligman will probably be absent on leave during the year 1895-96. Pro- 
vision, however, will be made in that case for his courses. 

The Scope of the Work. 

The work in sociology falls under three heads, viz. : the 
University courses of instruction in the various departments 
of social science, the work in the statistical laboratory, and 
the "field work," or practical work in connection with the 
Charity Organization Society, the State Charities Aid Asso- 
ciation, various public departments, the Brooklyn Bureau of 
Charities, the University Settlement Society of New York 
City, and the East Side House. 

The Courses of Instruction. 

The courses of instruction are divided into three groups, 
principal, special, and related. They are as follows: 

Principal. 

1 The Principles of Sociology: Professor Giddings 

2 The Evolution of the Family: Professor Giddings 

3 Pauperism, Poor Laws, and Methods of Charity: Pro- 
fessor Giddings 

4 The Principles of Criminology and Penology: Professor 
Giddings 



4 



5 The Theory and Practice of Statistics : Professor Mayo- 
Smith 

6 Historical and Practical Political Economy: Professor 
Mayo-Smith 

7 Economic Theory: Professor Clark 

8 The Social Effects of Taxation : Professor Seligman 

9 Physical Geography and Anthropology: Doctors Ripley 
and Farrand 

10 Seminarium in Sociology: Professor Giddings 

11 Work in the Statistical Laboratory: Professor Mayo- 
Smith 

12 Seminarium in Political Economy and Finance: Professors 
Seligman and Clark 

Special. 

13 History of Social-Economic Theories: Professor Selig- 
man 

14 Social and Industrial History of the United States : 
Professor Seligman 

15 Private Ethics and Relation to Social Reform : Dr. 

Hyslop 

16 Communistic and Socialistic Theories : Professor Clark 

17 The Principles of Administrative Law: Professor Good- 

NOW 

18 Corporation Problems (1896-97): Professor Seligman 

Related. 

19 Primitive Institutions (Evolution of law and custom) : 
Professor Munroe Smith 

20 Political and Constitutional History of Europe and the 
United States: Professors Burgess and Osgood 

21 Political Philosophy: Professor Dunning 

22 History of Philosophy: Professor Butler 

23 Principles of Education : Professor Butler 

24 Psychology: Professor Cattell and Dr. Farrand 



5 



Description of Courses. 

General Sociology. — This is the fundamental course, in which 
a foundation is laid for more advanced and special work in 
theoretical and practical sociology. It includes four parts: 
(i), The History of Sociological Theory since Comte, and 
the conception and definition of sociology as a science. (2), 
Descriptive Sociology, dealing with the analysis and classifi- 
cation of social phenomena. A society is described in eth- 
nographic terms as a subdivision of the population of the 
earth, which has a territorial or ethnical ground of unity, 
and develops its own distinctive culture and organization. 
(3), Historical Sociology, tracing the natural evolution of 
social activities and arrangements from their beginnings. (4), 
Explanatory Sociology, presenting the causes and laws of the 
natural evolution of society so far as they are yet apparent. 
Particular attention is given through the course to the rela- 
tions of sociology to economic and to political theory. — Two 
hours a week, Friday, 2.30 to 4.30, first term : Professor 
Giddings. 

The Evolution of the Family. — The family is the unitary 
group in human society. The study of its organization and 
history is of the same importance for the sociologist that the 
study of cell structure and differentiation is for the biologist. 
The investigations of Bachofen, Morgan, Maine, and Mac- 
Lennan into the origins of marriage, kinship, household 
organization, and clan relationships, stimulated sociological 
research as nothing else has ever done. The course on the 
evolution of the family presents the results of these researches, 
reviewing the literature and discussing some of the more im- 
portant problems, such as those of the early forms of mar- 
riage, the relation of the family to the clan and the tribe, the 
status of women and children, and the like. These studies 
lead up to an examination of the family in modern society, 
in country and city, under various conditions of nationality, 
residence, occupation, density of population, sanitary sur- 
roundings, education, and religion. In conclusion, the in- 
crease of divorce is considered, in its causes and consequences, 



6 



and in its relation to public opinion arid legislation. — Two 
hours a week, Friday, 2.30 to 4.30, second term: Professor 
Giddings. 

Pauperism, Poor Laws, and Charities. — The foundation of this 
course is a careful study of the English poor law; its history, 
practical working, and consequences. On this foundation is 
built a study of pauperism in general, but especially as it 
may now be observed in great cities. The laws of the dif- 
ferent commonwealths in regard to paupers, out-relief, alms- 
houses, dependent children, are compared. Finally the 
special modern methods of public and private philanthropy 
are considered, with particular attention to charity organi- 
zation, the restriction of out-door alms, and the reclamation 
of children. — Two hours a week, Monday and Wednesday at 
1.30, first term: Professor Giddings. 

Crime and Penology. — This course comprises a special study 
of the sociological problems of crime and penology. It takes 
up in order the nature and definitions of crime, the increase 
of crime in its modern forms, criminal anthropology — the 
physical and psychological characteristics of the criminal 
type — the social causes of crime, surroundings, parental 
neglect, education, the question of responsibility, historical 
methods of punishment, the history of efforts to reform 
prison methods, modern methods, the solitary system, the 
Elmira system, classification of criminals, classes of prisons, 
reformatories, and jails. — Two hours a week, Monday and 
Wednesday at 1.30, second term: Professor Giddings. 

The Theory and Practice of Statistics. — The science of sta- 
tistics is looked upon as the instrument of investigation in 
sociology. It teaches us how to comprehend social phenom- 
ena^and how to measure the action of social forces. This 
course deals with the general statistics of population under 
such topics as race, nationality, sex, age, conjugal condition, 
density, births, deaths, marriages, occupation, religion, edu- 
cation, migration, economic condition, suicide, vice, crime, 
and the like. Finally are considered the theory of statistics, 
methods of observation, the value of the results obtained, the 
doctrine of free will, and the possibility of discovering social 
laws. — Two hours a week, Monday and Wednesday at 4.30: 
Professor Mayo-Smith. 



7 



Historical and Practical Political Economy. — The student of 
sociology must be thoroughly trained in political economy, 
for all social questions are more or less connected with eco- 
nomic conditions and cannot be solved without reference to 
economic principles. Students are supposed to be familiar 
with the general principles of political economy and the out- 
lines of economic history. This course describes present 
economic institutions and discusses present economic ques- 
tions, with special reference to the condition of modern 
society. — Three hours a week, Monday and Wednesday at 
3.30, Friday at 1.30: Professor Mayo-Smith. 

Economic Theory. — This course treats especially of the laws 
of distribution. It treats of the influences that fix the rates 
of wages and profits, and analyzes the mechanism of social 
industry. It gives attention to influences that change the 
structure and functions of industrial society, and discusses 
the laws of economic progress. — Two hours a week, Tuesday 
and Thursday at 1.30: Professor Clark. 

The Social Effects of Taxation. — This course has to deal with 
the function, the nature, and the limits of taxation ; with the 
laws of incidence and shifting; with a comparison of existing 
methods; and especially with the reform of taxation so that 
its effects shall harmonize with the demands of social reform. 
— Two hours a week, Tuesday and Thursday at 3.30 : Pro- 
fessor Seligman. 

Physical Geography and Anthropology. — This course treats of 
the relation of man to the earth, and the influence of physical 
environment upon him. The subjects considered are physical 
geography, science of anthropology, prehistoric archaeology, 
ethnology, anthropometry, and comparative mythology. — Two 
hours a week, Thursday, 10.30 to 12.30: Drs. Ripley and 
Farrand. 

The Seminaria in sociology and political economy meet 
weekly, and give the students opportunity for research under 
the direction of the Professors. 

The work in the Statistical Laboratory will consist of training 
in tabulation and compilation of current statistics and original 
investigation. — Three hours a week, Wednesday, 9.30 to 12.30. 

The special courses offer more detailed treatment of economic 
and social questions of interest to the student of sociology. 



8 



The related courses offer opportunity to the student to enrich 
his sociology courses in a great variety of directions, accord- 
ing to his inclination and the object he has in view. 

For a description of the special and related courses see the 
Announcement of Courses given by the University Faculty of 
Political Science and by the Department of Philosophy. 

The Statistical Laboratory, 

The statistical laboratory is a place equipped with the more 
important apparatus of a statistical bureau, drawing tables, 
instruments, calculating and tabulating machines and books, 
cards, charts, and a collection of statistical publications. The 
object of the laboratory is to train the student in the methods 
of statistical analysis and computation. Each student will 
pursue a course of laboratory practice dealing with the general 
statistics of population, the relation of classes, the distribution 
of wealth, and the statistics of crime, vice and misfortune. 
He will be taught how to judge current statistics and to 
detect statistical fallacies; in short, to become an expert in 
judging of the value of sociological evidence. 

The object of the statistical laboratory is not merely to serve 
as a training place for students. It is intended to do practical 
work in the way of gathering and tabulating social statistics. 
An effort will be made, for instance, to collect the reports of 
the charity societies of New York, and tabulate the informa- 
tion which they contain. Eventually it is hoped to get into 
closer relations with these societies, to suggest a common 
schedule for their use, and thus to make their information of 
scientific value. Still further it is intended that the special 
investigations conducted by the Professor and Fellows in so- 
ciology into the social conditions of the population of New 
York shall be worked out in the statistical laboratory. It is 
well known that a great deal of similar material collected by 
various societies and churches of New York now goes to waste 
because of the expense and difficulty of handling it. The 
Statistical Laboratory of Columbia College will stand ready 
to receive such material and put it into scientific shape. The 
department has recently handled the Police Census of the 
Unemployed in New York City, and the school attendance 



9 



statistics, gathered, under the direction of the Professor of 
Sociology, for the use of the Tenement House Committee. 
Such work affords to the student the very best practical 
training in statistical and sociological method. 

Field Work. 

It is the intention that the student shall be brought into 
connection with actual social work. For this purpose arrange- 
ments have been made with the Charity Organization Society 
of New York, the Bureau of Charities of Brooklyn, the State 
Charities Aid Association, the University Settlement Society, 
and the East Side House, by which students will have a 
special opportunity to study and take part in the active work 
of these societies. 

The Charity Organization Society. 

For the purpose of affording an opportunity to study the 
practical work of relieving the poor, arrangements have been 
made with the Charity Organization Society of New York, by 
which special facilities for work and training are offered to the 
students of sociology. That Society is the largest organization 
of the sort in this country, follows the most approved methods, 
and is constantly perfecting its modes of operation. In 
the year 1893 it numbered 2,335 members and contributors, 
had 488 co-operating societies or agencies, investigated 
4,752 applications, and secured relief for 2,287 worthy 
applicants. Its registration bureau contains information 
about 170,000 families, or parts of families. It stands in 
close connection with the great charitable societies and insti- 
tutions of New York whose work it endeavors to co-ordinate 
and render more effective. Its officers take the liveliest 
interest in this effort to unite theoretical and practical work 
in sociology, and render cordial co-operation and aid. 

By the action of the Council of the Charity Organization 
Society the President and Faculty of Political Science of 
Columbia College have been given the privilege of nominating 
a member of the Council, so that the University is directly 
represented in the management of the Society. 



IO 



Advanced students in sociology have the opportunity of 
joining one or more District Committees organized under 
the direction of experienced members of the Society, and of 
training in the work of investigating and reporting upon 
applications for relief, and of friendly visiting among the 
poor. Experience of the various problems of charitable work 
and of social conditions is thus gained under the best 
guidance. 

Demonstrations are made at the Central Offices of the 
Society, of the methods of recording the applications for relief, 
of co-ordinating the work of different societies, of the details 
of management, of the different forms of aids to thrift such 
as the employment bureau, the wood-yard, the wayfarer's 
lodge, the penny provident fund, the pawn-shop. These 
demonstrations are repeated often enough to familiarize the 
student with the methods of the Society. 

As students gain experience they may be placed upon the 
special committees of the Society having these matters in 
charge, and after they have completed a course in sociology 
opportunity can be found for a selected number who wish to 
continue work in this direction, to have desks in the Central 
Office and form part of the working force of the Society under 
suitable arrangements. 

The Brooklyn Bureau of Charities. 

Similar opportunities for work are offered to students in 
connection with the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities. 

State Charities Aid Association. 

The State Charities Aid Association has been for twenty- 
two years the most vigilant watcher over the public charitable 
institutions of the State, and the most active promoter of 
wise legislation pertaining to public aid in all its forms. It 
has been chiefly instrumental in removing children from 
county poor-houses, and the charities article of the new State 
Constitution is the fruit of its efforts. It has, by law, powers 
of visitation and criticism of all public charitable institutions 
of this commonwealth. Every facility for becoming ac- 
quainted with its work is offered to graduate students of 



1 1 

sociology in Columbia College. The Professor of Sociology 
is a member of its Board of Managers, and qualified graduate 
students can become visitors of the Society. 

University Settlement Society. 

This Society leases a house at 26 Delancey Street, in the 
most crowded tenement-house district of New York City. Its 
object is by means of clubs, kindergarten, library, lectures, 
classes, debates, exhibition, and the East Side Sanitary Asso- 
ciation, to improve the condition of the people of that district 
and to assist in the work of social progress. Rooms are 
provided for three or four college graduates who live there 
and direct the work. Many others are desired to act as 
teachers and visitors. An unexampled opportunity is thus 
afforded for learning to understand ^the actual condition of a 
city population and for doing good. The head worker is a 
Fellow of Columbia College, and students of this department, 
whether in residence there or not, are cordially welcomed by 
him and assigned such work as they may be willing or able 
to undertake. 

East Side House. 

This is a settlement of college men at the foot of East 76th 
Street. Graduate students and Fellows from Columbia Col- 
lege are in residence there during the year. Students are 
offered the same privileges and opportunities as in the 
University Settlement Society. 

Purposes of the Course. 

It is believed that the combination of University instruction 
in sociology with the practical training in statistics and the 
field work in connection with the institutions of the city offers 
advantages to students of political economy and social science 
such as can scarcely be found elsewhere. It is also believed 
that such study will be of the utmost value to future clergy- 
men in training them for parish work in cities and factory 
towns ; to journalists as professional training; to public men 
and ordinary citizens who may be called upon in the future 
to direct the philanthropic and reformatory work of society. 
Still further there is a growing demand for trained men as 



12 



paid Superintendents or Secretaries of Charity Organization 
Societies and similar institutions in this country. For men 
who desire to devote their lives to philanthropy no better 
preparation for such positions can be conceived of than that 
here described. The officers of the Charity Organization 
Society have constant applications for men to fill such places, 
but the supply of men with adequate training and knowledge 
is entirely inadequate. 

It is also believed that there will be a growing demand for 
scientific statisticians in this country. Not only is the statis- 
tical work at Washington developing in refinement and extent, 
but numerous States have established Bureaus of Labor Statis- 
tics, many cities have Municipal Bureaus of Vital Statistics; 
while Boards of Health, and Boards of Trade and Commerce 
are paying increasing attention to gathering statistical in- 
formation. Sooner or later these places will be filled by men 
trained in political economy and sociology and in the science 
and technique of statistics. Quite recently two excellent 
positions in one of the government bureaus at Washington 
have been filled by civil service examination. The in- 
struction in the theory and methods of statistics, the work 
in the statistical laboratory and the field work in collecting 
social statistics offer opportunity for such training. This 
work can be supplemented by the related courses in sociology, 
political economy, criminal law, mathematics, medicine, 
offered by the University as the special position demands. 

General Information. 

For information in regard to admission, matriculation, and 
tuition fees, conditions for degrees, admission to the Uni- 
versity courses, examinations, prizes, library, calendar, free 
tuition, and details in regard to the officers and courses of in- 
struction see the Announcement of Courses in the School of 
Political Science. Twenty-four University Fellowships of the 
value of $500 each, some of which are likely to fall to this 
department, are awarded each year by the University 
Council. Students in the General, Union, or Jewish 
Theological Seminaries in the City of New York are admitted 
to pursue courses in this department, and to become candi- 
dates for degrees without charge for matriculation or tuition. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LA W 



17 



Candidates will not be permitted to offer Criminal Law 
alone as the Ph.D. major, but must combine with it the 
course on General International Law. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW 
In General 

The instruction offered by the Faculty of Political Science 
upon constitutional, administrative, international, and crim- 
inal law, and upon Roman law and comparative jurispru- 
dence, furnishes the natural and necessary complement to the 
courses offered by the Faculty of Law. Law is, with us, the 
chief avenue into politics ; and for this reason, if for no other, 
a complete legal education should include the science of 
politics. But the importance to the lawyer of the subjects 
above mentioned does not depend simply on the prospect of 
a political career. To become a thorough practitioner the 
student must acquire a considerable knowledge of public law ; 
and if he wishes to be anything more than a practitioner, if 
he wishes to know law as a science, some knowledge of other 
systems than our own becomes imperative. From this point 
of view the Roman law is of paramount importance, not 
merely by reason of its scientific structure, but because it is 
the basis of all modern systems except the English. 

The courses on constitutional and diplomatic history con- 
stitute the indispensable introduction to those in public law; 
and the courses on economics and finance will be found of 
great value by students of both public and private law. 

Of these subjects, criminal law is required as part of the 
Bachelor of Laws degree in the Law School, and Roman law, 
history of European law, comparative jurisprudence, com- 
parative constitutional law, administrative law, law of 
municipal corporations, law of taxation, and international 
law are elective for the same degree. The Faculty of Law 
also recommends that students who have not had an ade- 
quate training in history economics, and finance shall so 
prolong their course of study that they may avail themselves 
of the opportunity offered in the School of Political Science 
for studying these subjects. 



i8 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



For the greater encouragement of such a combination of 
studies, and to meet the increasing demand for a broader 
legal training that shall not be exclusively professional in its 
purpose, a course of university study has been established 
leading to the degree of Master of Laws. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Laws 

Preliminary Education. — The candidate must have com- 
pleted the curriculum of some college in good standing at 
least to the close of the Junior year. 

Course of Study. — The candidate must pursue his studies 
under the direction of the Faculties of Law and Political Sci- 
ence for four years, electing from the subjects offered by 
these faculties courses aggregating, in the four years, fifty- 
two hours a week, 1 provided that not more than thirty-four 
hours of work may be elected either in the field of private 
law or in that of public law, social ethics, history, and eco- 
nomics. 

Allozvaiice for Studies Prosecuted Elsewhere. — The student 
who has satisfactorily completed at other universities, col- 
leges, or law schools any considerable portion of the subjects 
offered by the Faculties of Law and Political Science {viz., 
not less than the equivalent of one term's work of thirteen 
hours a week), may be excused from a corresponding portion 
of the four years' residence required at Columbia. Under 
this rule a student who holds the bachelor's degree from a 
college having a curriculum substantially equivalent to that 
of the School of Arts of Columbia College, and who has pur- 
sued graduate courses in history and economics amounting to 
one year's work of thirteen hours a week, may complete the 
Master of Laws' course at Columbia College in three years : 
and the student who has completed a two or three years' law 
course at another law school may similarly receive credit for 
courses equivalent to those offered in Columbia College In 
no case, however, shall any one receive the degree of Master 
of Laws who has not spent four years in the study of history, 

1 The courses offered by the two Faculties, from which the student is to elect 
fifty-two hours, aggregate at present more than one hundred and ten hours 
per week. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW 



19 



economics, and public and private law in some university, 
college or law school, including a residence of at least one 
term at Columbia College; and the decision whether work 
performed at another institution shall be accepted as equiva- 
lent to work at Columbia rests, as regards each subject, with 
the faculty in whose jurisdiction that subject falls. 

Master of Laws' Course for Students Holding the Degree of 
Bachelor of Laws from Columbia College. — Students who have 
completed the junior year in the School of Arts of Columbia 
College or in some other institution maintaining an equiva- 
lent curriculum, and who have obtained the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws from Columbia College after pursuing the full three 
years' course of study, shall be entitled, upon pursuing for 
an additional year a course of study of at least thirteen hours 
a week under the Faculty of Law or the Faculty of Political 
Science, or under both of these Faculties, and passing satis- 
factory examinations, to receive the degree of Master of Laws ; 
provided that no student shall receive the degree who has 
not studied and passed satisfactory examinations in compar- 
ative constitutional law, administrative law, Roman law, 
international law, and in the three courses offered on equity, 
and who has not pursued at Columbia or elsewhere courses 
of instruction satisfactory to the Faculty of Political Science 
in history, social ethics, and economics. 

Arrangement of Studies. — Under the above regulations the 
student may choose either of two courses leading to the 
degree of Master of Laws. He may study primarily for the 
Bachelor of Laws' degree, and after obtaining this, prosecute 
his studies a year longer for the master's degree ; or he may 
register himself from the outside as a candidate for the 
master's degree without attempting to take the bachelor's 
degree. Those students who believe that they will be able 
to devote the necessary time to the legal studies are strongly 
recommended to take the latter course. Such students will 
find it to their advantage to make their elections for the first 
year largely in the field of social ethics, political philosophy, 
constitutional history, and economics, combining with these 
subjects courses in the elements of jurisprudence and the 



20 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



general principles of contracts and torts, and to divide the 
subsequent years between public and private law. 

The student who has completed his junior year in the 
School of Arts of Columbia College, or in some other col- 
lege maintaining an equivalent curriculum, may obtain the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts from Columbia College upon such 
a combination of legal and political courses aggregating not 
less than fifteen hours a week for one year; and such courses 
will also be counted as a part of the fifty-two hours a week 
required for the degree of Master of Laws. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

The work in economics and sociology falls under three 
heads, viz. : the University courses of instruction in the vari- 
ous departments of social science, the work in the statistical 
laboratory, and the "field work," or practical work in con- 
nection with the Charity Organization Society, the Brooklyn 
Bureau of Charities, the State Charities Aid Association, the 
University Settlement Society of New York City, and the 
East Side House. These are fully explained in the separate 
announcement of the courses in Sociology. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH FOR 
1895-96. 1 

The course of study embraces instruction and research in 
three groups of subjects: 

I History and Political Philosophy. 
II Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence. 
Ill Economics and Social Science. 

Seminaria 

Outside of the regular instruction in the various subjects 
by lecture, it is the intention to furnish the students an 
opportunity for special investigation of historical, legal, 
economic and social questions under the direction of the pro- 
fessors. This is done by means of original papers prepared 

1 Subject to revision in details in case of need. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 21 

by the students. The papers are read before the professor 
and the students, and are then criticised and discussed. 
There will be at least one seminarium in each subject. The 
number of meetings and the topics to be discussed are deter- 
mined each year. Attendance at a seminarium in the major 
subject is necessary on the part of candidates for the degrees 
of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 

There are also preliminary seminaria in history and politi- 
cal economy designed primarily for those that are not fully 
prepared for the more advanced work. A preliminary semi- 
narium taken by a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts will count for one hour toward the fifteen hours neces- 
sary for a degree. 

Group 1 — History and Political Philosophy 

The student is supposed to be familiar with the outlines of 
European history, ancient and modern, as well as of Ameri- 
can history. Students who are not thus prepared are recom- 
mended to take the undergraduate courses in history in the 
School of Arts. These are as follows 1 : 

1 (A) Outline of Mediceval and Modern History. — Two 
hours a week : Mr. Colby. 

2 (B) Outline of European History since 1815. — Two hours 
a week, first term : Prof. Dunning. 

3 Roman History. — Two hours a week, first term : Prof. 
Munroe Smith. 

4 English History. — One hour a week : Prof. Osgood. 

5 American History. — Two hours a week: Prof. Dunning. 

6 Historical and Political Geography. — The purpose of this 
course is to give a description of the physical geography of 
Europe, to point out the various sections into which it is 
naturally divided, to trace the territorial growth of modern 
European states, and to describe the geographical and ethnic 
conditions of the present states of the European continent. 
One hour a week : Prof. Goodnow. 

Subject A — European History 

7 General Political aud Constitutional History of Europe, 

1 The lettered courses are required for undergraduates. 



22 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



comprehending in detail : a view of the political situation of 
imperial Rome ; the history of the development of the govern- 
ment of the Christian church into the form of papal monarchy; 
the overthrow of the Roman imperial system and the estab- 
lishment of German kingdoms throughout middle, western, 
and southern Europe ; the character and constitution of these 
kingdoms; the conversion of the Germans to the Christian 
church, and the relations which the Christian church assumed 
towards the Germanic states; consolidation of the German 
kingdoms into the European empire of Charlemagne ; charac- 
ter and constitution of the Carolingian state ; its disruption 
through the development of the feudal system and the inde- 
pendent hierarchic church, and division into the kingdoms of 
Germany, France, and Italy; character and history of the 
feudal system as a state form; re-establishment of the 
imperial authority by the re-connection of Germany with 
Italy ; conflict of the middle ages between church and state ; 
the political disorganization and papal despotism resulting 
from the same; the development of the absolute monarchy 
and the reformation ; the limitation of absolute kingly power 
and the development of constitutionalism; and lastly, the 
realization of the constitutional idea of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. — Two hours a week : Prof. Osgood. 

8 The Political and Constitutional History of England. — 
The object of this course of lectures is to trace the growth of 
the English constitution from the earliest to the present 
times, dwelling upon foreign relations during periods when 
they had an important influence. Particular attention is paid 
to the administrative system developed by the Norman 
monarchs, and to the struggle of the thirteenth century, 
which culminated in the legislative work of Edward I. The 
political results of the reformation are described. Under the 
Stuarts, the conflict between the crown and parliament, which 
had been interrupted at the close of the fourteenth century, 
was resumed, owing chiefly to the rise of Puritanism. The 
House of Commons now leads the opposition. The history 
of the struggle between the two is detailed till the most 
important questions in dispute were settled by the events of 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 23 



1688-89. The development of parliamentary government 
under the aristocratic regime is then outlined. About the 
beginning of this century, and largely in consequence of the 
industrial revolution, the democratizing of the constitution 
began. The account given of the development of this ten- 
dency closes with the Reform Bill of 1884. The work of the 
first term will close at 1640. The history subsequent to 
that date will be treated during the second term. Two 
hours a week : Prof. Osgood. 

g Rise and Development of the French Monarchy during 
the latter half of the middle ages. — The purpose of this course 
of lectures is to trace the constitutional history of France 
from the dissolution of the Carolingian empire to the era of 
the absolute monarchy, at the close of the middle ages. The 
main line of evolution in the history of the French state 
during this period is the growth of the kingship from great 
theoretical powers and practical impotency under the first 
Capetians to the absolute monarchy of Louis XI. The various 
steps in this development, the forces aiding and opposing the 
extension of the royal power, the financial, judicial and 
administrative institutions necessitated by the centralization 
of power in the king, are described. — Two hours a week, 
second term : Mr. Beer. 

10 History of European Law. — See post, p. 31. — Two 
hours a week : Prof. Munroe Smith. 

11 History of Diplomacy. — See post., p. 28. — Two hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Moore. 

12 Early Church History. — The ante-Nicene period, a.d. 
100-31 1 ; spread and persecution; literary conflict with 
heathenism and heresy; conversion of the Roman empire; 
development of Christian doctrine and dicipline. — Two hours 
a week : 

13 Mediceval Church History. — From the time of Constan- 
tine to the Reformation. Nicene and post-Nicene periods: 
monasticism; rise of the papacy; development of doctrine; 
mediaeval Christianity; conversion of the barbarians, separa- 
tion of the Greek and Latin churches; the papacy and the 



24 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



empire; the crusades ; preparation for the reformation. — Two 
hours a week : 

14 Modern Church History. — The reformation on the con- 
tinent, in England and Scotland; the Roman Catholic 
counter-reformation; history of the Lutheran and Reformed 
churches. — Two hours a week : 

15 Seminar turn in Europeaii History. — Two hours a week: 
Prof. Osgood. 

Subject B — American History 

16 Political and Constitutional History of the United 
States. — This course of lectures covers the history of the 
colonies and of the revolutionary war; the formation and 
dissolution of the confederate constitution of 1781, the fed- 
eral constitution of 1787 and its application down to the civil 
war; the changes wrought in the constitution by the civil 
war, and the resulting transformation of the public law of 
the United States. — Two hours a week : Prof. Burgess. 

17 Political History of the Colonies and of the American 
Revolution. — This is an investigation course, extending 
through two years. During the first year attention will be 
devoted to the settlement of the colonies and their develop- 
ment in the seventeenth century. During the second year 
the growth of the system of colonial administration, the con- 
flict with the French, and the revolt of the colonies will be 
investigated. The object of the course is two-fold: first, to 
acquaint the student as thoroughly as possible with the 
history of the period; second, to teach him how to investi- 
gate and how to do the constructive work of the historian. 
The subject is taken up topically, and the titles of the chief 
original authorities bearing upon each topic are given by the 
instructor. These works the student must read, compare, 
and criticise. The result of his study must appear in the 
form of a consistent and truthful account of the event of 
which he is treating. It is intended that attention shall be 
fixed as exclusively as possible upon original sources. When 
secondary material is used, it must be examined and criti- 
cised in the light of the original. When necessary, an 
analytical study of the histories, relations, or other authori- 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 25 



ties is undertaken for the purpose of ascertaining the degree 
of their credibility. Attention is also called to the character 
of historical writing in each period under investigation. 
Students are brought, as far as possible, to view the world 
from the standpoint of the men whose works they are study- 
ing. It is intended that a class taking the full course shall 
have discussed before it all the most important original 
authorities bearing upon the history of the American colonies 
and revolution. — Two hours per week for two years : Prof. 
Osgood. 

18 The United States during Civil War and Reconstruction. — 
The object of this course is to describe the constitutional 
principles which came into play during the period from i860 
to 1877. Among the topics discussed in more or less detail 
are: The principles of the appeal to arms; the nature and 
scope of the "war power"; the status of the negro as 
affected by the war ; the various theories of reconstruction ; 
the adoption of the last three amendments to the constitu- 
tion; the actual process of reconstruction; the so-called 
"force legislation"; and the circumstances attending the 
final cessation of national interference in the Southern 
States. — Two hours a week, second term: Prof. Dunning. 

19 History of American Diplomacy . — See post., p. 28. Two 
hours a week, second term : Prof. Moore. 

20 American Church History. — Two hours a week: 

21 New York State and Federal Politics, 1820-1860. — 
Among the chief topics treated in this course are: Anti- 
masonry, rise of the Whig party, internal improvements, 
agrarian insurrections, McLeod case, anti-slavery ideas before 
1845, Texas and the Mexican war, compromise of 1850, elec- 
tion of 1852, Kansas-Nebraska bill, Dred Scott case, Lincoln- 
Douglas debate, election of i860, efforts at compromise. — 
Two hours a week, second term : Dr. Bancroft. 

22 Charter and Political History of New York City. — This 
course treats of the relations of the city to the state, showing 
the growth of municipal independence. The early charters 
conferred but few rights on the city, the selection of the 
most important city officials being made at Albany. Tarn- 



26 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



many Hall has been the most important and powerful party 
organization. A brief history of the Tammany organization, 
its rulers, and its method of nominating public officers, will 
be given. The " Tweed Ring" and the efforts of purifying 
city politics since its downfall will be described, including the 
reform charter of 1873, the amendments of 1884, the report 
of the Tilden Committee in 1875, and of the Roosevelt and 
Gibbs investigating committees. — One hour a week, first 
term: Dr. Bernheim. 

25 Seminarium in Early American History. — One hour a 
week: Prof. Osgood. 

Subject C — Political Philosophy 

26 General History of Political Theories. — Every people 
known to history has possessed some form, however vague 
and primitive, of political government. Every people which 
has attained a degree of enlightenment above the very lowest 
has been permeated by some ideas more or less systematic, 
as to the origin, nature, and limitations of governmental 
authority. It is the purpose of this course to trace historic- 
ally the development of these ideas, from the primitive 
notions of primitive people to the complex and elaborate 
philosophical theories that have characterized the ages of 
highest intellectual refinement. 

Book I., after a short survey of the theocratic system of 
the Brahmans, treats mainly of the political philosophy 
of Greece and Rome, with especial attention to the pro- 
found speculations of Plato and Aristotle. 

Book II. discusses the political doctrines of early Christianity 
and the Christian church, with the controversy of 
Papacy and Empire, and the elaborate systems of St. 
Thomas Aquinas and his adversaries. 

Book III. treats of that age of renaissance and reformation 
in which Machiavelli and Bodin, Suarez and Bellarmino, 
Luther and Calvin worked out their various solutions of 
the great problem, how to reconcile the conflicting doc- 
trines of theology, ethics, and politics. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 27 



Book IV. covers the period during which the theories were 
worked out which found realization in the English and 
French revolutions. Here are examined the doctrine of 
natural law as developed by Grotius and Puffendorf, the 
doctrine of divine right of kings with its corollary of 
passive obedience, as in Filmer and Bossuet, the theory 
of the constitutionalists, Locke and Montesquieu, and 
the idea of social contract made most famous by Rous- 
seau. 

Book V. traces the various currents of thought since Rous- 
seau: the idealism of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel, the 
reactionary philosophy which sought to overcome the 
tendencies of the revolution, the historical school of 
Burke and Savigny, and the English individualists like 
Bentham, Mill, and Spencer. — Three hours a week: 
Prof. Dunning. 
27 American Political Philosophy. — As the first nation to 
realize in practice many of the principles that characterize 
the modern state, the United States offers special opportu- 
nities for research to the student of political philosophy. In 
this course a twofold line of discussion is followed : First, by 
a study of the various documents of the revolutionary era, 
the Declaration of Independence, the constitutions, national 
and commonwealth, and other state papers, the dominant 
ideas of the people are derived from their official records. 
Second, the writings of the leading statesmen, like Hamil- 
ton, Jefferson, Calhoun, and Webster, as well as the more 
systematic and philosophical works of Lieber, Mulford, 
Brownson, Jameson, and others, are analyzed and subjected 
to critical comment. — One hour a week: Prof. Dunning; 
(not given 1895-96). 

30 Seminarian in Political Philosophy. — One hour a week : 
Prof. Dunning. 

Group II — Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Subject A — Constitutional Law 

I Comparative Constitutional Law of the principal Euro- 
pean States and of the United States ; comprehending a com- 
parison of the provisions of the constitutions of England, 



28 SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

United States, France, and Germany, the interpretation of 
the same by the legislative enactments and judicial decisions 
of the states, and the generalization from them of the funda- 
mental principles of public law common to them all. — Three 
hours a week : Prof. Burgess. 

2 Comparative Constitutional Law of the several Common- 
wealths of the American Union. — In this course of lectures 
comparison is made in the same manner of the constitutions 
of the forty-four commonwealths of the Union. — One hour a 
week, second term : Dr. Bernheim. 

5 Seminariun in Constitutional Law. — Two hours a week: 
Prof. Burgess. 

Subject B — International Law 

6 History of Diplomacy. — The object of this course is to 
exhibit the evolution of the relations between independent 
states and the manner in which those relations are conducted. 
The history of the diplomatic system of Europe is traced 
from its beginnings to the present time, and an exposition is 
given of the religious, dynastic, territorial, and commercial 
struggles of which that system is the result. The first part 
of the course relates to the development of the European 
concert prior to the Peace of Westphalia. This is followed 
by an examination of the most important of the general 
European treaties, beginning with those concluded at the 
Congress of Westphalia in 1648, and ending with the Treaty 
of Berlin of 1878. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. 
Moore. 

7 History of American Diplomacy. — In the study of Amer- 
ican diplomacy special attention will be given to the history 
and method of the diplomacy of the United States. The 
course will comprehend (1) the diplomacy of the Revolu- 
tion; (2) the period from the Treaty of Peace of 1783 to the 
termination of the war of 1812; (3) from the termination of 
that war to the civil war; (4) from the outbreak of the 
latter war to the present time. — Two hours a week, second 
term: Prof. Moore. 

8 International Law. — This course treats of the general 
principles of international law, as it has been developed by 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 29 



positive agreement, in the form of treaties and conventions, 
and by common usage, as shown in legislation, in the deci- 
sions of international tribunals and of municipal courts, and 
in the conduct of nations. The rules thus discovered are 
discussed in the light of the principles of reason and justice, 
as scientifically presented by writers on international law, 
and an effort is made to trace the systematic establishment 
of the rules which govern intercourse among nations at the 
present day. — Two hours a week: Prof. Moore. 

10 Seminarium in International Law. — Two hours a week: 
Prof. Moore. 

Subject C — Criminal Law 

11 Criminal Law, including the Conflict of Penal Laws 
and Extraditioji. — This course embraces (1) the general 
principles of criminal law, defining the relation of the indi- 
vidual to the state, as regards the maintenance of, public 
order; (2) the conflict of penal laws, and the punishment of 
extra-territorial crime; (3) extradition, including {a) the de- 
livery up of fugitives from justice as between nations, and 
(b) the delivery of such fugitives as between the states of 
the American Union, or interstate rendition. — Two hours a 
week: Prof. Moore. 

Subject D — Administrative Law 

16 Comparative Administrative Law of the United States 
and the principal European States. — The purpose of this 
course is to present the general principles of the administra- 
tive law of the United States, both in the nation and in the 
commonwealths, and to compare them with the law of Eng- 
land, France, and Germany. The following list of topics 
will give a general idea of the particular subjects discussed: 
The principle of the separation or distribution of powers; 
the executive power; administrative councils; heads of de- 
partments, their tenure of office, their powers and duties; 
local (including municipal) government; officers, their ap- 
pointment or election, their duties, their rights, removal 
from office; the administration in action; the control over 
the administration possessed by the higher administrative 
officers, the courts, and the legislature. Special attention 



3° 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



will here be paid to the writs of mandamus, quo warranto, 
certiorari, habeas corpus, and prohibition, and their statutory 
substitutes, by means of which the courts exercise their con- 
trol over the administration. The new courts will also be 
examined, which have been established in France and Ger- 
many during this century, and to which the name of admin- 
istrative courts has been given. — Two hours a week: Prof. 
Goodnow. 

17 The Law of Municipal Corporations. — This course 
treats of the development of the American municipal corpora- 
tion and the difference between it and the modern English 
municipal corporation; the creation of municipal corpora- 
tions; the control over American municipal corporations 
possessed by the commonwealth legislature, and its consti- 
tutional limitations both national and commonwealth; the 
dissolution of municipal corporations, and its effect; the or- 
ganization of municipal corporations together with a detailed 
discussion of their powers and liabilities both as govern- 
mental agencies and as corporate bodies, subjects of private 
law. — Two hours a week, first term : Prof. Goodnow. 

18 The Law of Taxation. — The subjects treated in this 
course are : The nature of taxes and the taxing power ; the 
limitations placed by the constitutions, both national and 
commonwealth, upon the taxing power; the construction of 
tax proceedings; the rules of law relative to the particular 
taxes, both national and commonwealth, levied in the United 
States ; the methods of assessment and collection ; the reme- 
dies open to the individual against arbitrary, unjust and 
illegal taxation; and the law of assessments for local im- 
provements of property specially benefited. — Two hours a 
week, second term: Prof. Goodnow. 

19 Comparative Administration of New York, London, 
Paris and Berlin. — This course treats of the history of muni- 
cipal government in London, showing the development of the 
present form of central government through the London 
County Council, in the organization of the Board of Public 
Works, of the School Board, and other central bodies with 
specific functions, and finally of the County Council itself. A 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



3i 



study is then made of the County Council as at present consti- 
tuted, with special reference to the social development of 
governmental functions. A similar sketch is given of the 
government of Paris and Berlin, to afford a basis of compari- 
son with the administrative organization and methods of New 
York. — One hour a week, second term: Dr. Bernheim. 

20 Seminar ium in Administrative Law. — Two hours a 
week: Prof. Goodnow. 

Subject E — Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

21 Roman Law I. — The history and institutions of the 
classical and Justinian law. Sohm's Institutes, supple- 
mented by lectures. Two hours a week, first term: Prof. 
Munroe Smith. 

22 Roman Law II — Cases from the Corpus Juris Civilio, 
principally in contracts. — Two hours a week, second term : 
Prof. Munroe Smith. 

23 History of European Law. — This course treats (1) of 
primitive law, with especial reference to the usages and ideas 
of the Indo-Germanic races; (2) of early German law, includ- 
ing a comparison of Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, and conti- 
nental German customs; (3) of mediaeval European law, 
including feudal and canon law; (4) of the ' 4 reception" of 
the Roman law; and (5) of the genesis and character of 
the great modern codes. — Two hours a week: Prof. Munroe 
Smith. 

24 Comparative Jurisprudence. — This course, based mainly 
on a comparison of the modern Roman and the English 
common law, aims to present the leading principles of 
modern property law and family law. — Two hours a week 
(1896-97): Prof. Munroe Smith. 

25 International Private Law. — In this course the theories 
of the foreign authorities and the practice of the foreign 
courts in the so-called " conflicts of law " are compared with 
the solution given to these questions by our courts. — One 
hour a week: Prof. Munroe Smith. 

29 Seminar ium in Legal History and Cojnparative Legis- 
lation. — One hour a week : Prof. Munroe Smith. 



32 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Group III — Economics and Social Science 

It is presumed that students before entering the school 
possess a knowledge of the general principles of political 
economy as laid down in the ordinary manuals by Walker or 
Mill, and also a knowledge of the general facts of economic 
history. Students who are not thus prepared are recom- 
mended to take the undergraduate courses in the School of 
Arts. These are 1 : 

1 (A) Elements of Political Economy. — Two hours a week, 
second term : Prof. Mayo-Smith and Mr. Day. 

2 Economic History of Europe and America. — Two hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Seligman and Mr. Day. 

Subject A — Political Economy and Finance 

3 Historical and Practical Political Economy. 

(A) Introduction; Production and Consumption. — This 
course is given every year, and is intended to cover the gen- 
eral questions of the application of political economy to 
actual social life. The principal topics are: the function of 
political economy and its relation to the other political 
sciences, method of study, literature and writers, method of 
applying theory and principle to economic questions; (2) the 
economic organization of society, its historical development, 
present economic institutions, the principle of individual lib- 
erty and the institution of private property in their economic 
influence; (3) the function of government in economic 
affairs, the individualistic view, the socialistic demand; (4) 
the theory of consumption and its effect in directing eco- 
nomic activity; (5) the production of wealth and the prob- 
lems of production, such as land-tenure, forms of productive 
enterprise, application of machinery and accumulation of 
capital. — Three hours a week, first term : Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

(B) The Problems of Exchange. — (Commerce, Trade and 
Transportation.) — This course treats of the history of com- 
merce, the question of free trade or protection ; the history 
of transportation and the railroad question ; money and the 

1 The lettered course is required for undergraduates. 



I 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 33 

mechanism of exchange ; banks and banking ; paper money, 
bimetallism and the silver question, currency reform ; history 
of credit ; theory of value and price, history and statistics of 
prices, index numbers; commercial crises, their history and 
causes, depression of trade since 1873, the financial panic of 
1893; theory of competition, history of monopolies, economic 
influence of monopolies; trusts; function of the government 
in regulating exchange. — Three hours a week, second term, 
given in 1895-96, and each alternate year thereafter: Prof. 
Mayo-Smith. 

(C) The Problems of Distribution. — (Relations of Labor 
and Capital.) — This course is devoted largely to labor ques- 
tions, such as the history of labor, guilds, apprenticeships, 
the factory system ; the present condition and progress of the 
laboring classes; statistics of wages, cost of living and ex- 
penditures of the laboring class; trade unions and benefit 
societies, strikes and boycotts; arbitration and conciliation; 
co-operation and profit-sharing; the state in relation to labor, 
poor relief, factory laws and employers' liability, working- 
men's insurance, aids to intelligence, thrift, health and well- 
being; the capitalist class, profit, rent and interest; the rela- 
tion of the employer to the laborer; progress and poverty; 
the demands of socialism. — Three hours a week, second term, 
given in 1896-97, and each alternate year: Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

For students desiring to take (A), (B), and (C) in one year, a short resume will 
be given of the omitted course (B) or (C) during the latter portion of the first term. 

4 History of Political Economy — In this course the various 
systems of political economy are discussed in their historical 
development. The chief exponents of the different schools 
are taken up in their order, but especial attention is directed 
to the wider aspects of the connection between the theories 
and the organization of the existing industrial society. The 
chief writers discussed are : 

I Antiquity : Orient, Greece, and Rome. 
II Middle ages: Aquinas, Glossators, writers on money, 
the usury question, etc. 
Ill Mercantilists : Stafford, Mun, Petty, North, Locke; Bodin, 
Vauban, Forbonnais; Serra, Galiani, Justi, etc. 



34 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



IV Physiocrats : Quesnay, Gournay, Turgot, etc. 
V Adam Smith and precursors : Tucker, Hume, Can til- 
Ion, Steuart. 

VI English school : Mai thus, Ricardo, Senior, McCulloch, 
Chalmers, Jones, Mill, etc. 
VII The continent : Say, Sismondi, Hermann, List, Cour- 
not, Bastiat, etc. 
VIII German historical school: Roscher, Knies, Hilde- 
brand, etc. 

IX Recent development : Rogers, Jevons,Cairnes, Bagehot, 
Leslie, Toynbee, Marshall; Wagner, Schmoller, 
Held, Brentano, Cohn; Menger, Sax, Bohm- 
Bawerk, Wieser; Leroy-Beaulieu, De Laveleye, 
Gide; Cossa, Nazzani, Loria, Ricca-Salerno, 
Pantaleoni ; Carey, George, Walker, Clark, Patten, 
Adams, etc. 

— Two hours a week. Given in 1896-97 and each alternate 
year thereafter : Prof. Seligman. 

5 Science of Finance. — This course is historical as well as 
comparative and critical. It treats of the various rules of 
public expenditures and the methods of meeting the same 
among different civilized nations. It describes the different 
kinds of public revenue, including the public domain and 
public property, public works and industrial undertakings, 
special assessments, fees and taxes. It is in great part a 
course on the history, theories, and methods of taxation in 
all civilized countries. It considers also public debt, methods 
of borrowing, redemption, refunding, repudiation, etc. 
Finally it describes the fiscal organization of the state, by 
which the revenue is collected and expended, and discusses 
the budget, national, state, and local. Students are furnished 
with the current public documents of the United States 
treasury, and the chief financial reports of the leading com- 
monwealths, and are expected to understand all the facts in 
regard to public debt, currency, and revenue therein con- 
tained. — Two hours a week: Prof. Seligman. 

6 Financial History of the United States. — This course 
endeavors to present a complete survey of American legis- 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



35 



lation on currency, finance, and taxation, as well as its con- 
nection with the state of industry and commerce. Attention 
is called especially to the financial history of the colonies 
(colonial currency and taxation); to the financial methods of 
the revolution and the confederation ; to the financial policy 
of the Federalists and the Republicans up to the war of 
1812, including the refunding and payment of the debt, the 
internal revenue, and the banking and currency problems; 
to the financial history of the war with England; to the 
changes in the methods of taxation, and the crises of 18 19, 
1825, 1837; to the distribution of the surplus and the United 
States bank ; to the currency problems up to the civil war ; 
to the financial management of the war; to the methods of 
resumption, payment of the debt, national and state banks, 
currency questions, and problems of taxation; and finally to 
the recent development in national, state, and municipal 
finance and taxation. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. 
Seligman. 

7 Industrial and Tariff History of the United States. — The 
arguments of extreme free-traders, as of extreme protection- 
ists, are often so one-sided that an impartial judgment can 
be formed only through a knowledge of the actual effects of 
the tariffs. It is the object of this course to give a detailed 
history of each customs tariff of the United States from the 
very beginning; to describe the arguments of its advocates 
and of its opponents in each case ; to trace as far as possible 
the position of each of the leading industries before and after 
the passage of the chief tariff acts, and thus to determine 
how far the legislation of the United States has influenced 
the progress of industry and the prosperity of the whole 
country. Attention is called especially to the industrial his- 
tory of the colonies; to the genesis of the protective idea 
and to Hamilton's report; to the tariffs from 1789 to 1808; 
to the restriction and the war with England ; to the tariffs of 
1816, 1824, and the "tariff of abominations" of 1828; to the 
infant-industry argument ; to the compromise and its effect 
on manufacturers; to the area of moderate free trade; to 
the tariff of 1857; to the war tariffs; to their continuance, 



36 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



and to the pauper-labor argument; to the McKinley act, and 
to the tariff of 1894. — Two hours a week, second term 
(1896-97): Prof. Seligman. 

8 Railroad Problems ; Economic , Social and Legal. — These 
lectures treat of railroads in the fourfold aspect of their 
relation to the investors, the employees, the public, and the 
state respectively. A history of railways and railway policy 
in America and Europe forms the preliminary part of the 
course. All the problems of railway management, in so far 
as they are of economic importance, come up for discussion. 

Among the subjects treated are: financial methods, rail- 
way construction, speculation profits, failures, accounts and 
reports, expenses, tariffs, principles of rates, classification 
and discrimination, competition and pooling, accidents, 
and employers' liability. Especial attention is paid to the 
methods of regulation and legislation in the United States as 
compared with European methods, and the course 
closes with a general discussion of state versus private 
management. — Two hours a week, second term: Prof. 
Seligman. 

9 Econojnic Theory I. — This course discusses the static laws 
of distribution. It concentrates the attention on the forces 
that would continue to act if the structure and the functions 
of economic society were to undergo no change. It treats of 
the influences that fix those normal rates of wages and of 
interest to which the actual earnings of labor and of capital 
tend to conform. It analyzes the mechanism of social indus- 
try, and traces the connection between wages and the product 
that is specifically attributable to labor, and also the con- 
nection between interest and the product that can be spe- 
cifically traced to capital. — Two hours a week, first term : 
Prof. Clark. 

10 Economic Theory II. — This course discusses the dy- 
namic laws of distribution. It gives attention to influences 
that change the structure and the functions of industrial 
society. It traces to their origin the gains that normally 
accrue to entrepreneurs as such, and seeks to determine 
under what theoretical conditions the benefits arising from 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 37 



economic progress would be at a maximum. — Two hours a 
week, second term : Prof. Clark. 

ii Communistic and Socialistic Theories. — The theory of 
political economy is severely criticised, and the present or- 
ganization of society is attacked by socialistic writers who 
demand many changes, especially in the institution of pri- 
vate property, the system of free competition and the modes 
of distribution. This course studies the theories of St. 
Simon, Fourier, Proudhon, Marx, Lassalle, Rodbertus and 
others; it discusses the socialistic interpretation of history, 
its conception of justice, its proposed reorganization of 
society, the justice of its demands, the possibility of its real- 
ization, and the alternative of social reform. — Two hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Clark. 

13 Preliminary Seminar ium in Political Economy. — Prima- 
rily for those that have already studied economics for only 
a year. Essays, readings and practical exercises on prob- 
lems of the day. — One hour a week: Profs. Mayo-Smith and 
Seligman, and Mr. Day. 

14 Seminarium in Political Economy. — For advanced stu- 
dents. — Two hours bi-weekly: Prof. Clark. 

15 Seminarium in Political Economy and Finance. — For 
advanced students. — Two hours, bi-weekly: Prof. Seligman. 

Subject B — Sociology and Statistics 1 

16 Physical Geography, Anthropology, and Ethnology . — This 
course will treat of the following subjects: 

I Physical Geography in its relation to the develop- 
ment of culture: a) areas of characterization, 
acclimatization, etc. ; b) theories of distribution. 

II History of the Science of Anthropology. 

Ill Prehistoric Archeology, including earliest evidences 
of human life, theories of migration, etc. 

1 For a fuller statement of the work in Sociology and the allied courses and 
equipment, see the separate announcement of the Courses in Sociology. 



38 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



IV Ethnology: a) language; b) manners and customs; 
c) classification of races; d) 1 race problems 
biologically considered, including variation, 
intermingling, and extermination. 
V Anthropometry 1 . 

VI Comparative Mythology. — Two hours a week: Dr. 
Ripley. 

17 Statistics and Sociology. — This course is given every 
year, and is intended to train students in the use of statistics 
as an instrument of investigation in social science. The 
topics covered are relation of statistics to sociology, cri- 
teria of statistics, population, population and land, sex, age 
and conjugal condition, births, marriages, deaths, sickness 
and mortality, race and nationality, migration, social posi- 
tion, infirmities, suicide, vice, crime, nature of statistical 
regularities. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. Mayo- 
Smith. 

18 Statistics and Economics. — This course covers those 
statistics of most use in political economy, but which have 
also a direct bearing on the problems of sociology. These 
include the statistics of land, production of food, condition 
of labor, wages, money, credit, prices, commerce, manufac- 
tures, trade, imports and exports, national wealth, public 
debt, and relative incomes. Two hours a week, second 
term. Given in 1895-96 and each alternate year: Prof. 
Mayo-Smith. 

19 Theory, Technique, and History of Statistical Science. — 
This course studies the theory of statistics, law of probabil- 
ities, averages, mean error, rules for collecting, tabulating 
and presenting statistics, graphical methods, the question of 
the freedom of the will, the value of the results obtained by 
the statistical method, the possibility of discovering social 
laws. Some account will also be given of the history and 
literature of statistics, and the organization of statistical 
bureaus. — Two hours a week, second term. Given in 
1896-97 and each alternate year: Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

1 This course will be given in the University Faculty of Philosophy by Dr. 
Livingston Farrand. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



39 



20 General Sociology. — This is the fundamental course in 
which a foundation is laid for more advanced and special 
work in theoretical and practical sociology. It includes four 
parts, namely, I. The history of sociological theory since 
Comte, and the conception and definition of sociology as a 
science; II. Descriptive sociology, dealing chiefly with the 
analysis and classification of social phenomena; III. Histor- 
ical sociology, tracing the natural evolution of social activi- 
ties and arrangements from their beginnings ; IV. Explana- 
tory sociology, presenting the causes and laws of the natural 
evolution of society so far as they are yet apparent. Partic- 
ular attention is given through the course to the relations 
of sociology to economic and to ethical theory. — Two hours 
a week, first term : Prof. Giddings. 

21 The Family. — Beginning with a review of late re- 
searches upon early forms of marriage, the relation of the 
family to the clan and the tribe, and the status of women 
and children, this course deals particularly with the family 
in modern society, in country and city, under various condi- 
tions of nationality, residence, occupation, density of popula- 
tion, sanitary surroundings, education and religion. In con- 
clusion the increase of divorce is considered, in its causes and 
consequences, and in its relation to public opinion and legis- 
lation. Two hours a week, second term : Prof. Giddings. 

22 Pauperism, Poor Laws, and Charities. — This course be- 
gins with a careful study of the English poor law — its history, 
practical working and consequences. On this foundation is 
built a study of pauperism in general, but especially as it 
may be now observed in great cities. The laws of the 
different commonwealths in regard to paupers, out-relief, 
alms-houses, and dependent children, are compared. Finally 
the special modern methods of public and private philan- 
thropy are considered, with particular attention to charity 
organization, the restriction of out-door alms, and the re- 
clamation of children. Two hours a week, first term : Prof. 
Giddings. 

23 Crime and Penology. — The topics taken up in this course 
are the nature and definitions of crime, the increase of crime 



40 SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

and its modern forms, criminal anthropology, the social 
causes of crime, surroundings, parental neglect, education, 
the question of responsibility, historical methods of punish- 
ment, the history of efforts to reform prison methods, modern 
methods, the solitary system, the Elmira system, classifica- 
tion of criminals, classes of prisons, reformatories, and jails. 
— Two hours a week, second term : Prof. Giddings. 

29 Seminarium in Statistics. — Work in the statistical lab- 
oratory. The object of the laboratory is to train the student 
in the methods of statistical analysis and computation. 
Each student will pursue a course of laboratory practice 
dealing with the general statistics of population, the relation 
of classes, the distribution of wealth, and the statistics of 
crime, vice, and misfortune. He will be taught how to 
judge current statistics and to detect statistical fallacies; in 
short, to become an expert in judging of the value of socio- 
logical evidence. For fuller statement, see the Announce- 
ment of Courses in Sociology. — Three hours a week, 
Wednesday (9.30 to 12.30): Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

30 Seminarium in Sociology. — Two hours, bi-weekly: Prof. 
Giddings. 



ORDER OF STUDIES 



It is recommended by the faculty that students, who in- 
tend to devote their whole time to the courses of study 
offered by this faculty, take them in the following order: 

FIRST YEAR 

Hours per week 

Constitutional History of Europe and United States 4 

Constitutional History of England .... 2 

Political Economy ....... 3 

Science of Finance 2 

History of Political Theories 3 



ORDER OF STUDIES 4* 

Honrs per week 

Financial History of the United States (2d term) . . 2 

Tariff History of the United States (2d term) . . 2 

Physical Geography and Anthropology (1st term) . . 2 

Historical and Political Geography 1 

Political History of New York (1st term) ... 2 

Institutes of Roman Law 2 

SECOND YEAR 

Comparative Constitutional Law of the principal Euro- 
pean States and of the United States ... 3 
History of European Law ...... 2 

Comparative Administrative Law of the United States, 

and of the principal European States ... 2 

History of Political Economy 2 

Economic Theory 2 

Statistics and Sociology (1st term) .... 2 

Statistics and Economics (2d term) .... 2 

Colonial History of the United States .... 2 

History of Diplomacy ( 1 st term) . . . . 2 

History of American Diplomacy (2d term) ... 2 

American Political Philosophy 1 

History of the United States 1820-1860 (2d term) . 2 

Sociology (1st term) 2 

The Family (2d term) 2 

Early and Mediaeval Church History .... 4 

THIRD YEAR 

Comparative Jurisprudence 2 

International Law _ 2 

Criminal Law ........ 2 

International Private Law ...... 1 

Law of Municipal Corporations (1st term) ... 2 

Law of Taxation (2d term) ...... 2 

Comparative Administration of New York, London 

and Paris (2d term) 2 

Socialism and Communism (1st term) .... 2 

Economic Theory (2d term) 2 

Theory of Statistics ....... 2 



42 SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Hours per week 



Pauperism and Poor Relief (ist term) 2 

Crime and Penology (2d term) ..... 2 

Railroad Problems 2 

History of United States, 1860-1877 (2d term) . . 2 

Rise and Growth of the French Monarchy (2d term) . 2 

Modern and American Church History ... 4 



UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 

Twenty-four University fellowships have been established, 
tenable for one year, with a possibility of reappointment for 
reasons of weight. Applications for fellowships should be 
addressed to the President of Columbia College on blank 
forms provided for the purpose. The following rules regard- 
ing the fellowships have been established by the University 
Council : 

1 The application shall be made prior to March 1, in 
writing, addressed to the President of Columbia College. 
Applications received later than March 1 may fail of consid- 
eration. The term of the fellowship is one year, dating from 
July 1. Residence should begin October 1. 

2 The candidate must give evidence 

(a) Of a liberal education, such as a diploma already 
granted, or about to be received, from a college or scien- 
tific school of good repute; 

(b) Of decided fitness for a special line of study, such 
as an example of some scientific or literary work already 
performed ; 

(c) Of upright character, such as testimonial from 
some instructor. 

3 The value of such fellowship is five hundred dollars. 
Payments will be based on the time during which the fellow 
shall have been in residence. The holder of a fellowship is 
exempt from all fees. 

4 Every holder of a fellowship will be expected to per- 
form such duties as may be allotted to him in connection 
with his course of study, which course will be such as to lead 
to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He will be expected 



PRIZES 



43 



to devote his time to the prosecution of special studies under 
the direction of the head of the department to which he be- 
longs, and before the close of the academic year to give evi- 
dence of progress by the preparation of a thesis, the comple- 
tion of a research, the delivery of a lecture, or by some other 
method. He must reside in New York or vicinity during 
the academic year. 

5 No holder of a fellowship shall be permitted to pursue 
a profession or technical course of study during his term. 
With the written approval of the President, but not other- 
wise, he may give instruction or assistance in any depart- 
ment of the University. 

6 No fellow shall be allowed to accept remunerative 
employment except by written permission of the President, 
and the acceptance of any such employment, without such 
permission, shall operate to vacate the fellowship. 

7 A fellow may be reappointed at the end of the year for 
reasons of weight. No fellow may be reappointed for more 
than two terms of one year each. 

8 As these fellowships are awarded as honors, those who 
are disposed, for the benefit of others or for any other rea- 
son, to waive the pecuniary emolument, may do so, and still 
have their names retained on the list of fellows. 



PRIZES 



Prize in Political Economy 

An annual prize of $150 for the best essay on some subject 
in political economy has been established by Mr. Edwin R. 
A. Seligman, one of the class of 1879 °f the School of Arts. 
Competition for the prize is open to all members of the 
School of Political Science. The topic selected must be 
approved by the faculty, and the essay itself must be not less 
than twenty thousand words in length. 

James Gordon Bennett Prize in Political Science 

A prize of $40, to be given on Commencement Day, has 
been established by Mr. James Gordon Bennett. The prize 



44 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



is to be awarded by the Faculty of Political Science for the 
best essay in English prose upon some subject of contempo- 
raneous interest in the domestic or foreign policy of the 
United States. The subject is assigned each year by the 
faculty. The competition is open to Seniors in the School 
of Arts, whether regular or special students, and to all stu- 
dents under any of the University Faculties who have not 
yet taken the baccalaureate degree in arts, letters, or philoso- 
phy, provided that they take courses amounting to six hours 
a week throughout the year in the School of Political Science. 
Essays must be submitted to the President on or before May 
i. If no satisfactory essay is received no award will be 
made. No award will be made for any essay that is de- 
fective in English composition. 

Medal Offered by the National Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution 

The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion offers annually a silver medal under the following 
regulations : 

i. Competition shall be open to members of the Senior 
Class in the School of Arts, and to first-year students, not 
graduates of the School of Arts, studying under any of the 
University Faculties. 2. Each essay must contain not less 
than 1600 and not more than 2000 words and shall be upon 
the subject: The Principles fought for in the War of the 
Revolution. 3. A typewritten copy of each essay must be 
presented to the President not later than May 1 of each year. 
4. The committee of award shall consist of the professors 
giving instruction in American History. 5. The prize shall 
in no case be awarded to any essay defective in English com- 
position. The award, if made, will be announced by the 
President at Commencement. 

A similar tender has been made to the principal colleges 
of the country, and the essays receiving the Silver Medals 
will be submitted to a Committee of the National Society in 
competition for a Gold Medal to be awarded to the writer of 
the essay deemed most meritorious. 



ACADEMY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



45 



ACADEMY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



This institution is devoted to the cultivation and advance- 
ment of the political sciences. It is composed mainly of 
graduates of Columbia College in the Schools of Law and 
Political Science ; but any person whose previous studies have 
fitted him to participate in the work of the academy is eligi- 
ble to membership. 

Meetings of the academy are held on the first Monday of 
each month. At these meetings papers are read by members 
presenting the results; of original investigation by the writers 
in some department of political science. 

Prize Lectureships 

The trustees have established in the School of Political 
Science three prize lectureships of the annual value of five 
hundred dollars each, tenable for three years. The power 
of appointment is vested in the faculty. One of these three 
lectureships becomes vacant at the close of each academic 
year. The previous holder may be reappointed. The con- 
ditions of competition are as follows : 

1 The candidate must be a graduate of Columbia College 
in the School of Political Science or the School of Law. In 
the latter case he must have pursued the curriculum of the 
School of Political Science for at least two years. 

2 He must be an active member of the Academy of 
Political Science. 

3 He must have read at least one paper before the 
Academy of Political Science during the year next preceding 
the appointment. 

The duty of the lecturer is to deliver annually, before the 
students of political science, a series of at least twenty lec- 
tures, the result of original investigation. 

These prize lectureships will be found especially useful 
and welcome to graduates of the school who propose to 
devote themselves to an academic career, and who in this 
way may acquire the experience and acquaintance with uni- 
versity methods of teaching which will stand them in good 
stead in their future career. 



4 6 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



LIBRARY 



The students of the School of Political Science are entitled 
to the use, subject to the rules established by the library 
committee, of the entire university library. The library is 
open from 8:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. during term time, and 
from 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. during the summer vacation. 
Information concerning the sources and literature of the 
political sciences is given in the various courses of lectures 
held in the schools. 

The special library of political science was begun in 1877, 
and it was intended to conclude the most recent and most 
valuable European and American works in this department. 
Particular attention is given to providing the material needed 
for original investigation. Every journal of importance, 
American or foreign, is taken regularly by the library. Any 
book needed by advanced students can usually be bought at 
once. Special tables are reserved for advanced students en- 
gaged in original research. Early application for a table is 
desirable. 

The library contains at present (April, 1895) about 
200,000 volumes. In the department of Political Science 
there are about 75,000 volumes. The collection is particu- 
larly rich in works on international, constitutional, and 
administrative law, Roman law and foreign law, and is grow- 
ing in these departments at the rate of several thousand vol- 
umes yearly. Another feature is the full collection of 
national, state, and local governmental reports and statistics 
in the various domains of economic inquiry, especially labor, 
finance, charity, poor law, and transportation reports. Re- 
cent large gifts have made it possible to build up a great 
collection in sociology. 

Students of history, economics, and public law will find 
New York to be a centre of library facilities absolutely un- 
rivalled elsewhere in this country. In addition to the 
University library there are rich treasures at the Astor 
Library, Lenox Library, New York Historical Library, 



LIBRARY 



47 



Long Island Historical Library, Library of the Charity Or- 
ganization Society, the Bar Association Library, and the 
Law Institute Library, to each of which students have access 
under favorable conditions. Advanced students of econom- 
ics also have at their disposal the library of the professor of 
Political Economy and Finance, which contains the most 
complete collection of works on political economy to be 
found in the United States. 



co 
O 

o 

O 

W 



FRIDAY. 


History of Political 
Theories. 
Prof. Dunning. 




Historical and Practical 
Political Economy. 
Prof. Mayo-Smith. 




Seminarium in Political 
Economy. 
Profs. Mayo- Smith 
and Seligman. 


History of New York. 
Dr. Bernheim. 


THURSDAY. 


Physical Geography and 
Anthropology. 
Dr. Ripley. 


Physical Geography and 
Anthropology. 
Dr. Ripley. 


Constitutional History 
of the United States. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Constitutional History 
of England. 
Prof. Osgood. 
Taxation and Finance. 
Prof. Seligman. 




WEDNESDAY. 


History of Political 
Theories. 
Prof. Dunning. 




Constitutional History 
of the United States. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Historical and Practical 
Political Economy. 
Prof. Mayo-Smith. 




TUESDAY. 


History of Political 
Theories. 
Prof. Dunning. 




Constitutional History 
of Europe. 
Prof. Osgood. 




Constitutional History 
of England. 
Prof. Osgood. 
Taxation and Finance. 
Prof. Seligman. 




MONDAY. 






Constitutional History 
of Europe. 
Prof. Osgood. 




Historical and Practical 
Political Economy. 
Prof. Mayo-Smith. 






Ao 

CO co 

d >-i 


do 

°? 


0 0 
CO co 


oo 

CO CO 
N CO 


o o 

co co 
CO 4- 


oo 

CO co 

IT) 



4§ 



SATURDAY. 


10 A.M to 12 

United States 
Colonial History. 
Prof. Osgood. 










FRIDAY. 




Roman Law. 
Prof.MuNROE Smith. 


History of Diplomacy, 
Prof. Moore. 
Sociology, 
The Family. 
Prof. GiDDINGS. 


Sociology, 
The Family. 
Prof. GiDDINGS. 




THURSDAY. 




Roman Law. 
Prof.MuNROE Smith. 
Economic Theory. 
Prof. Clark. 


History of Diplomacy. 
Prof. Moore. 




Financial History 
of the United States. 
Railroad Problems. 
Prof. Seligman. 


WEDNESDAY. 


United States during 
Civil War and Re- 
construction. 
Prof. Dunning. 




Comparative Consti- 
tutional Law. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Administrative Law. 
Prof. Goodnow. 


TUESDAY. 


United States during 
Civil War and Re- 
construction. 
Prof. Dunning. 


Economic Theory. 
Prof. Clark. 


Comparative Consti- 
tutional Law. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Financial History 
of the United States. 
Railroad Problems. 
Prof. Seligman. 


MONDAY. 






Comparative Consti- 
tutional Law. 
Prof. Burgess. 




Administrative Law. 
Prof. Goodnow. 




o o 

CO CO 

m ci 


io 

CO co 


A o 

CO CO 
M* CO 


4o 

co co 
CO 


i 

o o 

CO CO 



49 



H 

O 
fe 

fe 

o 

& 
O 



°* Si 



* 9 

03 Pi 

^ o 



15 

(/I M 

"3 w 

buo O 
Pi 



Oh. - 

2 o 



00 



2i§ 

<N U 

00 Z 
C « < 

« ui pq 



^8 



o * g 

o £ o 
o 

03 

cl, > 
'S Pk 

S 



S3 

bJO O 

I 2 

3 Ph 



cj Ph P 
S Ph 



"3 
O 

a 

'S-i 9 

Ph ^ O 



13 u 



18 



c p 
Ph 

G 



AH 

.2 J w 
S 3 £j § 

CD > 



5* 
II 



o 

0 *B 

.2 ba p 

5" 1 ° Q 

1 So 



Ph 



la 


6o. 




!-. 

CD 


CO 


i 






o 


Fe 


s 

N 


CR 


0 


00 


AN 


C3 


in 




0) 


CJ 




ed 




u 

Q 


C/3 


Po 





o . 

o w 



3|S 

0J 



•J3 O 
.2 J* 



52 h pi 

Cm 

o m PQ 

on rt Pi 
Ph 



H 

res o 
.2 > 



A o 
on d 



6o 

CO co 



6o 

CO co 



6 o 

CO CO 



50 



CALENDAR 



1895 — Feb. 11 — Second term begins, Monday. 

Feb. 22 — Washington's birthday, Friday, holiday. 

Feb. 27 — Ash- Wednesday, holiday. 

April 12 — Good- Friday, holiday. 

May 20 — Concluding examinations begin, Monday. 

May 30 — Memorial day, Thursday, holiday. 

June 12 — Commencement, Wednesday. 

Oct. 2 — Matriculation and Registration of Students 

begin, Wednesday. 
Oct. 7 — First term, i42d year begins, Monday. 
Nov. 5 — Election day, Tuesday, holiday. 

Nov. 28 — Thanksgiving day, Thursday, holiday. 

Dec. 23 — Christmas holidays begin, Monday. 

1896 — Jan. 4 — Christmas holidays end, Saturday. 
Feb. 8 — First term ends, Saturday. 

Feb. 10 — Second term begins, Monday. 

Feb. 19 — Ash-Wednesday, holiday. 

Feb. 22 — Washington's birthday, Saturday, holiday. 

April 3 — Good-Friday, holiday. 

May 30 — Memorial day, Saturday, holiday. 

June 10 — Commencement, Wednesday. 




COURSES 



IN THE 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



IN 



HISTORY, ECONOMICS, AND 
PUBLIC LAW 



1896-97 



NOTE 

In addition to the courses offered by the Faculty of Polit- 
ical Science, Columbia University offers the following: 



In Columbia College : 

A four-years' course leading to the degree of . . . . A.B. 
In the School of Law : 

A three-years' course leading to the degree of ... LL.B. 
In the School of Medicine (College of Physicians and Surgeons) : 

A four-years' course leading to the degree of . . . . M.D. 
In the School of Mines : 

A four-years' course in Mining Engineering leading to the degree of M.E. 

Civil Engineering " " C.E. 

Sanitary Engineering " " C.E. 

" Electrical Engineering " " E.E. 

Metallurgy " " Met.E. 

Geology and Palaeontology " " B.S. 
" Analytical and Applied 

Chemistry " " B.S. 

" " Architecture " " B.S. 



The courses detailed in this pamphlet may be taken as 
major or minor subjects for the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D., 
and some of them for the degree of A.B. All of them are 
elective as part of the requirements for the degree of LL.M., 
a university degree given for a four-year course in law and 
political science under the two Faculties of Law and Political 
Science. Other courses leading to the degrees of A.M. and 
Ph.D. are given under the various university faculties, espe- 
cially the Faculty of Philosophy and the Faculty of Pure 
Science. 

The first-year courses of the School of Law, the School of 
Mines, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons, are open, 
as electives, to Seniors in the College. Consequently, such 
Seniors as may desire to do so can prepare themselves for 
advanced standing in these schools by electing these first-year 
courses and counting them for the degree of A.B. 

Information and circulars as to any of the above courses 
may be had by addressing the Secretary of the University. 

The catalogue of the University is published in December 
and is sold at twenty-five cents a copy. 

All the schools and departments of Columbia University 
are at Madison Avenue and 49th Street, with the exception 
of the Department of Biology and the Medical School, which 
are at Tenth Avenue and 59th Street. 



2-96-7500 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Faculty of Political Science ..... i 

Other Officers ....... i 

General Statement ....... 3 

Purposes of the School ..... 3 

Admission and Registration .... 4 

Admission to Other Courses .... 5 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree ... 6 

Fees 7 

Committee on Aid for Students .... 8 

Regulations as to the Degrees of Master of Arts 

and Doctor of Philosophy .... 8 

Regulations for the Degree of Master of Laws . 11 

Political Science and Law ..... 12 

Social Science . . . . . . 13 

Courses of Study and Research .... 13 

Seminars ........ 14 

History and Political Philosophy ... 14 

Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence . 21 

Economics and Social Science .... 26 

Order of Studies ....... 35 

University Fellowships ..... 36 

University Scholarships 37 

Prizes 39 

Prize in Political Economy ..... 39 

James Gordon Bennett Prize .... 39 

Medal of the National Society .... 39 

Academy of Political Science .... 40 

Prize Lectureships ...... 40 

Library . 41 

Hours of Lectures .43 

Calendar ........ 46 



iii 



FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Seth Low, LL.D. , President 
John W. Burgess, Ph.D., LL.D. . . 323 West 57th St. 

Professor of History, Political Science, and Constitutional Law 
Dean of the Faculty 

Richmond Mayo-Smith, Ph.D. . . 305 West 77th St. 
Professor of Political Economy and Social Science 

Munroe Smith, A.M., J.U.D. 115th St., near Riverside Drive 
Professor of Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Frank J. Goodnow, A.M., LL.D. . .25 West 74th St. 
Professor of Administrative Law 
Secretary of the Faculty 

Edwin R. A. Seligman, LL. B., Ph.D. . 40 West 71st St. 

Professor of Political Economy and Finance 
Herbert L. Osgood, Ph.D. . . Columbia University 

Adjunct Professor of History 
William A. Dunning, Ph.D. . 70 Hanson Place, Brooklyn 

Adjunct Professor of History and Political Philosophy 
John Bassett Moore, A.B. . 24 Locust St., Flushing, L. I. 

Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law and Diplomacy 
Franklin H. Giddings, A.M. . . 150 West 79th St. 

Professor of Sociology 
John B. Clark, Ph.D. . . . Columbia University 

Professor of Political Economy 

James Harvey Robinson, Ph.D. . 170 West 85th St. 

Professor of History 

Edmond Kelly, A.M 107 East 60th St. 

Lecturer on the Political History of the State and City of New York 
Frederic Bancroft, Ph.D. Metropolitan Club, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Lecturer on American History 



OTHER OFFICERS 

George Louis Beer, A.M. . 38 Manhattan Square, South 

Prize Lecturer 1894-97, on European History 
Harry Alonzo Cushing . . 251 West 54th St. 

Prize Lecturer 1895-98, on History 

1 



2 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Arthur M. Day, A.M. East Side House, Foot East 76th St. 
Assistant in Economics 



Prize Lecturer 1896-99 

Robert Senftner .... Columbia University 
Registrar 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Purposes of the School 

The School of Political Science is under the direction of 
the Faculty of Political Science, and has charge of the univer- 
sity courses of study and research in history, economics, and 
public law. 

The School of Political Science was opened on Monday, 
the fourth day of October, 1880. 

In its course of instruction it undertakes to give a com- 
plete general view of all the subjects of public polity, both 
internal and external, from the threefold point of view of 
history, law, and philosophy. The prime aim is therefore 
the development of all the branches of the political and 
social sciences. The secondary and practical objects are : 

(a) To fit young men for all the political branches of the 
public service. 

(b) To give an adequate economic and legal training to 
those who intend to make journalism their profession. 

(c) To supplement, by courses in public law and compara- 
tive jurisprudence, the instruction in private municipal law 
offered by the Faculty of Law. 

(d) To educate teachers of political and social science. 

To these ends courses of study are offered of sufficient 
duration to enable the student not only to attend the lectures 
and recitations with the professors, but also to consult the 
most approved treatises upon the political sciences and to 
study the sources of the same. 

Young men who wish to obtain positions in the United 
States Civil Service — especially in those positions in the 
Executive Departments at Washington for which special 
examinations are held, will find it advantageous to follow 
many of the courses under the Faculty of Political Science. 
Some of the subjects upon which applicants for these positions 



3 



4 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



are examined are treated very fully in the curriculum of the 
school. Thus, extended courses of lectures are given on 
political geography and history, diplomatic history and 
international law, government, statistics, finance, and ad- 
ministration. 

Admission and Registration 

Admission to the School of Political Science is ordinarily 
granted to students who have completed the curriculum of 
some college in good standing at least to the close of the 
Junior year. Other persons of suitable age and attainments 
may also be admitted, to pursue special or partial courses 
with the consent of the Dean and of the instructor. There 
are no formal examinations for admission. Applications for 
admission are received at any time by the Secretary ; but it 
is generally advisable that they be presented, if possible, at 
the beginning of the academic year. 

An application for admission may be made at the office of 
the Dean of the Faculty of Political Science, or at such other 
place as may be designated, from time to time, for the pur- 
pose of registration. 

The student will then receive a certificate from the officer 
in charge which he must present to the Treasurer. He will 
then receive a matriculation card, after payment of the 
matriculation and tuition fees. This matriculation card must 
be shown to the officer in charge of registration, from whom 
the student then receives a registration book, which entitles 
him to attend the lectures in the School of Political Science, 
and which must be shown to each professor or other instructor 
at the beginning of each course of lectures. 

Every applicant for admission is expected to register at 
the beginning of each academic year of his membership in 
the school, on the Wednesday preceding the first Monday in 
October. A student who enters on his studies after the 
beginning of the academic year must register at the office of 
the Dean of the School of Political Science at the time of his 
entering on his studies. 

A student is counted as a full member of the school only 
from the date of issue of the registration book, and during 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



5 



the period of his being actually engaged in his studies as a 
resident in the school. 

Every student is required to file a list of his studies for the 
academic year at the time he registers, or within one week 
thereafter, at the office of the Secretary of the University. If 
he subsequently wishes to make any change in his studies he 
must file written notice of his wish at the Dean's office and 
must obtain the assent of the Dean. 

Immediate written notice must be given to the Dean of any 
change of address. 

Admission to the School of Political Science does not imply 
admission to candidacy for a degree. The conditions of 
candidacy for the several degrees are given below. 

Admission to Other Courses 

Any duly matriculated student in the School of Political 
Science is at liberty to attend courses offered by Columbia 
College or by the Faculties of Philosophy, Law, Medicine, 
Mines (Applied Science), and Pure Science, without any 
additional fee. 

Undergraduate studies of particular value to students in 



this School are as follows : 

Hours 
Per Week 

Outline of Mediaeval History (ist term) . . .2 
Outline of Modern History (2d term) ... 2 
Outline of European History since 1815 (ist term) . 2 
American History (ist term) ..... 2 
Elements of Political Economy (2d term) . . .2 
Economic History (ist term) ..... 2 



Among the cognate courses given by the Faculty of Phi- 
losophy are : 

History of philosophy, 2 hours a week; ethics, 2 hours a 
week ; biological anthropology, 2 hours a week ; readings in 
Gaius and Ulpian, 1 hour a week ; readings in Anglo-Saxon 
law; courses in Norman French, in the various modern 
languages, and others. 

Students enrolled either in the General, in the Union, or in 
the Jewish, Theological Seminary, in the City of New York, 



6 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



who may be designated for the privilege by the authorities of 
those institutions, and accepted by the President of Columbia 
University, are admitted to the courses offered by the Faculty 
of Political Science free of charge for tuition. 

By the terms of an alliance between Columbia University 
and the Teachers' College, at Morningside Heights, duly - 
qualified students of the Teachers' College are permitted to 
enter courses offered by the Faculty of Political Science 
either as candidates for degrees or as special students. 

All of these institutions offer reciprocal privileges to stu- 
dents of Columbia University. 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree 

Students are received as candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Master of Laws or Doctor 
of Philosophy. 

If the applicant is a candidate for a degree, he must file a 
certificate of his completion of the Junior year in some college 
of good standing, or if he holds a degree from any institution 
he must file evidence of such degree. Blanks for this purpose 
may be secured at the Dean's office. Certificates of graduation 
or dismission from institutions of learning in foreign countries 
are also accepted. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are required 
to pursue courses of instruction amounting in all to not less 
than fifteen hours of attendance per week for one year, and 
must conform to such requirements regarding a graduation 
thesis as are established for members of the Senior Class in 
Columbia College. Their selection of studies is not confined 
to those in this faculty. Students may pursue courses offered 
by the Faculty of Philosophy or the Faculty of Pure Science, 
or the first-year course in the School of Law or the School of 
Medicine, and count the same as part of the requirements for 
the Bachelor's degree. Law students, for example, may thus 
take their Bachelor's degree and so shorten by one year the 
time which otherwise would be necessary for the attainment 
of degrees in both arts and law. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



7 



Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy must hold a Bachelor's degree or an engineer- 
ing degree from some institution in good standing and 
continue their studies for not less than one and two years 
respectively. They are required to pursue courses of study 
and research in one major and two minor subjects. For a 
further statement see the regulations for University Degrees, 
pages 8 to n. 

The period of study above indicated for the attainment of 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is a minimum period. 
In most cases candidates for this degree have found it neces- 
sary to devote three years after the attainment of the bacca- 
laureate degree to the work required for the doctorate. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who 
have been in residence at other universities are given credit 
for the same. But no student can be a candidate for any 
degree unless he has been in residence at Columbia Uni- 
versity at least one term. 

For the degree of Master of Laws see pages n and 12. 

Students may present themselves for examination for a 
degree at any time during the year whenever the require- 
ments as to residence and an essay or dissertation have been 
complied with. 

Fees 

The matriculation fee is $5. This is not payable annually, 
but only at the commencement of the student's connection 
with the University. 

The annual tuition fee for every candidate for a degree is 
$150, payable in two equal instalments in October and Feb- 
ruary. For the degree of Master of Arts the maximum fee 
is $150; for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy the maximum 
fee is $300. The fee for students not candidates for a degree 
is calculated at the rate of $15 a year for each hour of attend- 
ance per week upon university exercises with a maximum fee 
of $150. In every case the fee covers the specified number of 
hours throughout the year — no student being received for a 
less period than one year. Such fees, when not more than 



8 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



one hundred dollars, are payable in advance; otherwise in 
half-yearly instalments at the same time as regular fees. 

Examination fees are as follows : For the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, $15; for the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Laws, $25 ; for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
$35 ; for examinations at unusual times, such as second ex- 
aminations, $5. The examination fee must in each case be 
paid before the candidate presents himself for examination 
for the degree. 

Holders of university and other fellowships are exempt 
from the payment of all fees. 

Committee on Aid for Students 

The University Council has constituted a Standing Com- 
mittee on Aid for Students. It is the design of the Committee 
to put students desiring to work their way through the Uni- 
versity, especially those coming from elsewhere than New 
York or the immediate vicinity, in the way of earning enough 
for their partial or complete support, or if possible to extend 
assistance to them in other ways while they are pursuing their 
studies here. It is believed that many opportunities may be 
offered to students of this class if the fact of their desire to 
obtain employment is made known. Some of the openings 
likely to be available are: Private tutoring, translating, 
copying of various sorts, teaching in evening schools, univer- 
sity extension lecturing, typewriting, selling text-books. All 
communications should be addressed to the Committee. 



Regulations as to the Degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy 

1. Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 
must hold a baccalaureate degree in arts, letters, philosophy, or science, or an 
engineering degree, or an equivalent of one of these from a foreign institution 
of learning. 

The Deans of the several schools will require candidates for the higher 
degrees to present satisfactory evidence that they are qualified for the studies 
they desire to undertake. 

2. Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 
must pursue their studies in residence for a minimum period of one and two 



MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 9 



years, respectively.* The year spent in study for the degree of Master of Arts 
is credited on account of the requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy. Residence at other universities may be credited to a candidate. In 
certain cases and by special arrangement, time exclusively devoted to in- 
vestigation in the field will be credited in partial fulfilment of the time required. 
No degree will be conferred upon any student who has not been in residence 
at Columbia University for at least one year. 

3. Each student who declares himself a candidate for the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, or either of them, shall, immediately after 
registration, designate one principal or major subject and two subordinate or 
minor subjects, which shall be the studies of his university course. 

4. The subjects from which the candidate's selection must be made are : 
Under the Faculty of Political Science : 

Group I. — History and political philosophy: 1. European history; 2. 
American history ; 3. political philosophy. 

Group II. — Public law and comparative jurisprudence: 1. constitutional 
law; 2. international law ; 3. criminal law ; 4. administrative law ; 5. com- 
parative jurisprudence. 

Group III. — Economics and social science: 1. political economy and 
finance ; 2. sociology and statistics. 

In his choice of subjects under this faculty, the candidate is limited by the 
regulation that not more than two of the three subjects may be selected from 
any one of the above groups, and by the following rules : 

Candidates offering European history as the major subject, must offer 
American history as one of the minor subjects, and vice versa. 

Candidates offering political economy and finance as the major subject, must 
offer sociology and statistics as one of the minor subjects, and vice versa. 

Candidates will not be permitted to offer constitutional law alone as the major 
subject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, but must combine with it the 
course on general international law, or on comparative administrative law. 

Candidates offering international law, or criminal law, or administrative law 
as the major subject, must take constitutional law as one minor subject. 

Candidates will not be permitted to offer criminal law alone as the major 
subject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, but must combine with it the 
course on general international law. 

To be recognized as a major subject for the degree of Master of Arts the 
courses selected must aggregate at least two hours per week throughout the 
year, and must also include attendance at a seminar ; for a minor subject for 
the degree of Master of Arts, the attendance at a seminar is not required. 

To be recognized as a minor subject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
courses must be taken, in addition to the requirements for a minor subject for 
the degree of Master of Arts, aggregating two hours weekly. To be recognized 
as a major subject for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, all of the courses 
and seminars offered in that subject must be taken. 

* In practice three years of study is usually necessary to obtain the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. 



IO 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



5. Each student is given a registration book, which is signed by the 
professor or instructor in charge of each course of instruction or investigation 
at the beginning and end of every such course. This registration book is to be 
preserved by the student as evidence of work accomplished and should be 
submitted to the Deans of the several faculties at the end of each year, that 
proper credit may be given and entered on the permanent records of the 
institution. 

6. Students desiring to be examined as candidates for any degree must make 
written application for such examination to the Dean of the proper faculty, on 
blank forms provided for the purpose. All such applications must be made on 
or before April 1st of the academic year in which examination is desired, and 
must be accompanied by the candidate's registration book, properly signed as 
above provided. 

7. Each candidate for the degree of Master of Arts shall present an essay 
on some topic previously approved by the professor in charge of his major 
subject. Before the candidate is admitted to examination the professor in 
charge of his major subject must have signified his approval of such essay. 
The Faculty of Political Science requires this essay to be a paper read during 
the year before the seminar of which the candidate is a member. 

8. Each candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy shall present a 
dissertation, embodying the result of original investigation and research, on 
some topic previously approved by the faculty. When such dissertation has 
been approved by the faculty, it shall be printed by the candidate, and one 
hundred and fifty copies shall be delivered to the faculty, unless for reasons of 
weight, a smaller number be accepted by special action of the University 
Council. On the title-page of every such dissertation shall be printed the 
words : 1 4 Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of 

Doctor of Philosophy, in the Faculty of , Columbia University." 

There shall be appended to each dissertation a statement of the educational 
institution that the author has attended, a list of the degrees and honors 
conferred upon him, as well as the titles of any previous publications. 

The several faculties have delegated the power to approve the subject chosen 
for his dissertation by any candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
as well as the power to approve the dissertation itself, to the professor in 
charge of the candidate's major subject. 

The Faculty of Political Science requires the dissertation to be submitted 
not later than April 1st of the academic year in which the examination for the 
degree is desired. With the consent of the Dean and the professor in charge 
of the candidate's major subject the examination may be held before the 
printed dissertation is submitted. 

9. Every candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in addition to 
passing such other examinations as may be required by the faculty, shall be 
subjected to an oral examination on his major subject, and shall defend his 
dissertation, in the presence of the entire faculty or of so many of its members 
as may desire to attend. The ability to read at sight Latin, French, and 
German, is required by the Faculty of Political Science, to be certified by the 
Dean. 



MASTER OF LAWS 



10. Students holding college degrees, who shall have completed with marked 
distinction one of the regular courses in the School of Law, the School of 
Medicine, or the School of Mines, may be recommended for the degree of 
Master of Arts ; provided that in each case the candidate presents a satisfactory 
dissertation, and that at least a part of the extra work required of him for the 
degree of Master of Arts be taken under the direction of either the Faculty of 
Philosophy, the Faculty of Political Science, or the Faculty of Pure Science, to 
the extent of a minor course for not less than one year. 

Regulations for the Degree of Master of Laws 

1. Any student who has satisfactorily completed the regular course of study 
in Columbia College, to the close of the Junior year, or in some other college 
maintaining an equivalent curriculum (every such case of equivalency to be con- 
sidered on its own merit), shall be entitled to be recommended for the degree of 
Master of Laws upon certificates from the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of 
Political Science that he has satisfactorily completed a four-years' course of 
study under said faculties. 

2. Every candidate for the degree of Master of Laws must elect from the 
subjects offered by said faculties, courses aggregating, in the four years, fifty- 
two hours per week, and must pass satisfactory examinations upon the sub- 
jects elected ; provided that not more than thirty-four hours of work may be 
elected either in the field of private law, or in that of public law, social 
ethics, history, and economics. 

3. Students, otherwise qualified, who have received the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws from this University, after pursuing the full course of study, shall be 
entitled, upon pursuing for an additional year a course of study of at least 
thirteen hours per week, under either or both of said faculties, and passing 
satisfactory examinations therein, to receive the degree of Master of Laws ; 
provided that no student shall receive the degree who has not studied and 
passed satisfactory examinations in comparative constitutional law, adminis- 
trative law, Roman law, international law, and in the three courses offered 
on equity* and who has not pursued here, or elsewhere, courses of instruction 
satisfactory to the Faculty of Political Science in history, social ethics, and 
economics. 

4. Each faculty shall determine the order in which the subjects offered by 
it shall be taken, and the maximum amount of work to be done therein during 
any one year. 

5. Students from other universities, colleges, or law schools, who shall have 
satisfactorily completed a course of study equivalent to at least one term of 
thirteen hours per week in the subjects indicated in Section 2, after receiving a 
Bachelor's degree, may be excused from the corresponding number of terms of 
the four years' residence required at Columbia, provided that in no case shall 
any one receive the degree of Master of Laws who has not spent at least four 

* Under this provision students would be allowed, but not required, to take history of 
European law, conflict of private law, law of municipal corporations, and the law of 
taxation. 



I 2 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



years in the study of the said subjects in some university, college, or law 
school ; and the decision whether work at another institution shall be accepted 
as equivalent to work at Columbia, shall rest, as far as the studies under the 
Faculty of Law are concerned, with the Faculty of Law, and as far as the studies 
under the Faculty of Political Science are concerned, with the Faculty of Polit- 
ical Science. But neither faculty shall admit a student from another university, 
college, or law school, to examination for the degree of Master of Laws without 
a residence of at least one term in this University.** 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND LAW 
In General 

The instruction offered by the Faculty of Political Science 
upon constitutional, administrative, international, and crim- 
inal law, and upon Roman law and comparative jurispru- 
dence, furnishes the natural and necessary complement to 
the courses offered by the Faculty of Law. Law is, with us, 
the chief avenue into politics; and for this reason, if for no 
other, a complete legal education should include the science 
of politics. But the importance to the lawyer of the subjects 
above mentioned does not depend simply on the prospect of 
a political career. To become a thorough practitioner the 
student must acquire a considerable knowledge of public 
law; and if he wishes to be anything more than a practitioner, 
if he wishes to know law as a science, some knowledge of 
other systems than our own becomes imperative. From this 
point of view the Roman law is of paramount importance, 

** Under the above regulations the student may choose either of two courses leading to 
the degree of Master of Laws. He may study primarily for the Bachelor of Laws degree, 
and, after obtaining this, prosecute his studies a year longer for the Master's degree ; or he 
may register himself from the outside as a candidate for the Master's degree without 
attempting to take the Bachelor's degree. Those students who believe that they will be 
able to devote the necessary time to the legal studies, are strongly recommended to take the 
latter course. Such students will find it to their advantage to make their elections for the 
first year largely in the field of social ethics, political philosophy, constitutional history, and 
economics, combining with these subjects courses in the elements of jurisprudence and the 
general principles of contracts and torts, and to divide the subsequent years between public 
and private law. 

The student who has completed his Junior year in Columbia College, or in some other 
college maintaining an equivalent curriculum, may obtain the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from Columbia College upon such a combination of legal and political courses 
aggregating not less than fifteen hours a week for one year ; and such courses will also be 
counted as a part of the fifty-two hours a week required for the degree of Master of Laws. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 



13 



not merely by reason of its scientific structure, but because it 
is the basis of all modern systems except the English. 

The courses on constitutional and diplomatic history con- 
stitute the indispensable introduction to those in public law; 
and the courses on economics and finance will be found of 
great value by students of both public and private law. 

Of these subjects, criminal law is required as part of the 
Bachelor of Laws degree in the Law School, and Roman law, 
history of European law, comparative jurisprudence, com- 
parative constitutional law, administrative law, law of munici- 
pal corporations, law of taxation, and international law, are 
elective for the same degree. The Faculty of Law also 
recommends that students who have not had an adequate 
training in history economics, and finance, shall so prolong 
their course of study that they may avail themselves of the 
opportunity offered in the School of Political Science for 
studying these subjects. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

The work in economics and sociology falls under three 
heads, viz. : The university courses of instruction in the 
various departments of social science, the work in the 
statistical laboratory, and the "field work," or practical 
work in connection with the Charity Organization Society, 
the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities, the State Charities Aid 
Association, the University Settlement Society of New York 
City, and the East Side House. These are fully explained in 
the separate announcement of the courses in sociology. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH FOR 
1896-97 1 

The course of study embraces instruction and research in 
three groups of subjects: 

I History and Political Philosophy. 
II Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence. 
Ill Economics and Social Science. 

1 Subject to revision in details in case of need. 



14 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Seminars 

Outside of the regular instruction in the various subjects 
by lecture, it is the intention to furnish the students an 
opportunity for special investigation of historical, legal, 
economic and social questions under the direction of the pro- 
fessors. This is done by means of original papers prepared 
by the students. The papers are read before the professor 
and the students, and are then criticised and discussed. There 
will be at least one seminarium in each subject. The number 
of meetings and the topics to be discussed are determined 
each year. Attendance at a seminar in the major subject 
is necessary on the part of candidates for the degrees of 
Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 

There are also preliminary seminars in history and polit- 
ical economy designed primarily for those that are not fully 
prepared for the more advanced work. A preliminary semi- 
nar taken by a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts will count for one hour toward the fifteen hours neces- 
sary for a degree. 

Group I — History and Political Philosophy 

The student is supposed to be familiar with the outlines of 
European history, ancient and modern, as well as of Ameri- 
can history. Students who are not thus prepared are recom- 
mended to take the undergraduate courses in history in the 
College. These are as follows 1 : 

1 (A) Outline of Mediaeval and Modern History. — Two hours 
a week: Mr. Cushing. 

2 (B) Outline of European History since 1815. — Two hours a 
week, first term: Prof. Dunning and Mr. Cushing. 

5 American History, — Three hours a week: Prof. Dunning. 

Subject A— European History 

7 Introduction to Modern European History. — The aim of this 
course is to furnish the student with such preliminary ideas 
of the mediaeval church and of the culture and thought of the 

1 The lettered courses are required for undergraduates. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 15 



fourteenth and fifteenth centuries as shall permit an intelli- 
gent study of the Reformation. The development of the 
papal hierarchy, the sources of the power and the nature of 
the corruption, of the church will be considered, as well as the 
great reform movement of the fourteenth and fifteenth cen- 
turies, culminating in the Councils of Constance and Basle. 
The contrast between the tendencies of mediaeval and modern 
thought will be illustrated by the writings of Dante, Petrarch, 
and the Humanists. The peculiar political conditions of 
Italy and the phases of political speculation from Aquinas to 
Machiavelli will be sketched out. Burckhardt's Civilization of 
the Renaissance will be used as a hand-book in the latter part 
of the work. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. Robinson. 
This course will be given in 1897-98. 

8 The Reformation and the Beginning of the Catholic Reaction. — 
This course will include a consideration of the political and 
intellectual conditions in Germany at the opening of the six- 
teenth century; the character and success of the Lutheran 
reform, taking into account the criticisms of Erasmus and of 
later writers like Dollinger, Hergenrother, and Janssen. The 
course of the Reformation outside of Germany; Calvin and 
the ''Institutes of Christianity"; the work of the Council of 
Trent; the Society of Jesus, its aims and organization; the 
Inquisition, and the development of the censorship of the 
press. — Two hours a week, second term: Prof. Robinson. 

This course will be given in 1897-98. 

Q The Political History of Europe from the Peace of Augsburg 
( J SSS) to the Treaty of Westphalia {1648). — Comprising the 
reign of Philip II. ; the Revolt of the Netherlands; the Wars 
of Religion in France, and the Thirty Years' War. — Two hours 
a week, first term: Prof. Robinson. 

10 France under Louis XIV. — The Antecedents and Opening of 
the French Revolution. — This course will include a description 
of the organization of the French monarchy under Louis XIV. ; 
the policy of Colbert; the development of the spirit of revo- 
lution in the eighteenth century. The more characteristic 
writings of Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Turgot, will 
be discussed and the progress of reform in France from the 



i6 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



accession of Louis XVI. to the completion of the Constitution 
of 1791 will be considered as a whole with a view of showing 
the strict historical continuity between the Revolution and the 
conditions preceding it. Besides gaining some familiarity 
with the works of the chief contemporaneous writers, students 
will be required to read De Tocqueville's Ancien Regime. — Two 
hours a week, second term : Prof. Robinson. 

11 Europe and the French Revolution, iyp2-iS'i^. — This will 
comprise a study of the antecedents of the revolutionary period 
in Europe; the causes of the general European war; the 
government of the committee of public safety; the partition 
of Poland ; the rise of Bonaparte; the internal conditions in 
France after the Reign of Terror; the foundation of the 
Consulate and the general peace of 1801. In treating Napo- 
leon's reconstruction of Europe special attention will be given 
to the permanent results of his policy. The course will termi- 
nate with a study of the Congress of Vienna. — Two hours a 
week: Prof. Robinson. 

This course will be given in 1897-98. 

12 The Development of Prussia under the Hohenzollern Dynasty 
and the Unification of Germany, 1416-1871. — Two hours a week, 
first term : Prof. Robinson. 

13 The Sources of Later Mediceval and of Modern Continental 
History — Methods of Historical Study. — While emphasis will be 
laid in all the above courses on the sources of our knowledge, 
this will furnish a systematic view of the whole field, and will 
include practical bibliographical exercises on the part of the 
students. Bernheim's Lehrbuch der Historischen Methode will 
serve as a basis for the work. — Two hours a week, second 
term : Prof. Robinson. 

14 Seminar in Modern European History. — Two hours every 
other week, both terms: Prof. Robinson. 

15 The Political and Constitutional History of England. — The 
object of this course of lectures is to trace the growth of the 
English constitution from the earliest to the present times, 
dwelling upon foreign relations during periods when they had 
an important influence. Particular attention is paid to the 
administrative system developed by the Norman monarchs, 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



17 



and to the struggle of the thirteenth century, which cul- 
minated in the legislative work of Edward I. The political 
results of the Reformation are described. Under the Stuarts, 
the conflict between the crown and parliament, which had 
been interrupted at the close of the fourteenth century, was 
resumed, owing chiefly to the rise of Puritanism. The House 
of Commons now leads the opposition. The history of the 
struggle between the two is detailed till the most important 
questions in dispute were settled by the events of 1688-89. 
The development of parliamentary government under the 
aristocratic regime is then outlined. About the beginning of 
this century, and largely in consequence of the industrial 
revolution, the democratizing of the constitution began. 
The account given of the development of this tendency closes 
with the Reform Bill of 1884. The work of the first term 
will close at 1640. The history subsequent to that date will 
be treated during the second term. — Two hours a week : 
Prof. Osgood. 

16 Rise and Development of the French Monarchy during the 
latter half of the middle ages. — The purpose of this course of 
lectures is to trace the constitutional history of France from 
the dissolution of the Carolingian empire to the era of the 
absolute monarchy, at the close of the middle ages. The main 
line of evolution in the history of the French state during this 
period is the growth of the kingship from great theoretical 
powers and practical impotency under the first Capetians to 
the absolute monarchy of Louis XI. The various steps in this 
development, the forces aiding and opposing the extension of 
the royal power, the financial, judicial and administrative 
institutions necessitated by the centralization of power in the 
king, are described. — Two hours a week, second term: Mr. 
Beer. 

17 History of European Law. — See post., p. 31. — Two hours 
a week: Prof. Munroe Smith. 

18 History of Diplomacy. — See post., p. 28. — Two hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Moore. 

19 Early Church History. — The ante-Nicene period, a.d. 
100-31 1 ; spread and persecution ; literary conflict with 



i8 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



heathenism and heresy ; conversion of the Roman empire ; 
development of Christian doctrine and discipline. — Two hours 
a week. See foot note. 

20 Mediceval Church History. — From the time of Constantine 
to the Reformation. Nicene and post-Nicene periods : Monas- 
ticism ; rise of the papacy; development of doctrine ; mediaeval 
Christianity; conversion of the barbarians, separation of the 
Greek and Latin churches; the papacy and the empire; the 
Crusades; preparation for the Reformation. — Two hours a 
week. See foot note. 

21 Modern Church History. — The Reformation on the con- 
tinent, in England and Scotland ; the Roman Catholic counter- 
reformation ; history of the Lutheran and Reformed churches. 
Two hours a week. See foot note. 

22 Seminar in European History. — Two hours a week : Prof. 
Osgood. 

Subject B— American History 

23 Political and Constitutional History of the United States. — 
This course of lectures covers the history of the colonies and 
of the revolutionary war; the formation and dissolution of 
the confederate constitution of 1781, the federal constitution 
of 1787 and its application down to the civil war; the changes 
wrought in the constitution by the civil war, and the result- 
ing transformation of the public law of the United States. — 
Two hours a week : Prof. Burgess. 

24 Political History of the Colonies and of the American Revo- 
lution. — This is an investigation course, extending through 
two years. During the first year attention will be devoted to 
the settlement of the colonies and their development in the 
seventeenth century. During the second year the growth of 
the system of colonial administration, the conflict with the 
French, and the revolt of the colonies, will be investigated. 
The object of the course is twofold : First, to acquaint the 
student as thoroughly as possible with the history of the 
period ; second, to teach him how to investigate and how to 

This course is given at the Union Theological Seminary, but may be counted 
as an equivalent of a two-hour course in Columbia. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



19 



do the constructive work of the historian. The subject is 
taken up topically, and the titles of the chief original authori- 
ties bearing upon each topic are given by the instructor. 
These works the student must read, compare, and criticise. 
The result of his study must appear in the form of a consist- 
ent and truthful account of the event of which he is treating. 
It is intended that attention shall be fixed as exclusively as 
possible upon original sources. When secondary material is 
used, it must be examined and criticised in the light of the 
original. When necessary, an analytical study of the his- 
tories, relations, or other authorities, is undertaken for the 
purpose of ascertaining the degree of their credibility. Atten- 
tion is also called to the character of historical writing in each 
period under investigation. Students are brought, as far as 
possible, to view the world from the standpoint of the men 
whose works they are studying. It is intended that a class 
taking the full course shall have discussed before it all the 
most important original authorities bearing upon the history 
of the American colonies and revolution. — Two hours a week 
for two years : Prof. Osgood. 

25 The United States during Civil War and Reconstruction. — 
The object of this course is to describe the constitutional 
principles which came into play during the period from i860 
to 1877. Among the topics discussed in more or less detail 
are: The principles of the appeal to arms; the nature and 
scope of the "war power"; the status of the negro as affected 
by the war; the various theories of reconstruction; the 
adoption of the last three amendments to the constitution; 
the actual process of reconstruction; the so-called ''force 
legislation"; and the circumstances attending the final cessa- 
tion of national interference in the Southern States. — Two 
hours a week, second term: Prof. Dunning. 

26 History of American Diplomacy. — See post, p. 28. — Two 
hours a week, second term : Prof. Moore. 

27 American Church History. — Two hours a week. See foot 
note, p. 18. 

28 The Political History of the United States, 1 849-1 861. — 
Among the chief subjects treated in this course are: The 



20 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



political results of the Mexican war; the compromise of 1850, 
the election of 1852, and the end of the Whig party; the 
Kansas-Nebraska bill; the development of the American and 
the Republican parties; the fight for Kansas; the election of 
1856; the Dred Scott case; the Kansas question in Congress; 
the Lincoln-Douglas debate, the "Irrepressible Conflict"; 
John Brown's raid, and "The Impending Crisis"; the conven- 
tions and campaign of i860; efforts at compromise; the 
formation of the Confederacy and the outbreak of the civil 
war. — Two hours a week, first term: Dr. Bancroft. 

29 Seminar in Early American History. — One hour a week: 
Prof. Osgood. 

Subject C— Political Philosophy 

40 General History of Political Theories. — Every people 
known to history has possessed some form, however vague 
and primitive, of political government. Every people which 
has attained a degree of enlightenment above the very lowest 
has been permeated by some ideas, more or less systematic, 
as to the origin, nature, and limitations of governmental 
authority. It is the purpose of this course to trace historic- 
ally the development of these ideas, from the primitive 
notions of primitive people to the complex and elaborate 
philosophical theories that have characterized the ages of 
highest intellectual refinement. 

Book I. treats mainly of the political philosophy of Greece 
and Rome, with especial attention to the profound 
speculations of Plato and Aristotle. 

Book II. discusses the political doctrines of early Christianity 
and the Christian church, with the controversy of papacy 
and empire, and the elaborate systems of St. Thomas 
Aquinas and his adversaries. 

Book III. treats of that age of renaissance and reformation 
in which Machiavelli and Bodin, Suarez and Bellarmino, 
Luther and Calvin, worked out their various solutions of 
the great problem, how to reconcile the conflicting doc- 
trines of theology, ethics, and politics. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 21 



Book IV. covers the period during which the theories were 
wrought out which found realization in the English and 
French revolutions. Here are examined the doctrine of 
natural law as developed by Grotius and Puffendorf, the 
doctrine of divine right of kings with its corollary of 
passive obedience, as in Filmer and Bossuet, the theory 
of the constitutionalists, Locke and Montesquieu, and the 
idea of social contract made most famous by Rousseau. 

Book V. traces the various currents of thought since Rous- 
seau : The idealism of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel, the 
reactionary philosophy which sought to overcome the 
tendencies of the revolution, the historical school of Burke 
and Savigny, and the English individualists like Bentham, 
Mill, and Spencer. — Two hours a week: Prof. Dunning. 

41 American Political Philosophy. — As the first nation to 
realize in practice many of the principles that characterize the 
modern state, the United States offers special opportunities 
for research to the student of political philosophy. In this 
course a twofold line of discussion is followed : First, by a 
study of the various documents of the revolutionary era, the 
Declaration of Independence, the constitutions, national and 
commonwealth, and other state papers, the dominant ideas of 
the people are derived from their official records. Second, 
the writings of the leading statesmen, like Hamilton, Jeffer- 
son, Calhoun, and Webster, as well as the more systematic 
and philosophical works of Lieber, Mulford, Brownson, 
Jameson, and others, are analyzed and subjected to critical 
comment. — One hour a week, in 1896-97 and alternate years 
thereafter: Prof. Dunning. 

42 Seminar in Political Philosophy. — One hour a week : Prof. 
Dunning. 

Group II — Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Subject A — Constitutional Law 

I Comparative Co?istitutional Law of the Principal European 
States and of the United States : comprehending a comparison of 
the provisions of the constitutions, principally of England, 



2 2 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



United States, France, and Germany, the interpretation of 
the same by legislative enactments and judicial decisions, and 
the generalization from them of the fundamental principles of 
public law common to them all. — Three hours a week: Prof. 
Burgess. 

5 Seminar in Constitutional Law. — Two hours a week: Prof. 
Burgess. 

Subject B — International Law 

6 History of Diplomacy. — The object of this course is to 
exhibit the evolution of the relations between independent 
states and the manner in which those relations are conducted. 
The history of the diplomatic system of Europe is traced 
from its beginnings to the present time, and an exposition is 
given of the religious, dynastic, territorial, and commercial 
struggles of which that system is the result. The first part 
of the course relates to the development of the European 
concert prior to the Peace of Westphalia. This is followed 
by an examination of the most important of the general 
European treaties, beginning with those concluded at the 
Congress of Westphalia in 1648, and ending with the Treaty 
of Berlin of 1878. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. 
Moore. 

7 History of American Diplomacy. — In the study of American 
diplomacy special attention will be given to the history and 
method of the diplomacy of the United States. The course 
will comprehend (1) the diplomacy of the revolution; (2) the 
period from the Treaty of Peace of 1783 to the termination 
of the war of 181 2; (3) from the termination of that war to 
the civil war; (4) from the outbreak of the latter war to the 
present time. — Two hours a week, second term: Prof. Moore. 

8 International Law. — This course treats of the general 
principles of international law, as it has been developed by 
positive agreement, in the form of treaties and conventions, 
and by common usage, as shown in legislation, in the decis- 
ions of international tribunals and of municipal courts, and 
in the conduct of nations. The rules thus discovered are 
discussed in the light of the principles of reason and justice, 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 23 



as scientifically presented by writers on international law, 
and an effort is made to trace the systematic establishment 
of the rules which govern intercourse among nations at the 
present day. — Two hours a week: Prof. Moore. 

10 Seminar in International Law. — Two hours a week: Prof. 
Moore. 

Subject C — Criminal Law 

11 Criminal Law, including the Conflict of Penal Laws 
and Extradition. — This course embraces (1) the general 
principles of criminal law, defining the relation of the indi- 
vidual to the state, as regards the maintenance of public 
order; (2) the conflict of penal laws, and the punishment of 
extra-territorial crime; (3) extradition, including (a) the de- 
livery up of fugitives from justice as between nations, and 
(b) the delivery of such fugitives as between the states of 
the American Union, or interstate rendition. — Two hours a 
week: Prof. Moore. 

Subject D— Administrative Law 

16 Comparative Administrative Law of the United States 
and the Principal European States. — The purpose of this 
course is to present the general principles of the administra- 
tive law of the United States, both in the nation and in the 
commonwealths, and to compare them with the law of Eng- 
land, France, and Germany. The following list of topics 
will give a general idea of the particular subjects discussed: 
The principle of the separation or distribution of powers; 
the executive power; administrative councils; heads of de- 
partments, their tenure of office, their powers and duties; 
local (including municipal) government; officers, their ap- 
pointment or election, their duties, their rights, removal 
from office; the administration in action; the control over 
the administration possessed by the higher administrative 
officers, the courts, and the legislature. Special attention 
will here be paid to the writs of mandamus, quo warranto, 
certiorari, habeas corpus, and prohibition, and their statutory 
substitutes, by means of which the courts exercise their con- 
trol over the administration. The new courts will also be 



2 4 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



examined, which have been established in France and Ger- 
many during this century, and to which the name of admin- 
istrative courts has been given. — Two hours a week: Prof. 
Goodnow. 

17 The Law of Municipal Corporations. — This course treats 
of the development of the American municipal corporation ; 
the creation of municipal corporations; the control over 
American municipal corporations possessed by the common- 
wealth legislature, and its constitutional limitations, both 
national and commonwealth; the dissolution of municipal 
corporations, and its effect; the organization of municipal 
corporations, together with a detailed discussion of their 
powers and liabilities, both as governmental agencies and as 
corporate bodies, subjects of private law. — Two hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Goodnow. 

18 The Law of Taxation. — The subjects treated in this 
course are: The nature of taxes and the taxing power; the 
limitations placed by the constitutions, both national and 
commonwealth, upon the taxing power; the construction of 
tax proceedings; the rules of law relative to the particular 
taxes, both national and commonwealth, levied in the United 
States; the methods of assessment and collection, and the 
remedies open to the individual against arbitrary, unjust, and 
illegal taxation. — Two hours a week, second term: Prof. 
Goodnow. 

19 Municipal Politics. — This course will include a brief 
survey of municipal development, with a view to determining 
the conditions that make municipal prosperity and those that 
contribute to its decay. It will include a brief study of 
municipal organization in Europe and in the United States; 
the respective merits of government by mayor and govern- 
ment by council; the relation of the city to the state, or, 
Home Rule; unsolved municipal problems, such as the 
treatment of sewage and garbage; the distinction between 
dispensable and indispensable municipal functions; whether 
the indispensable functions of municipal government, such 
as charity and correction, can be usefully usurped by private 
associations, however well intentioned ; how far municipal 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



25 



government is business, how far it is humanitarian ; the re- 
sult of efforts to extend dispensable municipal functions in 
Europe, as, for example, the ownership and exploitation of 
its own franchises, municipal lodging houses, municipal 
tenements, etc. ; the actual organization of municipal govern- 
ment in New York City; the history of New York City, par- 
ticular attention being given to its history since the Tweed 
Ring; the actual condition of political forces in New York 
City to-day and a study of the questions that are included 
in the term "practical politics." Two hours a week, second 
term : Mr. Kelly. 

20 Seminar in Administrative Law. — One hour a week: 
Prof. Goodnow. 

Subject E — Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

21 Roman Law L. — The history and institutions of the 
classical and Justinian law. Lectures, with assigned read- 
ing (Muirhead, Roman law; Sohm, Roman law). — Two hours 
a week, first term : Prof. Munroe Smith. 

22 Roman Law LL. — Cases from the Corpus Juris Civilis, 
principally in contracts. — Two hours a week, second term: 
Prof. Munroe Smith. 

23 History of European Law. — This course treats (1) of 
primitive law, with especial reference to the usages and ideas 
of the Indo-Germanic races; (2) of early German law, includ- 
ing a comparison of Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, and conti- 
nental German customs; (3) of mediaeval European law, 
including feudal and canon law; (4) of the "reception" of 
the Roman law; and (5) of the genesis and character of the 
great modern codes. — Two hours a week (1897-98): Prof. 
Munroe Smith. 

24 Comparative Jurisprudence. — This course, based mainly 
on a comparison of the modern Roman and the English 
common law, aims to present the leading principles of modern 
property law and family law, — Two hours a week (1896-97): 
Prof. Munroe Smith. 



26 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



25 International Private Law, — In this course the theories 
of the foreign authorities and the practice of the foreign 
courts in the so-called ''conflicts of law" are compared with 
the solution given to these questions by our courts. — One 
hour a week: Prof. Munroe Smith. 

29 Seminar in Legal History and Comparative Legislation, — 
One hour a week: Prof. Munroe Smith. 

Group III — Economics and Social Science 

It is presumed that students before entering the school 
possess a knowledge of the general principles of political 
economy as laid down in the ordinary manuals by Walker or 
Mill, and also a knowledge of the general facts of economic 
history. Students who are not thus prepared are recom- 
mended to take the undergraduate courses in Columbia 
College. These are 1 : 

(A) Elements of Political Economy. — Two hours a week, 
second term : Prof. Mayo-Smith and Mr. Day. 

I Economic History of Europe and America. — Two hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Seligman and Mr. Day. 

Subject A — Political Economy and Finance 

3 Historical and Practical Political Economy. 

(A) Introductions Production and Consumption. — This course 
is given every year, and is intended to cover the general 
questions of the application of political economy to actual 
social life. The principal topics are: The function of polit- 
ical economy and its relation to the other political sciences, 
method of study, literature and writers, method of applying 
theory and principle to economic questions; the economic 
organization of society, its historical development, present 
economic institutions, the principle of individual liberty and 
the institution of private property in their economic influ- 
ence; the function of government in economic affairs, the 
individualistic view, the socialistic demand; the theory of 

1 The lettered course is required for undergraduates. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



27 



consumption and its effect in directing economic activity; the 
production of wealth and the problems of production, such 
as land-tenure, history of agriculture, farm mortgages, inter- 
national competition, growth of population, division of labor, 
growth of capital, forms of productive enterprise, application 
of machinery and accumulation of wealth. — Three hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

(B) The Problems of Exchange. — (Commerce, Trade, and 
Transportation.) — This course treats of the history of com- 
merce, the question of free trade or protection ; the history 
of transportation and the railroad question ; money and the 
mechanism of exchange; banks and banking; paper money, 
bimetallism and the silver question, currency reform ; history 
of credit; theory of value and price, history and statistics of 
prices, index numbers; commercial crises, their history and 
causes, depression of trade since 1873, the financial panic of 
1893; theory of competition, history of monopolies, economic 
influence of monopolies ; trusts; function of the government 
in regulating exchange. — Three hours a week, second term, 
given in 1897-98, and each alternate year thereafter: Prof. 
Mayo-Smith. 

(C) The Problems of Distribution. — (Relations of Labor and 
Capital.) — This course is devoted largely to labor questions, 
such as the history of labor, guilds, apprenticeship, the 
factory system ; the present condition and progress of the 
laboring classes; statistics of wages, cost of living and ex- 
penditures of the laboring class; trades-unions and benefit 
societies, strikes and boycotts; arbitration and conciliation; 
co-operation and profit-sharing; the state in relation to labor, 
poor relief, factory laws and employers' liability, working- 
men's insurance; aids to intelligence, thrift, health, and well- 
being; the capitalist class, profit, rent, and interest; the rela- 
tion of the employer to the laborer; progress and poverty; 
the program of socialism. — Three hours a week, second term, 
given in 1896-97, and each alternate year: Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

For students desiring to take (A), (B), and (C) in one year, a short resume will 
be given of the omitted course (B) or (C) during the latter portion of the first 
term. 



28 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



4 Science of Finance. — This course is historical as well as 
comparative and critical. It treats of the various rules of 
public expenditures and the methods of meeting the same 
among different civilized nations. It describes the different 
kinds of public revenue, including the public domain and 
public property, public works and industrial undertakings, 
special assessments, fees, and taxes. It is in great part a 
course on the history, theories, and methods of taxation in 
all civilized countries. It considers also public debt, meth- 
ods of borrowing, redemption, refunding, repudiation, etc. 
Finally, it describes the fiscal organization of the state by 
which the revenue is collected and expended, and discusses 
the budget, national, state, and local. Students are furnished 
with the current public documents of the United States 
Treasury, and the chief financial reports of the leading com- 
monwealths, and are expected to understand all the facts in 
regard to public debt, currency, and revenue therein con- 
tained. — Two hours a week: Prof. Seligman. 

5 Financial History of the United States. — This course en- 
deavors to present a complete survey of American legislation 
on currency, finance, and taxation, as well as its connection 
with the state of industry and commerce. Attention is called 
especially to the financial history of the colonies (colonial 
currency and taxation); to the financial methods of the 
revolution and the confederation ; to the financial policy of 
the Federalists and the Republicans up to the war of 1812, 
including the refunding and payment of the debt, the internal 
revenue, and the banking and currency problems ; to the 
financial history of the war with England; to the changes in 
the methods of taxation, and the crises of 1819, 1825, 1837 ; to 
the distribution of the surplus and the United States bank; 
to the currency problems up to the civil war; to the financial 
management of the war; to the methods of resumption, 
payment of the debt, national and state banks, currency 
questions, and problems of taxation ; and finally to the recent 
development in national, state, and municipal finance and 
taxation. — Two hours a week, first term (1897-98): Prof. 
Seligman. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 29 



6 Industrial and Tariff History of the United States. — The 
arguments of extreme free-traders, as of extreme protection- 
ists, are often so one-sided that an impartial judgment can be 
formed only through a knowledge of the actual effects of the 
tariffs. It is the object of this course to give a detailed 
history of each customs tariff of the United States from the 
very beginning; to describe the arguments of its advocates 
and of its opponents in each case ; to trace as far as possible 
the position of each of the leading industries before and after 
the passage of the chief tariff acts, and thus to determine 
how far the legislation of the United States has influenced 
the progress of industry and the prosperity of the whole 
country. Attention is called especially to the industrial his- 
tory of the colonies; to the genesis of the protective idea and 
to Hamilton's report; to the tariffs from 1789 to 1808; to the 
restriction and the war with England; to the tariffs of 181 6, 
1824, and the "tariff of abominations" of 1828; to the infant- 
industry argument; to the compromise and its effect on manu- 
facturers ; to the era of moderate free trade ; to the tariff of 1 85 7 ; 
to the war tariffs ; to their continuance, and to the pauper-labor 
argument ; to the McKinley act, and to the tariff of 1894. — 
Two hours a week, second term (1896-97): Prof. Seligman. 

7 Railroad Problems j Economic , Social, and Legal. — These 
lectures treat of railroads in the fourfold aspect of their rela- 
tion to the investors, the employees, the public, and the state 
respectively. A history of railways and railway policy in 
America and Europe forms the preliminary part of the course. 
All the problems of railway management, in so far as they 
are of economic importance, come up for discussion. 

Among the subjects treated are: Financial methods, rail- 
way construction, speculation profits, failures, accounts and 
reports, expenses, tariffs, principles of rates, classification 
and discrimination, competition and pooling, accidents, and 
employers' liability. Especial attention is paid to the methods 
of- regulation and legislation in the United States as compared 
with European methods, and the course closes with a general 
discussion of state versus private management. — Two hours a 
week, second term (1897-98): Prof. Seligman. 



3° 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



8 History of Political Economy. — In this course the various 
systems of political economy are discussed in their historical 
development. The chief exponents of the different schools 
are taken up in their order, but especial attention is directed 
to the wider aspects of the connection between the theories 
and the organization of the existing industrial society. The 
chief writers discussed are: 

I Antiquity : Orient, Greece, and Rome. 
II Middle ages: Aquinas, Glossators, writers on money, 
the usury question, etc. 

III Mercantilists: Stafford, Mun, Petty, North, Locke; 

Bodin, Vauban, Forbonnais; Serra, Galiani, Justi, 
etc. 

IV Physiocrats : Quesnay, Gournay, Turgot, etc. 

V Adam Smith and precursors : Tucker, Hume, Cantillon, 
Steuart. 

VI English school : Malthus, Ricardo, Senior, McCulloch, 
Chalmers, Jones, Mill, etc. 
VII The continent : Say, Sismondi, Hermann, List, Cournot, 
Bastiat, etc. 

VIII German historical school : Roscher, Knies, Hildebrand, 
etc. 

IX Recent development : Rogers, Jevons, Cairnes, Bagehot, 
Leslie, Toynbee, Marshall; Wagner, Schmoller, 
Held, Brentano, Cohn; Menger, Sax, Bohm-Bawerk, 
Wieser; Leroy-Beaulieu, De Laveleye, Gide; Cossa, 
Nazzani, Loria, Ricca-Salerno, Pantaleoni; Carey, 
George, Walker, Clark, Patten, Adams, etc. 

— Two hours a week, given in 1896-97, and each alternate 

year thereafter : Prof. Seligman. 

9 Economic Theory I. — This course discusses the static laws 
of distribution. If the processes of industry were not chang- 
ing, wages and interest would tend to adjust themselves 
according to certain standards. A study of the mechanism 
of production would then show that one part of the product 
is specifically attributable to labor, and that another part is 
imputable to capital. It is the object of the course to show 
that the tendency of free competition, under such conditions, 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



3* 



is to give to labor, in the form of wages, the amount that it 
specifically creates, and also to give to capital, in the form of 
interest, what it specifically produces. The theory undertakes 
to prove that the earnings of labor and of capital are governed 
by a principle of final productivity, and that this principle 
must be studied on a social scale, rather than in any one 
department of production. — Two hours a week, first term: 
Prof. Clark. 

10 Economic Theory II. — This course discusses the dynamic 
laws of distribution. The processes of industry are actually 
progressing. Mechanical invention, emigration, and other 
influences, cause capital and labor to be applied in new ways 
and with enlarging results. These influences do not repress 
the action of the static forces of distribution, but they bring a 
new set of forces into action. They create, first, employers' 
profits, and, later, additions to wages and interest. It is the 
object of the course to show how industrial progress affects 
the several shares in distribution under a system of competi- 
tion, and also to determine whether the consolidations of 
labor and of capital, which are a distinctive feature of modern 
industry, have the effect of repressing competition. — Two 
hours a week, second term : Prof. Clark. 

11 Communistic and Socialistic Theories. — This course studies 
the theories of St. Simon, Fourier, Proudhon, Rodbertus, 
Marx, Lassalle, and others. It aims to utilize recent dis- 
coveries in economic science in making a critical test of these 
theories themselves and of certain counter-arguments. It 
examines the socialistic ideals of distribution, and the effects 
that, by reason of natural laws, would follow an attempt to 
realize them through the action of the state. — Two hours a 
week, first term : Prof. Clark. 

12 Theories of Social Reform. — This course treats of certain 
plans for the partial reconstruction of industrial society that 
have been advocated in the United States, and endeavors to 
determine what reforms are in harmony with economic 
principles. It treats of the proposed single tax, of the 
measures advocated by the Farmers' Alliance and of those 
proposed by labor organizations. It studies the general 



32 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



relation of the state to industry. — Two hours a week, second 
term: Prof. Clark. 

13 Preliminary Seminar in Political Economy. — Primarily for 
those that have already studied economics for only a year. 
Essays, readings, and practical exercises on problems of the 
day. — One hour a week: Prof. Seligman and Mr. Day. 

14 Seminar in Political Economy. — For advanced students. — 
Two hours, bi-weekly : Prof. Clark. 

15 Seminar in Political Economy and Finance. — For advanced 
students. — Two hours, bi-weekly: Prof. Seligman. 

29 Seminar in Practical Economics, in connection with Sem- 
inar in Statistics. — See p. 34. — For advanced students. — Two 
hours, bi-weekly: Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

Subject B — Sociology and Statistics 

16 Physical Geography, Anthropology, and Ethnology. — This 
course will treat of the following subjects: 

I Physical Geography in its relation to the development of 
culture: (a) areas of characterization, acclimatiza- 
tion, etc. ; (b) theories of distribution. 
II History of the Science of Anthropology. 

III Prehistoric Archaeology, including earliest evidences of 

human life, theories of migration, etc. 

IV Ethnology: {a) language; (b) manners and customs; (c) 

classification of races ; (d) 1 race problems, biologically 
considered, including variation, intermingling, and 
extermination. 
V Anthropometry. 1 
VI Comparative Mythology. — Two hours a week: Dr. Ripley. 

17 Statistics and Sociology. — This course is given every 
year, and is intended to train students in the use of statistics 
as an instrument of investigation in social science. The topics 
covered are: Relation of statistics to sociology, criteria of 
statistics, population, population and land, sex, age and 
conjugal condition, births, marriages, deaths, sickness and 

1 This course will be given in the Faculty of Philosophy by Dr. Livingston 
Farrand. 



COURSES OF STUDY AND RESEARCH 



33 



mortality, race and nationality, migration, social position, 
infirmities, suicide, vice, crime, nature of statistical regulari- 
ties. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

18 Statistics and Economics. — This course covers those statis- 
tics of most use in political economy, but which have also a 
direct bearing on the problems of sociology. These include 
the statistics of land, production of food, condition of labor, 
wages, money, credit, prices, commerce, manufactures, trade, 
imports and exports, national wealth, public debt, and relative 
incomes. — Two hours a week, second term, given in 1896-97 
and each alternate year: Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

19 Theory, Technique, and History of Statistical Science. — 
This course studies the theory of statistics, law of probabili- 
ties, averages, mean error, rules for collecting, tabulating 
and presenting statistics, graphical methods, the question of 
the freedom of the will, the value of the results obtained by 
the statistical method, the possibility of discovering social 
laws. Some account will also be given of the history and 
literature of statistics, and the organization of statistical 
bureaus. — Two hours a week, second term, given in 1897-98, 
and each alternate year: Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

20 General Sociology. — A foundation for special work is laid 
in this fundamental course. It includes two parts, namely: 
(1) the analysis and classification of social facts, with special 
attention to the systems of Comte, Spencer, Schaffle, De Greef, 
Gumplowicz, Tarde, and other theoretical writers; (2) the 
study of the historical evolution of society, with special 
attention to social origins; to the development of the family, 
of the clan and of the tribe; and to the beginnings of civiliza- 
tion. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. Giddings. 

21 Sociological Laws. — The more important social phenom- 
ena of modern times and the principles of theoretical sociology 
are together brought under critical review in this course, 
which is a study of social feeling, public opinion, and organ- 
ized action, with special reference to the verification of socio- 
logical laws. The attempt is made to analyze the causes of 
emotional epidemics, panics, outbreaks of mob violence, and 
revolutions; to explain by general principles the growth of 



34 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



public opinion on great questions; and to prove from history 
and from current events that public action is governed by 
definite laws of social choice. — Two hours a week, second 
term: Prof. Giddings. 

22 Pauperism, Poor Laws, and Charities. — This course begins 
with a careful study of the English poor law, its history, 
practical working, and consequences. On this foundation is 
built a study of pauperism in general, but especially as it may 
be now observed in great cities. The laws of the different 
commonwealths in regard to paupers, out-relief, alms-houses, 
and dependent children, are compared. Finally the special 
modern methods of public and private philanthropy are 
considered, with particular attention to charity organization, 
the restriction of out-door alms, and the reclamation of chil- 
dren. — Two hours a week, first term: Prof. Giddings. 

23 Crime and Penology. — The topics taken up in this course 
are the nature and definitions of crime, the increase of crime 
and its modern forms, criminal anthropology, the social 
causes of crime, surroundings, parental neglect, education, 
the question of responsibility, historical methods of punish- 
ment, the history of efforts to reform prison methods, modern 
methods, the solitary system, the Elmira system, classification 
of criminals, classes of prisons, reformatories, and jails. — 
Two hours a week, second term: Prof. Giddings. 

29 Seminar in Statistics. — Work in the statistical labora- 
tory. — The object of the laboratory is to train the student 
in the methods of statistical analysis and computation. Each 
student will pursue a course of laboratory practice dealing 
with the general statistics of population, the relation of classes, 
the distribution of wealth, and the statistics of crime, vice, 
and misfortune. He will be taught how to judge current 
statistics and to detect statistical fallacies ; in short, to become 
an expert in judging of the value of sociological evidence. 
Each year some practical piece of work on an extensive scale 
is undertaken by the class. — Two hours bi-weekly, Wednesday 
(11 to 1): Prof. Mayo-Smith. 

30 Seminar in Sociology. — Two hours bi-weekly: Prof. 
Giddings. 



ORDER OF STUDIES 



35 



It is recommended by the faculty that students, who in- 
tend to devote their whole time to the courses of study offered 



ORDER OF STUDIES 

It is recommended by the faculty that students, who in- 
tend to devote their whole time to the courses of study offered 
by this faculty, take them in the following order: 

FIRST YEAR 

Hours 
Per Week 

History of Europe and United States .... 4 

Constitutional History of England .... 2 

Historical and Practical Political Economy . . 3 

Science of Finance ....... 2 

History of Political Theories ..... 3 

Financial History of the United States (1st term) . 2 

Tariff History of the United States (2d term) . . 2 

Physical Geography and Anthropology (1st term) . 2 

Institutes of Roman Law ...... 2 

SECOND YEAR 

Comparative Constitutional Law of the Principal Euro- 
pean States and of the United States ... 3 
History of European Law ..... 2 

Comparative Administrative Law of the United States, 

and of the Principal European States ... 2 

History of Political Economy ..... 2 

Economic Theory . . . . . . .2 

Statistics and Sociology (1st term) .... 2 

Statistics and Economics (2d term) .... 2 

American Colonial History ..... 2 

History of Diplomacy (1st term) ..... 2 

History of American Diplomacy (2d term) . . 2 

American Political Philosophy ..... 1 

History of the United States, 1849-1861 (1st term) . 2 

General Sociology (1st term) ..... 2 

Sociological Laws (2d term) ..... 2 

Early and Mediaeval Church History .... 4 



36 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



THIRD YEAR Hours 

Per Week 

Comparative Jurisprudence ..... 2 

International Law ....... 2 

Criminal Law ........ 2 

International Private Law ...... 1 

Law of Municipal Corporations (1st term) . . 2 

Municipal Politics (2d term) ..... 2 

Law of Taxation (2d term) ..... 2 

Socialism and Communism (1st term) ... 2 

Theories of Social Reform (2d term) ... 2 

Theory of Statistics (2d term) ..... 2 

Pauperism and Poor Relief (1st term) ... 2 

Crime and Penology (2d term) ..... 2 

Railroad Problems ....... 2 

American Colonial History ...... 2 

History of United States, 1860-1877 (2d term) . 2 

Rise and Growth of the French Monarchy (2d term) . 2 

Modern and American Church History ... 4 



UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 

Twenty-four fellowships, known as "University Fellow- 
ships," each of the value of five hundred dollars a year, are 
awarded by the Council to those applicants who give evi- 
dence of special fitness to pursue courses of higher study and 
original investigation, the competition to be open to gradu- 
ates of all colleges and scientific schools. Vacancies occur- 
ring in any of such fellowships shall be filled in the same 
manner in which original appointments are made. 

The application shall be made prior to March 1st, in 
writing, addressed to the President of Columbia University. 
Applications received later than March 1st may fail of con- 
sideration. The term of the fellowship is one year, dating 
from July 1st. Residence should begin October 1st. 

The candidate must give evidence 

(a) Of a liberal education, such as a diploma already 
granted, or about to be received, from a college or scientific 
school of good repute; 



UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 



37 



(b) Of decided fitness for a special line of study, such 
as an example of some scientific or literary work already per- 
formed ; 

(c) Of upright character, such as a testimonial from some 
instructor. 

The value of each fellowship is five hundred dollars. Pay- 
ments will be based on the time during which the Fellow 
shall have been in residence. The holder of a fellowship is 
exempt from the charges for tuition and all fees. 

Every holder of a fellowship will be expected to perform 
such duties as may be allotted to him in connection with his 
course of study, which course shall be such as to lead to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He will be expected to de- 
vote his time to the prosecution of special studies under the 
direction of the head of the department to which he belongs, 
and before the close of the academic year to give evidence of 
progress by the preparation of a thesis, the completion of a 
research, the delivery of a lecture, or by some other method. 
He must reside in New York or vicinity during the academic 
year. 

No holder of a fellowship shall be permitted to pursue a 
professional or technical course of study during his term. 
With the written approval of the President, but not other- 
wise, he may give instruction or assistance in any department 
of the University. 

A Fellow may be reappointed at the end of a year for 
reasons of weight. No Fellow may be reappointed for more 
than two terms of one year each. 

As these fellowships are awarded as honors, those who are 
disposed, for the benefit of others or for any other reason, to 
waive the pecuniary emoluments, may do so, and still have 
their names retained on the list of Fellows. 

University Scholarships 

Thirty University Scholarships are awarded annually to 
students in the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, 
and Pure Science. These scholarships are awarded under 



38 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



the following regulations, prepared by the authority of the 
University Council and with its approval: 

The University Scholarships are open to all graduates of 
colleges and scientific schools whose course of study has been 
such as to entitle them to be enrolled at Columbia as can- 
didates for a university degree. 

These scholarships are tenable for one academic year, with 
a possibility of renewal for one year longer. They are of an 
annual value of one hundred and fifty dollars each. 

Payments will be made to university scholars in two equal 
instalments: one on October ist and one on February ist. 
University scholars will be required to pay all of the fees 
established for matriculation, tuition, and graduation. 

Applications for University Scholarships should be made in 
writing, on blanks that will be furnished for the purpose, and 
addressed to the President of Columbia University. For the 
scholarships to be awarded in the spring, applications should 
be filed not later than May ist. No application for a Uni- 
versity Scholarship will be required from an applicant for a 
University Fellowship. Should a scholarship be awarded to 
an unsuccessful applicant for a fellowship, the only informa- 
tion required from the candidate will be that contained in the 
formal application for the latter honor. 

Not more than twenty of the University Scholarships will 
be awarded by the University Council at its regular meeting 
in May. The award will be made after applications have 
been examined and recommendations made by the Standing 
Committee on University Fellowships. In making these 
recommendations the Committee will give preference to 
those candidates for University Fellowships who have failed 
of appointment by the University Council after having been 
recommended for the same by any faculty or department. 

At least ten University Scholarships will be reserved to be 
filled in the autumn, and applications for the same will be 
received up to October ist. 

University scholars will be required to enroll themselves as 
candidates for a degree and to pursue a regular course of 
study leading thereto. 



PRIZES 



39 



PRIZES 

Prize in Political Economy 

An annual prize of $150 for the best essay on some subject 
in political economy has been established by Mr. Edwin R. 
A. Seligman, one of the class of 1879 of Columbia College. 
Competition for the prize is open to all members of the 
School of Political Science. The topic selected must be 
approved by the faculty, and the essay itself must be not less 
than twenty thousand words in length. 

James Gordon Bennett Prize in Political Science 

A prize of $40, to be given on Commencement Day, has 
been established by Mr. James Gordon Bennett. The prize 
is to be awarded by the Faculty of Political Science for the 
best essay in English prose upon some subject of contempo- 
raneous interest in the domestic or foreign policy of the 
United States. The subject is assigned each year by the 
faculty. The competition is open to Seniors in Columbia 
College, whether regular or special students, and to all stu- 
dents under any of the university faculties who have not 
yet taken the baccalaureate degree in arts, letters, or phi- 
losophy, provided that they take courses amounting to six 
hours a week throughout the year in the School of Political 
Science. Essays must be submitted to the President on or 
before May 1st. If no satisfactory essay is received no award 
will be made. No award will be made for any essay that is 
defective in English composition. 

Medal Offered by the National Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution 

The National Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution offers annually a silver medal under the following 
regulations : 

1. Competition shall be open to members of the Senior 
Class in Columbia College, and to first-year students, not 



4 o 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



graduates of Columbia College, studying under any of the 
faculties of the University. 2. Each essay must contain not 
less than 1,600 and not more than 2,000 words, and shall be 
upon the subject: " The Principles Fought For in the War of 
the Revolution." 3. A typewritten copy of each essay must 
be presented to the President not later than May 1st of each 
year. 4. The committee of award shall consist of the pro- 
fessors giving instruction in American history. 5. The prize 
shall in no case be awarded to any essay defective in English 
composition. The award, if made, will be announced by the 
President at Commencement. 

A similar tender has been made to the principal colleges 
of the country, and the essays receiving the silver medals 
will be submitted to a Committee of the National Society in 
competition for a gold medal to be awarded to the writer of 
the essay deemed most meritorious. 



ACADEMY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

This institution is devoted to the cultivation and advance- 
ment of the political sciences. It is composed mainly of 
graduates of Columbia University in the Schools of Law and 
Political Science, but any person whose previous studies have 
fitted him to participate in the work of the academy is eligible 
to membership. 

Meetings of the academy are held on the first Monday of 
each month. At these meetings papers are read by members 
presenting the results of original investigation by the writers 
in some department of political science. 

Prize Lectureships 

The trustees have established in the School of Political 
Science three prize lectureships of the annual value of five 
hundred dollars each, tenable for three years. The power 
of appointment is vested in the faculty. One of these three 
lectureships becomes vacant at the close of each academic 



LIB EAR Y 



41 



year. The previous holder may be reappointed. The con- 
ditions of competition are as follows : 

1 The candidate must be a graduate of Columbia University 
in the School of Political Science or the School of Law. In 
the latter case he must have pursued the curriculum of the 
School of Political Science for at least two years. 

2 He must be an active member of the Academy of Political 
Science. 

3 He must have read at least one paper before the Acad- 
emy of Political Science during the year next preceding the 
appointment. 

The duty of the lecturer is to deliver annually, before the 
students of political science, a series of at least twenty lec- 
tures, the result of original investigation. 

These prize lectureships will be found especially useful 
and welcome to graduates of the school who propose to devote 
themselves to an academic career, and who in this way may 
acquire the experience and acquaintance with university 
methods of teaching which will stand them in good stead in 
their future career. 



LIBRARY 

The students of the School of Political Science are entitled 
to the use, subject to the rules established by the library com- 
mittee, of the entire university library. The library is open 
from 8.30 a.m. to 11 p.m. during term time, and from 8.30 
a.m. to 10 p.m. during the summer vacation. Information 
concerning the sources and literature of the political sciences 
is given in the various courses of lectures held in the schools. 

The special library of political science was begun in 1877, 
and it was intended to conclude the most recent and most 
valuable European and American works in this department. 
Particular attention is given to providing the material needed 
for original investigation. Every journal of importance, 
American or foreign, is taken regularly by the library. Any 
book needed by advanced students can usually be bought at 



4 2 



SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



once. Special tables are reserved for advanced students en- 
gaged in original research. Early application for a table is 
desirable. 

The library contains at present (April, 1896) about 225,000 
volumes. In the department of history, political and social 
science, there are about 100,000 volumes. In both European 
and American history the library is well furnished with most 
of the great collections of sources as well as with the best 
secondary works. The collection is particularly rich in 
works on international, constitutional, and administrative law, 
Roman law and foreign law. In all these departments the 
library is growing at the rate of several thousand volumes 
yearly. Another feature is the full collection of national, 
state, and local governmental reports and statistics in the 
various domains of economic inquiry, especially labor, finance, 
charity, poor law, and transportation reports. Recent large 
gifts have made it possible to build up a great collection in 
sociology. 

Students of history, economics, and public law, will find 
New York to be a centre of library facilities absolutely un- 
rivalled elsewhere in this country. In addition to the Uni- 
versity Library, there are rich treasures at the Astor Library, 
Lenox Library, New York Historical Library, Long Island 
Historical Library, Library of the Charity Organization 
Society, the Bar Association Library, and the Law Institute 
Library, to each of which students have access under favor- 
able conditions. Advanced students of economics also have 
at their disposal the Library of the Professor of Political 
Economy and Finance, which contains the most complete 
collection of works on political economy to be found in the 
United States. 



43 



ci 

o 2q 

o 



03 

o g ^ 

2 o s 

•a* o 



o o o 



C 

« o 3 

Si- 



8*1 S 



Oh hi 



2* 



0) 

, *-> u< 

55 

PH 



O <U 
to o5 to 

« IB 

ffi CO W 

oJ <u g 

ocpq 

*j <u o 

6° 



WT3 O 
d o 

l?s 

Smh o 
•S °£ 

S3 

O 

U 



a 5 

^ o 

rt CO 
c . 

O <M 

•43 o 



2 ! 

CO M CO 

c 1 o 

Oh "">.. r 
2 M o 



W CO W 

lis 

.0 c pq 
"S ^ ^ 

£ <a 9 

|-£pH 



.5 U 

III 

3 o 

M £ 



i-i 0 

_ o 
c 



Ph S 



0 § 



CO 



•O « o 

■a 2 s 



2oo 
•S^Ph 



.52 Q 

£ *2 0 
so 

-S3 o 
o c ^ 

«« . 

■■g °PH- 

c 
o 
U 



a! iz; 

.2 ^ 
■a 3 

rt co 

£S . 
O <+4 

\n o 



c o 

p. M p 



M o 

I o' 
u ^ 



^ S - 

2 0 S 

Ph § CO 
•3 w 6 

C W >4 

u "X3 
OOO 
.2 ^ Ph 



o o 
d - h 



o o 

m e-i 



o o 

no « 



44 



id is o 

-OraO 



X 
H 

a & 



§ w 

O a; 

b o 

°Ph 



.js-8 

O ttJ 



O V 

Ph 



h 

H 

M o 

G a! 

S & 



o 

S W 

O p4 

O . 

P,Ph 



>> 




8a 


o ^ 




o « s 




° o o 






:onom 
Prof. 


Hist 
litical 
rof. S 


W 


O fV, 
Ph 



C/3 H 



o 



O co 



O^Ph 



2* 



• ? S w 

In 1h 2 

Ph o £ 



1/3 



uh °° S 

° 1 5 

Q CO 

S 



o £ 1/5 
> — Pi 

a 2 2 

O^Ph 



8 M 

8^ 
w 



s 3 

° o o 

O " w 

— t-i 

O Ph 

Ph 



P.S s . 



£ bo 
X S Ph 



o £ £ 

2 o . 

a "Ph 

o 

u 



o o 
■? o *? 

O H 



45 



G CO 
1 — > <D . . 



O « 

u 

Is 

"3 



s « q 

H-o o 



| o 8 



so 



• X 

►EL 

^ 8 a 

> c o 

•rt <u 

rt "2 z 

* Is 

o i4-j 

u 2 



o 

i/> bo Q 
*C © Q 

<U Q i- 1 

3 « 



.HIS . 



o w 

s g^ 



to 

a 



a & 

1 3 

'o • 
£ g 



H 

9 
o 

.52 !* 



(/5 

c 
o 

•*3 G 

2 • 2 / g > o 

8.1 « £ S 
£<F x oj a 

© Sj5 s 

rt i- O O 



OS 

is 



G 



3 25 
M o 

c ^ 

IN 



I Si 
IS-sS 

O J w z 
"43 o p 

v © 
S P. o 



4J Si 

•I « * 

*• G W 
^ O M 

I* 



.2^ 

g 



o o 
6 - M M 



> M 

i-) ° 
M o 

G ^ 



o o 
«? o «? 

H •<-> W 



G PS 

as U 



o «*s 

00 g 



H 

3 8 



46 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1896 — June 10 — Commencement, Wednesday. 

Oct. 5 — First term, 143d year begins, Monday. 

Nov. 3 — Election day, Tuesday, holiday. 

Nov. 26 — Thanksgiving day, Thursday, holiday. 

Nov. 27 — Friday, holiday. 

Dec. 21 — Christmas holidays begin, Monday. 

1897 — Jan. 2 — Christmas holidays end, Saturday. 
Feb. 6 — First term ends, Saturday. 

Feb. 8 — Second term begins, Monday. 

Feb. 12 — Lincoln's birthday, Friday, holiday. 

Feb. 22 — Washington's birthday, Monday, holiday. 

Mar. 3 — Ash- Wednesday, holiday. 

April 16 — Good-Friday, holiday. 

May 17 — Concluding Examinations begin, Monday. 

May 30 — Memorial day, Sunday. 

May 31 — Monday, holiday. 

June 9 — Commencement, Wednesday. 

Oct. 4 — First term, 144th year begins, Monday. 



February 16, 1907 



Columbia Itninjersity 
gnttetin of Information 



HISTORY 
ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC LAW 



COURSES OFFERED BY THE 

FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

AND THE 

SEVERAL UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
I907-O9 



Published by 

Columbia Tnmversttg 
In tbe CltB of 1Rew J^ork 

Morningside Heights 
New York, N. Y. 



(Issued 25 times during the Academic year, monthly in November 
and December, and weekly between February and June. Entered 
as second-class matter at the New York, N. Y., Post Office, 
Dec. 22, 1900, under Act of July 16, 1894.) 

These include : 

1. The President's Annual Report to the Trustees. 

2. The Catalogue of the University, issued in Decem- 

ber, price 25 cents. 

3. The Announcements of the several Colleges and 

Schools and of certain Divisions, issued in the 
Spring and relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the 
right is reserved to make changes in detail as 
circumstances require. The current number of 
any of these Announcements will be sent without 
charge upon application to the Secretary of the 
University. For information as to the various 
courses offered by the University consult the last 
page of this Announcement. 



ABRIDGED ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The Academic year is thirty-seven weeks in length, ending on the 
Wednesday nearest the nth of June. In 1907-08 the year begins on 
September 25, 1907, and ends on June 10, 1908. It is divided into two 
half-years of fifteen weeks of instruction each. In 1907-08 the second 
half-year begins on February 3, 1908. The Summer Session for 1907 
begins on July 9 and ends on August 17. 

The exercises of the University are suspended on Election Day, Thanks- 
giving Day, and the following two days, for two weeks at Christmas, 
on Washington's Birthday, from the Thursday before Good Friday 
through the following Monday, and on Memorial Day. 

The complete Academic Calendar will be found in the University 
catalogue and so far as it refers to the students studying under any 
Faculty, in the announcement of that Faculty. 



D.T.-jan.i907-6,ooo 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Nicholas Murray Butler, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. Oxon., . President 
John W Burgess, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Ruggles Professor of Political Science and Constitutional Law, and Dean 
Munroe Smith, J.U.D., LL.D., 

Professor of Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 
*Frank J. Goodnow, LL.D., 

Eaton Professor of Administrative Law and Municipal Science 
Edwin R. A. Seligman, Ph.D., LL.D., 

McVickar Professor of Political Economy 
Herbert L. Osgood, Ph.D., .... Professor of History 
William A. Dunning, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Lieber Professor of History and Political Philosophy 
John Bassett Moore, LL.D., 

Hamilton Fish Professor of Lnter national Law and Diplomacy 
Franklin H. Giddings, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Professor of Sociology and the History of Civilization 
John B. Clark, Ph.D., LL.D., . . Professor of Political Economy 
James Harvey Robinson, Ph.D., . . Professor of History 

William M. Sloane, Ph.D.. L.H.D., LL.D., Seth Low Prof essor of History 
Henry R. Seager, Ph.D., . Professor of Political Economy, and Secretary 
Henry L. Moore, Ph.D., . . . Professor of Political Economy 
William R. Shepherd, Ph.D., . . Adjunct Professor of History 
James T. Shotwell, Ph.D., . . . Adjunct Professor of History 
George W. Botsford, Ph.D., . . Adjunct Professor of History 
Vladimir G. Simkhovitch, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Economic History 
Edward Thomas Devine, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Social Economy 

Henry Johnson, Ph.D., Professor of History 

Samuel McCune Lindsay, Ph.D., . Professor of Social Legislation 



Other Officers 

Richard J. H. Gottheil, Ph.D., . Professor of the Semitic Languages 
A. V. Williams Jackson, L.H.D., Ph.D., LL.D., 

Professor of Lndo-Lranian Languages 
John D. Prince, Ph.D., . . Professor of the Semitic Languages 
Friedrich Hirth, Ph.D., . . Dean Lung Professor of Chinese 
Charles A. Beard, Ph.D., . . . Adjunct Professor of Politics 
Arthur C. McGiffert, Ph.D., D.D., 

Washburn Professor of Church History in Union Theological Seminary 
William Walker Rockwell, S.T.B., Lie. Th., 

Assistant Professor of Church History in Union Theological Seminary 
Frederick Joseph Kinsman, A.M., Oxon., 

Professor of History in the General Theological Seminary 
George J. Bayles, Ph.D., .... Lecturer in Ecclesiology 

Maude A. Huttmann, A.M., Lecturer in History in Barnard College 

Carleton Huntley Hayes, A.M., Lecturer in History in Barnard College 
Edward L. Stevenson, Ph.D., . . . Lecturer in Geography 
1 Absent on leave in 1907-08. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Students are received as candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy under the Faculty of Political Science ; for the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science either in Columbia 
College or in Barnard College, and for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Teachers College. They are also permitted to pursue special or partial 
courses subject to the regulations of the Faculty under which they may 
register. 

Certain courses which may be counted toward the several degrees are 
also offered in the Summer Session of the University. 

Students enrolled in the General, the Union, the Drew, the Jewish, 
St. Joseph's, or the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, or in the 
School of Philanthropy in the City of New York, who may have been 
designated for the privilege by the authorities of these institutions, 
and accepted by the President of Columbia University, are admitted 
to the courses offered by the Faculty of Political Science free of all 
charge for tuition. These institutions offer reciprocal privileges to the 
students of Columbia University. 

Teachers College, founded in 1888, and Barnard College, founded in 
1S89, have now become parts of the educational system of Columbia 
University. 

Admission 

There are no examinations for admission to the graduate courses 
under the Faculty of Political Science. Students are admitted at any 
time during the year. They must, however, present themselves for 
registration at the opening of the first or second half-year in order to 
obtain full credit for residence. They may present themselves for exam- 
ination for a degree whenever the requirements as to residence, and as 
to an essay or dissertation, have been complied with. For details see 
the announcement of the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, and 
Pure Science, which may be had on application to the Secretary of the 
University. 

The courses of instruction have been renumbered in accordance with 
a scheme uniform throughout the University, and attention is called to 
the following information which the number assigned to a course will 
in each case indicate : 

Odd numbers indicate the first, even numbers the second half of the 
academic year. Courses designated 1-2, 21-22, etc., run through both 
half-years. Courses numbered between 1 and 100 are, in general, 
elementary, and may not be offered in fulfilment of the requirements for 

4 



5 



the higher degrees (A.M. and Ph.D.). Courses numbered from 101 to 
200 are primarily for students who hold a first degree but are open to 
undergraduates who have completed 64 points (for law 94 points), 
including all prescribed courses except Philosophy A and two half-year 
courses in Natural Science. In general no such course may be taken 
without some elementary training in the same or in some allied subject. 
Courses from 201 to 300 are restricted to graduate students. Seminars 
are numbered from 301 up. Attention is called to the pamphlet entitled 
Instruction for Graduate Students Leading to the Degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy, which may be had on application to the 
Secretary of the University, and particularly to the fact that the require- 
ments for the higher degrees are based upon subjects and not upon 
courses. Students who wish to offer a subject either as a major or 
minor should, before registration, consult the officers of instruction con- 
cerned with regard to their selection of courses. 

For conditions of admission to Columbia College and Barnard College, 
see the circular upon entrance examinations, which may be had upon 
application to the Secretary of the University. 

Those graduate courses which are open to undergraduates are closed 
to women students unless announced separately as open to students of 
Barnard College ; but all purely graduate courses in History and 
Economics are open to women graduate students who have the first 
degree. 

Students who register for graduate courses are supposed to be familiar 
with the outlines of European history, ancient and modern, as well as of 
American history. Students who are not thus prepared are strongly 
recommended to take the undergraduate courses. 

For information in regard to degrees, fees, fellowships, scholarships, 
student employment, dormitories, and expense of living, see the appro- 
priate announcement either of the Faculties of Political Science, 
Philosophy and Pure Science, or of Columbia, Barnard, or Teachers 
College. 



Group I— HISTORY AND POLITICAL 
PHILOSOPHY 



GRADUATE COURSES 

The graduate courses fall under five subjects : A — Ancient and 
Oriental History ; B — Mediaeval and Church History ; C — Modern 
European History from the Opening of the Sixteenth Century ; 
D — American History ; E — Political Philosophy. 

Courses A1-A2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14, 121-122, 125- 
126, 157-158 and 161-162 are given separately at Barnard College. 

Courses numbered 200 and above are open to graduate women 
students upon the same terms as to men. 



Subject A— Ancient and Oriental History 

History 103 — History of India and of Persia. Professor Jackson. 
'M. and W. at 2.10. 306 U. 

In the first part of this course particular attention will be given to the 
early history and civilization of India and of Persia. The development 
of these countries will then be traced with special reference to their 
general historical position and their present importance in relation to 
the West. 

This course is identical with Indo-Iranian 109, Faculty of Philosophy. 

Given in 1Q07-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 104 — The Rise of Arabian Civilization and the Spread 
of Mohammedanism. Professor Gottheil. 
Tu. and Th. at 1.10. 309 U. 

This course will treat of the geographical position of Arabia, its early 
history as recorded upon the monuments, the Sabaeans and Himyarites, 
pre-Mohammedan civilization, the life of Mohammed, the rise of 
Mohammedanism as a religious system and as a political power, Arabic 
historiography, the early Caliphs, Ali and his followers, and the Abbasside 
Caliphs. 

This course is identical with Semitics 120, Faculty of Philosophy. 

History 109 — The History of Western Asia and Egypt. 

Professor Prince. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 309 U. 

6 



7 



The ancient history of Western Asia from the earliest times until the 
period of Alexander the Great, embracing an historical survey of early 
Babylonia, the Assyrian Empire, the later Babylonian Empire, and the 
Persian rule in Babylonia, as well as a briefer discussion of the Egyptian, 
Phoenician and Hittite civilizations. Especial attention will be given 
to the points of contact between the Assyro-Babylonian historical records 
and the Old Testament, and to the most important ethnological problems 
which a study of the ancient peoples of Western Asia presents. 

Given in igoy-oS and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 111-112 — The Language, Literature, Government, and 
Social Life of the Chinese. Professor Hirth. 
One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 
For students not wishing to become specialists in Chinese. 

History 113-114 — History of China. Professor Hirth. 
One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 

This course, which is a continuation of the course given in 1906-07, is 
intended for all students, including such as do not study the Chinese 
language. Special attention will be paid to the cultural and economical 
development of China and her relations to other Asiatic nations. 

History 213-214 — The Period of Transition in Roman History 
from the Republic to the Empire. Professor Botsford. 
S. , 9-1 1. 301 L. 

On the basis of the literary and epigraphic sources the course will 
follow, through the decline of the republic and through the early 
principate, the gradual growth of imperial ideas, institutions and 
organization, with due reference to underlying social conditions. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 215-216— Greek Constitutional History. Professor 
Botsford. 
S., 9-11. 301 L. 

Attention will be directed to the origin of the city and to the development 
of forms of government with especial reference to Athens and other 
prominent states. The influence of political theories and ideals on the 
making of constitutions and on historiography will be noted. Like 
History 213-214, the course will be based on a critical examination of 
the sources. 

History 217-218 — The Roman Empire. Professor Botsford. 
Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 
Similar to History 5-6 (see page 17), but more advanced. 
Given in igoj-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 31 1-312— Seminar in Greek and Roman History. 

Professor Botsford. 

Two hours bi-weekly. Hours to be arranged. 



8 



Subject B— Mediaeval and Church History 

History 121-122— The Intellectual History of Western Europe 
from the Break-up of the Roman Empire to the Protestant 
Revolt. Professor Robinson. 

Tu. at 9.10 and 10.10, and Th. at 10.10. 410 L. Tu. at 2.10 and 3.10, 
and Th. at 3.10. 339 B. 

The main object of this course is to trace the changing intellectual 
preoccupations and attitude of mind of the educated class from the times 
of Boethius to those of Luther and Erasmus. Among the topics consid- 
ered are : The dependence of the early middle ages upon the later Empire ; 
Gregory the Great and his writings ; asceticism ; allegory, symbolism, 
and the miraculous ; the so-called " Carolingian renaissance" ; reforms 
of Gregory VII ; supremacy of the mediaeval Church ; the sacramental 
system ; relation of the Church to the civil power ; heresy and the 
inquisition ; the friars ; Abelard ; the twelfth century renaissance ; the 
universities; rise of the vernacular languages ; mediaeval historiography ; 
scholasticism ; Roger Bacon and beginnings of natural science ; Petrarch 
and humanism; the antecedents of the Protestant revolt ; Erasmus and 
Luther ; implications of the Protestant revolt. 

History 125-126 — The History of England to 1660. Professor 
Osgood. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 410 L. Tu. and Th. at 2. 10. 405 L. 

The object of this course is, by means of lectures and outside reading, 
to give a view of the development of the English Constitution from the 
fifth century to the Revolution of 1689. The work is based chiefly upon 
the writings of Stubbs, Gneist, Hallam, Gardiner, and Ranke. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 221 — Later Roman Empire and Early Middle Ages. 

Professor Shotwell. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 10, with two additional hours to be arranged. 410 L. 

This course deals with the transition from ancient to mediaeval history ; 
the social and intellectual conditions in the later Roman Empire and the 
causes of its disintegration, the origin of the barbarian kingdoms, the 
Merovingian and Carolingian culture, the renewed invasions of the 
Northmen, Saracens and Hungarians and the "dark age." This is an 
advanced course. It involves a constant reference to the sources and a 
critical analysis of the most notable modern historians. Lectures, 
discussion and independent research upon the part of the students.* 

Given in jgoj—08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 223 — Europe in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. 

Professor Shotwell. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 10, with two additional hours to be arranged. 410 L. 

♦Candidates for the A.M. may take merely the lectures to count, with certain assigned 
reading, as a half minor. 



9 



A survey of both the political and intellectual history of the so-called 
Mediaeval Renaissance, including the mediaeval church, feudalism, the 
towns, the beginnings of the modern national state, the origin of the 
universities and the range of culture they represented, and the general 
intellectual changes from Abelard to Dante. Some attention will be paid 
to mediaeval architecture and archaeology in general, but the greater part 
of the work will be based upon the literary and documentary sources. 
Luchair's Manuel des Institutions francaises and Rashdall's Universities 
of Europe in the Middle Ages are recommended as guides in the field. 
Lectures, discussion and independent research upon the part of the 
students.* 

Given in iqo8-oq and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 226 — The So-called Italian Renaissance and the 
Opening of the Protestant Revolt. Professor Robinson. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 10, with two additional hours to be arranged. 410 L. 

This course will deal with the culture of the Italian cities in the 
fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and the spread of Humanism in the 
north ; the great councils of the early fifteenth century and the efforts to 
reform the Church ; Luther and the opening of the Protestant revolt. 
The work will include a discussion of the chief contemporaneous writers 
and a criticism of the current conception of the " renaissance." Especial 
attention will be given to Petrarch's, Luther's and Erasmus's letters. 
Lectures, discussion and independent research upon the part of the 
students.* 

Given in 1Q07-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 321 — Historical Bibliography; The Sources of European 
History; Methods of Historical Study. Professors Robinson, Shot- 
well, and Simkhovitch. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This course aims to introduce the student to the various classes of 
sources and will include practical exercises in the use of bibliographical 
apparatus. The chief theories of the scope and nature of historical 
research will also be discussed. 

History 229-230— General Church History : Period I, The Ancient 
Church to 590 A. D.; Period II, The Mediaeval Church, 590-15174 
Professors McGiffert and Rockwell. 

History 231-232— General Church History: Period III, The 
Modern Church ; American Church History.:}: Professor Rockwell. 

* Candidates for the A.M. may take merely the lectures to count, with certain assigned 
reading, as a half minor. 

X These courses are given at the Union Theological Seminary and may be taken to make 
up a minor subject for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 



History 233-234 — History of Christian Doctrine: I, History of 
Thought in the Primitive Catholic Church.* Professor McGiffert. 

History 235-236 — History of Christian Doctrine: II, History of 
Protestant Thought.* Professor McGiffert. 

History 237— English Church History: Reformation and Post- 
Reformation Periods.* Professor McGiffert. 

History 238 — History of Early Christian Literature.* Professor 
McGiffert. 

History 239-240 — Historical Training Class. Principles and 
Methods of Historical Investigation.* Professor Rockwell. 

History 241-242 — Religious Thought in the Middle Ages (a 

research course intended especially for graduates).* Professor 
McGiffert. 

History 331-332 — Seminar in Church History.* Professors 
McGiffert and Rockwell. 

History 243 — History of the Church during the First Three 
Centuries. 1 Professor Kinsman. 

History 244 — Period of the Councils. 1 Professor Kinsman. 

History 245 — Studies in the Apostolic Age. 1 Professor Kinsman. 

History 246— The Church of the Middle Ages and the Conti- 
nental Reformation. 1 Professor Kinsman. 

History 247 — The History of the Church of England. 1 Professor 
Kinsman. 

History 248 — The Church in Smyrna. 1 Professor Kinsman. 
History 249 — The Church in Jerusalem. 1 Professor Kinsman. 



Subject C — Modern European History from the Opening 
of the Sixteenth Century 

History 151— European History, 1815-1848. Professor Sloane. 
M., W., and F. at 1.10, with a fourth hour by arrangement. 327 U. 
Given in igo7-o8 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 153 — Contemporary European History since 1848 

Professor Sloane. 

M., W., and F. at 1.10, with a fourth hour by arrangement. 327 U. 

Given in iqoS-oq and in alternate years thereafter. 

* These courses are given at the Union Theological Seminary and may be taken to make 
up a minor subject for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 

1 These courses are given at the General Theological Seminary and may be taken to make 
up a minor subject for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 



1 1 

History 157-158 — History of Great Britain principally during the 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Professor Osgood. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 410 L. Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 405 L. 

In this course a somewhat detailed account will be given of the political 
development of England during the last two centuries. Reference will 
also be made to the relations with Scotland and Ireland. This part of 
the course will be a continuation of History I55 _I 56. Lectures and 
assigned readings. 

Given in igoy-oS and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 226 — The So-called Italian Renaissance and the Opening 
of the Protestant Revolt. Professor Robinson. 

Tu. and Th, at II. 10, with two additional hours to be arranged. 410 L. 
(For description see page 9.) 

Given in igoj-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 252— The Reforms of the French Revolution. Professor 
Robinson. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 10, with two additional hours to be arranged. 410 L. 

This course does not deal primarily with the political history but with 
the great and permanent achievements of the Revolution ; it includes a 
description of the organization of the French monarchy under Louis XVI; 
the development of the spirit of reform in Europe; "benevolent des- 
potism"; the progress of reform in France to the completion of the 
constitution of 1791 ; how the French revolution became an issue of 
general European importance. The work will include a discussion of 
the chief classes of sources and a good knowledge of French is essential. 
Lectures, discussion and independent research on the part of the stu- 
dents.* 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 253 — The Economic and Social Evolution of Russia 
since 1800. Professor Simkhovitch. 
M. and F. at 10.10. 418 L. 

This course describes the economic development of the country, the 
growth of Slavophil, liberal and revolutionary doctrines and parties, and 
the disintegration of the autocratic regime. 

(Identical with Economics 241.) 

History 357 — The Work of Napoleon. Professor Sloane. 
W. and F. at 10.10, first or second half-year, or both by arrangement. 
301 L. 

This is a research course for the most advanced students only. It is 
open to such selected individuals as give evidence of capacity for original 
research, and the ability to read French and German fluently is indis- 

*Candidates for the A.M. may take merely the lectures to count, with certain assigned 
reading, as a half minor. 



12 



pensable to admission. The topics are chosen by the instructor and the 
student works under his direction, given in personal consultations twice 
a week. The papers prepared are expected to be short monographs, 
thoroughly discussing the theme on the basis of the original authorities. 

History 321 — Historical Bibliography ; The Sources of European 
History; Methods of Historical Study. Professors Robinson, Shotwell, 
and Simkhovitch. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

(For description see page 9.) 

Subject D — American History 

History 161-162 — Political and Constitutional History of the 
United States. Professors Burgess and Shepherd. 

Tu. and Th. at i.io. 413 L. M. and W. at 2.10. 339 B. 

This course of lectures covers the history of the colonies and of the 
Revolutionary War ; the formation and dissolution of the Confederacy of 
1781 ; the formation of the Federal Constitution of 1787 and its application 
and development down to the Civil War ; the changes wrought in the 
Constitution by the Civil War ; and the resulting transformation of the 
public law of the United States. 

History 261-262 — American Colonial History during the Seven- 
teenth Century. Professor Osgood. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This is an advanced lecture and investigation course. The subjects of 
study will be chiefly the corporation (or colony of the New England type) 
and the proprietary province, as forms of colonial government. The 
early history of Virginia as a royal province will also be considered. 
The beginning of efforts on the part of Great Britain to assert imperial 
control over the colonies will also be traced. This course is open only to 
approved candidates for the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees and to such special 
students as receive permission to attend. 

Given in igoj-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 263-264 — American Colonial History during the Eight- 
eenth Century. Professor Osgood. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This course begins at 1690 and ends at 1760. It is devoted to the study 
of the royal province as a form of colonial government, and of the 
British system and policy of colonial administration during the period of 
intercolonial wars. It is both a continuation of the preceding course 
and an introduction to the study of the American Revolution. It is open 
to the same class of students as History 297-298, and the method of 
instruction is the same as in that course. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 



i3 



History 361-362 — The American Revolution. Professor Osgood. 
S., 10-12. 301 L. 

This course will be conducted as a lecture and investigation course 
and will consist of a detailed study of the sources of American history 
from about 1760 to the close of the Revolution. 

[History 363-364 — Seminar in American Colonial History. Pro- 
fessor Osgood. 
One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 
Not given in igoy-og.] 

History 365 — European Politics and the War of 1812. Professor 
Sloane. 

W. and F. at 10.10, first or second half-year, or both by arrangement. 
301 L. 

Research course for the most advanced students only. It is given to 
selected individuals who show capacity for original research, and is 
open only to those who read French and German fluently. The topics 
are chosen by the instructor and the students work under his direction, 
given in personal consultations twice a week. The papers prepared are 
expected to be short monographs thoroughly discussing the theme on 
the basis of original authorities. 

History 267-268 — The United States from 1850, with special 
reference to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Professor Dunning. 
M. and F. at 11. 10. 410 L. 

The chief object of this course is to describe the constitutional principles 
which came into play during the period from 1850 to 1884. Among the 
topics discussed in more or less detail are : The principles of the appeal 
to arms; the nature and scope of the "war power"; the status of the 
Negro as affected by the war ; the various theories of Reconstruction ; 
the adoption of the last three amendments to the Constitution ; the 
actual process of Reconstruction; the so-called "force legislation," 
and the ultimate undoing of the Reconstruction. In addition to these 
constitutional topics, the general political and social progress of the 
nation is treated. 

History 367-368— Seminar in later United States History. 

Professor Dunning. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 271-272 — History of Spanish America. Professor 
Shepherd. 

W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 405 L. 

This course is intended to serve in part as an introduction to the 
history of the South and West in the United States. The Spanish 
system of colonial administration will be the leading theme, but some 
attention will be devoted also to the political development of the 
Spanish-American republics. 

Given in igoy-oS and in alternate years thereafter. 



14 



History 273-274 — The Development of the West since 1803. 

Professor Shepherd. 
W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 405 L. 

This course will trace the history of the country west of the Appa- 
lachians since its acquisition by the United States. It will describe the 
conditions of settlement, the organization of Territories, and the forma- 
tion of States. The social, economic and political elements visible in 
the process will be examined with special reference to their bearing 
upon the growth of national sentiment and power. 

Given in igoS-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 371-372 — Seminar in the Early History of the South 
and West. Professor Shepherd. 

Two hours bi-weekly. Hours to be arranged. 

Subject E — Political Philosophy 

History 181-182— General History of Political Theories. 

Professor Dunning. 

M. and W. at 10.10. 406 L. 

Every people known to history has possessed some form, however vague 
and primitive, of political government. Every people which has attained 
a degree of enlightenment above the very lowest has been permeated by 
some ideas, more or less systematic, as to the origin, nature and 
limitations of governmental authority. It is the purpose of this course to 
trace historically the development of these ideas, from the primitive 
notions of primitive people to the complex and elaborate philosophical 
theories that have characterized the ages of highest intellectual 
refinement. The basis of the lectures is Dunning's History of Political 
Theories (two volumes), which covers the period from the earliest times 
to the middle of the eighteenth century. For the theories of the French 
Revolution and the nineteenth century various authorities are referred to. 

History 281-282— American Political Philosophy. Professor 
Dunning. 

M. and F. at II. 10. 410 L. 

As the first nation to realize in practice many of the principles that 
characterize the modern state, the United States offers special 
opportunities for research to the student of political philosophy. In 
this course a two-fold line of discussion is followed : First, by a study 
of the various documents of the revolutionary era, the Declaration of 
Independence, the constitutions, national and commonwealth, and 
other state papers, the dominant ideas of the people are derived from 
their official records. Second, the writings of the leading statesmen 
like Hamilton, Jefferson, Calhoun, and Webster, as well as the more 
systematic and philosophical works of Lieber, Mulford, Brownson, 



*5 



Jameson, and others, are analyzed and subjected to critical comment. 
Merriam's History of American Political Theories will be made the basis 
of the course, and the method will be chiefly that of a seminar. 
Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 381-382— Seminar in Political Philosophy. Professor 
Dunning. 

One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 

Cognate Historical Courses 

History of Diplomacy. Professor J. B. Moore. 
See Public Law 221 and 120. 

History and Principles of Colonial Administration. Professor 
Goodnow. 

See Public Law 243. 

History of European Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
See Jurisprudence 265-266. 

Fiscal and Industrial History of the United States. Professor 
Seligman. 

See Economics 107. 

Social Evolution. Professor Giddings. 
See Sociology 251 and 252. 

Courses on Historical and Political Geography. 

Geography 31-32 — Historical and Political Geography. Dr. 

Stevenson. 

M. and W. at 2.10. 405 L. 

It is proposed in this course to consider those influences, geographical 
in character, which are determining factors in national life. It will 
include a study of the physical features of the various continental areas. 
Consideration will be given to the course of migration of peoples, lines 
of travel, trade routes and trade centers ; the establishment and the 
change of national boundaries ; the geographical distribution of peoples 
and states. Attention will be directed to the general culture of man- 
kind, including economic, political, social, and religious conditions in the 
various periods of history as that culture has been affected by geo- 
graphical influences. The political geography of the present in the 
various continents will be given special consideration in this course ; 
present-day problems of territorial expansion and how influenced by 
geographical conditions ; geographical questions in general having to 
do with national interests and international geographical relations. 



i6 



Geography 131-132— The Expansion of Geographical Knowledge. 

Dr. Stevenson. 

M. and W. at 4.10. 410 L. 

This will be primarily a course in the geography of discovery. The 
theoretical and the practical geography of the ancients will be con- 
sidered ; the particular contributions of the Greeks and the Romans 
to the expansion of that knowledge ; what was done in the middle ages 
to favor, what to hinder, an acquaintance with near and with remote 
regions of the earth ; the renaissance of geography. Particular attention 
will be given to the period of great geographical discoveries ; over- 
land and maritime explorations of the 15th century as a preparation 
for the discovery of America ; the geography of exploration and settle- 
ment in the New World and in the Far East. The contemporaneous 
records of the various periods will be studied. The cartography of 
discovery will receive special consideration. 



COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE AND 
BARNARD COLLEGE 

History A1-A2— Epochs of Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern 
History, with special reference to forms of government and changes in 
social conditions, 
t, Three hours a week. 

; Columbia College : 

Section 1, M.,W., and F. at 10.10. 
Section 2, M. and W. at 10.10, and S. at 11. 10. 
Professor Shepherd and Mr. Hayes. 

Barnard College : 

Section 1, Tu., Th., and S. at 9.10. 

Section 2, Tu. and Th. at 9.10, and S. at 10.10. 

Professor Shotwell and Miss Huttmann. , 

The course is designed to furnish a general introduction to the work of 
the Department of History. In the syllabus upon which it is primarily 
founded the attention of the student is constantly directed to the most 
essential facts, movements, and tendencies alone. The correlation of 
these is duly emphasized, and their real significance explained as 
factors in human progress. Lectures, recitations, and notes on assigned 
readings constitute the substance of the work required. 

History 3-4 — Greece and Early Rome.. Professor Botsford. 
M., W., and F. at 9.10. 327 U. M., W., and F. at 10.10. 332 B. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 



17 



This course will cover the history of the western world from the 
Mycenaean age to the unification of Italy under Rome (264 B. C). The 
central idea will be the development of civilized life, which expressed 
itself in art, literature, and philosophy, in social customs and personal 
character as well as in political ideals and institutions. Italy will be 
treated in its relations with Greece. The lectures will be supplemented 
by reading in the authorities and in translated sources. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 5-6 — The Roman Empire. Professor Botsford. 
M., W., and F. at 9.10. 327 U. M., W., and F. at 10.10. 332 B. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

The expansion of the Roman power (from 264 B. C.) and the decline 
of the republic will be merely introductory to the period of the emperors, 
which the course will follow to the reign of Justinian. Attention will 
be directed not only to organization and administration, but also to 
public works, literature, and social life. 

Given in igoj-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

iiisTORY 7-8 — Mediaeval and Modern History to the Peace of 
Westphalia. Professor Shotwell. 
Three hours a week. 
Columbia College : 

M., W., and F. at 11. 10. 
Barnard College : 

Tu. at 2.10 and Th. at 2.10 and 3.10. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

This course covers practically the same period as Course I2I-I22, but 
treats different phases of the political and social development, such as 
Charlemagne's Empire, Feudalism, the Crusades, the Mediaeval Church, 
the Towns, especially the Italian City-States in the Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth Centuries, the Rise of the Modern Monarchies, the Protestant 
Revolt, the Hapsburg Predominance, and the Thirty Years' War. 

Not given in iqoy-08. 

History 9-10 — Continental European History, Modern and Con- 
temporaneous. 

Three hours a week. 
Columbia College : 

Tu. at 10.10 and 11. 10 and Th. at 10.10. Professor Shotwell and 
Mr. Hayes. 

Barnard College: 

Tu. at 2.10 and Th. at 2.10 and 3.10. Professor Shotwell and Miss 
Huttmann. 

Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 



i8 



This course traces the political history of Europe from the Peace of 
Westphalia to the close of the nineteenth century. It includes a survey 
of the modern state system of Europe, the methods of government and 
the condition of the people during the eighteenth century, the struggles 
for liberty and national unity. Less attention is paid to international 
complications than to the internal history of the various countries. An 
especial effort will be made to prepare the student to understand current 
political and social issues in Europe. 

History 11-12— English History to the Reform Bill, 1832. 

Professor Beard. 

Columbia College : 

M., W., and F. at 11. 10. 
Given in igoy-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 
Barnard College: 

M., W., and F. at II. 10. 
Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

While in the main the political elements visible in the growth and 
expansion of England will dominate the course, proper attention will be 
given to the other factors that have produced the English type of 
civilization. The work involves the study of topics, based upon a 
suitable text-book ; it is illustrated by reference to the convenient 
collections of sources, and amplified by the reading of standard 
authorities. 

History 13-14 — History of the United States to the Close of 
Reconstruction. 

Three hours. 
Columbia College : 

M., W. , and F. at 2.10. Professor Dunning. 

Barnard College : 

M., W., and F. at 11. 10. Professor Shepherd. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

This is largely a reading course, devoted to the study of the people of 
the United States in their general social development. Much attention 
is paid to the characteristics of the population in the various sections, to 
the personality of the great political and military leaders and to the 
influence of these upon the progress of the nation. The standard 
histories by Bancroft, Schouler, MacMaster, Adams and Rhodes, and 
the American Statesmen Series are extensively employed in the course, 
and particular attention is devoted to the Civil War. In the class-room 
the method of procedure is that of reports on assigned topics and 
discussions rather than of text-book recitations. 



19 



COURSES IN TEACHERS COLLEGE 

History 51-52 — The Literature of American History. Lectures, 
readings, and reports. Professor Johnson. 
Tu. and Th. at 4.10. 

Emphasis is laid in this course upon the things that seem essential 
to an intelligent reading of the literature of American history. After 
a brief account of the materials and methods of historical study in 
general, some of the special problems of historical writing in America 
are examined and illustrated. The readings assigned include examples 
of important letters, diaries, journals, memoirs, speeches, autobiog- 
raphies and biographies as well as the most important general and 
special histories. The historical value of the treatment of certain 
familiar episodes by poets, novelists, and authors of books for children 
is investigated and some attention is given to the claims, made in 
behalf of such writings, as to atmosphere, interest, and availability. 

Education 173-174 — Theory and Practice of Teaching History 
in Secondary Schools. Lectures, discussions, and practical work. 6 
hours. Professor Johnson. 

Class work, 4 hours. Tu. and Th. at 9.10. 

Practical work, 2 hours. Hours must be arranged with the instructor 
before registration. 

The course treats of present conditions and ideals in the United States 
and in other countries. Among the special topics considered are : the 
claims of historical scholarship ; the claims of education ; recent tendencies 
in text-book writing ; the choice of facts ; the high-school recitation in 
history. The practical work includes observation and criticism of 
teaching exercises and the preparation of material for class use. 

Prerequisite : 18 hours of college history. 

Education 273-274 — Practicum. 4 hours. Professor Johnson. 
F., 1. 10-3. 

The practicum offers to advanced students opportunities for the 
investigation of special questions connected with the teaching of history 
in elementary and secondary schools and in normal schools. 

COURSES IN THE SUMMER SESSION* 

S3 — History of Greece. Lectures, reports, and required readings. 
Professor Botsford. 

Five hours a week at 9.30. 327 U. 

S5 — History of Rome. Lectures, reports, and required readings. 
Professor Botsford. 

Five hours a week at 10.30. 327 U. 

* For fuller details consult the Bulletin of Information in reference to the Summer Session. 



20 



SI3-I4^ — American History; general history of the United States 
from the beginning of the Mexican^War to the close of Reconstruc- 
tion. Recitations, reports, and assigned readings, with an occasional 
explanatory lecture. Professor Ames. 

Five hours a week at 8.30. 510 F. 

S169-1703 — American History ; political and constitutional history of 
the United States from the admission of Texas to the close of Recon- 
struction. Lectures, discussions, and reference work. Professor Ames. 

Five hours a week at 9.30. 510 F. 

5154 — Economic History; the leading facts of the economic history 
of Europe, especially England. Professor Cheyney. 

Five hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

5155— English History to 1650. Professor Cheyney. 
Five hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 



Group II— PUBLIC LAW AND COMPARATIVE 
JURISPRUDENCE 



The courses in this group are not open to women. 



Subject A — Constitutional Law 

Public Law 201-202 — Comparative Constitutional Law. Professor 
Burgess. 

Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 413 L. 

Comprehending a comparison of the provisions of the constitutions of 
all the principal modern states (particularly of England, the United 
States, France, and Germany), the interpretation of the same by legislative 
enactments and judicial decisions, and the generalization from them of 
the fundamental principles of public law common to them all. Special 
attention is also given to the governmental organization of the territories 
and other dependencies of the United States. 

Public Law 203-204 — Private Rights and Immunities under the 
Constitution of the United States. Professor Burgess. 
M. and W. at 2.10. 401 L. 
Chiefly discussion of cases. 

Public Law 101-102 — American Constitutional Law in its 
Historical Development. Professor Burgess. 
Tu. and Th. at 1.10. 413 L. 
This course is identical with History 169-170. 

Public Law 301-302 — Advanced Seminar in Constitutional Law. 

Professor Burgess. 
F. at 2.10. 406 L. 

Subject B — International Law 

Public Law 221 — History of Diplomacy.. Professor J. B. Moore. 
M. and W. at 9.10. 406 L. 

The object of this course is to exhibit the evolution of the relations 
between independent states and the manner in which those relations are 
conducted. The history of the diplomatic system of Europe is traced 
from its beginnings to the present time, and an exposition is given of 

21 



22 



the religious, dynastic, territorial, and commercial struggles of which 
that system is the result. The first part of the course relates to the 
development of the European concert prior to the Peace of Westphalia. 
This is followed by an examination of the most important of the general 
European treaties, beginning with those concluded at the Congress of 
Westphalia in 1648 and ending with those of recent date. 

Public Law 120 — History of American Diplomacy. Professor 
J. B. Moore. 

M. and W. at 9.10. 406 L. 

In the study of American diplomacy special attention will be given to 
the history and methods of the diplomacy of the United States. The 
course will comprehend : (1) the diplomacy of the Revolution ; (2) the 
period from the Treaty of Peace of 1783 to the termination of the War of 
1812 ; (3) from the termination of that war to the Civil War ; (4) from the 
outbreak of that war to the present time. 

Public Law 223-224— International Law. Professor J. B. Moore. 
W. and F. at 3.10. 418 L. 

This course treats of the general principles of international law, as it 
has been developed by positive agreement, in the form of treaties and 
conventions, and by common usage as shown in legislation, in the 
decisions of international tribunals and of municipal courts, and in the 
conduct of nations. The rules thus discovered are discussed in the light 
of the principles of reason and justice, as scientifically presented by 
writers on international law, and an effort is made to trace the systematic 
establishment of the rules which govern intercourse among nations at 
the present day. 

» 

Public Law 321-322 — Seminar in International Law. Professor 
J. B. Moore. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 



Subject C— Administrative Law 

Public Law 141— Administrative Law of the United States and 
the Principal European States. Professor Goodnow. 
M. and W. at 4.10. 406 L. 

The purpose of this course is to present the general principles of the 
administrative law of the United States, both in the nation and in the 
commonwealths, and to compare the law existing in the United States 
with the law of England, France, and Germany. 



23 



Public Law 242 — Law of Officers (Extraordinary Legal Remedies). 

Professor Goodnow. 

M. and W. at 4.10. 406 L. 

The purpose of this course is to present the general principles of the 
law of public officers, in particular those relating to their appointment or 
election, their powers and duties, their rights, removal from office ; the 
control over their action possessed by the higher administrative officers, 
the courts, and the legislature. Special attention will here be paid to the 
writs of mandamus , quo warranto, certiorari, habeas corpus, and prohibition, 
and their statutory substitutes, by means of which the courts exercise 
their control over the administration. Chiefly discussion of cases. 

Public Law 243 — History and Principles of Colonial Adminis- 
tration. Professor Goodnow. 
Tu. and Th. at 10.10. 406 L. 

Public Law 244 — Municipal Science and Administration. Pro- 
fessor Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 10.10. 406 L. 

This course deals with municipal activities in the United States and 
the more important foreign countries. The principal subjects treated are : 
The origin and evolution of the city ; the position of the city in the state 
government ; municipal functions ; the control of the state over the city ; 
municipal elections ; municipal organization ; the different branches of 
municipal activity, such as police, charities, education, and finances. 

Public Law 245 — The Law of Municipal Corporations. Professor 
Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 9.10. 401 L. 

Chiefly discussion of cases. Abbott, Cases on Public Corporations, and 
Smith, Cases on Municipal Corporations. 

Public Law 246— The Law of Taxation. Professor Goodnow. 
Tu. and Th. at 9.10. 401 L. 
Chiefly discussion of cases. 

Public Law 341-342— Seminar in Administrative Law. Profes- 
sor Goodnow. 

M. at no. 301 L. 

Subject D — Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Jurisprudence 161 — Elements of Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
M., W., and F. at 10.10. 413 L. 

This course gives a general view of the origin and development of the 
law and of rights, remedial and substantive ; a description of the sources 
of the law in force in the United States ; and a systematic outline of the 
principal branches of the law. Lectures and assigned reading. 



2 4 



Jurisprudence 263-264 — Roman Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
W. and F. at 1.10. 410 L. 

This course traces briefly the historical development of the Roman 
law, and treats of the law of persons, of things, of obligations and of 
succession. Lectures, with assigned reading (Muirhead, Historical 
Introduction to the Private Law of Rome ; Sohm, Institutes of Ro?nan Law). 
The latter part of the second half-year is devoted to a discussion of 
cases from the Corpus Iuris Civilis, principally in contracts. 

Jurisprudence 265-266 — History of European Law. Professor 
Munroe Smith. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This course treats (1) of early German law, including a comparison of 
Anglo-Saxon and Continental German customs ; (2) of the development 
of law in the Frankish Empire ; (3) of feudal law ; (4) of canon law ; (5) 
of the law merchant; (6) of the "reception" of the Roman law ; and (7) 
of the genesis and character of the modern civil codes. 

Jurisprudence 268 — Modern Civil Law of Western Europe. Pro- 
fessor Munroe Smith. 

Three hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This course gives a general view of the private law of France, Italy, 
Spain, and Germany. It is open only to students who have taken Course 
263-264, or who have done equivalent work. 

Jurisprudence 269-270 — Conflict of Laws. Professor J. B. Moore. 
F. at 9.10. 415 L. 

Within the limits of the subject, a comparison is made of theories and 
practice in different jurisdictions, both in civil matters and in criminal ; 
and attention is given to the special aspects of interstate law in the United 
States. 

Jurisprudence 361-362 — Seminar in Legal History. Professor 
Munroe Smith. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Seminar for candidates for the Master's degree. The work consists in 
reading selected titles of the Corpus Iuris Civilis, of mediaeval law-books 
and of modern codes upon some special topic. Papers are presented by 
the members of the seminar, usually based upon a comparison of Roman 
and English law. 

Jurisprudence 363-364 — Seminar in Comparative Jurisprudence. 

Professor Munroe Smith. 
Hours to be arranged. 

Advanced seminar for candidates for the Doctor's degree. 



25 



COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Politics 1-2. Professor Beard. 
M.,W., and F. at 9.10. 

A study of the structure and powers of the Federal and State govern- 
ments and their actual workings under the American party system. 
As a part of their regular work, the students are advised and will be 
expected to attend the public lectures given on the Blumenthal foun- 
dation. 

Politics 3-4. Professor Beard. 
M.,W., and F. at 10.10. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

The first half-year will be devoted to a study of the history and organi- 
zation of the present political parties and the second half-year to a 
comparison of the leading features of American government with those 
of the principal countries of Europe. As a part of their work, the 
students are advised and will be expected to attend the public lectures 
given on the Blumenthal foundation. 



Group III— ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 



GRADUATE COURSES 

It is presumed that students who take economics, sociology or social 
economy as their major subject are familiar with the general principles 
of economics and sociology as set forth in the ordinary manuals. Stu- 
dents who are not thus prepared are recommended to take the courses 
in Columbia College or Barnard College designated as Economics I and 2 
(or A and 4) and Sociology 151-152. 

The graduate courses fall under three subjects : A — Political Econ- 
omy and Finance ; B — Sociology and Statistics ; C — Social Economy. 

Courses numbered 200 and above are open to graduate women students 
upon the same terms as to men. For a description of other courses open 
to women see Courses in Barnard College, pp. 36-37. 



Subject A — Political Economy and Finance 

Economics 101-102 — Taxation and Finance. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 422 L. 

This course is historical, as well as comparative and critical. After 
giving a general introduction and tracing the history of the science of 
finance, it treats of the various rules of the public expenditures and the 
methods of meeting the same among civilized nations. It describes the 
different kinds of public revenues, including the public domain and 
public property, public works and industrial undertakings, special assess- 
ments, fees, and taxes. It is in great part a course on the history, 
theories and methods of taxation in all civilized countries. It considers 
also public debt, methods of borrowing, redemption, refunding, repudia- 
tion, etc. Finally, it describes the fiscal organization of the state by 
which the revenue is collected and expended, and discusses the budget, 
national, state, and local. 

Economics 103 — Money and Banking. Professor H. L. Moore. 
M. and W. at 11. 10. 415 L. 

The aim of this course is : (1) to describe the mechanism of exchange 
and to trace the history of the metallic money, the paper money, and 
the banking system of the United States ; to discuss such questions as 
bi-metallism, foreign exchanges, credit cycles, elasticity of the currency, 
present currency problems, and corresponding schemes of reform ; (2) to 
illustrate the quantitative treatment of such questions as variations 
in the value of the money unit, and the effects of appreciation and 
depreciation. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

26 



2 7 



Economics 104 — Commerce and Commercial Policy. Professor 
H. L. Moore. 

M. and W. at 1 1. 10. 415 L. 

In this course the economic bases of modern commerce, and the 
significance of commerce, domestic and foreign, in its relation to 
American industry, will be studied. An analysis will be made of the 
extent and character of the foreign trade of the United States, and the 
nature and effect of the commercial policies of the principal commercial 
nations will be examined. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 105 — The Labor Problem. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 10. 415 L. 

The topics considered in this course are : The rise of the factory system, 
factory legislation, the growth of trade unions and changes in the law 
in respect to them, the policies of trade unions, strikes, lockouts, arbitra- 
tion and conciliation, proposed solutions of the labor problem, and the 
future of labor in the United States. 

Given in igoy-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 106 — The Trust and Corporation Problem. Professor 
Seager. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 10. 415 L. 

In this course special attention is given to the trust problem as it 
presents itself in the United States. Among the topics considered are 
the rise and progress of industrial combinations, the forms of organiza- 
tion and policies of typical combinations, the common law and the trusts, 
anti-trust acts and their results, and other proposed solutions of the 
problem. 

Given in igoj-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 107— Fiscal and Industrial History of the United 
States. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 415 L. 

This course endeavors to present a survey of national legislation on 
currency, finance, and taxation, including the tariff, together with its 
relations to the state of industry and commerce. The chief topics 
discussed are : The fiscal and industrial conditions of the colonies ; the 
financial methods of the Revolution and the Confederation ; the genesis 
of the protective idea ; the fiscal policies of the Federalists and of the 
Republicans; the financial management of the War of 1812; the industrial 
effects of the restrictive and war periods; the crises of 1819, 1825, and 
1837 ; the tariffs of 1816, 1824, and 1828 ; the distribution of the surplus 
and the Bank war; the currency problems before 1863; the era of 
" free trade," and the tariffs of 1846 and 1857 ; the fiscal problems of the 
Civil War ; the methods of resumption, conversion and payment of the 



28 



debt ; the disappearance of the war taxes ; the continuance of the war 
tariffs; the money question and the acts of 1878, 1890, and 1900; the 
loans of 1894-96 ; the tariffs of 1890, 1894, and 1897 ; the fiscal aspects of 
the Spanish War. The course closes with a discussion of the current 
problems of currency and trade, and with a general consideration of the 
arguments for and against protection as illustrated by the practical 
operations of the various tariffs. 

Given in igoy-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 108 — Railroad Problems ; Economic, Social, and Legal. 

Professor Seligman. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 415 L. 

These lectures treat of railroads in the fourfold aspect of their relation 
to the investors, the employees, the public, and the state respectively. 
A history of railways and railway policy in America and Europe forms 
the preliminary part of the course. The chief problems of railway 
management, so far as they are of economic importance, come up for 
discussion. Among the subjects treated are : Financial methods, 
railway constructions, speculation, profits, failures, accounts and 
reports, expenses, tariffs, principles of rates, classification and discrimi- 
nation, competition and pooling, accidents, and employers' liability. 
Especial attention is paid to the methods of regulation and legislation 
in the United States as compared with European methods, and the course 
closes with a general discussion of state versus private management. 

Given in igoy-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 109 — Communistic and Socialistic Theories. Professor 
Clark. 

Tu. and Th. at 1.10. 406 L. 

This course studies the theories of St. Simon, Fourier, Proudhon, 
Rodbertus, Marx, Lasalle, and others. It aims to utilize recent discov- 
eries in economic science in making a critical test of these theories 
themselves and of certain counter-arguments. It examines the socialistic 
ideals of distribution, and the effects that, by reason of natural laws, 
would follow an attempt to realize them through the action of the state. 

Economics iio — Theories of Social Reform. Professor Clark. 
Tu. and Th. at 1. 10. 406 L. 

This course treats of certain plans for the partial reconstruction of 
industrial society that have been advocated in the United States, and 
endeavors to determine what reforms are in harmony with economic 
principles. It treats of the proposed single tax, of the measures 
advocated by the Farmers' Alliance, and of those proposed by labor 
organizations, and the general relation of the state to industry. 



2 9 



Economics 201— Economic Readings I : Classical English Econo- 
mists. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 10. 415 L. 

In this course the principal theories of the English economists from 
Adam Smith to John Stuart Mill are studied by means of lectures, 
assigned readings and reports, and discussions. Special attention is 
given to the Wealth of Nations, Malthus's Essay on Population, the bullion 
controversy of 1810, the corn law controversy of 1815, and the treatises 
on Political Economy of Ricardo, Senior, and John Stuart Mill. 

Given in iqo8-oq and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 202 — Economic Readings II : Contemporary Econo- 
mists. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 10. 415 L- 

In this course the theories of contemporary economists are compared 
and studied by the same methods employed in Economics 201. Special 
attention is given to Bohm-Bawerk's Positive Theory of Capital and 
Marshall's Principles of Economics. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 203-204 — History of Economics. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 415 L. 

In this course the various systems of political economy are discussed 
in their historical development. The chief exponents of the different 
schools are taken up in their order, and especial attention is directed to 
the wider aspects of the connection between the theories and the organi- 
zation of the existing industrial society. The writers discussed are 
divided as follows : (1) Antiquity; (2) Middle Ages; (3) Mercantilists; 
(4) Physiocrats ; (5) Adam Smith and Precursors ; (6) English School ; 
(7) The Continent ; (8) German Historical School ; (9) Recent Develop- 
ment — England, Germany, Austria, France, Italy, America. 

Given in igo8-og and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 205 — Economic Theory I. Professor Clark. 
M. and W. at 2.10. 406 L. 

This course discusses, first, the static laws of distribution. If the 
processes of industry were not changing, wages and industry would 
tend to adjust themselves according to certain standards. A study of the 
mechanism of production would then show that one part of the product 
is specifically attributable to labor, and that another part is imputable to 
capital. It is the object of the course to show that the tendency of free 
competition, under such conditions, is to give to labor, in the form of 
wages, the amount that it specifically creates, and also to give to capital, 
in the form of interest, what it specifically produces. The theory 
undertakes to prove that the earnings of labor and of capital are governed 



3° 



by a principle of final productivity, and that this principle must be 
studied on a social scale, rather than in any one department of 
production. The latter part of this course enters the field of Economic 
Dynamics, defines an economic society and describes the forces which 
so act upon it as to change its structure and its mode of producing and 
distributing wealth. 

Economics 206 — Economic Theory II. Professor Clark. 
M. and W. at 2.10. 406 L. 

This course continues the discussion of the dynamic laws of distribu- 
tion. The processes of industry are actually progressing. Mechanical 
invention, emigration and other influences cause capital and labor to be 
applied in new ways and with enlarging results. These influences do 
not even repress the action of the static forces of distribution, but they 
bring a new set of forces into action. They create, first, employers' 
profits, and, later, additions to wages and interest. It is the object of 
the course to show how industrial progress affects the several shares in 
distribution under a system of competition, and also to determine 
whether the consolidations of labor and capital, which are a distinctive 
feature of modern industry, have the effect of repressing competition. 

It is a further purpose of the course to present the natural laws by 
which the increase of capital and that of labor are governed, and to 
discuss the manner in which the earnings of these agents are affected by 
the action of the state, and to present at some length the character and 
the effects of those obstructions which pure economic law encounters in 
the practical world. 

Economics 207 — Theory of Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
M. and W. at 1.10. 415 L. 

The aim of this course is to present the elementary principles of 
statistics and to illustrate their application by concrete studies in the 
chief sources of statistical material. The theoretical part of the course 
includes the study of averages, index numbers, interpolation, principles 
of the graphic method, elements of demography, and statistical principles 
of insurance. The laboratory work consists of a graded series of 
problems designed to develop accuracy and facility in the application of 
principles. (Identical with Sociology 255.) 

Economics 209 — Quantitative Economics I : Advanced Statistics. 

Professor H. L. Moore. 
M. and W. at 11. 10. 415 L. 

Quantitative Economics I and II (see Economics 210) investigate 
economics as an exact science. This course treats economics from the 
inductive, statistical side. It aims to show how the methods of quantita- 
tive biology and anthropology are utilized in economics and sociology. 



3i 



Special attention is given to recent contributions to statistical theory by 
Galton, Edgeworth, and Pearson. Economics 207, or an equivalent, is 
a prerequisite. 

Given in igoy-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 210 — Quantitative Economics II : Mathematical 
Economics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
M. and W. at 11. 10. 415 L. 

This course treats economics from the deductive side. It aims to show 
the utility of an analytical treatment of economic laws expressed in 
symbolic form. The work of Cournot is presented and used as a basis 
for the discussion of the contributions to the mathematical method by 
Walras, Marshall, and Pareto. Economics 207, or an equivalent, is a 
prerequisite. 

Given in igoj-08 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 241 — The Economic and Social Evolution of Russia 
since 1800. Professor Simkhovitch. 
M. and F. at 10.10. 418 L. 

This course describes the economic development of the country, the 
growth of Slavophil, liberal and revolutionary doctrines and parties, and 
the disintegration of the autocratic regime. (Identical with History 253.) 

Economics 242 — Radicalism and Social Reform as Reflected in 
the Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Professor Simkhovitch. 
F. at 10.10 and 11. 10. 418 L. 

An interpretation of the various types of modern radicalism, such as 
socialism, nihilism, and anarchism, and of the social and economic 
conditions on which they are based. 

Economics 301-302 — Seminar in Political Economy and Finance. 

Professors Seligman, Clark, and Seager. 

For advanced students. Tu., 8.15-10.15 p.m. 301 L. 

Subject B — Sociology and Statistics. 

Sociology 151— Principles of Sociology, Analytical and De- 
scriptive. Professor Giddings and Mr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 415 L. 

This is a fundamental course, intended to lay a foundation for advanced 
work. In the first half-year, in connection with a text-book study of 
theory, lectures are given on the social traits, organization and welfare 
of the American people at various stages of their history, and students 
are required to analyze and classify sociological material of live interest, 
obtained from newspapers, reviews, and official reports. 



32 



Sociology 152— Principles of Sociology, Historical. Professor 
Giddings and Mr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 415 L. 

In this course the main outlines of historical sociology are presented. 
The beginning of social relations in animal bands are indicated, and the 
successive stages of anthropogenic, ethnogenic and demogenic associa- 
tion are reviewed. This course is the proper preparation for Sociology 
251-252. 

Sociology 251— Social Evolution— Ethnic and Civil Origins. 

Professor Giddings. 

F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 415 L. 

This course on historical sociology deals with such topics as : (1) the 
distribution and ethnic composition of primitive populations ; (2) the types 
of mind and of character, the capacity for cooperation, the cultural beliefs, 
and the economic, legal, and political habits of early peoples ; (3) early 
forms of the family, the origins, structure, and functions of the clan, the 
organization of the tribe, the rise of the tribal federations, tribal 
feudalism, and the conversion of a gentile into a civil plan of social 
organization. Early literature, legal codes and chronicles, descriptive of 
the Celtic and Teutonic groups which combined to form the English 
people before the Norman Conquest, are the chief sources made use of 
in this course. 

Sociology 252 — Social Evolution — Civilization, Progress, and 
Democracy. Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 415 L. 

This course, which is a continuation of Sociology 251, comprises three 
parts, namely : (1) the nature of those secondary civilizations which are 
created by conquest, and of the policies by which they seek to maintain 
and to extend themselves ; (2) an examination of the nature of progress 
and of its causes, including the rise of discussion and the growth of 
public opinion ; also a consideration of the policies by which continuing 
progress is ensured, — including measures for the expansion of intellec- 
tual freedom, for the control of arbitrary authority by legality, for the 
repression of collective violence, and for the control of collective impulse 
by deliberation ; (3) a study of the nature, the genesis, and the social 
organization of modern democracies, including an examination of the 
extent to which non-political associations for culture and pleasure, 
churches, business corporations, and labor unions, are more or less 
democratic ; and of the democratic ideals of equality and fraternity in 
their relations to social order and to liberty. The documents of English 
history since the Norman Conquest are the chief sources made use of in 
this course. 



33 



Sociology 257— Historical Types of Society : Ancient. Professor 

GlDDINGS. 

M. and W. at 4.10. 415 L. 

The object of this course, and of Sociology 258, is to examine the 
fundamental types of human society as they have appeared in history, 
and to study their relations to one another, and to the physical environ- 
ment. In the first half-year attention is given chiefly to the sociological 
types that appeared in the Eastern Mediterranean region before the 
Christian Era. 

Sociology 258 — Historical Types of Society : Modern. Professor 

GlDDINGS. 

M. and W. at 4.10. 415 L. 

This is a continuation of Sociology 257. The subject-matter of the 
course is found in the European societies that have flourished since the 
beginning of the Christian Era, and particular attention is given to the 
question of the extent to which they have reproduced the types that 
appeared in the Eastern Mediterranean region in earlier days, and to 
what extent they present original features attributable to specific 
environmental and ethnic influences. 

Sociology 255 — Theory of Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
M. and W. at 1. 10. 415 L. 

This course is identical with Economics 207 (see page 30). 

Sociology 256 — Social Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
M. and W. at 1. 10. 415 L. 

Actual statistical materials, descriptive and explanatory of contempo- 
raneous societies, are the subject-matter of this course, which presupposes 
a knowledge of statistical operations (Sociology 255) and applies it to the 
analysis of concrete problems. The lectures cover such topics as : (1) the 
statistics of population, including densities and migrations, composition 
by age, sex, and nationality, amalgamation by intermarriage ; (2) statis- 
tics of mental traits and products, including languages, religious prefer- 
ences, economic preferences (occupations), and political preferences ; (3) 
statistics of social organization, including families, households, munici- 
palities, churches, business corporations, labor unions, courts of law, 
army, navy, and civil service ; (4) statistics of social welfare, including 
peace and war, prosperity, education or illiteracy, vitality, and morality, 
including pauperism and crime. 

Sociology 259 — Ecclesiology. Dr. Bayles. 
Tu. and F. at 4.10. 405 L. 

The purpose of this course is to define the present relations of the eccle- 
siastical institutions to the other institutions of American society : the 
state, the government, marriage, family, education, and public wealth. 
An analysis is made of the guarantees of religious liberty contained in 



34 



the federal and commonwealth constitutions; of the civil status of churches 
in terms of constitutional and statute law ; of the methods of incorpora- 
tion, of the functions of trustees, of legislative and judicial control ; of 
denominational polity according to its type ; of the functional activity of 
churches in their departments of legislation, administration, adjudica- 
tion, discipline, and mission ; of the influence of churches on ethical 
standards ; of the distribution of nationalities among the denominations, 
of the territorial distribution of denominational strength, of the relation 
of polity to density of population, and of the current movements in and 
between various organizations tending toward changes of functions and 
structure. 

Sociology 311-312 — Seminar in Sociology. Professor Giddings. 
Two hours bi-weekly. Hours to be arranged. 

The Statistical Laboratory, conducted by Professor H. L. Moore, is 
equipped with the Hollerith tabulating machines, comptometers, and 
other modern facilities. 

Subject C — Social Economy 

Social Economy 281-282— Poverty and Relief. Professor Devine. 
Tu. and Th. at 4.10. 415 L. 

This course, in the first half-year, presents a survey of the remedial 
agencies by which modern communities deal with the problem of depend- 
ence, including: child-helping societies and reformatories; institutions 
for sick and convalescent, aged and infirm, feeble-minded and insane, 
vagrants and criminals ; and organized charities for work in the homes 
of the poor. The personal causes of distress are analyzed and an 
attempt is made to measure the extent of the social burden caused by the 
lack of the capacity for self-support. 

In the second half-year, the course turns to the social causes of 
distress and considers movements which aim at the improvement 
of working and living conditions, and changes in the educational 
system designed to increase individual industrial efficiency. Housing 
and sanitary reform, the prevention of disease and accidents, the length- 
ening of childhood, and definite plans for raising the standard of 
living are considered. Industrial exploitation, the breaking down of 
character by temptations for which the community is responsible, and 
other instances of commercial greed and social neglect may properly be 
included in this study. 

Social Economy 283-284 — Social Legislation in the United States 
and Europe. Professor Lindsay. 
Tu. and Th. at 5.10. 415 L. 

The content rather than the form of social legislation and the forces at 
work shaping and crystallizing public opinion on subjects that affect the 



35 



general welfare rather than the special political and economic interests 
of the people will determine the scope of this course. The subjects 
treated will be : education, with special reference to public school 
systems and compulsory attendance ; public health, with special refer- 
ence to sanitation, food legislation, and temperance ; marriage and 
divorce ; welfare of women and children, with special reference to the 
child-labor question ; poor relief ; humanitarian ideals ; and religion and 
art, including public improvements, scenic preservation, and forestry. 
Students will be expected to brief the federal and state laws and court 
decisions thereunder as a basis for class lectures and discussions. 
Comparisons will be made with similar legislation in Europe, especially 
in England, France, and Germany. In 1907-08 the emphasis will be 
placed upon the development of social legislation in the United States, 
and in alternate years thereafter on European social legislation. 

Social Economy 321-322 — Seminar in Social Economy. Professors 
Devine and Lindsay. 
F., 8-10 p.m. Bi-weekly. 

The Seminar for 1907-08 will consider recent developments in the 
social and philanthropic activities of New York City, e.g., social settle- 
ments, parks, and playgrounds, outside activities of public schools, 
children's institutions, relief societies, agencies for the aid of immigrants, 
preventive work of organized charities, and educational and religious 
movements. 



COURSES IN THE SCHOOL OF PHILANTHROPY 

The School of Philanthropy, conducted by the Charity Organization 
Society, under the direction of Professor Lindsay, offers courses* aggre- 
gating not less than eight hours a week throughout the academic year, and 
also a Summer School course of six weeks in June and July. These 
courses are open to regular students of Columbia University who satisfy 
the Director that they are qualified to pursue them with profit, and may 
be offered as a minor by candidates for an advanced degree. 

The program of studies for 1907-08 is as follows : (a) General survey 
{40 lectures) ; {b) Racial traits in the population (20 lectures) ; {c) Con- 
structive social work (30 lectures) ; {d) Care of families in their homes 
(40 lectures) ; (e) Administration of charitable and educational institu- 
tions (20 lectures) ; (/) Child-helping agencies (40 lectures) ; (g) Treat- 
ment of the criminal (30 lectures) ; (k) The State in its relation to charities 
and corrections (20 lectures). 

* These courses are given in the United Charities Building, corner Fourth Avenue and 
22d Street. A handbook giving full information about the work of the School may be 
obtained from the Director. 



36 



COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Economics 1-2 — Introduction to Economics — Practical Economic 
Problems. Professors Seligman and Seager and Assistants. 

Sections 1 and 2, M. at 1.10 and W. and F. at 11. 10. Sections 3 and 4, 
M., W., and F. at 1.10. W. and F. recitations in 415 L. M. lecture in 
422 L. 



COURSES IN BARNARD COLLEGE 

Economics A — Outlines of Economics. Professor Moore and Assist- 
ants. 

Sections 1 and 2, M.,W., and F. at 9.10. Sections 2 and 3, M. and W. 
at 9.10 and F. at 2.10. 

Economics 4 — Economic History of England and the United 
States. Professor Moore and Assistants. 

Section 1, M.,W., and F. at 9.10. Section 2, M. and W. at 9.10 and F. 
at 2.10. 

Economics 105 — The Labor Problem. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 1.10. 301 B. 

The topics treated in this course are the rise of the factory system, 
factory legislation, the growth of trade unions and changes in the law in 
respect to them, the policies of trade unions, strikes, lockouts, arbitration 
and conciliation, proposed solutions of the labor problem, and the future 
of labor in the United States. 

Economics 120 — Practical Economic Problems. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 1. 10. 301 B. 

The topics treated in this course are the defects in the monetary and 
banking systems of the United States, government expenditures and 
government revenues, protection vs. free trade, the relation of the 
government towards natural monopolies, and federal control of trusts. 

Economics 107 — Fiscal and Industrial History of the United 
States. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 415 L. 
(For description see pages 27-28.) 

Economics 108 — Railroad Problems, Economic, Social, and Legal. 

Professor Seligman. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 415 L. 
(For description see page 28.) 



37 



Economics 109 — Communistic and Socialistic Theories. Professor 
Clark. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 10. 

In this course a brief study is made of the works of St. Simon, Fourier, 
Proudhon, Owen, and Lasalle, and a more extended study is made of 
Marx's treatise on capital. Recent economic changes, such as the 
formation of trusts and strong trade unions, are examined with a 
view to ascertaining what effect they have had on the modern socialistic 
movement. 

Economics iio — Theories of Social Reform. Professor Clark. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 10. 

In this course a study is made of modern semi-socialistic movements 
and of such reforms as have for their object the improvement of the 
condition of the working class. Municipal activities, factory legislation, 
the single tax, recent agrarian movements and measures foi the regula- 
tion of monopolies are studied. 

Sociology 151-152 — Principles of Sociology. Professor Giddings 
and Mr. Tenney. 

M. and W. at 3.10. 415 L. 

(For description see pages 31-32.) 



COURSES IN THE SUMMER SESSION* 

sA — Principles of Economics. Lectures, recitations, and essays. 
Professor McCrae. 

Five hours a week at 8.30. 301 H. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
1 or A.) 

sB— Railroad Problems. Lectures and class discussions. Professor 
McCrae. 

Five hours a week at 11.30. 301 H. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
108.) 



*For fuller details consult the Bulletin of Information in reference to the Summer Session. 



3S 



CONSULTATION HOURS FROM 
Sept. 23 to Oct. 4, 1907. 

The Dean of the Faculty of ) 

Political Science, or I IO to 12 M " and 2 '3° to 5 p.m. 

The Secretary ) Library, 404, 403. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 



Professor Dunning 
Professor Osgood 
Professor Robinson 
Professor Sloane 
Professor Shepherd 
Professor Shotwell 
Professor Botsford 
Professor Johnson 



10 to 12 A.M. 
and 
2 to 4 P.M. 



)■ Library, 403 
J 



public law and jurisprudence 
Professor Burgess, 2.30 to 5 p.m. Library, 404. 

Professor Munroe Smith, M., W., and F., 11 to 12 A.m. Library, 409. 

Professor Goodnow, 10 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. Library, 407. 

Professor J. B. Moore, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Library, 411. 

Professor Beard, M., W., and F., 12 to 12.30 p.m. Hamilton Hall, 714. 



economics and social science 
Professor Seligman "] 

Professor Clark 10 to 12 a.m. ) 

Professor Seager „ t a ?<* M \ Librar ^ 

2 to 4 P.M. ) 

Professor H. L. Moore J 

Professor Giddings, 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Library, 408. 

Tu.and Th.,11.10 a.m. to 12. 10 p.m. West Hall,202. 
W. and F., 2.10 to 3.10 p.m. Barnard, 318. 
Professor Simkhovitch, M., Tu., Th., and F., 2 to 4 p.m. Library, 307. 
Professor Devine 



Professor H. L. Moore 



Professor Lindsay 



4.10 to 5 p.m. West Hall, 201, 203. 



CN ? 
CM | o 



«5 g 
M Ph 



o 

NO O 

D I— I 

£ . 3 
P ^ 
•h . * 

ts 



* Q N 

M O ? 
I no -'- 

fOM « J 

M N H 

N I O m 

>>i? w ° 

O 



cn 



O 

o 

£^ 

O - 

>> q 



40 



CN 

VO Q 

?o 

M O 
NO O 

Jh • CO 

en 
2 



co M ' 

b ^ 
cn S 

o 
o 
W 



2 

u 

> 

* 00 

CO 



fcV: cn 
o o 

.2 £ 



CO 

g 1 Sw 

8-3 



00 u 

CN g 

I CM 2 

boo . 

2 N< o 

cn 

23 Ph 



S 

o _ 

§^ 
cj ^ 
Wo 



> 
o 
X 

« 00 



NO £ 

CM E 



Z no 
< (M 



M CO 

>> . « 

-S2 £ 



c z 2 
d s " 

2 ^ 
a. • 

■8 8 

^Ph 



vO 

cte 

N^ 

£ o 



n pa W 

m O o 

^P4 £ 
2 ^ 

In O 
£ph 



.Q Ph 
P 

Ph 



CN £ 

>>co 
o . 
cn o 

5 £ 



CN « >— I 
N O o 
>,Ph £ 
O ^ 
w O 



vo" 
O 

w I (/) m 

O M H 

o N 2 

C Ph 

o 

CJ 



O B 

Jh C c> 

2 0 0 

.2 ■ " 
Pm 



vO 



7 OT 

I cn 



cn 



J. 0 3 , 

cn 



. o 



CJ O 
HH 3 P^ 



o 

CN W 

„ O 

M O 

cu q 



J2 C 
Ph 



10 

S3 

^CO 

>% . 

2 ^ 
.2 £ 



£0 

M Z 

M 5 , 

00 z W 

M ^NO 

o 

1-1 ^1- 

o <*: 
* ? 



M H 



CJ « - 

C O W 



2 S 

I C 

o 2^ 

M CN J 

cn I 1— 1 
CJ Os . 

a SW 



0 0 



NO * 

CN 5 

I s 

NO W 

CN W , 

iu Ch 

CJ Oi o 

c z £ 

v- ^ 

■So 

^ Ph 



no W 

r^cN o 
0 o 

cn iO _] 
•§ ^ J - 

g >, H 

C O iJh 

8^ 

CO Ph 



IN ^ 
t3 O h 

„ 0 o 



CN 3 



CN S W 
w O o 
>>P< 2- 
v., 

O ^* 

to P P 



Pm 

Pm 



cn m W 

O o 

o ^ 
tn O 

£ph 



PU 

p- 
Pm 



b^ 

2 

to p 

£p^ 



CN P3 1 
CN O o 



vo 
O 

M ^ 

cn I cO ^° 



bo o> 
o o o 

to . ^ 

W 0 
Ph 



CN 

s ? » 

v° I cn 

M W 

o o 

bw • ^ 
2 cj o 



I W 

ON X 

O < , 

•H J h-J 

0 ^ 

G Ph 
O 

o 



o 

. o 

M O 

CN S , 

^ PQ ^ 

. 1 . • 



Ph 




00 
VO 
CN 

I CN 

vO CN 
CN 



mQ 



Coo 

O CN 



2 g 

1 o 

M CN i 

cn I t-1 
o Ov . 

a §w 

G i*> 

O O 
CJ 1^ 

W ^ 



co 
M z 



C^- cn 



O o 



CO ^ 
M 0 

s|. 



•2 ^ 
p 

Ph 



vO W 
^ lO « 

cm o 
0 „ c 

CM log 

cn j 
o CM • M 

G^ ffi 

W go 
co£ 



0 § 



4i 



cm 
o 

co 
I co 

m a 
o o 

dW O 



3^ 
d 

Ph 



CM 

lO co 
CM O 

I Z 

to5 

CM Q 



O 

o o 



I o 
CO O 
CM 5< 

o . 

3 2 



CM 

VO V) 
CM O 

J. 2 
CM Q M 

3 "o 



o 

in M 



bo „ 

_0 fQ 



O 



CM 
O 

CM co 
I co 

M W 

o o 

<J o 
Ph 



O o 



a 2 



CM Q 

H O 

i oo o 

O H o 



22" 

CM 

tn I 
o CO : 

G 

8 ' 
w 



g w 

w J, Q m 

00 ^ "f 
.2 CM O 



00 



co- 
co 

N 1 



ID 




N 3 

CO O 
CM ^ 

^ pq co 



I 2 



CM 

VO co 

M O 

± 2 

M 

K " IT) 

I * 
o *o 

■5d5 



CM 
CM 

i 

£ J> - 
**>• cm 
cm i 
^ to 

O N 



0 

w 

w M 

5 a 



CM 

J?* 

I O 

M CO 

CO 2 

M W ^ 

M O 
& £ M 

Is 



CM 

£ o o 



Ph 



00 

lO co 
CM O 

iO Q 

CM Q 

o . • 



CM Q 

Pi 

CM W 

O CM ^ 

to P 



CM 



^ ^ ^ 

o O 
Ph 



CM 

i < 

O p 



S w 2 



NO 

CM Q 

M O 

I 00 o 
o M o 

.2 £ 



CM 

O 



Ph 



CM 3 

t" H-I 

o . ^ 

"in 

C/3 



S N I 

O CM W 

-rl 00 
.2 CM o 
y »h 

Ph 



X 



S CM g 

— co . - 



CO o 

O co 

m « 

v- <! 

O i— 

to • 

'£ 2 



CM 

o 

CM oo 

I CO 

M W 

O O 



O 

i O w 



CM J 



O O 

3Ph 



O 

CM 

§^ 

o 
W 



T g 

VO Q , 

£ o 

O Ph 



CM 

CO ^ 

HI 2 

I o 

M CO 

CO 2 

M H 

£•6 

• £ * C- 

O Q 

o 



CM 

- o 

•H q HH 1 

^ c o 
«00 



^3 Ph 
P 
Ph 



00 

lO co 
CM C3 

|^§- 

I O 

3 o 



in 



Columbia University 



SCOPE 

General Culture 

Graduate non-profes- 
sional courses 

Public and Private 
Law 

Practice of Medicine 



Mining Engineering | 
Metallurgy ' 
Chemistry and Engi- ] 
n e e r i n g — C i v i I , j 
Sanitary, Electrical, j- 
Mechanical, Chem- j 
ical J 
Architecture, Music, 

Design 
Ed ucation — elemen- 
tary or secondary 
teaching 
Advanced courses 



Pharmacy 

There is an annual 



Courses are offered 
both at the Univer- 
sity and elsewhere 



Columbia College 

Barnard College 

Political Science 

Philosophy 

Pure Science 

School of Law 
(3 years) 

College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons 
(4 years) 

School of Mines 
(4 years) 

Schools of Chemistry 
and Engineering 
(4 years) 

Schools of Architecture, 
Music and Design 

Teachers College 
(2 years) 

Teachers College 



College of Pharmacy 

(2 and 3 years) 
Summer Session 



Extension Teaching 



OPEN TO 

Men 
Women 
Men and 
Women 

Men 
Men 



Men 1 



Men 



Men 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 



LEADING TO 

A.B. or B.S. 
A.B. or B.S. 
A.M. 
and Ph.D. 

LL.B. 
M.D. 



E.M. 
Met.E. 
Chem. 
C.E. 
E.E. 
Mech.E. 
Chem.E. 

B.S. or 
Certificate 
Bachelor's 
Diploma 
and B.S. 
Master's 
and Doctor's 
Diploma 
Degrees and 
Diplomas 
Suitable aca- 
demic credit 
or certification 
Suitable aca- 
demic credit 
or certification 



The normal preparation for Columbia College and Barnard College 
is the equivalent of a four-year secondary school course. The Schools 
of Political Science, Philosophy, Pure Science, and Law require for 
entrance a college course or its equivalent. Two years of collegiate 
work are prescribed for Teachers College and for the degree courses in 
Architecture, Music and Design and, while the minimum requirements 
do not at present prescribe it, the same preparation is strongly recom- 
mended in Medicine, Mines, Chemistry, and Engineering. 

In the Summer Session and Extension Teaching there are no entrance 
tests for non-matriculants, but before being registered as candidates 
for degrees or diplomas, matriculants must fulfil the appropriate entrance 
requirements. 

The program of studies in the College places the emphasis on the 
quality of the student's work rather than upon the time spent in residence, 
and is so arranged as to make it possible for a properly qualified student 
to complete the requirements for both the Bachelor's degree and for any 
one of the professional degrees of the University in six years, or, in some 
cases, in a shorter period. 

Students registered as candidates for non-professional degrees may at 
the same time receive credit toward a diploma in teaching and vice versa. 

Bulletins of Information regarding any of these courses may be 
obtained from the Secretary of the University, and further information 
will be furnished on request. A complete Catalogue, issued in Decem- 
ber of each year, is sold for twenty-five cents. 




April 3, 190^ 



tulktitt itxfjjrttmliott 



HISTORY 
ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC LAW 



COURSES OFFERED BY THE 

FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

AND THE 

SEVERAL UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



IQOQ-IO IttUWWll 

y Wflfc 

QNNEMfn OF ItUHBi^ 



Published by 

Columbia mniversitg 
in tbe Git£ of IFtew l^ork 

Morningside Heights 
New York, N. Y. 



®0tximMa Winxv&x&itvi 



(Issued 25 times during the Academic year, monthly in November 
and December, and weekly between February and June. Entered 
as second-class matter at the New York, N. Y., Post Office, 
Dec. 22, 1900, under Act of July 16, 1894.) 

These include : 

1. The President's Annual Report to the Trustees. 

2. The Catalogue of the University, issued in Decem- 

ber, price 25 cents. 

3. The Announcements of the several Colleges and 

Schools, and of certain Divisions, issued in the 
Spring and relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the 
right is reserved to make changes in detail as 
circumstances require. The current number of 
any of these Announcements will be sent without 
charge upon application to the Secretary of the 
University. For information as to the various 
courses offered by the University consult the last 
page of this Announcement. 



ABRIDGED ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The academic year is thirty-seven weeks in length, ending on the 
Wednesday nearest the nth of June. In 1909-10 the year begins on 
September 22, 1909, and ends on June 8, 1910. It is divided into two 
half-years of fifteen weeks of instruction each. In 1909-10 the second 
half-year begins on February 7, 1910. The Summer Session for 1909 
begins on July 7 and ends on August 18. 

The exercises of the University are suspended on Election Day, Thanks- 
giving Day, and the following two days, for two weeks at Christmas, 
on Washington's Birthday, from the Thursday before Good Friday 
through the following Monday, and on Memorial Day. # 

The complete Academic Calendar will be found in the University 
catalogue and so far as it refers to the students studying under any 
Faculty, in the announcement of that Faculty. 



D.T.-mch. 1909-6,000 — T . H . 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER President of the University 

A.B., Columbia, 1882 ; A.M., 1883; Ph.D., 1884; LL.D., Syracuse, 1898 ; Tulane, 
1901 ; Johns Hopkins, Princeton, Yale, and University of Pennsylvania, 1902 ; 
Chicago. 1903 ; Manchester and St. Andrew's, 1905 ; Cambridge, 1907 ; Williams, 
1908; Litt.D., Oxford, 1905. 

1 John W. Burgess Ruggles Professor of Political Science and 

Constitutional Law, and Dean 
A.B., Amherst, 1867; A.M., 1870; LL.D., 1884; Ph.D., Princeton, 1883. 

Munroe Smith.. .Professor of Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

A.B., Amherst, 1874; A.M., t88o ; LL.B., Columbia, 1877; LL.D., 1904; J.U.D., 
Gottingen, 1880. 

Frank J. Goodnow Eaton Professor of Administrative Law and 

Municipal Science 

A.B., Amherst, 1879 ; A.M., 1886; LL.B., Columbia, 1882, cum laude ; LL.D., 1904. 

Edwin R. A. Seligman McVickar Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Columbia, 1879; A.M., 1883; LL.B., 1884; Ph.D., 1884 ; LL.D., 1904. 

William Henry Carpenter Villard Professor of Germanic Philology, 

and Associate Dean 

A.B., Hamilton, 1881 ; Ph.D., Freiburg, 1881. 

1 Herbert L. Osgood Professor of History 

A.B., Amherst, 1877; A.M., 1880; LL.D., 1907; Ph.D., Columbia, 1889. 

x John Bassett Moore Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law 

and Diplomacy 

A. B., Virginia, 1880; LL.D., Yale, 1901. 

William A. Dunning Lieber Professor of History and Political 

Philosophy 

A.B., Columbia, 1881 ; A.M., 1883 ; Ph.D., 1885 ; LL.D., 1904. 

Franklin Henry Giddings Professor of Sociology and the 

History of Civilization 
A.B., Union, 1877 ; A.M., 1889 ; Ph.D., 1897 ; LL.D., Oberlin, 1900. 

John B. Clark Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Amherst, 1872 ; Ph.D., 1890 ; LL.D., 1897 ; LL.D., Princeton, 1896. 

James Harvey Robinson Professor of History 

A.B., Harvard, 1887 ; A.M., 1888 ; Ph.D., Freiburg, 1890. 

William Milligan Sloane '. Seth Low Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia, 1868; L.H.D., 1887; A.M. and Ph.D., Leipzig, 1876; LL.D., 
Rutgers, 1898 ; Princeton, 1903. 

1 Absent on leave 1909-10. 



Henry Rogers Seager Professor of Political Economy 

Ph.B., Michigan, 1890: Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 1894. 

1 Henry L. Moore. , Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Randolph-Macon, 1892; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1896. 

William Robert Shepherd , Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia, 1893 ; A.M., 1894 ; Ph.D., 1896. 

James T. Shotwell Professor of History 

A.B., Toronto, 1898 ; Ph.D., Columbia, 1903. 

1 George W. Botsford Adjunct Professor of History 

A. B., Nebraska, 1884; A.M., 1889; Ph.D., Cornell, 1891. 

Vladimir G. Simkhovitch Adjunct Professor of Economic History 

Ph.D., Halle-Wittenberg, 1898. 

Edward Thomas Devine Schiff Professor of Social Economy 

B. A., Cornell College, Iowa, 1887 ; M.A., 1890 ; LL.D., 1904 ; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 

1895. 

Henry Johnson Professor of History in Teachers College 

B.L., University of Minnesota, 1889 ; A.M., Columbia, 1902. 

Samuel McCune Lindsay Professor of Social Legislation 

Ph.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1889 ; Ph.D., Halle, 1892. 

2 Henry Suzzallo Professor of the Philosophy of Education in 

Teachers College 

A.B., Stanford, 1899 ; A.M., Columbia, 1902 ; Ph.D., 1905. 

George Winfield Scott Professor of International Law 

A.B., Leland Stanford, 1896 ; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1902. 



Other Officers 



Richard J. H. Gottheil Professor of Rabbinical Literature and the 

Semitic Languages 

A.B., Columbia, 1881 ; Ph.D., Leipzig, 1886. 

A. V. Williams Jackson .Professor of Indo-Iranian Languages 

A. B., Columbia, 1883 ; A.M., 1884 ; L.H.D., 1885 ; Ph.D., 1886 ; LL.D., 1904. 

Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology 

Ph.D., Kiel, 1881. 

Livingston Farrand Professor of Anthropology 

A. B., Princeton, 1888; A.M., 1891 ; M.D., Columbia, 1891. 

1 Absent on leave 1909-10. 



John D. Prince Professor of the Semitic Languages 

A.B., Columbia, 1888 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1892. 

Friedrich Hirth Dean Lung Professor of Chinese 

A.M. and Ph.D., Rostock, 1869. 

Charles A. Beard Adjunct Professor of Politics 

A. B., De Pauw University, 1898 ; A.M., Columbia, 1903 ; Ph.D., 1904. 

Mrs. Mary K. Simkhovitch Adjunct Professor of Social Economy in 

Barnard College 

B. A., Boston University, 1890. 

Henry R. Mussey. . . .Adjunct Professor of Economics in Barnard College 
A.B., Beloit, 1900 ; Ph.D., Columbia, 1905. 

Arthur C. McGiffert, Ph.D., D.D Washburn Professor of Church 

History in Union Theological Seminary 

William Walker Rockwell, S.T.B., Lie. Th Assistant Professor of 

Church History in Union Theological Seminary 
Henry Peter Scratchley, M. A., B.D. .Acting Professor of Ecclesiastical 

History in the General Theological Seminary 

Marshall Bowyer Stewart, M.A., B.D Instructor in Ecclesiastical 

History in the General Theological Seminary 

George J. Bayles Associate in Ecclesiology 

A.B., Columbia, 1891 ; A.M., 1892 ; LL.B., 1893 ; Ph.D., 1895. 



Alvan A. Tenney, Ph.D Tutor in Sociology 

Maude A. Huttmann, A.M Tutor in History in Barnard College 

Carlton Huntley Hayes, A.M Lecturer in History 

Eugene E. Agger, Ph.D Lecturer in Political Economy 

Carl F. L. Huth, A.M Lecturer in History 

Edward McChesney Sait, A.M Lecturer in Public Law 

Lilian Brandt, A.M Assistant in Social Economy 

Juliet Stuart Points, A.M Assistant in History in Barnard College 



iii 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Students are received as candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy under the Faculty of Political Science ; for the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science either in Columbia 
College or in Barnard College, and for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Teachers College. They are also permitted to pursue special or partial 
courses subject to the regulations of the Faculty under which they may 
register. 

Certain courses which may be counted toward the several degrees are 
also offered in the Summer Session of the University. 

Students enrolled in the General, the Union, the Drew, the Jewish, 
St. Joseph's, or the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, or in the 
School of Philanthropy in the City of New York, who may have been 
designated for the privilege by the authorities of these institutions, 
and accepted by the President of Columbia University, are admitted 
to the courses offered by the Faculty of Political Science free of all 
charge for tuition. These institutions offer reciprocal privileges to the 
students of Columbia University. 

Teachers College, founded in 1888, and Barnard College, founded in 
1889, have now become parts of the educational system of Columbia 
University. 

Admission 

There are no examinations for admission to the graduate courses 
under the Faculty of Political Science. Students are admitted at any 
time during the year. They must, however, present themselves for 
registration at the opening of the first or second half-year in order to 
obtain full credit for residence. They may present themselves for exam- 
ination for a degree whenever the requirements as to residence, and as 
to an essay or dissertation, have been complied with. For details see 
the announcement of the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy and 
Pure Science, which may be had on application to the Secretary of the 
University. 

The courses of instruction have been renumbered in accordance with 
a scheme uniform throughout the University, and attention is called to 
the following information which the number assigned to a course will 
in each case indicate : 

Odd numbers indicate the first, even numbers the second, half of the 
academic year. Courses designated 1-2, 21-22, etc., run through both 
half-years. Courses numbered between I and 100 are, in genera!, 
elementary, and may not be offered in fulfilment of the requirements for 

5 



6 



the higher degrees (A.M. and Ph.D.). Courses numbered from 101 to 
200 are primarily for students who hold a first degree but are open to 
undergraduates who have completed 64 points (for law 94 points), 
including all prescribed courses except Philosophy A and two half-year 
courses in Natural Science. In general no such course may be taken 
without some elementary training in the same or in some allied subject. 
Courses from 201 to 300 are restricted to graduate students. Seminars 
are numbered from 301 up. Attention is called to the pamphlet entitled 
Instruction for Candidates for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy, which may be had on application to the Secretary of the 
University, and particularly to the fact that the requirements for the 
higher degrees are based upon subjects and not upon courses. Students 
who wish to offer a subject either as a major or minor should, before 
registration, consult the officers of instruction concerned with regard 
to their selection of courses. 

For conditions of admission to Columbia College and Barnard College, 
see the circular upon entrance examinations, which may be had upon 
application to the Secretary of the University. 

Those graduate courses which are open to undergraduates — i. e. the 
courses numbered from 101 to 200 — are closed to women students unless 
announced separately as open to students of Barnard College ; but all 
purely graduate courses in History and in Economics and Social Science 
are open to women graduate students who have the first degree. 

Students who register for graduate courses are supposed to be familiar 
with the outlines of European history, ancient and modern, as well as of 
American history. Students who are not thus prepared are strongly 
recommended to take the undergraduate courses. 

For information in regard to degrees, fees, fellowships, scholarships, 
prizes, student employment, dormitories, the Academy of Political Science, 
expense of living, and public lectures, see the appropriate announcement 
either of the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy and Pure Science, 
or of Columbia, Barnard, or Teachers College. 

Abbreviations of names of buildings: B='Barnard College; Hm = 
Hamilton; L= Library ; S=Schermerhorn ; T = Teachers College; 
U=University ; W=West Hall. 

Libraries 

Students of the several subjects taught under the direction of the 
Faculty of Political Science will find New York to be a centre of library 
facilities unrivalled elsewhere in the United States. The library of 
Columbia University alone contains about 450,000 bound volumes and 
perhaps 100,000 items of unbound material. Upwards of 150,000 of the 
works available lie within the domain of history, politics, public law, 
jurisprudence, economics, and social science. Most of them are stored 
in a considerable number of special study-rooms open only to authorized 



7 



readers, thus affording advanced students and investigators in those 
fields the fullest opportunity to carry on their work in quiet rooms in the 
immediate vicinity of the literature of the subjects under consideration. 
Since officers of the University have always been regarded as ex-officio 
members of the library staff, they are constantly consulted in the matter 
of purchases, and any book needed by advanced students can usually be 
bought at once. Thus built up around the university departments, the 
library has brought to Columbia a series of remarkably efficient working 
collections. All of them are accurately catalogued both by authors and 
by subjects on cards accessible to readers. The facilities of the library 
are enhanced by the maintenance of a system of inter-university loans 
through which authorities that it does not possess may be placed at the 
disposal of officers and students. As a designated depository, further- 
more, the library receives all the publications of the United States 
Government, and has fairly complete sets of the legislative and diplo- 
matic documents issued by foreign governments. It is supplied with 
every journal of importance, and possesses entire sets of the great 
Sitzungsberichte, Jahrbiicher, etc. 

Among the resources of the library bearing upon European history 
are abundant stores of epigraphic material, including the Corpora and 
many original inscriptions on stone, and of archaeological material such 
as that furnished by the magnificent Avery collection ; the Rolls Series 
and the Calendars of State Papers ; the Parliamentary Papers ; the 
Publications of the Record Commission ; the Monumenta Germaniae 
Historica ; the Documents Inedits ; the great ecclesiastical collections ; 
many rare pamphlets relating to the French Revolution ; a large amount 
of Napoleana ; the Warburg collection of matter covering every phase 
of present conditions in Russia, and a noteworthy series of Russian 
public documents, the gift of Count Witte. 

For the study of American history the library possesses, not only the 
colonial and other records published by the Federal Government and by 
the several states, but complete sets also of the collections of all of the 
state, and of many of the local historical societies ; the Force Revolution- 
ary Tracts ; the reports of state constitutional conventions, and the 
unique Townsend Library of national, state and individual records of 
the Civil War. 

In addition to the official documentation, periodical literature, and 
extensive collections above noted, the library offers unusual advantages 
to students of politics, public law, jurisprudence, economics, and social 
science in the library of Henry Livingston Thomas, late Chief Translator 
of the Department of State, in that of the Holland Society of New York 
with its valuable collection of works of Grotius, in that of the Reform 
Club of the City of New York, of which it is the depository, and in a vast 
number of general and special works dealing with those branches of 
knowledge. The equipment of publications on sociological theory, the 



8 



history of the family, pauperism, crime and penology is unparalleled in 
the country. In social economy, charities and philanthropy the Library 
of the New York School of Philanthropy is available. 

The materials thus furnished by the University Library are richly 
supplemented by those in the libraries of public institutions, learned 
societies, and civic organizations, with which New York abounds. In 
the list of such establishments may be placed the Lenox and Astor 
Libraries, with their great collections of newspapers, pamphlets, and 
manuscripts, including at the former the Bancroft and Munoz transcripts ; 
the American Museum of Natural History ; the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art ; the American Geographical Society ; the American Numismatic 
and Archaeological Society ; the New York Genealogical and Biographical 
Society ; the New York Society ; the Authors' Club ; the New York 
Historical Society ; the Long Island Historical Society ; the General 
Theological Seminary ; Union Theological Seminary, with its 100,000 
volumes and 55,000 pamphlets bearing upon practically all phases of 
church history in Europe and America ; the Hispanic Society of America, 
with its unique collection of materials relating to the history, institutions, 
and culture of Spain, Portugal and Latin America ; the Bar Association ; 
the Law Institute, and the Charity Organization Society. To the libraries 
of all of these students have access under favorable conditions. Advanced 
students also have at their disposal the library of the McVickar Professor 
of Political Economy, which contains the most complete collection of 
works on economics to be found in the United States. 

The Academy of Political Science 

Under the auspices of this body, which is in affiliation with Columbia 
University, opportunities are given for the discussion of questions of 
interest as presented in papers by specialists. Associate membership, 
open to students only, includes all privileges except voting and holding 
office. The annual dues for associate membership are $3. All members 
receive the Political Science Quarterly, the official publication of the 
Academy, without cost. 

Public Lectures 

The University conducts many courses of public lectures of particular 
interest to students under the Faculty of Political Science. Some of 
these are given by distinguished foreigners, others by men prominent 
in public life in the United States. Certain of the courses, also, are 
maintained by specific endowment, such as the Beer lectures in political 
science, the Blumenthal lectures in politics, and the Carpentier lectures 
in law. 

Publications 

Under the editorial supervision of the Faculty of Political Science, 88 
monographs, comprised in 34 volumes, have been published in the series 
known as "Studies in History, Economics and Public Law." The firm 



9 



of Longmans, Green & Co. has charge of their publication. Students 
whose doctoral dissertations are accepted for inclusion in the "Studies" 
may secure certain financial advantages from the publication of their 
work in this form. 

The Faculty of Political Science also edits the Political Science 
Quarterly which has now reached its twenty-fourth volume. 

Fellowships and Scholarships 

Twelve university fellowships of the value of $650 each are awarded 
annually to students under the Faculty of Political Science, Philosophy, 
and Pure Science. Three special fellowships also are awarded to 
students under the Faculty of Political Science alone. These are the 
George "William Curtis Fellowship in Political Science, of an annual 
value equal to the net income of an endowment of $10,000 accruing 
during a period of three years, and awarded every third year for a term 
of two years ; the Garth Fellowship in Political Economy, of a value 
equal to the net annual income of a fund of $16,250, and awarded 
annually ; and the Schiff Fellowship in Political Science of a value of 
$600 and awarded annually. The Gottsberger Fellowship, of an annual 
value equal to the net income of a fund of $9,500, and awarded every 
second year, is open to graduates of Columbia College only, and is 
assigned to students under the Faculty of Political Science in rotation 
with the Faculties of the other non-professional schools of the University. 

Twenty university scholarships of an annual value of $150 and eight 
additional scholarships known as the President's University Scholarships 
are awarded similarly to students under the Faculty of Political Science, 
Philosophy, and Pure Science. There are also four university scholar- 
ships, known as the Curtis University Scholarships, having the same 
value and open to women students only. 

Applications must be made in writing on blanks furnished for the 
purpose by the Secretary of the University, and must be filed with that 
officer : for fellowships, on or before March 1 ; for scholarships, on or 
before May 1. 

Prizes 

The following prizes are open to competition by students under the 
Faculty of Political Science : the Bennett Prize ($40) awarded to the 
student not holding a baccalaureate degree who submits the best essay 
upon some subject of contemporaneous interest in the domestic or 
foreign policy of the United States ; the Grant Squires Prize ($200) 
awarded every five years to the graduate student who conducts an 
original investigation of a sociological character which may be deemed 
the most meritorious ; and the Toppan Prize ($150) for the best written 
examination upon a paper prepared by the Professor of Constitutional 
Law. 



Group I— HISTORY AND POLITICAL 
PHILOSOPHY 



GRADUATE COURSES 

The graduate courses fall under five subjects : A — Ancient and 
Oriental History ; B — Mediaeval and Church History ; C — Modern 
European History from the Opening of the Sixteenth Century ; 
D — American History ; E — Political Philosophy. 

Courses numbered 200 and above (except those included also in 
Group II) are open to graduate women students upon the same terms as 
to men. 

The buildings in which the lectures are given are indicated as follows : 
B = Barnard College ; Hm = Hamilton ; L = Library ; S = Schermerhorn ; 
T=Teachers College ; U = University. 

Subject A — Ancient and Oriental History § 

History 103 — History of India and of Persia. Professor Jackson. 
M. and W. at 2.10. 306 U. 

In the first part of this course particular attention will be given to the 
early history and civilization of India and of Persia. The development 
of these countries will then be traced with special reference to their 
general historical position and their present importance in relation to 
the West. 

(Identical with Indo-Iranian 109, Faculty of Philosophy.) 

[History 104 — The Rise of Arabian Civilization and the Spread 
of Mohammedanism. Professor Gottheil. 
Tu. and Th. at 1.10. 309 U. 

This course will treat of the geographical position of Arabia, its early 
history as recorded upon the monuments, the Sabseans and Himyarites, 
pre-Mohammedan civilization, the life of Mohammed, the rise of 
Mohammedanism as a religious system and as a political power, Arabic 
historiography, the early Caliphs, Ali and his followers, and the Abbasside 
Caliphs. 

(Identical with Semitics 120, Faculty of Philosophy.) 
Not given in igog-io.] 

History 109 — The History of Western Asia and Egypt. 

Professor Prince. 

M. and W. at 4.10. 309 U. 

The ancient history of Western Asia from the earliest times until the 

period of Alexander the Great, embracing an historical survey of early 

§ Students whose major subject is Ancient History are advised to choose one minor from 
the courses in Greek and Roman epigraphy and archaeology, and in Roman topography and 
numismatics, given by the Division of Classical Philology. For a description of these 
courses see the Announcement of that Division. 

IO 



1 1 



Babylonia, the Assyrian Empire, the later Babylonian Empire, and the 
Persian rule in Babylonia, as well as a briefer discussion of the Egyptian, 
Phoenician and Hittite civilizations. Especial attention will be given 
to the points of contact between the Assyro-Babylonian historical records 
and the Old Testament, and to the most important ethnological problems 
which a study of the ancient peoples of Western Asia presents. 

(Identical with Semitics 1 19, Faculty of Philosophy.) 

Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter, if five students apply. 

History 111-112 — The Language, Literature, Government, and 
Social Life of the Chinese. Professor Hirth. 
Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 
For students not wishing to become specialists in Chinese. 

History 113-1 14— History of China. Professor Hirth. 
One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 

Continued from previous year and intended for all students, including 
such as do not study the Chinese language. Special attention will be 
paid to the cultural and economical development of China and her rela- 
tions to other Asiatic nations. 

History 115-116 — The Period of Transition in Roman History 
from the Republic to the Empire. Mr. Huth. 
S. at 9 and 10. 406 L. 

On the basis of the literary and epigraphic sources, as well as of the 
modern authorities, the course will follow, through the decline of the 
republic and through the early principate, the gradual growth of imperial 
ideas, institutions and organization, with due reference to underlying 
social conditions. 

[History 117-118— The Middle Period of the Roman Empire, from 
Hadrian to Constantine. Professor Botsford. 
S. at 9 and 10. 406 L. 

In this course attention will be directed to the transformation of the 
imperial government from a principate to a strongly centralized despotism, 
and to the accompanying changes in administration, economy, society, 
intelligence and religion. It will be based on the sources as well as on 
the modern authorities. 

Not given in igog-io.] 

History 211-212 — Roman Civilization. Professor Olcott. 
M. and W. at 5.10. 109 L. 
(Identical with Latin 229-230.) 

History 213 — Historical Types of Society ; Ancient : The Theory 
of Progress.:}: Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

(Identical with Sociology 257. For description see page 38.) 
Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

% Courses thus marked are purely historical, treating the subjects historically and genetic- 
ally, but emphasizing different aspects of Economics, Sociology, and Public Law as essential 
forms of treatment. 



I 2 



[History 215-216— History of Greece, Political, Social, and In- 
tellectual. Professor Botsford. 

Three hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 
Not given in igog-io.~] 

History 311-312 — Seminar in Greek and Roman History. Mr. 

Huth. 

Two hours bi-weekly. Hours to be arranged. 



Subject B— Mediaeval and Church History. 

History 121-122 — The History of the Intellectual Class in Europe 
from the Greek Sophists to the French Philosophes. Professor 
Robinson. 

Tu. and Th. at 10, with a third hour to be arranged. 410 L. Tu. and 
Th. at 3.10 with a third hour to be arranged. 339 B. 

The object of this course is to trace the changing intellectual interests 
and attitude of mind of the educated class from Socrates and Plato to 
Voltaire and Rousseau. The general range of Greek culture, especially 
as inherited by the Romans, will form a background for an estimate of 
the Christian conception of man and the world as represented in Augus- 
tine's City of God. Miracles, allegory, monasticism, the "dark age," the 
" Twelfth century Renaissance," the revival of Aristotle, the universities, 
and the general nature of the scholastic learning, will occupy the first 
half-year. The second term will be devoted to Roger Bacon and the 
beginnings of modern experimental science, Peter Dubois, Marsiglio of 
Padua, Dante, Humanism from Petrarch to Erasmus, the invention of 
printing, the intellectual aspects of the Protestant Revolt, astrology, 
witchcraft, Bacon's Advancement of Learning, the genesis of the spirit of 
progress, the Deists, and the Encyclopaedists. 

[History 125-126 — The History of England to 1660. Professor 
Osgood. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 410 L. 

The object of this course is, by means of lectures and outside reading, 
to give a view of the development of the English Constitution from the 
fifth century to the Revolution of 1689. The work is based chiefly upon 
the writings of Stubbs, Gneist, Hallam, Gardiner, and Ranke. 

Not given in igog-10.] 



13 



[History 217— Social Evolution : Ethnic and Civil Origins. % 

Professor Giddings. 

F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

(Identical with Sociology 251. For description see page 37.) 
Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.] 

History 218 — History of European Law4 Professor Munroe 
Smith. 

M., W., and F. at 1.10. 410 L. 

(Identical with Jurisprudence 266. For description see page 29.) 

History 220 — Primitive Institutions in Europe. Professor 
Shotwell. 

Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This course deals with the persistence in European institutions, cus- 
toms, laws and religions of those phenomena of primitive life which are 
connected directly with magic and taboo. The field covered is mainly 
that of the later Roman Empire, early Christianity and the Germanic 
peoples. Lectures and discussions. 

History 221 — Later Roman Empire and Early Middle Ages. 

Professor Shotwell. 
W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This course deals with the transition from ancient to mediaeval history ; 
the social and intellectual conditions in the later Roman Empire, the 
causes of its disintegration, the rise of Christianity and its relation to 
paganism, the persecutions, the triumph of the Christian church, and the 
rise of the papacy. The course also includes a survey of the origins of 
the barbarian kingdoms, Merovingian and Carolingian culture, the 
renewed invasions of the Northmen, Saracens and Hungarians, the 
" dark age," and the beginnings of feudalism. Lectures and discussions. 

Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 223— Paganism and Christianity. Professor Shotwell. 
M. at 4.10 and 5.10. 20S L. 

This is a research course, dealing with the non-theological aspects of 
the transition from paganism to Christianity. It includes a survey of 
the antique popular religion, the mystery cults, the attitude toward magic 
in the later empire, the persecutions, both pagan and Christian, the 
growth of religious intolerance, the lives of the saints and the place of 
miracle in Christian propaganda. 

Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

$ Courses thus marked are purely historical, treating the subjects historically and genetic- 
ally, but emphasizing different aspects of Economics, Sociology, and Public Law as essential 
forms of treatment. 



14 



[History 225— The Later Middle Ages. Professor Shotwell. 
W. at 4.10 and 5. 10. 208 L. 

The main object of this course is to trace the general development of 
European civilization from the tenth century to the beginning of modern 
times. It will include a survey of the mediaeval church, feudalism, the 
beginnings of the modern national state (especially in France), the 
recovery of Roman law and the work of the lawyers, the renaissance of 
commerce and the history of the towns, the increase in capital and the 
social disorders in France and Germany, the question of apostolic poverty 
and the mendicant orders, the papacy and the conciliar movement. 
Finally an effort will be made to measure the importance of the Italian 
renaissance. Lectures and discussions. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter .~\ 

History 226 — The Protestant Revolt. Professor Robinson. 
M. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 
(For description see page 16.) 

[History 227 — Europe in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. 

Professor Shotwell. 

M. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This is a research course, designed to supplement History 225. Atten- 
tion will be concentrated upon some of the more vital interests of the 
so-called mediaeval renaissance. Political, religious, and social institutions 
(especially in France), will be studied, mainly upon the basis of Luchaire's 
Manuel des Institutions francaises. Some attention will also be paid to 
mediaeval architecture and to archaeology, but the greater part of the 
work will be based upon literary and documentary sources. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.} 

History 228— The Catholic Reformation (i.e., the so-called Counter 
Reformation) and the Council of Trent. Professor Robinson. 
W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 
(For description see page 16.) 

History 321— Historical Bibliography ; The Sources of European 
History ; Methods of Historical Study. Professors Robinson, Shot- 
well, and Simkhovitch. 

Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This course aims to introduce the student to the various classes of 
sources and will include practical exercises in the use of bibliographical 
apparatus. The chief theories of the scope and nature of historical 
research will also be discussed. Langlois and Seignobos' Introduction to 
the Study of History will be read. 



*5 



History 229-230 — General Church History: Period I, The Ancient 
Church to 590 A. D.; Period II, The Mediaeval Church, 590-1517; 
Period III, The Modern Church.* Professors McGiffert and 
Rockwell. 

History 233-234 — History of Christian Doctrine : I, History of 
Thought in the Primitive and Catholic Church.* Professor 
McGiffert. 

History 235-236 — History of Christian Doctrine : II, History of 
Protestant Thought.* Professor McGiffert. 

History 237 — English Church History : Reformation and Post- 
Reformation Periods.* Professor McGiffert. 

History 238 — History of Early Christian Literature.* Professor 
McGiffert. 

History 241-242 — Religious Thought in the Eighteenth Century 

(a research course intended especially for graduates).* Professor 
McGiffert. 

History 331-332 — Seminar in Church History.* Professors 
McGiffert and Rockwell. 

History 243 — The Church during the First Three Centuries.f 

Professor Scratchley. 

History 244 — Latin Fathers. f Mr. Stewart. 

History 246 — The Church from the Council of Nicsea to Charle- 
magne, f Professor Scratchley. 

History 248— The Church of England in the Middle Ages.f Mr. 

Stewart. 

History 249 — The Church of England. f Professor Scratchley. 

History 250 — The Church from Charlemagne to Modern Times, 
exclusive of England. f Professor Scratchley. 

* These courses are given at the Union Theological Seminary and may be taken to make up 
a minor subject for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 

t These courses are given at the General Theological Seminary and may be taken to make 
up a minor subject for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 



i6 



Subject C — Modern European History from the Opening 
of the Sixteenth Century 

History 151— European History, 1815-1848. Professor Sloane. 
M.,W., and F. at 1.10, with a fourth hour by arrangement. 327 U. 
Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

[History 153 — Contemporary European History since 1848. 

Professor Sloane. 

M.,W., and F. at 1.10, with a fourth hour by arrangement. 327 U. 
Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.'] 

[History 157-158— History of Great Britain, principally during the 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Professor Osgood. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 410 L. 

In this course a somewhat detailed account will be given of the political 
development of England during the last two centuries. Reference will 
also be made to the relations with Scotland and Ireland. This part of 
the course will be a continuation of History 125-126. Lectures and 
assigned readings. 

Not given in iqoq-io.] 

History 164 — History and Principles of Colonial Administration.^: 

Professor Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 10. 406 L. 
(Identical with Public Law 144.) 

History 214 — Historical Types of Society. Modern: The Theory 
of Progress.}: Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2. 10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

(Identical with Sociology 258. For description see page 39.) 
Given in iqoq-io and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 226 — The Protestant Revolt. Professor Robinson. 
M. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This course will consist in a critical study of the antecedents and 
nature of the Protestant Revolt, with especial attention to the influence 
of the Humanists and to Luther's role as leader of the revolt in Germany. 
Lectures and discussions. 

Given in iqoq-io and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 228 — The Catholic Reformation (i.e., the so-called Counter 
Reformation) and the Council of Trent. Professor Robinson. 
W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This is a research course open only to those who have taken or are 
taking History 226, which it is designed to supplement. It will be a 

X Courses thus marked are purely historical, treating the subjects historically and genetic- 
ally, but emphasizing different aspects of Economics, Sociology, and Public Law as essential 
forms of treatment. 



17 



study of the changes which took place in the mediaeval church, whether 
as a result or not of the Protestant Revolt. 

Given in igog-io and in alternate years thereafter. 

[History 251 — History of Spain. Professor Shepherd. 
Tu. at 4. 10 and 5.10. 319 U. 

Studies especially the institutions and culture of Spain from the 
fifteenth century to the nineteenth. Incidental reference will be made 
to Portugal so far as may be needful to indicate the type of civilization 
carried by this country, as well as by Spain, to America. 

Not given in igog-io.] 

[History 252 — The Reforms of the French Revolution. Professor 
Robinson. 

M. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This course does not deal primarily with the political history but with 
the great and permanent achievements of the Revolution ; it includes a 
description of the organization of the French monarchy under Louis 
XVI; the development of the spirit of reform in Europe; "benevolent 
despotism"; the progress of reform in France to the completion of the 
constitution of 1791. Lectures and discussions. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.] 

[History 253— The Economic and Social Evolution of Russia 
since 1800. Professor Simkhovitch. 
M. and F. at 10. 418 L. 

(Identical with Economics 241. For description see page 36.) 
Not given in igog-io.] 

[History 254— The Progress of the French Revolution (1789-1800) 
with special attention to the sources. Professor Robinson. 
W. at 4. 10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

This is a research course open to those only who have taken, or are 
taking, History 252 which it is designed to supplement. A good knowl- 
edge of French is, of course, required. 

Given in igio—11 and in alternate years thereafter .] 

History 255— History of Diplomacy.:}: Professor Scott. 
M. and Tu. at 11. 405 L. 

(Identical with Public Law 221. For description see page 26.) 

[History 256— Social Evolution : Civilization, Liberty, and De- 
mocracy.}: Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

(Identical with Sociology 252. For description see page 38.) 
Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.] 

% Courses thus marked are purely historical, treating the subjects historically and genetic- 
ally, but emphasizing different aspects of Economics, Sociology, and Public Law as essential 
forms of treatment. 



iS 



History 321 — Historical Bibliography ; The Sources of European 
History ; Methods of Historical Study. Professors Robinson, Shot- 
well, and Simkhovitch. 

Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

(For description see page 14.) 

History 357 — The Work of Napoleon. Professor Sloane. 
W. and F. at 10, first or second half-year, or both by arrangement. 
301 L. 

This is a research course for the most advanced students only. It is 
open to such selected individuals as give evidence of capacity for original 
research, and the ability to read French and German fluently is indispen- 
sable to admission. The topics are chosen by the instructor and the 
student works under his direction, given in personal consultations, twice 
a week. The papers prepared are expected to be short monographs, 
thoroughly discussing the theme on the basis of the original authorities. 

Subject D— American History 

History 161 — The Formation of the American Constitutional 
System. Professor Beard. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10. 413 L. 

(Identical with Public Law 101. For description see page 25.) 

History 162 — The Development of the American Constitutional 
System. Professor Beard. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10. 413 L. 

(Identical with Public Law 102. For description see page 25.) 

History 163 — Fiscal and Industrial History of the United States.:}: 

Professor Seligman. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 422 L. 

(Identical with Economics 107. For description see page 32.) 
Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 164 — History of American Diplomacy.:}: Professor Scott. 
M. and Tu. at 11. 405 L. 

(Identical with Public Law 120. For description see page 27.) 

[History 261-262— American Colonial History during the Seven- 
teenth Century. Professor Osgood. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This is an advanced lecture and investigation course. The subjects of 
study will be chiefly the corporation (or colony of the New England type) 
and the proprietary province, as forms of colonial government. The 

% Courses thus marked are purely historical, treating the subjects historically and genetically, 
but emphasizing different aspects of Economics, Sociology, and Public Law as essential 
forms of treatment. 



19 



early history of Virginia as a royal province will also be considered. 
The beginning of efforts on the part of Great Britain to assert imperial 
control over the colonies will also be traced. This course is open only to 
approved candidates for the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees and to such special 
students as receive permission to attend. 
Not given in iqoq-io.] 

[History 263-264 — American Colonial History during the Eight- 
eenth Century. Professor Osgood. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This course begins at 1690 and ends at 1760. It is devoted to the study 
of the royal province as a form of colonial government, and of the 
British system and policy of colonial administration during the period of 
intercolonial wars. It is both a continuation of the preceding course 
and an introduction to the study of the American Revolution. It is open 
to the same class of students as History 261-262, and the method of 
instruction is the same as in that course. 

Not given in iqoq-io.~\ 

History 267-268 — The United States from 1850, with special 
reference to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Professor Dunning. 
M. and F. at II. 410 L. 

The chief object of this course is to describe the constitutional principles 
which came into play during the period from 1850 to 1884. Among the 
topics discussed in more or less detail are : The principles of the appeal 
to arms ; the nature and scope of the " war power" ; the status of the 
negro as affected by the war ; the various theories of Reconstruction ; 
the adoption of the last three amendments to the Constitution ; the 
actual process of Reconstruction; the so-called "force legislation," 
and the ultimate undoing of Reconstruction. In addition to these 
constitutional topics, the general political and social progress of the 
nation is treated. 

History 271 — Spanish and French Colonization in the United 
States from 1513 to 1697. Professor Shepherd. 
Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 319 U. 

Traces the work of discovery, exploration, and settlement carried on 
by Spain and France within the continental area of the United States, 
and studies the types of civilization thereby produced. 

Given in iqoq-io and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 272 — Spanish and French Colonization in the United 
States from 1697 to 1803. Professor Shepherd. 
Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 319 U. 

A continuation of the preceding course, but with special reference to 
the occupation of the Louisiana country. 

Given in iqoq-io and in alternate years thereafter. 



20 



[History 273— The South and West to 1840. Professor Shepherd. 
Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 319 U. 

Describes the process of American migration and settlement beyond 
the Alleghanies, with due regard to the European race elements concerned. 
The institutions established in the South and West and the traits developed 
in each of these sections, together with the organization and government 
of the Territories and the' circumstances under which they were admitted 
to the Union as States, will be examined in the light of their respective 
influence upon the early growth of the nation. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter .] 

[History 274 — The West since 1840. Professor Shepherd. 
Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 319 U. 

A continuation of the preceding course, but with special reference to 
the occupation and development of the region west of the Mississippi. 
The social, economic, and political forces which have determined the 
expansion of the United States to the Pacific, and the relation of these 
forces to the progress of national sentiment and power, will be the chief 
objects of study. 

Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter.] 

History 275 — Colonial Latin America. Professor Shepherd. 
W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 319 U. 

An examination of the characteristics of Spanish and Portuguese 
dominion in America, exclusive of the continental area of the United 
States. The system of colonial administration (particularly that of 
Spain), and the efforts of other European states to destroy the political 
and commercial monopoly of Spain and Portugal, will be the topics 
treated in most detail. 

History 276 — The Latin American Republics. Professor Shepherd. 
W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 319 U. 

A study of the several countries of Latin America since the attainment 
of their national independence. Special attention will be given to their 
economic, social, political, and intellectual conditions, and to their rela- 
tions with Europe and the United States. 

[History 361-362 — The American Revolution. Professor Osgood. 
S. at 10 and 11. 301 L. 

This course will be conducted as a lecture and investigation course 
and will consist of a detailed study of the sources of American history 
from about 1760 to the close of the Revolution. 

Not given in igog-io.] 

[History 363-364— Seminar in American Colonial History. Pro- 
fessor Osgood. 

One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 
Not given in 190g-10.l1 



21 



History 365 — European Politics and the War of 1812. Professor 
Sloane. 

W. and F. at 10 first or second half-year, or both by arrangement. 301 L. 

Research course for the most advanced students only. It is given to 
selected individuals who show capacity for original research, and is 
open only to those who read French and German fluently. The topics 
are chosen by the instructor and the students work under his direction 
given in personal consultations twice a week. The papers prepared are 
expected to be short monographs thoroughly discussing the theme on the 
basis of original authorities. 

[History 367-368— Seminar in later United States History. Pro- 
fessor Dunning. 

One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.] 

Subject E — Political Philosophy 

History 279-280— General History of Political Theories. Professor 
Dunning. 

M. and W. at 10. 406 L. 

Every people known to history has possessed some form, however 
vague and primitive, of political government. Every people which has 
attained a degree of enlightenment above the very lowest has been per- 
meated by some ideas, more or less systematic, as to the origin, nature 
and limitations of governmental authority. It is the purpose of this 
course to trace historically the development of these ideas, from the 
primitive notions of primitive people to the complex and elaborate 
philosophical theories that have characterized the ages of highest 
intellectual refinement. The basis of the lectures is Dunning's History 
of Political Theories (two volumes), which covers the period from the 
earliest times to the middle of the eighteenth century. For the theories 
of the French Revolution and the nineteenth century various authorities 
are referred to. 

[History 281-282— American Political Philosophy. Professor 
Dunning. 

M. and F. at 11. 410 L. 

As the first nation to realize in practice many of the principles that 
characterize the modern state, the United States offers special opportuni- 
ties for research to the student of political philosophy. In this course a 
two-fold line of discussion is followed : First, by a study of the various 
documents of the revolutionary era, the Declaration of Independence, 
the constitutions, national and commonwealth, and other state papers, 
the dominant ideas of the people are derived from their official records. 
Second, the writings of the leading statesmen like Hamilton, Jefferson, 
Calhoun, and Webster, as well as the more systematic and philosophical 



22 



works of Lieber, Mulford, Brownson, Jameson, and others, are analyzed 
and subjected to critical comment. Merriam's History of American 
Political Theories will be made the basis of the course, and the method 
will be chiefly that of a seminar. 

Given in igio-u and in alternate years thereafter.] 

History 381-382 — Seminar in Political Philosophy. Professor 
Dunning. 

One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 



COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE AND 
BARNARD COLLEGE 

History A1-A2 — Epochs of History. 
Three hours a week. 
Columbia College : 

Section 1, Tu., Th., and S. at 9. 301 Hm. 
Section 2, M., W., and F. at 10. 301 Hm. 
Section 3, Tu., Th., and S. at 10. 301 Hm. 

Professor Shepherd (second half-year), Dr. Hayes, Mr. Sait, 
and Mr. Hum 

Barnard College : 

Section 1, Tu. and Th. at 11, and W. at 3.10. 
Section 2, Tu. and Th. at 1.10, and W. at 3.10. 
Section 3, Tu. and Th. at 2.10, and W. at 3.10. 
Professor Shotwell and Miss Huttmann. 

History 9-10— Continental European History, Modern and Con- 
temporaneous. 

Three hours a week. 
Columbia College : 

M., W., and F. at 1.10, and a fourth hour, for consultation, to be. 
arranged. 502 Hm. Professor Shotwell and Dr. Hayes. 

Barnard College : 

M., W., and F. at 2.10. Professor Shotwell and Miss Points. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

History 11-12— A General Survey of English History. 516 Hm. 

Mr. Sait. 
Three hours. 
Columbia College : 

Tu., Th., and S. at IT. 
Given in igog-io and in alternate years thereafter. 



^3 



[Barnard College : 

M., W., and F. at n. 
Given in igio-n and in alternate years thereafter.} 

Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

History 13-14— History of the United States to the Close of 
Reconstruction. 

Three hours. 

Columbia College : 

M.,W., and F. at 2.10. 702 Hm. Professor Dunning. 

Barnard College : 

M.,W., and F. at 11. 339 B. Professor Shepherd. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 



COURSES IN TEACHERS COLLEGE 

History 51-52 — The Literature of American History. Lectures, 
readings, and reports. Professor Johnson. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 

Education 173 — Theory and Practice of Teaching History in 
Secondary Schools. Lectures, discussions, and practical work. Five 
hours. Professor Johnson. 

Class work, three hours. Tu., Th., and S. at 9. 

Practical work, two hours. Hours must be arranged with the 
instructor before registration. 

By special arrangement with the instructor, graduate students whose 
major subject lies outside of the department of history in Teachers 
College may omit the practical work of this course and register for the 
class work only. 

Prerequisite : Eighteen hours of college history. 

Education 174 — Historical Bibliography for Teachers in 
Secondary Schools. Lectures, reports, and practical work. Five 
hours. Professor Johnson. 

Class work, three hours. Tu., Th., and S. at 9. 

Practical work, two hours. Hours must be arranged with the instructor 
before registration. 

The aim of the course is to discover in the various fields of history the 
literature especially adapted to the needs and abilities of pupils in 
American secondary schools. 

By special arrangement with the instructor, students may omit the 
practical work of this course and register for the class work only. 



24 



Education 273-274— Practicum. Four hours. Professor Johnson. 
W. at 2.10 and 3.10. 

The practicum offers to advanced students opportunities for the 
investigation of special questions connected with the teaching of history 
in elementary and secondary schools and in normal schools. 



COURSES IN THE SUMMER SESSION* 

sAi -Europe in the Middle Ages: the Chief Political, Economic, 
and Intellectual Achievements. Lectures, reading, and discussion. 
Dr. Hayes. 

Five hours a week at 9.30. 703 Hm. 

sA2— Modern and Contemporary European History. Lectures, 
reading, and discussion. Dr. Hayes. 
Five hours a week at 10.30. 703 Hm. 

si3-i4^ — American History: Political History of the United 
States from 1815 until 1889. Recitations, written tests, reports, and 
occasional lectures. Professor Bassett. 

Five hours a week at 8.30. 702 Hm. 

S104 — History of Greece: from Pericles to the Roman Conquest. 

Lectures, readings, papers, and discussions. Professor Botsford. 
Five hours a week at 9.30. 702 Hm. 

sio6 — History of the Roman Empire : from Augustus to 
Constantine. Lectures, readings, papers, and discussions. Professor 
Botsford. 

Five hours a week at 10.30. 702 Hm. 

S128 — Seminar. English Commercial Relations with the Continent 
in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries. Professor Cheyney. 
Tu. at 2.30 and 3.30. 702 Hm. 

3169-170^ — American History: the Period from 1789 until 1815. 

Lectures, reports, examination of original materials and the larger 
secondary sources. Professor Bassett. 
Five hours a week at 11.30. 702 Hm. 

* For fuller details consult the Bulletin of Information in reference to the Summer Session. 



Group II— POLITICS, PUBLIC LAW AND 
COMPARATIVE JURISPRUDENCE 



The courses in this group are not open to women. 

Subject A — Constitutional Law 

Public Law ioi — The Formation of the American Constitutional 
System. Professor Beard. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10. 413 L. 

Includes a study of the following topics : The government of the 
American colonies on the eve of the Revolution; the process by which 
union, independence and self government were established; the failure 
of the Articles of Confederation; the formation of the Federal Constitu- 
tion; the fundamental principles of the system of government inaugurated 
in 1789; and the place of the State in that system. 

(Identical with History 161.) 

Public Law 102 — The Development of the American Constitutional 
System. Professor Beard. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10. 413 L. 

Embraces a study of the historical development of the federal system 
of government through legislation, judicial decisions, and political 
practice. The leading decisions of the Supreme Court on great constitu- 
tional questions will be discussed in their proper historical relation, and 
the influence of extra-legal party practices in the actual conduct of 
government will be considered. The tendencies in the evolution of 
State constitutions will be treated as a part of the evolution of the 
American constitutional system. 

(Identical with History 162.) 

Public Law 103-104 — Comparative Politics and Government. 

Professor Beard. 

M. and W. at 10. 422 L. 

Comprehending a study of the nature and origin of the state and 
government, and a comparison of the system of government prevailing 
in England, France, Germany, and the United States, and the generaliza- 
tion of the fundamental principles of public law common to them all. 
The administrative organization and the relations of the central 
institutions to the political subdivisions of the respective countries will 
also be treated. 



25 



26 



Public Law 105— Party Government in the United States. 

Professor Beard. 

M. and W. at 11. 413 L. 

The relation of political parties to the frame-work of government ; 
character of party antagonisms in the United States historically considered ; 
the origin and development of party organization and machinery ; the 
national convention and campaign ; state, local, and municipal party 
organization; sources of strength in party machinery ; ballot reform, 
primary legislation, and corrupt practices acts. 

Public Law 106 — American State Government. Professor Beard. 
M. and W. at 11. 413 L. 

Special attention will be devoted to the government of New York State 
with reference to tendencies and practices of other states. The principal 
topics will be the organization of the central government of the state and 
system of control over local and municipal institutions ; problems of 
administrative control over state departments ; questions of legislative 
organization and procedure ; recent tendencies in legislative methods ; 
character of recent legislative activities ; lobbies ; reference bureaus ; 
and bill drafting. 

Public Law 203-204 — The Constitutional Law of the United 
States. Professor Goodnow. 
M. and W. at 2.10. 422 L. 

Chiefly discussion of cases. McClain, Cases on Constitutional Law. 

Public Law 301-302 — Seminar in Constitutional and Administra- 
tive Law. Professors Goodnow and Beard. 
M. at 1. 10. 301 L. 

Intended for students who are writing their theses in constitutional or 
administrative law. A number of questions relating to American and 
European law and practice will be considered in the seminar, and the 
research work of each student will be conducted under the personal 
supervision of the instructors. 

Subject B — International Law 

Public Law 221 — History of Diplomacy. Professor Scott. 
M. and Tu. at 11. 405 L. 

The object of this course is to exhibit the evolution of the relations 
between independent states and the manner in which those relations are 
conducted. The history of the diplomatic system of Europe is traced 
from its beginnings to the present time, and an exposition is given of 
the religious, dynastic, territorial, and commercial struggles of which 
that system is the result. The first part of the course relates to the 
development of the European concert prior to the Peace of Westphalia. 



27 



This is followed by an examination of the most important of the general 
European treaties, beginning with those concluded at the Congress of 
Westphalia, and ending with those of recent date. 
(Identical with History 255.) 

Public Law 120 — History of American Diplomacy. Professor 
Scott. 

M. and Tu. at II. 405 L. 

In the study of American diplomacy special attention will be given' to 
the history and methods of the diplomacy of the United States. The 
course will comprehend : (1) The diplomacy of the Revolution ; (2) the 
period from the Treaty of Peace of 1783 to the termination of the War of 
1812 ; (3) from the termination of that war to the Civil War; (4) from the 
outbreak of that war to the present time. 

(Identical with History 164.) 

Public Law 223-224 — International Law. Professor Scott. 
M. and Tu. at 3.10. 405 L. 

This course treats of the general principles of international law, as it 
has been developed by positive agreement, in the form of treaties and 
conventions, and by common usage as shown in legislation, in the 
decisions of international tribunals and of municipal courts, and in the 
conduct of nations. The rules thus discovered are discussed in the light 
of the principles of reason and justice, as scientifically presented by 
writers on international law, and an effort is made to trace the systematic 
establishment of the rules which govern intercourse among nations at 
the present day. 

Public Law 321-322 — Seminar in International Law. Professor 
Scott. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

Subject C — Administrative Law 
Public Law 143 — Municipal Science and Administration. Professor 

GOODNOW. 

Tu. and Th. at 10. 406 L. 

This course deals with municipal activities in the United States and 
the more important foreign countries. The principal subjects treated are : 
The origin and evolution of the city ; the position of the city in the state 
government ; the control of the state over the city ; municipal elections ; 
municipal organization. 

Public Law 144 — History and Principles of Colonial Adminis- 
tration. Professor Goodnow. 
Tu. and Th. at 10. 406 L. 
(Identical with History 164.) 



28 



[Public Law 146 — Municipal Functions. Professor Beard. 

Organization and management of the ordinary departments of modern 
cities ; methods of approaching transit, housing, and land questions ; 
public ownership and operation ; recent municipal progress in meliorating 
the conditions of city life ; city planning ; direct employment and con- 
tract systems ; problems of administrative and public control over the 
management of public business. 

Not given in 7909-10.] 

Public Law 241 — Law of Officers (Extraordinary Legal Remedies). 

Professor Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 9. 422 L. 

The purpose of this course is to present the general principles of the 
law of public officers, in particular those relating to their appointment or 
election, their powers and duties, their rights, removal from office ; the 
control over their action possessed by the higher administrative officers, 
the courts, and the legislature. Special attention will here be paid to the 
writs of mandamus, quo warranto, certiorari, habeas corpus, and prohibition, 
and their statutory substitutes, by means of which the courts exercise 
their control over the administration. Chiefly discussion of cases. 

[Public Law 246— The Law of Municipal Corporations. Professor 

Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 9. 406 L. 

Chiefly discussion of cases. Abbott, Cases on Public Corporations , and 
Smith, Cases on Municipal Corporations. 
Not given in 1909-10.] 

Public Law 248 — The Law of Taxation. Professor Goodnow. 
Tu. and Th. at 9. 401 L. 

Chiefly discussion of cases. Goodnow, Cases on Taxation. 

Public Law 341-342 — Seminar in Constitutional and Administra- 
tive Law. Professors Goodnow and Beard. 
M. at 1. 10. 301 L. 

(Identical with Public Law 301-302. For description see page 26.) 

Subject D— Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Jurisprudence 161 — Elements of Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
M.,W., and F. at 10. 413 L. 

This course gives a general view of the origin and development of the 
law and of rights, remedial and substantive ; a description of the sources 
of the law in force in the United States ; and a systematic outline of the 
principal branches of the law. Lectures and assigned reading. 



2 9 



Jurisprudence 263 — Roman Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
M.,W. , and F. at 1.10. 410 L. 

This course traces briefly the historical development of the Roman 
law, and treats of the law of persons, of things, of obligations and of 
succession. Lectures, with assigned reading (Muirhead, Historical 
Introduction to the Private Law of Rome ; Sohm, Institutes of Roman Law). 
The latter part of the second half-year is devoted to a discussion of 
cases from the Corpus luris Civilis, principally in contracts. 

Jurisprudence 266 — History of European Law. Professor Munroe 
Smith. 

M.,W., and F. at 1.10. 410 L. 

This course treats (1) of early German law, including a comparison of 
Anglo-Saxon and Continental German customs ; (2) of the development 
of law in the Frankish Empire ; (3) of feudal law ; (4) of canon law ; (5) 
of the law merchant ; (6) of the " reception " of the Roman law ; and (7) 
of the genesis and character of the modern civil codes. 

(Identical with History 218.) 

Jurisprudence 268 — Modern Civil Law of Western Europe. 
Professor Munroe Smith. 

M.,W., and F. at 3.10. 406 L. 

This course gives a general view of the private law of France, Italy, 
Spain, and Germany. It is open only to students who have taken Course 
263, or who have done equivalent work. 

Jurisprudence 269-270 — Conflict of Laws. Professor Munroe 
Smith. 

Th. at 3.10. 406 L. 

Within the limits of the subject, a comparison is made of theories and 
practice in different jurisdictions, both in civil matters and in criminal ; 
and attention is given to the special aspects of interstate law in the United 
States. 

Jurisprudence 361-362 — Seminar in Legal History. Professor 
Munroe Smith. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Seminar for candidates for the Master's degree. The work consists in 
reading selected titles of the Corpus luris Civilis, of mediaeval law-books 
and of modern codes upon some special topic. Papers are presented by 
the members of the seminar, usually based upon a comparison of Roman 
and English law. 

Jurisprudence 363-364— Seminar in Comparative Jurisprudence. 

Professor Munroe Smith. 
Hours to be arranged. 

Advanced seminar for candidates for the Doctor's degree. 



3° 



COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Politics 1-2. Professor Beard. 
M.,W., and F. at 9. 617 Hm. 

As a part of their regular work, the students are advised, and will be 
expected to attend, the public lectures given on the Blumenthal foun- 
dation. 



Group III— ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 



GRADUATE COURSES 

It is presumed that students who take economics, sociology or social 
economy as their major subject are familiar with the general principles 
of economics and sociology as set forth in the ordinary manuals. Stu- 
dents who are not thus prepared are recommended to take the courses in 
Columbia College or Barnard College designated as Economics I and 2 
(or Ai and A2) and Sociology 151-152. 

The graduate courses fall under three subjects : A — Political Econ- 
omy and Finance ; B — Sociology and Statistics ; C — Social Economy. 

Courses numbered 200 and above are open to graduate women students 
upon the same terms as to men. For a description of other courses open 
to women see Courses in Barnard College, pages 42-43. 

Subject A — Political Economy and Finance 

Economics ioi — Science of Finance. I : Public Expenditures and 
Revenues. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 1.10. 422 L. 

This course is historical, as well as comparative and critical. After 
giving a general introduction and tracing the history of the science of 
finance, it treats of the various classes of public expenditure and the 
fiscal principles which govern them. It describes and analyzes the 
different kinds of public revenues, including the public domain and pub- 
lic property, public works and industrial undertakings, fees and special 
assessments. Special attention is devoted to the specific American 
problems. 

Economics 102— Science of Finance. II : Taxation, Public Debts 
and the Budget. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 1.10. 422 L. 

This course deals with the history, theories and methods of taxation 
in all civilized countries. It treats of such problems as the incidence and 
the general principles of taxation and proceeds to discuss the separate 
classes of taxes with special reference to American conditions. It con- 
siders also public debt, methods of borrowing, redemption, refunding, 
repudiation, etc. Finally, it describes the fiscal organization of the state 
by which the revenue is collected and expended, and discusses the 
budget, national, state, and local. 

31 



3 2 



Economics 104 — Commerce and Commercial Policy. Professor 

MUSSEY. 

Tu. and Th. at II. 415 L. 

In this course the economic bases of modern commerce, and the 
significance of commerce, domestic and foreign, in its relation to Ameri- 
can industry, will be studied. An analysis will be made of the extent 
and character of the foreign trade of the United States, and the nature 
and effect of the commercial policies of the principal commercial nations 
will be examined. 

Economics 105— The Labor Problem. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at II. 415 L. 

The topics considered in this course are : The rise of the factory 
system, factory legislation, the growth of trade unions and changes in the 
law in respect to them, the policies of trade unions, strikes, lockouts, 
arbitration and conciliation, proposed solutions of the labor problem, and 
the future of labor in the United States. 

Economics 106 — The Trust and Corporation Problem. Professor 
Seager. 

Tu. and Th. at 10. 415 L. 

In this course special attention is given to the trust problem as it 
presents itself in the United States. Among the topics considered are 
the rise and progress of industrial combinations, the forms of organiza- 
tion and policies of typical combinations, the common law and the trusts, 
anti-trust acts and their results, and other proposed solutions of the 
problem. 

Given in jgog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 107 — Fiscal and Industrial History of the United 
States. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 422 L. 

This course endeavors to present a survey of national legislation on 
currency, finance, and taxation, including the tariff, together with its 
relations to the state of industry and commerce. The chief topics 
discussed are : The fiscal and industrial conditions of the colonies ; the 
financial methods of the Revolution and the Confederation ; the genesis 
of the protective idea ; the policies of the Federalists and of the Repub- 
licans ; the War of 1812 ; the crises of 1819, 1825, and 1837 ; the tariffs of 
1816, 1824, and 1828 ; the distribution of the surplus and the Bank war ; 
the currency problems before 1863 ; the era of " free trade" ; the fiscal 
problems of the Civil War ; the methods of resumption ; the new indus- 
trial problems ; the currency acts of 1878, 1890, and 1900 ; the loans of 
1894-96 ; the tariffs of 1890, 1894, and 1897 ; Spanish War financiering ; 
the crisis of 1907. The course closes with a discussion of the present 
fiscal and industrial situation. 

(Identical with History 163.) 

Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 



33 



Economics 108— Railroad Problems ; Economic, Social, and Legal. 

Professor Seligman. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 422 L. 

These lectures treat of railroads in the fourfold aspect of their relation 
to the investors, the employees, the public, and the state respectively. A 
history of railways and railway policy in America and Europe forms the 
preliminary part of the course. The chief problems of railway manage- 
ment, so far as they are of economic importance, come up for discussion. 
Among the subjects treated are : Financial methods, railway con- 
structions, speculation, profits, failures, accounts and reports, expenses, 
tariffs, principles of rates, classification and discrimination, competition 
and pooling, accidents, and employers' liability. Especial attention is 
paid to the methods of regulation and legislation in the United States as 
compared with European methods, and the course closes with a general 
discussion of state versus private management. 

Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 109 — Socialism. Professor Simkhovitch. 
Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 406 L. 

The course gives an outline of the social movement during the nine- 
teenth century, and a brief review of the doctrines of the leading French, 
English and German exponents of socialism, such as Babeuf, St. Simon, 
Fourier, Cabet, Proudhon, Louis Blanc, Robert Owen, Thompson, the 
English Christian Socialists, the German "philosophical" socialists, 
Lasalle and Rodbertus. Special attention is given to the Marxian 
theories, as well as to the revolt against Marxism — the revisionist 
movement. 

Economics iio — Theories of Social Reform. Professor Clark. 
Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 406 L. 

This course treats of certain plans for the partial reconstruction of 
industrial society that have been advocated in the United States, and 
endeavors to determine what reforms are in harmony with economic 
principles. It treats of the proposed single tax, of the measures 
advocated by the Grangers' and the Farmers' Alliance, and of those 
proposed by labor organizations, of the method of dealing with monopo- 
lies, and of the general relation of the state to industry. 

[Economics 112 — Money and Banking. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 10. 415 L. 

The purpose of this course is to supply the historical and theoretical 
basis necessary to a wise solution of the monetary and banking problems 
that are of special interest to the people of the United States. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.] 



34 



Economics 201 — Economic Readings: Classical English Econo- 
mists. Professor Seager. 
W. at 10 and 11. 418 L. 

In this course the principal theories of the English economists from 
Adam Smith to John Stuart Mill are studied by means of lectures, 
assigned readings and reports, and discussions. Special attention is 
given to the Wealth of Nations, Malthus's Essay on Population, the bullion 
controversy of 1810, the corn law controversy of 1815, and the treatises 
on Political Economy of Ricardo, Senior, and John Stuart Mill. 

[Economics 203 — History of Economics to Adam Smith. Professor 
Seligman. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 415 L. 

In this course the various systems of political economy are discussed 
in their historical development. The chief exponents of the different 
schools are taken up in their order, and especial attention is directed 
to the wider aspects of the connection between the theories and the 
organization of the existing industrial society. The writers discussed are 
divided as follows: (1) Antiquity ; (2) the Middle Ages ; (3) the 
Mercantilists; (4) the Physiocrats; (5) the English Precursors of Adam 
Smith. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter.] 

[Economics 204 — History of Economics since Adam Smith. 

Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 415 L. 

The chief writers discussed in this course are: (1) The English Classical 
School ; (2) the Early British Socialists ; (3) the Continental Development 
to 1870 ; (4) the Early American Writers ; (5) the German Historical 
School ; (6) the Socialists ; (7) the Austrian School ; (8) the Leading 
Contemporary Economists. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter^ 

Economics 205 — Economic Theory I. Professor Clark. 
M. and W. at 2.10. 406 L. 

This course discusses, first, the static laws of distribution. If the 
processes of industry were not changing, wages and industry would 
tend to adjust themselves according to certain standards. A study of the 
mechanism of production would then show that one part of the product 
is specifically attributable to labor, and that another part is imputable to 
capital. It is the object of the course to show that the tendency of free 
competition, under such conditions, is to give to labor, in the form of 
wages, the amount that it specifically creates, and also to give to capital, 
in the form of interest, what it specifically produces. The theory 
undertakes to prove that the earnings of labor and of capital are governed 
by a principle of final productivity, and that this principle must be 
studied on a social scale, rather than in any one department of 



35 



production. The latter part of this course enters the field of Economic 
Dynamics, defines an economic society and describes the forces which 
so act upon it as to change its structure and its mode of producing and 
distributing wealth. 

Economics 206— Economic Theory II. Professor Clark. 
M. and W. at 2.10. 406 L. 

This course continues the discussion of the dynamic laws of distribu- 
tion. The processes of industry are actually progressing. Mechanical 
invention, emigration and other influences cause capital and labor to be 
applied in new ways and with enlarging results. These influences do 
not even repress the action of the static forces of distribution, but they 
bring a new set of forces into action. They create, first, employers' 
profits, and, later, additions to wages and interest. It is the object of 
the course to show how industrial progress affects the several shares in 
distribution under a system of competition, and how progress itself is 
caused, and also to determine whether the consolidations of labor and 
capital, which are a distinctive feature of modern industry, necessarily 
have the effect of repressing competition and checking progress. 

It is a further purpose of the course to present the natural laws by 
which the increase of capital and that of labor are governed, and to 
discuss the manner in which the earnings of these agents are affected by 
the action of the state, and to present at some length the character and 
the effects of those obstructions which pure economic law encounters in 
the practical world. 

[Economics 207 — Theory of Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10, and 11. 415 L. 

The aim of this course is to present the elementary principles of 
statistics and to illustrate their application by concrete studies in the 
most important sources of statistical material. The theoretical part of 
the course includes the study of averages, index-numbers, interpolation 
and the principles of the graphic method. Toward the end of the term 
a review is given of the statistical processes employed in mathematical 
economics and of the chief empirical results that have already been 
established. 

Laboratory exercises are required of all students attending the course. 
(Identical with Sociology 255.) 
Not given in igog-ioJ\ 

[Economics 210 — Social Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10, and 11. 415 L. 

(Identical with Sociology 256. For description see page 38.) 
Not given in igog-io.] 



36 



[Economics 241 — The Economic and Social Evolution of Russia 
since 1800. Professor Simkhovitch. 
M. and F. at 10. 418 L. 

This course describes the economic development of the country, the 
growth of Slavophil, liberal and revolutionary doctrines and parties, and 
the disintegration of the autocratic regime. 

(Identical with History 253.) 

Not given in iqoq-ioI\ 

Economics 242— Radicalism and Social Reform as reflected in 
the Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Professor Simkhovitch. 
F. at 10 and ri. 418 L. 

An interpretation of the various types of modern radicalism, such as 
socialism, nihilism, and anarchism, and of the social and economic 
conditions on which they are based. 

Economics 301 — Seminar in Political Economy and Finance. 

Professors Seligman, Clark, and Seager. 

For advanced students. Tu., 8. 15-10. 15 p.m. 301 L. 

Economics 302 — Seminar in Political Economy and Finance. 

Professors Seligman, Clark, and Seager. 

For advanced students. Tu., 8. 15-10. 15 P.M. 301 L. 

Subject B — Sociology and Statistics 

Sociology 151 — Principles of Sociology, Analytical and Descriptive. 

Professor Giddings and Dr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 401 and 413 L. 

This is a fundamental course, intended to lay a foundation for 
advanced work. In connection with a text-book study of theory, lectures 
are given on the pre-suppositions and the methods of the scientific study 
of society, and students are required to analyze and to classify 
sociological material of live interest, obtained from newspapers, reviews, 
and official reports. 

Sociology 152 — Principles of Sociology, Historical. Professor 
Giddings and Dr. Tenney. 

M. and W. at 3.10. 401 and 413 L. 

In this course the main outlines of historical sociology are so presented 
as to constitute an introduction to the study of social evolution and to 
the theory of progress. The beginnings of social relations in animal 
bands are indicated, and the successive stages of anthropogenic, 
ethnogenic, and demogenic association are reviewed. This course is 
the proper preparation for Sociology 251, 252, 257, and 258. 



37 



Sociology 153 — Ethnology: Primitive Culture. Lectures, papers, 
and discussions. Professor Farrand. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 505 S. 

This course consists of a detailed treatment of the questions involved 
in primitive culture, such as the origin and development of mythology, 
morality, and religion, education, art, social customs, etc. Students 
are expected to have taken Anthropology 1-2 or 101-102, or to give 
satisfactory evidence of previous work before being admitted to this course. 

(Identical with Anthropology 105.) 

Sociology 154 — Ethnology: Primitive Culture. Lectures, papers, 
and discussions. Professor Farrand. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 505 S. 

A continuation of the preceding course, and admission to it is subject 
to the same conditions. 

(Identical with Anthropology 106.) 

Sociology 155 — The European Race and its Early History. 

Lectures, papers, and discussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

In this course the distribution of types of man in Europe and the 
history of their development into the modern nations are traced. The 
important relations of the history of civilization in Europe to the civili- 
zation in Asia and in Africa are discussed, and the traits of European 
civilization due to the psychologic unity of mankind are considered. 

(Identical with Anthropology ill.) 

Sociology 156 — The European Race and its Early History. 

Lectures, papers, and discussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 
A continuation of the preceding course. 
(Identical with Anthropology 112.) 

[Sociology 251— Social Evolution: Ethnic and Civil Origins. 

Professor Giddings. 

F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

This course in historical sociology deals with such topics as : (1) The 
early distribution and ethnic composition of western European popula- 
tions ; (2) the original types of mind and of character, the capacity for coop- 
eration, the cultural beliefs and the economic, legal and political habits of 
western European peoples ; (3) early forms of the family, the origins, 
structure, and functions of the clan, the organization of the tribe, the 
rise of tribal federations, tribal feudalism, and the conversion of a 
gentile into a civil plan of social organization in western Europe. Early 
literature, legal codes and chronicles, descriptive of the Celtic and 
Teutonic groups which combined to form the English people before the 
Norman Conquest, are the chief sources made use of in this course. 

(Identical with History 217.) 

Given in igio-i 1 and in alternate years thereafter.^ 



38 



[Sociology 252— Social Evolution : Civilization, Liberty, and 
Democracy. Professor Giduings. 
F. at 2. 10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

This course comprises three parts, namely : (1) An examination of the 
nature of those secondary civilizations which are created by conquest, 
and of the policies by which they seek to maintain and to extend 
themselves ; (2) A study of the growth and of the policies of liberty, 
including measures for the expansion of intellectual freedom, for the 
control of arbitrary authority by legality, for the repression of collective 
violence, and for the control of collective impulse by deliberation ; (3) 
a study of the nature, the genesis, and the social organization of modern 
democracies, including an examination of the extent to which 
non-political associations are more or less democratic ; and of the 
democratic ideals of equality and fraternity in their relations to social 
order and to liberty. The documents of English history since the 
Norman Conquest are the chief sources made use of in this course. 

(Identical with History 256.) 

Given in ig 10-11 and in alternate years thereafter.] 

[Sociology 255 — Theory of Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10, and n. 415 L. 

(Identical with Economics 207. For description see page 35.) 
Not given in jgoo-io.] 

[Sociology 256— Social Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10, and n. 415 L. 

This course, which presupposes a knowledge of statistical processes 
(Sociology 255)) begins with a detailed study of the methods and generali- 
zations of vital statistics and leads to an examination of recent theories 
of population in the light of the data afforded by official publications. 
Toward the end of the term a review is given of the statistical methods 
employed in anthropometry and in eugenics, and of the chief empirical 
results that have already been established. 

Laboratory exercises are required of all students attending the course. 

(Identical with Economics 210.) 

Not given in iqoq-io.] 

Sociology 257 — Historical Types of Society. Ancient : The 
Theory of Progress. Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

The object of this course, and of Sociology 258, is to examine the 
fundamental types of human society as they have appeared in history, to 
follow the evolution of world-society, and to examine the theory of 
progress. Attention is given chiefly to the influence of physical environ- 
ments, the early migrations and the resulting distribution of the white 
races, and to the social types that appeared before the rise of Grecian 
civilization. 

(Identical with History 213.) 

Given in iqog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 



39 



Sociology 258— Historical Types of Society. Modern: The 
Theory of Progress. Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 413 L. 

The subject-matter of this course is found in the European societies 
that have flourished since the rise of Grecian civilization, and particular 
attention is given to the question of the extent to which they present 
original features attributable to specific environmental and ethnic 
influences. 

(Identical with History 214.) 

Given in igog-10 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Sociology 259 — Ecclesiology. Dr. Bayles. 
Tu. and F. at 4.10. 405 L. 

The purpose of this course is to define the present relations of the eccle- 
siastical institutions to the other institutions of American society : the 
state, the government, marriage, family, education, and public wealth. 
An analysis is made of the guarantees of religious liberty contained in 
the federal and commonwealth constitutions ; of the civil status of churches 
in terms of constitutional and statute law ; of the methods of incorpora- 
tion, of the functions of trustees, of legislative and judicial control ; of 
denominational polity according to its type ; of the functional activity of 
churches in their departments of legislation, administration, adjudica- 
tion, discipline, and mission ; of the influence of churches on ethical 
standards ; of the distribution of nationalities among the denominations, 
of the territorial distribution of denominational strength, of the relation 
of polity to density of population, and of the current movements in and 
between various organizations tending toward changes of functions and 
structure. 

Sociology 260 — Primitive Institutions in Europe. Professor 
Shotwell. 

Th. at 4.10 and 5.10. 208 L. 

(Identical with History 220. For description see page 13.) 

Sociology 311 — General Seminar. Sociological Theories: 

Historical. Professor Giddings and Dr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 4.10. 422 L. 

This is an investigation and lecture course, and is required of all 
students making sociology a major subject for advanced degrees. 
Fellows making sociology a minor subject may be admitted. 

Sociology 312— General Seminar. Sociological Theory: System- 
atic. Professor Giddings and Dr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 4.10. 422 L. 

This is an investigation and lecture course, and is required of all 
students making sociology a major subject for advanced degrees. 
Fellows making sociology a minor subject may be admitted. 



4° 



Sociology 315-316— Modern Problems in Social Evolution. Dr. 

Tenney. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Sociology 317— Advanced Seminar: Problems and Methods of 
Sociological Research. Professor Giddings. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10, bi-weekly. 301 L. 

Sociology 318— Advanced Seminar: Dissertations in Preparation. 

Professor Giddings. 

Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10, bi-weekly. 301 L. 

Subject C — Social Economy 

Social Economy 281 — Misery and its Causes. Professor Devine. 
Tu. and Th. at 4.10. 415 L. 

This course is a survey of social mal-adjustments (e.g., congestion of 
population, preventable disease, child-labor, overwork, casual employ- 
ment, exploitation of employees and consumers, lack of playgrounds, 
obsolete educational systems, inefficiency in administration of justice) ; 
the resulting privation and degeneration ; the social aspects of crime ; 
the causes of poverty ; and the conditions which are unfavorable to a 
normal standard of living. 

Social Economy 282— Efficiency and Relief. Professor Devine. 
Tu. and Th. at 4.10. 415 L. 

This course is a study of the methods by which society undertakes to 
relieve distress and to promote efficiency. It includes the social aspects 
of philanthropy and of education. Special attention is given to construct- 
ive social movements, such as those for housing and sanitary reform, and 
the prevention of disease and of accidents. 

Social Economy 283 — Social Legislation relating to the Work- 
shop and Factory. Professor Lindsay. 
Tu. and Th. at 5.10. 415 L. 

A comparative study of the methods and results of recent legislation 
in American States and European countries dealing with social prob- 
lems relating to the place in which the wage-earner works and the 
conditions under which he works. Factory legislation, including the 
regulation of child-labor ; industrial insurance against sickness, inva- 
lidity, old age, and unemployment ; employers' liability and workmen's 
compensation acts; old-age pensions and annuities; hours of labor; 
dangerous occupations ; arbitration of labor disputes. 

Social Economy 284 — Social Legislation relating to the Family, 
Home, and School. Professor Lindsay. 
Tu. and Th. at 5.10. 415 L. 

This course follows the same methods as Course 283, and treats of 
marriage and divorce ; public poor relief ; truancy ; sanitation ; pure 



4i 



food ; humane treatment of children ; petty finance, including pawn 
brokerage, chattel mortgages, and salary loans ; and public health, 
including contagious diseases, registration of tuberculosis, vaccination, 
control of milk and water supply. 

Social Economy 287 — Social Legislation relating to City and 
Rural Community Life. Professor Lindsay. 
Two hours. Hours to be arranged. 415 L. 

This course will be offered either as an alternative, or in addition to 
Course 284. Methods are the same as in Course 283. Topics: Parks and 
playgrounds ; amusements ; liquor traffic; protection of natural resources; 
scenic preservation ; town-planning and congestion. 

Given in igio-11. 

Social Economy 321— Seminar in Social Economy. Professors 
Devine and Lindsay. 
F., 8-10 P.M. 

Social Economy 322 — Seminar in Social Economy. Professors 
Devine and Lindsay. 
F., 8-10 p.m. 



COURSES IN THE SCHOOL OF PHILANTHROPY 

The New York School of Philanthropy is an affiliated professional 
school conducted by the Charity Organization Society, under the 
direction of Professor Lindsay. It offers a one-year course in social 
work, which includes supervised field and practice work and lecture 
courses aggregating not less than eight hours per week in both terms of 
the academic year, and a summer term of six weeks in June and July for 
conferences of experienced professional workers. These courses, given 
in the United Charities Building, are open to regular students of Columbia 
University, and may be credited as minors for candidates for higher 
degrees. The detailed program of these courses will be sent gratis upon 
application to the Director of the School at 105 East 22d Street, New 
York City, to whom all inquiries about the work and certificates of the 
school should be made. 

COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Economics i — Introduction to Economics. Professors Seligman and 
Mussey, and Dr. Agger. 

Section 1, M. and \V. at 9 in 613 Hra„ F. at 1.10, 422 L. 
Section 2, M. and W. at 11 in 616 Hm., F. at 1.10, 422 L. 
Section 3, M. and W. at 1.10 in 607 Hm., F. at i.io, 422 L. 
Section 4, M. and W. at 1.10 in 609 Hm., F. at 1.10, 422 L. 
Prerequisite : History A1-A2. 

Economics 2 — Practical Economic Problems. Professors Seligman 
and Mussey, and Dr. Agger. 
Hours as in Economics I. 
Prerequisite: History A1-A2. 



4 2 



COURSES IN BARNARD COLLEGE 

Economics Ai — Outlines of Economics. Professor Mussey and 
Dr. Agger. 

Section i, M.,W.,and S. at 10. Section 2, M. and W. at 11 and S. at 10. 
Sections 3 and 4, Tu., Th., and S. at 10. 

Economics A2— Practical Economic Problems. Professor Mussey 
and Dr. Agger. 
Hours as in Ai. 

Economics 104— Commerce and Commercial Policy. Professor 
Mussey. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 

(For description see page 32.) 

Economics 107 — Fiscal and Industrial History of the United 
States. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 
(For description see page 32.) 

Economics 108— Railroad Problems, Economic, Social, and Legal. 

Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 
(For description see page 33.) 

Economics 115 — Socialism and Social Reform. Professor Clark. 

Tu. and Th. at 1.10, and a third hour to be arranged. 

In this course a brief study is made of the works of St. Simon, Fourier, 
Proudhon, Owen, and Lasalle, and a more extended study is made of 
Marx's treatise on capital. Recent economic changes, such as the 
formation of trusts and strong trade unions, are examined with a 
view to ascertaining what effect they have had on the modern socialistic 
movement. A study is made of modern semi-socialistic movements 
and of such reforms as have for their object the improvement of the 
condition of the working class. Municipal activities, factory legislation, 
the single tax, recent agrarian movements and measures for the regula- 
tion of monopolies are studied. 

Economics 116 — Labor Problems. Professor Seager. 

Tu. and Th. at t.io, and a third hour to be arranged. 

Attention in this course is divided about equally between problems 
connected with labor organizations — collective bargaining, strikes, arbi- 
tration, etc. ; and problems whose solution involves legislation — child- 
labor, dangerous trades, the sweating system, immigration, etc. Lectures 
are supplemented by assigned readings, discussions, and special reports. 



43 



Sociology ii— The Industrial Family. Professor Mary K. 

SlMKHOVITCH. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 

Prerequisite or parallel : Economics A. 

Topics of the first half-year are racial composition, occupations, homes, 
and social life of the Industrial Family. 

Sociology 12— The Industrial Family. Professor Mary K. 

SlMKHOVITCH. 

Tu. and Th. at 3. 10. 

Topics of the second half-year are rents, dress, food, housing, educa- 
tion, and recreation as related to the standard of living. 

Sociology 13 — Social Progress in Cities. Professor Mary K. 

SlMKHOVITCH. 

Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 

Course 11-12 is recommended as a parallel. 

Public agencies charged with the welfare of the community will be 
discussed in the first half-year. 

Sociology 14 — Social Progress in Cities. Professor Mary K. 

SlMKHOVITCH. 

Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 

Private institutions or associations working for social progress are 
discussed in the second half-year. 

Sociology 151 — Principles of Sociology. Professor Giddings and 
Dr. Tenney. 

M. and W. at 3.10. 401 and 413 L. 
(For description see page 36.) 

Sociology 152 — Principles of Sociology. Professor Giddings and 
Dr. Tenney. 

M. and W. at 3.10. 401 and 413 L. 
(For description see page 36.) 



COURSES IN THE SUMMER SESSION* 
Economics 

si — Principles of Economics. Lectures and text-book discussion. 
Professor Kemmerer. 

Five hours a week at 11.30. 309 Hm. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics I 
or Al.) 

* For fuller details consult the Bulletin of Information in reference to the Summer Session. 



44 



SI03 — Money and Banking. Lectures and assigned reading. Pro- 
fessor Kemmerer. 

Five hours a week at 1.30. 309 Hm. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
112.) 

SI05 — Labor Problems. Lectures and assigned reading, Professor 
Raper. 

Five hours a week at 2.30. 408 Hm. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
105 or 116.) 

sio8— Railway Problems. Lectures and assigned reading. Pro- 
fessor Raper. 

Five hours a week at 3.30. 408 Hm. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
108.) 

Sociology 

sioi — Principles of Sociology, Analytical and Descriptive. 

Lectures, readings, and papers. Professor Giddings. 
Five hours a week at 9.30. 415 L. 

S102 — Principles of Sociology, Historical. Lectures, readings, and 
papers. Professor Giddings. 

Five hours a week at 10.30. 415 L. 



45 

OFFICE HOURS 



SPECIAL 
(Sept. 20-25, 1909) 



The Dean or f 10 * 2 404 L 



REGULAR 



The Secretary C * nd 403 L. M.W. 3.15-4. 403 L. 

2—4 



History 

and 
Political 
'hilosophy 



Politics 
ublic Law 

and 
omparative 
risprudence 



.conomics 
and 
Social 
Science 



f Prof. Dunning 


10-12, 2-4 


704 Hm. 


W. r . 3 


710 Hm. 


Prof. Robinson 


10-12, 2-4 


704 Hm. 


Tu. Th. 9.30- 


10 711 Hm. 


Prof. Sloane 


10—12, 2—4 


704 Hm. 


M. W. F. 2 


704 Hm. 


■{ Prof. Shepherd 


10—12, 2—4 


AO? L 


M W 1 iz-a 


AO? L. 

AJ. 


Prof. Shotwell 


10—12, 2—4 


704 Hm. 


Tu. ?-a 


708 Hm. 


Prof. Johnson 


10—12, 2—4 


T. 


Tu. Th. 10-11 


320 T. 


Mr Httth 

ata 1 . iiu 1 aa 


10— 12, 2—4 


70 A FT m 

J\J£^. A A 111. 


ivi. vv . j 4 


714 Hm. 


I Prnf TVTttnrof Smith 


W. F. 10-12 


409 L, 


vv . 1 . 4 — J 


409 L. 


j Prof. Goodnow 


10-12.30 


404 L. 


M. W. 3-4 


404 L. 


I Prof. Beard 


2-4 


403 L. 


M. 2-4 


715 Hm. 


[ Prof. Scott 


M. Tu. 10-12 


411 L. 


M. Tu. 10-11 


412 L. 


Prof. Seligman 


2-4 


409 L. 


Tu. Th. F. 2- 


-3 409 L. 


Prof. Giddings 


10, 3 


408 L. 


M. 2.30, F. 1. 


30 408 L. 


Prof. Clark 


10-12, 2-4 


409 L. 


M. W. 1.30 


204 W. 


Prof. Seager 


10-12, 2-4 


409 L. 


Tu. Th. 2-3 


403 L. 


Prof. SlMKHOVITCH 


M.-Th. 10-12, 


2-4 307 L. 


M. W. 2-4 


307 L. 


Prof. Devine 


4.10-5 


201 W. 


Tu. Th. 5 


201 W. 


| Prof. Lindsay 


4.10-5 


205 W. 


Tu. Th. 4-5 


205 W. 


Prof. Mussey 


10-12, 2-4 


409 L. 


M. 2-3 


205 w. 



4 6 



IT) ^ > 

M D i-l 

in ^ 



10 £ J 

m £> M 

>, . o 
o £ 



10 

^GO 

. 

2 0 



M H 

^ 3 

CO 1-1 

■is? 

Ph 



n > 



W 00 



Ho 



00 

NO C5 

(M g 

« 2 



N > 
o • 

Wo 

u 
Ph 



rt O M 
JON 

n w 

p 

Ph Ph 



00 £ 
Ph Ph 



- O 

t/5 O 



- o o 
S2z 



SO _ 

M ^ Q > 

-2 Ph 
Ph 



CO 
O 



2 £ 

'as 

O . 

o p 

W Ph 



It* 



SO 
lO 



10 0 CO 



>, . 
o o 



CO o 
M g 

On § , 

>,Q o 

O <4-l 

« 2 
3* 



I Q 

0 s 

Ph 



X 
m H 

CO 

a w 1 

G O " 

Jfis 



w 

o 

CO 



to 



23^ 



0 

S Ph 



5 « 

e co » 
0 2 

a* 



1 ° 

Ph Ph 



CO ^ 

J O H 
O ^ tH- 



3 u, 
Ph Ph 



J. Z 



>,P< 
O V4J 

.2 2 



M > 

VO 2^ 

. M o ^ 
^^00 
2 « O 2. 
wW . Tt 

Xi Ph 
53 
Ph 



CO ^ 

o 



w 



b_JCO jn 

o . o 

K^Ph 



o 

SO H 

Q • O 



2 « 

O !3H 

as 

o o 
^Ph 



a co ^ 

o P 



SO 
lO 

H 

«. cn 
lO < 

mo co 

M CO 

[3 Ph 
"o 
O 

CO 



o 

00 o 

7 ~ 

Os 

Csl D 
Ih 

o J 

S o 

8^ 



o 

H 

W M 

J- ^ 

^Ph 
X 

Ph 



CO 

(1) 



»o8 ^ 

IT) H 

b^co ^ 

o M . o 

S .3 "8 * 



o » 

SO 



^ 8 j 



£1^ 

K -g £ 18 

P, ffiPH 



SO 
O 

M 

- Q 
0 < 

M M 



Sw 

^Ph cn 



S 0 

O o 10 

0* * J 0 



47 



o M 

5,1 



3D 



N N W , 

y « o 



u o fit 

2 55 z " 



P, « 

.2 "* .a-o j 
•2 o 



a . * 

§£ 

o ^ 

W 



•5 



vo „ 

NO g 

N N W 



Co « o 

III- 

3pH 



Ul hi N 



j?5 

o^o 



vo H 

N H 
N N W , 

. « OH 

D o o 

.2^a - 

B 2^ 

1- !_ 3 

3pH Ph 



° 3 
? £ 
O N O 
fo^S Q j 
^ V> Q * m 

£ i o <: h 

rt w o W O 
o 

o 

p-l 



m N Q M 

b 5* 
175.2 2 

^ CO 



" " « 

5/5 2 1/5 < . i 

o K o JH 

s S § ^ §• 



25 

fO o 

O c/3 



.2 ^ 

hH O 



o 

° s 

^ ° 

£ O ^ 

£ 2 

,Q Ph 

Pi 



VO 
O 
CM 

o < , 
N Jh 



So 



Ov£ O 

O S M * 

H > M fit 

u K U tJ H 

"3 W '3 U o 

§^ § 8 

U • 0(1, 



00 H 
N O IN S 



CO 



fl £ O 

V) S 

Is' 



00 

M O O , 

t< in u N 

s . 
5 go 



r>. DP 

N H 

ON § 

vO CO 
g O J 

c £5 ° 
§zo 

2^ 

cu . 

'C o 



S3 

00 H 
VO S 

<u CO 



^ W5 r* 
M O W |_1 

MO ^ 3 

2 • Q "* 

is 

COQh 



jogco 



o o 

CO 



PO o 

O tn 

^ u 



W 2 

Ph 



O 

N o i-l 

^ O w 

.Ho 

r— c »H 

Ph 



vO 
O 

tN 

9lU\D 

.2 . o 
B'o * 

C Ph 
O 
o 
W 



00 

2 * 

vo § 

M O O , 

w g 2 
8ph 
w 



N 

« S i-J 

^ CO , n 
O 



Ph 



«*H 



CVJ % 

« 8 

^co 

Ph 



2 S*! 



lN co 
c o H 



t3 n- 



a. ^! 



03 p, 



CO 



4 8 



£ » 
o . 



b bJO 2 co 

2 -2 ,5 o 
.2 £ 

1/3 *« 



£.0 tfu 

b^ 

o ^ 

co O 



Effl PJ CJ 

J H 

bo g o oo 

o p4 > a O 

S H M N 

S « o S 

^ o W " 



S w 

§ n 5 

W .rQ if? 



oo <+: 

CM o 



O NO 

CM - 
CM 

u 

o 
jtn 

ffi o o 



w 

CM £ 



« 9 
_r a 

01 a o> 



O „J 

.2 2 
M Ph 



M ot S3 U g < 

S !i > t-3 goo g 
W co^ 



O f}2 s> a o 

a . S * N 



CM > 

O.j! O 



OO ° 

v; co 

CM 7 

CM S ^ 

CTO oo 
Of/ o 

+■* CM 

to . v ^ 
*+h 

ffi o 

Ph 



b^ £ 



co o 



CM "g 
CO 

m q g 

M ^ 5 i 

b c H N 
8 2 



CM 

M H 

N H 

I O 

b^ 
2 p 



bgi 



0? O N g 



Mo 



bOoo 
Or/ O 

.a • N 
B 2 



b^ 
o i+: 

tn O 



-2 

NO M 

M > 

o M 

w£ 

£^ 

Ph 



Q 
P3 



offl o 
o . ^ 

CO 



00 

CO o 

^25 ^ 

cop ^ 3 



.2 2 



S « 

8^ 
^ " ..^ 

03 00 

•3 N 2 

o Cu 



00 

M 

p CO o 



Ph 



cog^f 

o o e 



S < 

O rf. co 

8 n g ^ 

■ZJ 60 • 

£ £ 







O . ► W 




co 5 o 




^ < «< 

M <5 fc) 




O O C/5 








«a c 




.y c/3 a 


0 
cn 


o .2 w 




c o 21 




o »- < 




o Ph 




W U 





On W 

M 2 

>» « 
J^Ph 



5£ 



•J 

CO W 
M > 

O 



5 a 



25 

NO O 
CM E 

59 

v- O co 

5 p$ o 

to • . « 

ffi o 

Ph 



£0 c 
£ ■ P 
§£ 



M O 
CM 



>-°2 

So 



CO w 
CM ^ 



„ hrj OO 
■ • CO M 



CO 

ffi O 
Ph 



25 

no O 

cm a , 

bo co 
2& g 

CO . ^ 

£ O 
Ph 



O O 
H OO 



Columbia University 



SCOPE 




OPEN TO 


LEADING TO 


General Culture 


Columbia College 


Men 


A.B. or B.S. 


Barnard College 


Women 


j\.u. or £5.o. 


Graduate non-profes- 


Political Science 


Men and 


A AT 

A . iM . 


sional courses 


Philosophy 
Pure Science 


Women 


and Ph.D. 


■n LV j -n • 

.rublic and Jrnvate 


ocnool 01 L3W 


M 

en 


LL.B. 


Law 


V j yea's; 




M.D. 


Practice of Medicine 


College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons 
(4 years) 


Men 


Mining Engineering 


School of Mines 


Men 


£/,M. 


Metallurgy 


(4 years) 




Met.E. 
Chem 

c.e! 

E.E. 
Mech.E. 
Chem.E. 


Chemistry and Engi- 






nee ring — C ivil, 


Schools of Chemistry 


Men 


Sanitary, Electrical, 
Mechanical, Chem- 
ical 


and Engineering 




(4 years) 




A rr\t if ppfnrf* IVTiiQir* 


Schools of Architecture 


M 


B.S. or 




Music and Design 




Certificate 


E d u cation — elemen- 


Teachers College 


Men and 


Bachelor's 


tary or secondary 


(2 years) 


Women 


Diploma 


teaching 




and B.S. 


Advanced courses 


Teachers College 


JMen 3no 


!Mcistcr s 




^^omen 


cinci Doctor s 
Diploma 


Pharmacy 


College of Pharmacy 


Men and 


Degrees and 




(2 and 3 years) 


Women 


Diplomas 


There is an annual 


Summer Session 


Men and 
Women 


Suitable aca- 
demic credit 
or certification 


Courses are offered 


Extension Teaching 


Men and 


Suitable aca- 


both at the Univer- 


Women 


demic credit 


sity and elsewhere 






or certification 



The normal preparation for Columbia College and Barnard College 
is the equivalent of a four-year secondary school course. The Schools 
of Political Science, Philosophy, Pure Science, and Law require for 
entrance a college course or its equivalent. Two years of collegiate 
work are prescribed for Teachers College and for the degree courses in 
Architecture, Music and Design and, while the minimum requirements 
do not at present prescribe it, the same preparation is strongly recom- 
mended in Medicine, Mines, Chemistry, and Engineering. 

In the Summer Session and Extension Teaching there are no entrance 
tests for non-matriculants, but before being registered as candidates 
for degrees or diplomas, matriculants must fulfil the appropriate entrance 
requirements. 

The program of studies in the College places the emphasis on the 
quality of the student's work rather than upon the time spent in residence, 
and is so arranged as to make it possible for a properly qualified student 
to complete the requirements for both the Bachelor's degree and for any 
one of the professional degrees of the University in six years, or, in some 
cases, in a shorter period. 

Students registered as candidates for non-professional degrees may at 
the same time receive credit toward a diploma in teaching and vice versa. 

Bulletins of Information regarding any of these courses may be 
obtained from the Secretary of the University, and further information 
will be furnished on request. A complete Catalogue, issued in Decem- 
ber of each year, is sold for twenty-five cents. 



Tenth Series, No. 6 




^^~^b$RS&T^^ I9IO '~ 




Colutnma GantViersttp 
Bulletin of Snfbrmatton 



HISTORY 
ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC LAW 



COURSES OFFERED BY THE 

FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

AND THE 

SEVERAL UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1910 -I I 



OF THE 
UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS 



Published by 

Columbia (Hntoersttp 
in t&e Cttp of Bern gorn 

Morningside Heights 
New York, N. Y. 



Columbia 5Entuergttp 
^Bulletin of ^nformattoa 



(Issued 25 times during the Academic year, monthly in November 
and December, and weekly between February and June. Entered 
as second-class matter at the New York, N. Y M Post Office, 
Dec. 22, 1900, under Act of July 16, 1894.) 

These include: 

1. The President's Annual Report to the Trustees. 

2. The Catalogue of the University, issued in Decem- 

ber, price 25 cents. 

3. The Announcements of the several Colleges and 

Schools, and of certain Diyisions, issued in the 
Spring and relating to the work of the next year. 
These are made as accurate as possible, but the 
right is reserved to make changes in detail as 
circumstances require. The current number of 
any of these Announcements will be sent without 
charge upon application to the Secretary of the 
University. For information as to the various 
courses offered by the University consult the last 
page of this Announcement. 



ABRIDGED ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The academic year is thirty-seven weeks in length, ending on the 
second Wednesday in June. In 1910-11 the year begins on September 
28, 1910, and ends on June 14, 191 1. It is divided into two half-years 
of nineteen and eighteen weeks, respectively. In 1910-11 the second 
half-year begins on February 8, 191 1. The Summer Session for 19 10 
begins on July 6 and ends on August 17. 

The exercises of the University are suspended on Election Day, Thanks- 
giving Day, and the following two days, for two weeks at Christmas, 
on Washington's Birthday, from the Thursday before Good Friday through 
the following Monday, and on Memorial Day. 

The complete Academic Calendar will be found in the University 
catalogue and, so far as it refers to the students studying under any 
Faculty, in the announcement of that Faculty. 



OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER 



President of the University 



A.B., Columbia, 1882; A.M., 1883; Ph.D., 1884; LL.D., Syracuse, 1898; Tulane, 
1901; Johns Hopkins, Princeton, Yale, and University of Pennsylvania, 1902; 
Chicago, 1903; Manchester and St. Andrew's, 1905; Cambridge, 1907; Williams, 
1908; Harvard and Dartmouth, 1909; Litt.D., Oxford, 1905. 



A.B., Amherst, 1867; A.M., 1870; LL.D., 1884; Ph.D., Princeton, 1883; Leipzig 
(Hon.), 1909. 

Munroe Smith . Professor of Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

A.B., Amherst, 1874; A.M., 1880; LL.B., Columbia, 1877; LL.D., 1904; J.U.D., 
Gottingen, 1880; J.D., Louvain, 1909. 

Frank J. Good now Eaton Professor of Administrative Law and 

Municipal Science 

A.B., Amherst, 1879; A.M., 1886; LL.D., 1898; LL.B., Columbia, 1882, cum laude; 
LL.D., 1904; Harvard, 1909. 

Edwin R. A. Seligman McVickar Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Columbia, 1879; A.M., 1883; LL.B., 1884; Ph.D., 1884; LL.D., 1904. 

William Henry Carpenter. . .Villard Professor of Germanic Philology, 



John W. Burgess 



Ruggles Professor of Political Science and 
Constitutional Law, and Dean 



and Associate Dean 



A.B., Hamilton, 1881; Ph.D., Freiburg, 1881. 



Herbert L. Osgood Professor of History 

A.B., Amherst, 1877; A.M., 1880; LL.D., 1907; Ph.D., Columbia, 1889. 



John Bassett Moore 



Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law 

and Diplomacy 



A.B., Virginia, 1889; LL.D., Yale, 1901. 



2 William A. Dunning Lieber Professor of History and Political 

Philosophy 

A.B., Columbia, 1881; A.M., 1883; Ph.D., 1885; LL.D., 1904. 



Franklin Henry Giddings Professor of Sociology and the 

History of Civilization 
A.B., Union, 1877; A.M., 1889; Ph.D., 1897; LL.D., Oberlin, 1900. 



i John B. Clark Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Amherst, 1872; Ph.D., 1890; LL.D., 1897; LL.D., Princeton, 1896. 



Absent on leave 1910-11. 
Absent on leave first half-year. 



4 



James Harvey Robinson Professor of History 

A.B., Harvard, 1887; A.M., 1888; Ph.D., Freiburg, 1890. 

1 William Milligan Sloane Seth Low Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia, 1868; L.H.D., 1887; A.M. and Ph.D., Leipzig, 1876; LL.D., Rut- 
gers, 1898; Princeton, 1903. 

Henry Rogers Seager Professor of Political Economy 

Ph.B., Michigan, 1890; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 1894. 

Henry L. Moore Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Randolph-Macon, 1892; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1896. 

William R. Shepherd Professor of History, and Secretary 

A.B., Columbia, 1893; A.M., 1894; Ph.D., 1896. 

James T. Shotwell Professor of History 

A.B., Toronto, 1898; Ph.D., Columbia, 1903. 

George W. Botsford Professor of History 

A. B., Nebraska, 1884; A.M., 1889; Ph.D., Cornell, 1891. 

Vladimir G. Simkhovitch . . . Associate Professor of Economic History 

Ph.D., Halle-Wittenberg, 1898. 

Edward Thomas Devine Schiff Professor of Social Economy 

B. A., Cornell College, Iowa, 1887; M.A., 1890; LL.D., 1904; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 
1895. 

Henry Johnson Professor of History in Teachers College 

B.L., University of Minnesota, 1889; A.M., Columbia, 1902. 

Charles A. Beard Associate Professor of Politics 

A.B., De Pauw University, 1898; A.M., Columbia, 1903; Ph.D., 1904. 

Samuel McCune Lindsay Professor of Social Legislation 

Ph.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1889; LL.D., 1909; Ph.D., Halle, 1892. 

Henry Suzzallo Professor of the Philosophy of Education 

in Teachers College 

A.B., Stanford, 1899; A.M., Columbia, 1902; Ph.D., 1905. 

Henry R. Mussey Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Beloit, 1900; Ph.D., Columbia, 1905. 

William D. Guthrie Professor of Law 

A.M. (Hon.), Yale, 1904. 

Ernst Daenell, Ph.D Kaiser Wilhelm Professor of German 

History and Institutions for the year 1910-11 
Professor of Modern History Jn the University of Kiel. 

1 Absent on leave 1910-11. 



5 



Other Officers 

Richard J. H. Gottheil Professor of Rabbinical Literature and the 

Semitic Languages 

A.B., Columbia, 1881; Ph.D., Leipzig, 1886. 

1 A. V. Williams Jackson Professor of Indo-Iranian Languages 

A.B., Columbia, 1883; A.M., 1884; L.H.D., 1885; Ph.D., 1886; LL.D., 1904. 

Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology 

Ph.D., Kiel, 1881; LL.L., Clark, 1909. 

Livingston Farrand Professor of Anthropology 

A.B., Princeton, 1888; A.M., 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1891. 

John D. Prince Professor of the Semitic Languages 

A.B., Columbia, 1888; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1892. 

Friedrich Hirth Dean Lung Professor of Chinese 

A. M. and Ph.D., Rostock, 1869. 

Mrs. Mary K. Simkhovitch Associate in 

Social Economy in Teachers College 

B. A., Boston University, 1890. 

Carlton H. Hayes Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia, 1904; A.M., 1905; Ph.D., 1909. 

Arthur C. McGiffert, Ph.D., D.D. .Washburn Professor of Church 

History in Union Theological Seminary 

William Walker Rockwell, S.T.B., Lic.Th. . . .Assistant Professor of 
Church History in Union Theological Seminary 

Harold Harrison Tryon, B.A., M.A., B.D Instructor in New 

Testament and Church History in Union Theological Seminary 

Henry Peter Scratchley, M.A., B.D Acting Professor of 

Ecclesiastical History in the General Theological Seminary 

George J. Bayles Associate in Ecclesiology 

A.B., Columbia, 1891; A.M., 1892; LL.B., 1893; Ph.D., 1895. 

Alvan A. Tenney, Ph.D Instructor in Sociology 

Maude A. Huttmann, A.M. .Instructor in History in Barnard College 

Eugene E. Agger, Ph.D Instructor in Economics 

Edward McChesney Sait, A.M Lecturer in Public Law 

Charles Downer Hazen, Ph.D., Lecturer in History 

Robert Livingston Schuyler, Ph.D Lecturer in History 

Lilian Brandt, A.M Assistant in Social Economy 

1 Absent on leave second half-year. 



Students are received as candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy under the Faculty of Political Science; for the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science either in Columbia 
College or in Barnard College, and for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Teachers College. They are also permitted to pursue special or partial 
courses subject to the regulations of the Faculty under which they may 
register. 

Certain courses which may be counted toward the several degrees are 
also offered in the Summer Session of the University. 

Students enrolled in the General, the Union, the Drew, the Jewish, 
St. Joseph's, or the New Brunswick, Theological Seminary, or in the 
School of Philanthropy in the City of New York, who may have been 
designated for the privilege by the authorities of these institutions, and 
accepted by the President of Columbia University, are admitted to the 
courses offered by the Faculty of Political Science free of all charge for 
tuition. These institutions offer reciprocal privileges to the students 
of Columbia University. 

Teachers College, founded in 1888, and Barnard College, founded in 
1889, have now become parts of the educational system of Columbia 
University. 

Admission 

There are no examinations for admission to the graduate courses under 
the Faculty of Political Science. Students are admitted at any time 
during the year. They must, however, present themselves for registra- 
tion at the opening of the first or second half-year in order to obtain full 
credit for residence. They may present themselves for examination 
for a degree whenever the requirements as to residence, and as to an 
essay or dissertation, have been complied with. For details see the 
announcement of the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy and 
Pure Science, which may be had on application to the Secretary of the 
University. 

The courses of instruction have been renumbered in accordance with 
a scheme uniform throughout the University, and attention is called to 
the following information which the number assigned to a course will 
in each case indicate: 

Odd numbers indicate the first, even numbers the second, half of the 
academic year. Courses designated 1-2, 21-22, etc., run through both 
half-years. Courses numbered between 1 and 100 are, in general, ele- 
mentary, and may not be offered in fulfilment of the requirements for 
the higher degrees (A.M. and Ph.D.). Courses numbered from 101 to 
200 are primarily for students who hold a first degree but are open to 
undergraduates who have completed 64 points (for law 94 points), in- 
cluding all prescribed courses except Philosophy A and two half-year 



7 



courses in Natural Science. In general no such course may be taken 
without some elementary training in the same or in some allied subject. 
Courses from 201 to 300 are restricted to graduate students. Seminars 
are numbered from 301 up. Attention is called to the pamphlet entitled 
Instruction for Candidates for the Degrees of Master of A rts and Doctor of 
Philosophy, which may be had on application to the Secretary of the 
University, and particularly to the fact that the requirements for the 
higher degrees are based upon subjects and not upon courses. Students 
who wish to offer a subject either as a major or minor should, before 
registration, consult the officers of instruction concerned with regard 
to their selection of courses. 

For conditions of admission to Columbia College and Barnard College, 
see the circular upon entrance examinations, which may be had upon 
application to the Secretary of the University. 

Those graduate courses which are open to undergraduates — i. e., the 
courses numbered from 101 to 200 — are closed to women students unless 
announced separately as open to students of Barnard College; but all 
purely graduate courses in History and in Economics and Social Science 
are open to women graduate students who have the first degree. 

Students who register for graduate courses are supposed to be familiar 
with the outlines of European history, ancient and modern, as well as of 
American history. Students who are not thus prepared are strongly 
recommended to take the undergraduate courses. 

For information in regard to degrees, fees, fellowships, scholarships, 
prizes, student employment, dormitories, the Academy of Political Science, 
expense of living and public lectures, see the appropriate announcement 
either of the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy and Pure Science, 
or of Columbia, Barnard, or Teachers College. 

Abbreviations of names of buildings: B=Barnard College; E=East; 
Hm=Hamilton; K=Kent; L=Library; S=Schermerhorn ; T=Teach- 
ers College; U=University; W=West Hall. 



Libraries 

Students of the several subjects taught under the direction of the 
Faculty of Political Science will find New York to be a centre of library 
facilities unrivalled elsewhere in the United States. The library of 
Columbia University alone contains about 435,000 bound volumes and 
perhaps 100,000 items of unbound material. Upwards of 150,000 of the 
works available lie within the domain of history, politics, public law, 
jurisprudence, economics and social science. Most of them are stored 
in a considerable number of special study-rooms open only to authorized 
readers, thus affording advanced students and investigators in those 
fields the fullest opportunity to carry on their work in quiet rooms in the 
immediate vicinity of the literature of the subjects under consideration. 



8 



Since officers of the University have always been regarded as ex-officio 
members of the library staff, they are constantly consulted in the matter 
of purchases, and any book needed by advanced students can usually be 
bought at once. Thus built up around the university departments, the 
library has brought to Columbia a series of remarkably efficient working 
collections. All of them are accurately catalogued both by authors and 
by subjects on cards accessible to readers. The facilities of the library 
are enhanced by the maintenance of a system of inter-university loans 
through which authorities that it does not possess may be placed at the 
disposal of officers and students. As a designated depository, further- 
more, the library receives all the publications of the United States 
Government, and has fairly complete sets of the legislative and diplo- 
matic documents issued by foreign governments. It is supplied with 
every journal of importance, and possesses entire sets of the great 
Sitzungsberichte, Jahrbucher, etc. 

Among the resources of the library bearing upon European history 
are abundant stores of epigraphic material, including the Corpora and 
many original inscriptions on stone, and of archeological material such 
as that furnished by the magnificent Avery collection; the Rolls Series 
and the Calendars of State Papers; the Parliamentary Papers; the 
Publications of the Record Commission; the Monumenta Germaniae 
Historica; the Documents In^dits; the great ecclesiastical collections; 
many rare pamphlets relating to the French Revolution; a large amount 
of Napoleana; the Warburg collection of matter covering every phase 
of present conditions in Russia, and a noteworthy series of Russian public 
documents, the gift of Count Witte. 

For the study of American history the library possesses, not only the 
colonial and other records published by the Federal Government and by 
the several states, but complete sets also of the collections of all of the 
state, and of many of the local, historical societies; the Force Revolu- 
tionary Tracts; the reports of state constitutional conventions, and the 
unique Townsend Library of national, state and individual records of 
the Civil War. 

In addition to the official documentation, periodical literature arid 
extensive collections above noted, the library offers unusual advantages 
to students of politics, public law, jurisprudence, economics and social 
science in the library of Henry Livingston Thomas, late Chief Translator 
of the Department of State, in that of the Holland Society of New York 
with its valuable collection of works of Grotius, in that of the Reform 
Club of the City of New York, of which it is the depository, and in a vast 
number of general and special works dealing with those branches of 
knowledge. The equipment of publications on sociological theory, the 
history of the family, pauperism, crime and penology is unparalleled in 
the country. In social economy, charities and philanthropy the Library 
of the New York School of Philanthropy is available. 



9 



The materials thus furnished by the University Library are richly 
supplemented by those in the libraries of public institutions, learned 
societies and civic organizations, with which New York abounds. In 
the list of such establishments may be placed the Lenox and Astor 
Libraries, with their great collections of newspapers, pamphlets and 
manuscripts, including at the former the Bancroft and Munoz transcripts; 
the American Museum of Natural History; the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art; the American Geographical Society; the American Numismatic 
Society; the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society; the New 
York Society; the Authors' Club; the New York Historical Society; 
the Long Island Historical Society; the General Theological Seminary; 
Union Theological Seminary, with its 100,000 volumes and 55,000 pam- 
phlets bearing upon practically all phases of church history in Europe 
and America; the Hispanic Society of America, with its unique collection 
of materials relating to the history, institutions and culture of Spain, 
Portugal and Latin America; the Bar Association; the Law Institute 
and the Charity Organization Society. To the libraries of all of these 
students have access under favorable conditions. Advanced students 
also have at their disposal the library of the McVickar Professor of Political 
Economy, which contains the most complete collection of works on 
economics to be found in the United States. 

The Academy of Political Science 

Under the auspices of this body, which is in affiliation with Columbia 
University, opportunities are given for the discussion of questions of 
interest as presented in papers by specialists. Associate membership, 
open to students only, includes all privileges except voting and holding 
office. The annual dues for associate membership are $3. All members 
receive the Political Science Quarterly, the official publication of the 
Academy, without cost. 

Public Lectures 

The University conducts many courses of public lectures of particular 
interest to students under the Faculty of Political Science. Some of 
these are given by distinguished foreigners, others by men prominent 
in public life in the United States. Certain of the courses, also, are 
maintained by specific endowment, such as the Beer lectures in political 
science, the Blumenthal lectures in politics and the Carpentier lectures 
in law. 

Publications 

Under the editorial supervision of the Faculty of Political Science, 94 
monographs, comprised in 35 volumes, have been published in the series 
known as "Studies in History, Economics and Public Law." The firm 
of Longmans, Green & Co. has charge of their publication. Students 



10 



whose doctoral dissertations are accepted for inclusion in the "Studies" 
may secure certain financial advantages from the publication of their 
work in this form. 

The Faculty of Political Science also edits the Political Science Quarterly, 
which has now reached its twenty-fifth volume. 

Fellowships and Scholarships 

Twelve university fellowships of the value of $650 each are awarded 
annually to students under the Faculty of Political Science, Philosophy 
and Pure Science. Three special fellowships also are awarded to students 
under the Faculty of Political Science alone. These are the George 
William Curtis Fellowship in Political Science, of an annual value equal 
to the net income of an endowment of $10,000 accruing during a period 
of three years, and awarded every third year for a term of two years; 
the Garth Fellowship in Political Economy, of a value equal to the net 
annual income of a fund of $16,250, and awarded annually; and the 
Schiff Fellowship in Political Science of a value of $600 and awarded 
annually. The Gottsberger Fellowship, of an annual value equal to the 
net income of a fund of $9,500, and awarded every second year, is open 
to graduates of Columbia College only, and is assigned to students under 
the Faculty of Political Science in rotation with the Faculties of the 
other non-professional schools of the University. 

Twenty university scholarships of an annual value of $150 and eight 
additional scholarships known as the President's University Scholarships 
are awarded similarly to students under the Faculty of Political Science, 
Philosophy and Pure Science. There are also four university scholar- 
ships, known as the Curtis University Scholarships, having the same 
value and open to women students only. 

Applications must be made in writing on blanks furnished for the 
purpose by the Secretary of the University, and must be filed with that 
officer: for fellowships, on or before March 1; for scholarships, on or 
before May 1. 

Prizes 

The following prizes are open to competition by students under the 
Faculty of Political Science: the Bennett Prize ($40) awarded to the 
student not holding a baccalaureate degree who submits the best essay 
upon some subject of contemporaneous interest in the domestic or 
foreign policy of the United States; the Grant Squires Prize ($200) 
awarded every five years to the graduate student who conducts an 
original investigation of a sociological character which may be deemed 
the most meritorious; and the Toppan Prize ($150) for the best written 
examination upon a paper prepared by the Professor of Constitutional 
Law. 



GRADUATE COURSES 

t 

The graduate courses fall under five subjects: A — Ancient and Oriental 
History; B — Medieval and Church History; C — Modern European 
History; D — American History; E — History of Thought and Culture. 

Courses numbered 200 and above (except those included also in Group 
II) are open to graduate women students upon the same terms as to men. 

Subject A — Ancient and Oriental History* 

History 103 — History of India and of Persia. Professor Jackson. 
M. and W. at 2 . 10. 306 U. 

In the fir3t part of this course particular attention will be given to the early history 
and civilization of India and of Persia. The development of these countries will then be 
traced with special reference to their general historical position and their present importance 
in relation to the West. 

(Identical with Indo-Iranian 109.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 104 — The Rise of Arabian Civilization and the Spread of 
Mohammedanism. Professor Gottheil. 
Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10. 309 U. 

This course will treat of the geographical position of Arabia, its early history as recorded 
upon the monuments, the Saba?ans and Himyarites, pre-Mohammedan civilization, the 
life of Mohammed, the rise of Mohammedanism as a religious system and as a political 
power, Arabic historiography, the early Caliphs, Ali and his followers, and the Abbasside 
Caliphs. 

(Identical with Semitics 120.) 

History 109— The History of Western Asia and Egypt. Professor 
Prince. 

M. and W. at 3 . 10 . 309 U. 

The ancient history of Western Asia from the earliest times until the period of Alexander 
the Great, embracing an historical survey of early Babylonia, the Assyrian Empire, the 
later Babylonian Empire and the Persian rule in Babylonia, as well as a briefer discussion 
of the Egyptian, Phoenician and Hittite civilizations. Especial attention will be given to 
the points of contact between the Assyro-Babylonian historical records and the Old Testa- 
ment, and to the most important ethnological problems that a study of the ancient peoples 
of Western Asia presents. 

(Identical with Semitics 119.) 
Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter, if five students apply. 

* Students whose major subject is Ancient History are advised to choose one minor 
from the courses in Greek and Roman epigraphy and archeology, and in Roman topography 
and numismatics, given by the Department of Classical Philology. For a description of 
these courses see the Announcement of the Division of Ancient and Oriental Languages 
and Literatures. 



12 



History 113-114 — History of China. Professor Hirth. 
One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 

Continued from previous year and intended for all students, including such as do not 
study the Chinese language. Special attention will be paid to the cultural and economical 
development of China and her relations to other Asiatic nations. 

History 117-118 — The Development of the Roman Empire. Professor 
Botsford. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 109 L. 

The following are the principal topics of the course: 

I. The physical and political environment that determined the national character of 
Italy; the Etruscan civilization and its relation to Rome; the present status of knowledge 
concerning the early growth of the city; the expansion of its hegemony over Italy; the 
early cultural development of the peninsula under Hellenic influence. 

II. The condition of the Mediterranean in the third and second centuries B. C, which 
favored the creation of a universal empire; the conquest of Carthage and the rapid expan- 
sion of Roman supremacy over the nearer East; the Spanish and Gallic wars; the provinces 
and the protected states; the birth of a Graeco-Roman civilization. 

III. The transformation of the aggregate of Mediterranean states under Roman 
supremacy into a thoroughly organized empire — from Augustus to Marcus Aurelius; the 
aims and methods of the imperial government; the administration and the social and 
economic condition of the cities; the commercial and cultural unification of the empire; 
the beginnings of Christianity and the pagan reformation. 

The students are expected to read and to make frequent oral or written reports to the 
class. 

History 21 1-2 12 — Roman Civilization. Professor Olcott. 
M. and W. at 5 . 10. 109 L. 
(Identical with Latin 229-230.) 

History 215-216 — History of Greece, Political, Social and Intellectual. 

Professor Botsford. 

Three hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This course is planned for those who attend the lectures in History 3-4, and who wish 
to obtain graduate credit therefor by supplementary studies of a more advanced nature 
along the lines indicated by the lectures. The work is especially valuable as an intro- 
duction to Greek life and literature, and as a preparation for teaching Greek history. The 
instructor directs these supplementary studies through conferences with the individual 
members of the course. 

History 217-218 — Constitutional History of Greece. Professor Bots- 
ford. 
S. 9-1 1. 

On the basis of Aristotle's Constitution of Athens and other sources this course first 
traces the development of the Athenian constitution from the earliest times to the fourth 
century B. C. Other city governments, as the Lacedaemonian and the Cretan, are treated 
in comparison with the Athenian. Attention is then given to the aggregation of tribes 
and cities in larger groups, including the amphictyonies and early political leagues such aa 
the Boeotian, Peloponnesian and Delian, the tendencies toward national unity in the 
fourth century and the federal unions of the third century B. C. As a part of the work of 
the course the students are expected to prepare papers on special topics. 

Not given in igio-11. 



13 



History 311-312 — Seminar in Greek and Roman History. Professor 

BOTSFORD. 

Two hours bi-weekly. Hours to be arranged. 

Subject B — Medieval and Church History 

History 121-122 — The History of the Intellectual Class in Europe 
from the Greek Sophists to the French Philosophies. Professor Robinson. 

Tu. and Th. at 10.00, with a third hour to be arranged. 615 K. Tu. 
and Th. at 3. 10, with a third hour to be arranged. 339 B. 

Women students desiring to take this course will register for the after- 
noon section. 

(For description see page 23.) 

History 125-126 — The History of England to 1660. Professor Osgood. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 615 K. 

The object of this course is, by means of lectures and outside reading, to give a view 
of the development of the English Constitution from the fifth century to the Revolution 
of 1689. The work is based chiefly upon the writings of Stubbs, Gneist, Hallam, Gardiner 
and Ranke. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 149 — Historical Geography of Europe. Professor Shepherd. 
Tu. at 1 . 10 and 2 . 10. 614 K. 
(For description see page 17.) 

History 221 — Later Roman Empire and Early Middle Ages. Professor 
Shot well. 

W. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 

This course deals with the transition from ancient to medieval history; the social and 
intellectual conditions in the later Roman Empire, the causes of its disintegration, the rise 
of Christianity and its relation to paganism, the persecutions, the triumph of the Christian 
church and the rise of the papacy. The course also includes a survey of the origins of the 
barbarian kingdoms, Merovingian and Carolingian culture, the renewed invasions of the 
Northmen, Saracens and Hungarians, the "dark age" and the beginnings of feudalism. 
Lectures and discussions. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 223 — Paganism and Christianity. Professor Shotwell. 
M. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 

This is a research course, dealing with the non-theological aspects of the transition from 
paganism to Christianity. It includes a survey of the antique popular religion, the mys- 
tery cults, the attitude toward magic in the later empire, the persecutions, both pagan and 
Christian, the growth of religious intolerance, the lives of the saints and the place of miracle 
in Christian propaganda. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 224 — History of European Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
M., W., and F. at 1.10. 515 K. 

(Identical with Jurisprudence 266. For description see page 32.) 



14 



History 225 — The Later Middle Ages. Professor Shotwell. 
M. and W. at 5.10. 615 K. 

The main object of this course is to trace the general development of European civiliza- 
tion from the tenth century to the beginning of modern times. It will include a survey of 
the medieval church, feudalism, the beginnings of the modern national state (especially in 
France), the recovery of Roman law and the work of the lawyers, the renaissance of com- 
merce and the history of the towns, the increase in capital and the social disorders in 
France and Germany, the question of apostolic poverty and the mendicant orders, the 
papacy and the conciliar movement. Finally an effort will be made to measure the 
importance of the Italian renaissance. Lectures and discussions. 

Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 226 — The Protestant Revolt. Professor Robinson. 
M. at 4.10 and 5.10. 
(For description see page 18.) 
Given in iQii-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 227 — Europe in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. Pro- 
fessor Shotwell. 
M., 8-10 P.M. 614 K. 

This is a research course. It deals with the structure of the medieval churoh, the 
workings of feudalism, the r61e of the towns and the rise of the national state (especially 
in France). Some attention will also be paid to medieval architecture and to archeology, 
but the greater part of the work will be based upon literary and documentary sources. 

Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 228 — The Catholic Reformation {i. e., the so-called Counter 
Reformation) and the Council of Trent. Professor Robinson. 
W. at 4. 10 and 5.10. 
(For description see page 18.) 
Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 229 — General Church History. Period I: The Ancient Church 
to 590 A.D.* Professor McGiffert. 
Four hours a week. 
(Identical with Church History 1.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 230 — General Church History. Periods II and III: The 
Medieval and Modern Church, 590-1789.* Professor Rockwell. 
:, ^Four hours a week. 

In this course the emphasis is put on the modern period; a fuller treatment of the 
Medieval Church is offered in History 234. 

(Identical with Church History 2.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 231 — History of Christian Doctrine. I: History of Thought in 
the Primitive and Catholic Church.* Professor McGiffert. 
Tu., W., Th. and F. at 10. 



*See note, page 17. 



15 



The design of this course is to trace and explain the rise and development of the con- 
trolling religious conceptions of the Primitive and Catholic Church. 
(Identical with Church History 3.) 

History 232— History of Christian Doctrine. H: History of Protestant 
Thought.* Professor McGiffert. 
Tu., W., Th. and F. at 10. 

A continuation of the preceding course, which aims to do for Protestant thought what 
History 231 does for the thought of the Primitive and Catholic Church. 

(Identical with Church History 4.) 

History 234— Medieval Church History, 590-1517.* Professor Rock- 
well. 

Tu. and Th. at 12. 

The conversion of the Germans; the growth and decay of the papal monarchy; monas- 
ticism; scholasticism; mysticism. 

(Identical with Church History 6.) 

History 235 — European Church History in the Nineteenth Century.* 

Professor Rockwell. 
W. and F. at 9. 

The age of revolution; Ultramontanism and the rise of the modern Protestant situation. 
(Identical with Church History 7.) 

History 236 — English Church History (Reformation and Post-Refor- 
mation Periods).* Professor McGiffert. 
Two hours a week. 

Deals particularly with the institutional history of the English Church, and also with 
religious life in England, both within and without the Establishment. 

(Identical with Church History 8.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 237 — American Church History.* Professor Rockwell. 
Two hours a week. 

The spread of Christianity in North America; movements of Christian life and thought; 
history and characteristics of the leading denominations. 

(Identical with Church History 9.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 238 — I-Iistory of Early Christian Literature.* Professor 
McGiffert. 

Two hours a week. 

Deals with the literature of the first three centuries of the Christian Church. 
(Identical with Church History 10.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 239 — History of the New Testament Canon, with reading in 
the sources.* Mr. Tryon. 
M. and W. at II. 

(Identical with Church History 13.) 



* See note on page 17. 



i6 



History 240 — History of New Testament Times.* Mr. Tryon. 
M. and W. at 11. 

(Identical with Church History 14.) 

History 241 — Readings in the Early Fathers.* Mr. Tryon. 

Two hours a week. 

Conferences on the reading required in History 229, from which selections will be made 
for reading in the original, with critical and historical comment. Not restricted to those 
taking History 229. 

(Identical with Church History 15.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 242 — History of the Papacy.* Mr. Tryon. 

Two hours a week. 

Readings in the sources, with critical and historical comment. Intended to supplement 
History 230, but open also to those not taking this course. 

(Identical with Church History 16.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 243 — Christianity in the Light of its History.* Professor 

McGlFFERT. 

W. and F. at 2. 

A study of the genius of Christianity. 

(Identical with Church History 21.) 

History 245 — The Church during the First Three Centuries.* Pro- 
fessor SCRATCHLEY. 
Two hours a week. 

History 246 — The Church from the Council of Nicaea to Charlemagne.* 

Professor Scratchley. 
Two hours a week. 

History 247 — The Church of England.* Professor Scratchley. 

Two hours a week. 

History 248 — The Church from Charlemagne to Modern Times, 
exclusive of England.* Professor Scratchley. 
Two hours a week. 

History 315-316 — Historical Seminar.* Professors McGiffert and 
Rockwell. 
Th. at 3 and 4. 

Open to a limited number of students of high standing after personal application to 
Professor McGiffert. 

(Identical with Church History 51-52.) 

History 317-318.— Religious Thought in France in the Eighteenth 
Century. Professor McGiffert. 
} Tu. at 3 and 4. 



*See note, page 17. 



17 



A research course open to graduates and other advanced students. 
(Identical with Church History 103-104.) 

History 319-320 — Historical Training Class.* Professor Rockwell. 
F. at 3 and 4. 

The first term is given to historical bibliography with the aim of affording practice in 
finding quickly the sources and literature most valuable for Church History. The second 
term is devoted to a study of the principles of historical investigation, with a consideration 
of the methods and aims of leading ecclesiastical historians. Open to graduates and other 
advanced students who may desirp to specialize in history. 

(Identical with Church History 1 01 -102.) 

History 321 — Historical Bibliography; The Sources of European 
History; Methods of Historical Study. Professors Robinson, Shot- 
well and Simkhovitch. 

Th. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 614 K. 

This course aims to introduce the student to the various classes of sources, and will 
include practical exercises in the use of bibliographical apparatus. The chief theories of 
the scope and nature of historical research will also be discussed. Langlois and Seignobos' 
Introduction to the Study of History will be read. 

History 331 — Seminar. Critical Exercises in the Historical Writers 
of the Middle Ages. Professor Daenell. 
Hours to be arranged. 

Students intending to join this seminar are requested to provide themselves with 
Adami's " Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae Pontificum," published by Hahn at Hanover, 
latest edition. 

Subject C — Modern European History 

History 149 — Historical Geography of Europe. Professor Shepherd. 
Tu. at 1. 10 and 2.10. 614 K. 

An examination of physical features, routes of trade and travel, distribution of peoples 
and states, changes in territorial ownership and shifting of boundaries, in their relation to 
the development of Europe since the break-up of the Roman Empire. The course will 
afford a practical training in the use of historical atlases and of maps in general, as aids 
to the study of history. 

History 150 — Historical Geography of European Expansion. Pro- 
fessor Shepherd. 

Tu. at 1 . 10 and 2 . 10. 614 K. 
(For description see History 149.) 



* These courses, given at the Union Theological Seminary, may be taken to make 
up a minor subject for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy . History 
229 and 230 are designed to cover in outline the history of the Church from the first cen- 
tury to the last decade of the eighteenth; and History 231 and 232, the history of Chris- 
tian thought from the beginning to the present time. In each course the students are 
required to do a certain amount of reading in the works of the Fathers and other great 
leaders and ^thinkers, and also to prepare a historical essay containing the results of a 
direct study of assigned sources. The other courses supplement these general courses and 
aim to give a fuller knowledge of particular periods and, in the case of History 315-316, 
317-318 and 319-320, to afford special training in independent historical investigation. 

t These courses are given at the General Theological Seminary, and may be taken to 
make up a minor subject for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy . 



i8 



History 151-152 — Continental European History, 1815-1910. Dr. 

Hazen. 

M. and Tu. at 11.00. 614 K- 

The spread of democratic principles since 1815; the growth of the present political 
institutions of the European nations; the achievement of national unity in Italy and 
Germany; the rise of the Balkan States; the growth of colonial empires; the relations 
of Europe with the far East. 

History 153 — Contemporary European History since 1848. Professor 
Sloane. 

M., W., and F., at 1.10, with a fourth hour by arrangement. 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 155 — The Social History of England. Professor Shot well. 
M. and W. at 3. 10. 615 K. 

(For description see page 24.) 

History 156 — The Social History of England in the Nineteenth Century. 

Professor Shotwell. 

M. and W. at 3. 10. 615 K. 
(For description see page 24.) 

History 157-158 — History of Great Britain, principally during the 

Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Professor Osgood. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 

In this course a somewhat detailed account will be given of the political development 
of England during the last two centuries. Reference will also be made to the relations 
with Scotland and Ireland. This part of the course will be a continuation of History 
125-126. Lectures and assigned readings. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 164 — History and Principles of Colonial Administration. 

Professor Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 10. 509 K. 
(Identical with Public Law 144.) 

History 190 — The Development of the World' s Commerce from the 
Sixteenth Century to the Present Time, with special reference to Germany. 

Professor Daenell. 
W. andF. at 11. 614 K. 

History 226 — The Protestant Revolt. Professor Robinson. 
M. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 

This course will consist in a critical study of the antecedents and nature of the Pro- 
testant Revolt, with especial attention to the influence of the Humanists and to Luther's 
role as leader of the revolt in Germany. Lectures and discussions. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 228 — The Catholic Reformation (*. e., the so-called Counter 
Reformation) and the Council of Trent. Professor Robinson. 
W. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 



19 



This is a research course open only to those -who have taken or are taking. History 226, 
which it is designed to supplement. It will be a study of the changes which took place in 
the medieval church, whether as a result or not of the Protestant Revolt. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 251 — History of Diplomacy. Professor J. B. Moore. 
M. and Tu. at 11. 515 K. 

(Identical with Public Law 221. For description see page 30.) 

History 252 — The Reforms of the French Revolution. Professor 
Robinson. 

M. at 4.10 and 5.10. 615 K. 

This course does not deal primarily with the political history but with the great and 
permanent achievements of the Revolution; it includes a description of the organization 
of the French monarchy under Louis XVI; the development of the spirit of reform in 
Europe; "benevolent despotism"; the progress of reform in France to the completion of 
the constitution of 1791. Lectures and discussions. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 253 — The Economic and Social Evolution of Russia since 

1800. Professor Simkhovitch. 
M. and F. at 10. 

(Identical with Economics 241. For description see pages 37, 38.) 
Not given in 1910-11. 

History 254 — The Progress of the French Revolution (1789-1800), 
with special attention to the sources. Professor Robinson. 
W. at 4.10 and 5. 10. 615 K. 

This is a research course open to those only who have taken, or are taking, History 
252, which it is designed to supplement. A good knowledge of French is, of course, 
required. 

Given in 1910-11 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 269 — History of Spain. Professor Shepherd. 
Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

Studies the institutions and culture of Spain, and incidentally of Portugal, with espe- 
cial reference to the period between the fifteenth century and the nineteenth, so asTto 
indicate the types of civilization carried by those countries to America. 

History 321 — Historical Bibliography; The Sources of European 
History; Methods of Historical Study. Professors Robinson, Shot- 
well and Simkhovitch. 

Th. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 614 K. 

(For description see page 17.) 

History 356 — Seminar in the Social History of England during the 
Industrial Revolution. Professor Shot well. 
M. at 8. 614 K. 



2 0 



History 357 — The Work of Napoleon. Professor Sloane. 

W. and F. at 10, first or second half-year, or both by arrangement. 

This is a research course for the most advanced students only. It is open to such 
selected individuals as give evidence of capacity for original research, and the ability to 
read French and German fluently is indispensable to admission. The topics are chosen 
by the instructor, and the student works under his direction, given in personal consulta- 
tions, twice a week. The papers prepared are expected to be short monographs, thoroughly 
discussing the theme on the basis of original authorities. 

Not given in igio-11. 

Subject D — American History 

History 150 — Historical Geography of European Expansion. Professor 
Shepherd. 

Tu. at 1. 10 and 2. 10. 614 K. 

While following the general plan of History 149 in its application to the terri- 
torial history of the European colonies and dependencies in the world at large, the several 
processes of discovery, exploration, conquest, occupation and cession will be considered 
chiefly in their relation to America. 

History 161 — The Formation of the American Constitutional System. 

Professor Beard. 

Tu. at 4. io and 5. io. 405 K. 

(Identical with Public Law 101. For description see page 29.) 

History 162 — The Development of the American Constitutional 
System. Professor Beard. 
Tu. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 405 K. 

(Identical with Public Law 102. For description see page 29.) 

History 163 — Fiscal and Industrial History of the United States. 

Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 

(Identical with Economics 107. For description see page 35.) 
Given in IQH-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 166 — History of American Diplomacy. Professor J. B. Moore. 
M. and Tu. at 11. 515 K. 

(Identical with Public Lav/ 120. For description see page 30.) 

History 261-262 — American Colonial History during the Seventeenth 
Century. Professor Osgood. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This is an advanced lecture and investigation course. The subjects of study will be 
chiefly the corporation (or colony of the New England type) and the proprietary province, 
as forms of colonial government. The early history of Virginia as a royal province will 
also be considered. The beginning of efforts on the part of Great Britain to assert imperial 
control over the coloniee will also be traced. This course is open only to approved candi- 
dates for the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, and to such special students as receive permission 
to attend. 



21 



History 263-264 — American Colonial History during the Eighteenth 

Century. Professor Osgood. 
Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

This course begins at 1690 and ends at 1760. It is devoted to the study of the royal 
province as a form of colonial government, and of the British system and policy of colonial 
administration during the period of intercolonial wars. It is both a continuation of the 
preceding course and an introduction to the study of the American Revolution. It is open 
to the same class of students as History 261-262, and the method of instruction is the 
same as in that course. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 267-268 — The United States from 1850, with special reference 
to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Professor Dunning. 
M. and F. at 11. 

The chief object of this course is to describe the constitutional principles that came into 
play during the period from 1850 to 1884. Among the topics discussed in more or less 
detail are: The principles of the appeal to arms; the nature and scope of the "war power"; 
the status of the negro as affected by the war; the various theories of Reconstruction; the 
adoption of the last three amendments to the Constitution; the actual process of Recon- 
struction; the so-called "force legislation," and the ultimate undoing of Reconstruction. 
In addition to these constitutional topics, the general political and social progress of the 
nation is treated. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 271 — Spanish and French Colonization in the United States 
from 1513 to 1731. Professor Shepherd. 
W. at 4.10 and 5. 10. 

Traces the course of settlement by the Spaniards in Florida, New Mexico and Texas, 
and by the French in the region about the Great Lakes and in the Louisiana country. 
The motives and methods concerned in the process will be described, and compared with 
the elements involved in English colonization. 

History 272 — Spanish and French Colonization in the United States 
from 1731 to 1821. Professor Shepherd. 
W. at 4.10 and 5.10. 

A continuation of the preceding course, with especial reference to the lapse of French 
dominion and the extension of Spanish power in their bearing upon the conversion of the 
English colonies into the United States, and upon the subsequent relations between this 
country and Spain. The Spanish and the French types of civilization will be described, 
and compared with Anglo-American characteristics and institutions. 

History 275 — Colonial Latin America. Professor Shepherd. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10. 614 K. 

A study of Spanish and Portuguese dominion in America, exclusive of the continental 
area of the United States. The forms of government and their operation, trade and 
industry, social characteristics and the influence of the Church will be described with 
particular regard to the development of colonial ideas and institutions that have left a 
more or less abiding impress upon Latin America. 



22 



History 276 — The Republics of Latin America. Professor Shepherd. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5. 10. 614 K. 

This course is open only to students who have taken History 275. It will 
describe the stage of culture in Latin America at the close of the colonial period, as 
compared with that of the United States at the beginning of its national career; the 
peculiar nature of the wars of independence; the adverse circumstances under which the 
republics have struggled to secure and maintain stability; their relations with Europe and 
the United States, and their economic, social, political and intellectual condition at the 
present time. 

History 361-362 — The American Revolution. Professor Osgood. 
S. at 10 and n. 614 K. 

This course will be conducted as a lecture and investigation course, and will consist of 
a detailed study of the sources of American history from about 1760 to the close of the 
Revolution. 

History 363-364 — Seminar in American Colonial History. Professor 
Osgood. 

One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 

History 365 — European Politics and the War of 1812. Professor 
Sloane. 

W. and F. at 10, first or second half-year, or both by arrangement. 

Research course for the most advanced students only. It is given to selected individuals 
who show capacity for original research, and is open only to those who read French and 
German fluently. The topics are chosen by the instructor, and the students work under 
his direction given in personal consultations twice a week. The papers prepared are 
expected to be short monographs thoroughly discussing the theme on the basis of original 
authorities. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 367-368 — Seminar in later United States History. Professor 
Dunning. 

One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Subject E — History of Thought and Culture 

History 119 — Ethnology: Primitive Culture. Lectures, papers and 
discussions. Professor Farrand. 
M. and W. at 3 . 10. 505 S. 

(Identical with Sociology 153 and Anthropology 105. For description 
see page 38.) 

History 120 — Ethnology: Primitive Culture. Lectures, papers and 
discussions. Professor Farrand. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 505 S. 

(Identical with Sociology 154 and Anthropology 106. For description 
see page 38.) 



23 



History 121-122 — The History of the Intellectual Class in Europe 
from the Greek Sophists to the French Philosophes. Professor Robinson. 

Tu. and Th. at 10, with a third hour to be arranged. 615 K. Tu. and 
Th. at 3.10, with a third hour to be arranged. 339 B. 

Women students desiring to take this course will register for the after- 
noon section. 

The object of this course is to trace the changing intellectual interests and attitude of 
mind of the educated class from Socrates and Plato to Voltaire and Rousseau. The general 
range of Greek culture, especially as inherited by the Romans, will form a background for 
an estimate of the Christian conception of man and the world as represented in Augustine's 
City of God. Miracles, allegory, monasticism, the "dark age," the "Twelfth century 
Renaissance," the revival of Aristotle, the universities and the general nature of the 
scholastic learning, will occupy the first half-year. The second term will be devoted to 
Roger Bacon and the beginnings of modern experimental science, Peter Dubois, Marsiglio 
of Padua, Dante, Humanism from Petrarch to Erasmus, the invention of printing, the 
intellectual aspects of the Protestant Revolt, astrology, witchcraft, Bacon's Advancement 
of Learning, the genesis of the spirit of progress, the Deists and the Encyclopedists. 

History 123 — The Races of Europe. Lectures, papers and discussions. 
Professor Boas. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

(Identical with Sociology 155 and Anthropology m. For description 
see page 39.) 

Not given in igio-11. 

History 124 — The Races of Europe. Lectures, papers and discussions. 
Professor Boas. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

(Identical with Sociology 156 and Anthropology 112. For description 
see page 39.) 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 127 — Ethnography of Siberia and North America. Lectures, 
papers and discussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

(Identical with Sociology 157 and Anthropology 107. For descrip- 
tion see page 39.) 

History 128— Ethnography of Central and South America. Lectures, 
papers and discussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

(Identical with Sociology 158 and Anthropology 108. (For descrip- 
tion see page 39.) 



History 155 — The Social History of England. Professor Shotwell. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 615 K. 



24 



Thi3 course deals mainly with the history of work and of the working classes in England, 
down to and including the Industrial Revolution. After a preliminary survey of the primi- 
tive institutions, it will take up such phases of the social history of England as the manorial 
system, serfdom, peasant revolts, the growth of national consciousness, the role of England 
n the expansion of Europe and, finally, the great inventions of the eighteenth century. 
This course, like History 156, to which it furnishes the introduction, is distinctly historical 
and not a course in economic theory. 

History 156 — The Social History of England in the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. Professor Shot well. 
M. and W. at 3. 10. 615 K. 

This course is practically a continuation of History 155. It carries on the history of 
mechanical inventions, and attempts to measure historically their importance in the events 
and movements of the nineteenth century in England. It deals mainly with the rise of 
the industrial proletariat, and includes a survey of criminal law, the chartist movement, 
repressive and reform legislation, and the social movements of more recent times. 

History 159 — History of Socialism. Professor Simkhovitch. 
Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 515 K. 

(Identical with Economics 109. For description see page 35.) 

History 183-184 — Moral and Political Philosophy. Professor Dewey. 
M. and W. at 1.10. 

A discussion of the rights and duties involved in social organization, with especial 
reference to the historic evolution and present problems of justice and charity and to the 
moral problems involved in the economic organization of society. 

(Identical with Philosophy 131-132.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 21 1-2 12 — Roman Civilization. Professor Olcott. 
M. and W. at 5.10. 109 L. 
(Identical with Latin 229-230.) 

History 213 — Historical Types of Society. Ancient: The Theory of 
Progress. Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2 . 10 and 3. 10. 

(Identical with Sociology 257. For description see page 40.) 
Given in igii-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 214 — Historical Types of Society. Modern: The Theory 
of Progress. Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 

(Identical with Sociology 258. For description see page 40.) 
Given in igii-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 



History 220 — Primitive Institutions in Europe. Professor Shotwell. 
Th. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 



OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



25 

This course deals with the persistence in European institutions, customs, laws and 
religions of those phenomena of primitive life which are connected directly with magio 
and taboo. The field covered is mainly that of the later Roman Empire, early Chris- 
tianity and the Germanic peoples. Lectures and discussions. 

(Identical with Sociology 260.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 255 — Social Evolution: Ethnic and Civil Origins. Professor 

GlDDINGS. 

F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 515 K. 

(Identical with Sociology 251. For description see page 40.) 
Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 256 — Social Evolution: Civilization, Liberty and Democracy. 

Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2.10 and 3. 10. 515 K. 

(Identical with Sociology 252. For description see page 40.) 
Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 260 — Radicalism and Social Reform as reflected in the Liter- 
ature of the Nineteenth Century. Professor Simkhovitch. 
F. at 10 and 11. 405 K. 

(Identical with Economics 242. For description see page 38.) 

History 279 — General History of Political Theories, Ancient and 
Medieval. Professor Dunning. 
M. and W. at 10. 

Every people known to history has possessed some form, however vague and primitive, 
of political government. Every people which has attained any important degree of 
enlightenment has been permeated by some ideas, more or less systematic, as to the origin, 
nature and limitations of governmental authority. It is the purpose of this course to 
trace historically the development of these ideas, from their earliest expression among the 
Greeks to the form taken by them in the sixteenth century, A. D. The basis of the lec- 
tures is Dunning's History of Political Theories (two volumes). 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 280 — General History of Modern Political Theories. Pro- 
fessor Dunning. 

M. and W. at 10. 615 K. 

This is a continuation of the preceding course through the seventeenth, eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. It deals in particular with the philosophical ideas about politics 
and government that have been brought into prominence by the revolutionary movements 
during this period. 

History 281 — American Political Philosophy before 1850. Professor 
Dunning. 

M. and F. at 11. 

As the first nation to realize in practice many of the principles that characterize the 
modern state, the United States offers special opportunities for research to the student of 
political philosophy. In this course a two-fold line of discussion is followed: First, by a 



26 



study of the various documents of the revolutionary era, the Declaration of Independence, 
the constitutions, national and commonwealth, and other state papers, the dominant ideas 
of the people are derived from their official records. Second, the writings of the leading 
statesmen like Hamilton, Jefferson, Calhoun and Webster, as well as the more systematic 
and philosophical works of Lieber and others, are analyzed and subjected to critical 
comment. Merriam's History of American Political Theories will be made the basis of the 
course, and the method will be chiefly that of a seminar. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

History 282 — American Political Philosophy since 1850. Professor 
Dunning. 

M. and F. at n. 615 K. 

In this course, continuing the preceding, the central theme of investigation and discus- 
sion is the transforming influence of the Civil War and its results on the conceptions of 
nation, constitution, government, law, liberty and the other fundamental ideas of modern 
political science. The method is the same as in History 281. Statesmen like Lincoln 
and Sumner, and philosophers like Mulford, Brownson and Hurd, are especially examined. 

History 381-382 — Seminar in Political Philosophy. Professor Dun- 
ning. 

One hour a week. Hour to be arranged. 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE AND 
BARNARD COLLEGE 

History A1-A2 — Epochs of European History. 

Three hours a week. 

Columbia College: 

Section 1, Tu., Th., and S. at 9. 702 Hm. 
Section 2, Tu., Th., and S. at 10. 702 Hm. 
Section 3, M., W., and F. at 10. 702 Hm. 
Section 4, M., W., and F. at 1 . 10. 702 Hm. 
Section 5, M., W., and F. at 2 . 10. 702 Hm. 

Professor Hayes, Dr. Schuyler, and Mr. Sait. 

Barnard College: 

Section 1, Tu. and Th. at 11, and W. at 3. 10. 
Section 2, Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10, and W. at 3 . 10' 
Section 3, Tu. and Th. at 2 . 10, and W. at 3 . 10. 
Miss Huttmann. 

History 3-4 — Greece and Early Italy. Professor Botsford. 
Columbia College: 

M., W. and F. at 11. 707 Hm. 



2? 



Barnard College: 

M., W. and F. at 10. 339 B. 
Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 
Prerequisite: History A1-A2. 

History 5-6 — The Roman Empire. Professor Botsford. 
Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

History 9-10 — European History, Modem and' Contemporaneous. 

Columbia College: 

Two lectures and three hours of laboratory work, counting as a 
four-hour course. Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10. 702 Hm. Tu. or Th. 2 . 10-5. 
716 Hm. Professor Hayes and Dr. Schuyler. 

Barnard College: 

M., W., and F. at no, and a fourth hour, for consultation, to be 
arranged. 339 B. Professor Shot well. 
Prerequisite: History A1-A2. 

History 13 — History of the United States from 1783 to the War with 
Mexico. 

r Three hours. 
Columbia^ College : 

M., W., and F. at 2. 10. 703 Hm. Dr. Schuyler. 
Barnard College: 

M., W., and F. at 11. 339 B. Professor Shepherd. 
Prerequisite: History A1-A2. 

History 14 — History of the United States since the War with Mexico. 

Three hours. 
Columbia College: 

M., W., and F. at 2.10. 703 Hm. Professor Dunning. 
Barnard College: 

M., W., and F. at 11. 339 B. Professor Shepherd. 
Prerequisite: History A1-A2. 

COURSES IN TEACHERS COLLEGE 

History 51-52 — The Literature of American History. Lectures 

readings and reports. Professor Johnson. 
Tu. and Th. at 3 . 10. 

Education 173-174 — Theory and Practice of Teaching History in 
Secondary Schools. Lectures, discussions and practical work. Six 
hours. Professor Johnson. 

Class work, four hours. Tu. and Th. at 9. 



28 



Practical work, two hours. Hours must be arranged with the in- 
structor before registration. 

By special arrangement with the instructor, graduate students whose 
major subject lies outside of the department of history in Teachers 
College may omit the practical work of this course and register for 
the class work only. 

Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of college history. 

Education 273-274 — Practicum. Four hours. Professor Johnson. 
W. at 2. 10 and 3. 10. 

The practicum offers to advanced students opportunities for the investigation of special 
questions connected with the teaching of history in elementary and secondary schools and 
in normal schools. 

COURSES IN THE SUMMER SESSION* 

sAi — Europe in the Middle Ages: the Chief Political, Economic and 
Intellectual Achievements. Lectures, reading and discussion. Professor 
Hayes. 

Five hours a week at 9 . 30. 702 Hm. 

This course is the equivalent of History Ai in Columbia College. Stu- 
dents may count this course toward the A. B. and B. S. degrees, but not 
in conjunction with sA2. 

sA2— Modern and Contemporary European History. Lectures, read- 
ing and discussion. Professor Hayes. 
Five hours a week at 10.30. 702 Hm. 

S13-14D — American History: Political History of the United States 
from 1815 to 1889. Recitations, written tests, reports and occasional 
lectures. Professor Bassett. 

Five hours a week at 8 . 30. 702 Hm. 

S115-116D — Roman Politics. Research course. Professor Abbott. 
Five hours a week at 9 . 30. 502 Hm. 
(Identical with Latin S155-156.) 

si 56 — The Social History of England in the Nineteenth Century. Lec- 
tures, readings and discussion. Professor Shotwell. 
Five hours a week at 9 . 30. 602 Hm. 

S162D — American History from 1815 to 1837. Lectures, reports, 
examination of original materials and familiarity with the larger secondary 
sources. Professor Bassett. 

Five hours a week at 9.30. 717 Hm. 

S356 — Seminar in the Social History of England during the Industrial 
Revolution. Professor Shotwell. 
Five hours a week at 8.30. 301 L. 

* For fuller details consult the Bulletin of Information in reference to the Summer 
Session. 



(Srmqi 2 — ItoltttrB, fubltr Slaw attb 
(Enmparatfe itmsjtrutonr? 

The courses in this group are not open to women. 

Subject A — Constitutional Law 

Public Law ioi — The Formation of the American Constitutiona 
System. Professor Beard. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10. 405 K. 

Includes a study of the following topics: The government of the American colonies on 
the eve of the Revolution; the process by which union, independence and self-government 
were established; the failure of the Articles of Confederation; the formation of the Federal 
Constitution; the fundamental principles of the system of government inaugurated in 
1789; and the place of the State in that system. 

(Identical with History 161.) 

Public Law 102 — The Development of the American Constitutional 
System. Professor Beard. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10. 405 K. 

Embraces a study of the historical development of the federal system of government 
through legislation, judicial decisions and political practice. The leading decisions of the 
Supreme Court on great constitutional questions will be discussed in their proper historical 
relation, and the influence of extra-legal party practices in the actual conduct of govern- 
ment will be considered. The tendencies in the evolution of State constitutions will be 
treated as a part of the evolution of the American constitutional system. 

(Identical with History 162.) 

Public Law 103-104 — Comparative Politics and Government. Pro- 
fessor Beard. 

M. and W. at 10. 405 K. 

Comprehending a study of the nature and origin of the state and government, and a 
comparison of the system of government prevailing in England, France, Germany and the 
United States, and the generalization of the fundamental principles of public law common 
to them all. The administrative organization and the relations of the central institutions 
to the political subdivisions of the respective countries will also be treated. 

Public Law 105 — Party Government in the United States. Pro- 
fessor Beard. 

M. and W. at 11. 405 K. 

The relation of political parties to the framework of government; the character of 
party antagonisms in the United States historically considered; the origin and develop- 
ment of party organization and machinery; the national convention and campaign; state, 
local and municipal party organization; sources of strength in party machinery; ballot 
reform, primary legislation and corrupt practices acts. 



30 



Public Law 106 — American State Government. Professor Beard. 
M. and W. at n. 405 K. 

Special attention will be devoted to the government of New York State with reference 
to tendencies and practices of other states. The principal topics will be the organization 
of the central government of the state and system of control over local and municipal 
institutions; problems of administrative control over state departments; questions of 
legislative organization and procedure; recent tendencies in legislative methods; character 
of recent legislative activities; lobbies; reference bureaus; and bill drafting. 

Public Law 202 — Introduction to Constitutional Law. Professor 
Guthrie. 

M. at 9. 405 K. 

A consideration of the leading principles of constitutional interpretation as developed 
in English and American decisions. 

Public Law 203-204 — The Constitutional Law of the United States. 

Professor Goodnow. 

M. and W. at 2.10. 411 K. 

Chiefly discussion of cases. McClain, Cases on Constitutional Law. 

Public Law 301-302 — Seminar in Constitutional and Administrative 
Law. Professors Goodnow and Beard. 
M. at 1 . 10. 509 K. 

Intended for students who are writing their theses in constitutional or administrative 
law. A number of questions relating to American and European law and practice will be 
considered in the seminar, and the research work of each student will be conducted under 
the personal supervision of the instructors. 

Subject B — International Law 

Public Law 120 — History of American Diplomacy. Professor J. B. 
Moore. 

M. and Tu. at II. 515 K. 

In the study of American diplomacy special attention will be given to the history and 
methods of the diplomacy of the United States. The course will comprehend: (1) The 
diplomacy of the Revolution; (2) the period from the Treaty of Peace of 1783 to the termi- 
nation of the War of 1812; (3) from the termination of that war to the Civil War: (4) 
from the outbreak of that war to the present time. 

(Identical with History 166.) 

Public Law 221 — History of Diplomacy. Professor J. B. Moore. 
M. and Tu. at 11. 515 K. 

The object of this course is to exhibit the evolution of the relations between independent 
states and the manner in which those relations are conducted. The history of the diplo- 
matic system of Europe is traced from its beginnings to the present time, and an exposition 
is given of the religious, dynastic, territorial and commercial struggles of which that system 
is the result. The first part of the course relates to the development of the European 
concert prior to the Peace of Westphalia. This is followed by an examination of the roost 
important of the general European treaties, beginning with those concluded at the Congress 
of Westphalia, and ending with those of recent date. 

(Identical with History 251.) 



3i 



Public Law 223-224. International Law. Professor J. B. Moore. 
M. and Tu. at 3. 10. 411 K. 

This course treats of the general principles of international law, as it has been developed 
by positive agreement, in the form of treaties and conventions, and by common usage as 
shown in legislation, in the decisions of international tribunals and of municipal courts, 
and in the conduct of nations. The rules thus discovered are discussed in the light of the 
principles of reason and justice, as scientifically presented by writers on international law, 
and an effort is made to trace the systematic establishment of the rules which govern 
intercourse among nations at the present day. 

Public Law 321-322 — Seminar in International Law. Professor 
J. B. Moore. 

Two hours a week. Hours to be arranged. 

Subject C — Administrative Law 

Public Law 143 — Municipal Science and Administration. Professor 
Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 10. 405 K. 

This course deals with municipal activities in the United States and the more important 
foreign countries. The principal subjects treated are: The origin and evolution of the 
oity; the position of the city in the state government; the control of the state over the 
city; municipal elections; municipal organization. 

Public Law 144 — History and Principles of Colonial Administration. 

Professor Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 10. 509 K. 
(Identical with History 164.) 

Public Law 146 — Municipal Functions. Professor Beard. 

Organization and management of the ordinary departments of modern cities; method; 
of approaching transit, housing and land questions; public ownership and operation; 
recent municipal progress in meliorating the conditions of city life; city planning; direct 
employment and contract systems; problems of administrative and public control over 
the management of public business. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

Public Law 241 — Law of Officers (Extraordinary Legal Remedies). 

Professor Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 9. 405 K. 

The purpose of this course is to present the general principles of the law of public officers, 
in particular those relating to their appointment or election, their powers and duties, their 
rights, removal from office; the control over their action possessed by the higher admin- 
istrative officers, the courts and the legislature. Special attention will here be paid to the 
writs of mandamus, quo warranto, certiorari, habeas corpus and prohibition, and their 
statutory substitutes, by means of which the courts exercise their control over the admin- 
istration. Chiefly discussion of cases. 

Public Law 246 — The Law of Municipal Corporations. Professor 
Goodnow. 

Tu. and Th. at 9. 405 K. 



32 

Chiefly discussion of cases. Abbott, Cases on Public Corporations, and Smith, Cases 
on Municipal Corporations. 

Public Law 248 — The Law of Taxation. Professor Goodnow. 
Tu. and Th. at 9. 

Chiefly discussion of cases. Goodnow, Cases on Taxation. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

Public Law 341-342 — Seminar in Constitutional and Administrative 

Law. Professors Goodnow and Beard. 
M. at 1 . 10. 509 K. 

(Identical with Public Law 301-302. For description see page 30.) 
Subject D — Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Jurisprudence 161 — Elements of Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
M., W., and F. at 10. 401 K. 

This course gives a general view of the origin and development of the law and of rights, 
remedial and substantive; a description of the sources of the law in force in the United 
States; and a systematic outline of the principal branches of the law. Lectures and 
assigned reading. 

Jurisprudence 263 — Roman Law. Professor Munroe Smith. 
M., W. f and F. at 1 . 10. 515 K. 

This course traces briefly the historical development of the Roman law, and treats of 
the law of persons, of things, of obligations and of succession. Lectures, with assigned 
reading: Muirhead, Historical Introduction to the Private Law of Rome; Sohm, Institutes 
of Roman Law. 

Jurisprudence 266 — History of European Law. Professor Munroe 
Smith. 

M. f W., and F. at 1 . 10. 515 K. 

This course treats (1) of early German law, including a comparison of Anglo-Saxon and 
Continental German customs; (2) of the development of law in the Visigothic and 
Frankish Empires; (3) of feudal law; (4) of canon law; (5) of the law merchant; (6) of 
the "reception" of the Roman law; and (7) of the genesis and character of the modern 
civil codes. 

(Identical with History 224.) 

Jurisprudence 268 — Modern Civil Law of Western Europe. Pro- 
fessor Munroe Smith. 

M., W., and F. at 3. 10. 509 K. 

This course is devoted to the discussion of special topics in the private law of France, 
Italy, Spain and Germany. It is open only to students who have taken Course 263, or 
who have done equivalent work. 

Jurisprudence 269-270 — Conflict of Laws. Professor J. B. Moore. 
M. at 4. 10. 405 K. 

Within the limits of the subject, a comparison is made of theories and practice in different 
jurisdictions, both in civil matters and in criminal; and attention is given to the special 
aspects of interstate law in the United States. 



33 



Jurisprudence 361-362 — Seminar in Legal History. Professor Mun- 
roe Smith. 

Hours to be arranged. 

Seminar for candidates for the Master's degree. The work consists in reading selected 
titles of the Corpus Iuris Civilis, of medieval law-books and of modern codes upon some 
special topic. Papers are presented by the members of the seminar, usually based upon a 
comparison of Roman and English law. 

Jurisprudence 363-364 — Seminar in Comparative Jurisprudence. 

Professor Munroe Smith. 
Hours to be arranged. 

Advanced seminar for candidates for the Doctor's degree. 



COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Politics 1-2. Professor Beard. 
M. f W., and F. at 9. 617 Hm. 

As a part of their regular work, the students are advised, and will be expeoted, to attend 
the public lectures given on the Blumenthal foundation. 



(group 3— Ermtnmira unh hartal §>t\mtt 

GRADUATE COURSES 

It is presumed that students who take economics, sociology or social 
economy as their major subject are familiar with the general principles 
of economics and sociology as set forth in the ordinary manuals. Stu- 
dents who are not thus prepared are recommended to take the courses in 
Columbia College or Barnard College designated as Economics i and 2 
(or Ai and A2) and Sociology 151-152. 

The graduate courses fall under three subjects: A — Political Econ- 
omy and Finance; B — Sociology and Statistics; C — Social Economy. 

Courses numbered 200 and above are open to graduate women students 
upon the same terms as to men. For a description of other courses open 
to women see Courses in Barnard College, page 45. 

Subject A — Political Economy and Finance 

Economics ioi — Science of Finance. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10. 515 K. 

This course is historical, as well as comparative and critical. After giving a genera 
introduction and tracing the history of the science of finance, it describes and analyzes 
the different kinds of public revenues, including the public domain and public property, 
public works and industrial undertakings, fees and special assessments. It then takes up 
the discussion of the general theories and principles of taxation, devoting especial attention 
to the problem of the incidence of taxation and to the newer social theories of taxation. 

Economics 102 — Science of Finance. Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10. 515 K. 

This course seeks to apply general principles to a consideration of actual systems of 
taxation. Special attention is paid to the practical American problems of federal, state 
and local taxation, and their interrelations. The course then treats of the various classes 
of public expenditure and the fiscal principles which govern them. It considers also pub- 
lic debt, methods of borrowing, redemption, refunding, repudiation, etc, Finally, it 
describes the fiscal organization of the state by which the revenue is collected and 
expended, and discusses the budget, national, state and local, 

Economics 104 — Commerce and Commercial Policy. Professor Mus- 
sey. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 405 K. 

This course is a consideration of the relation of commerce to economic prosperity and 
social well-being. It begins with a short sketch of the growth of commerce and an outline 
of the leading historical types of commercial policy. It takes up the conditions and 
consequences of modern commerce, analyzing the foreign trade of the principal countries, 
especially the United States, in relation to natural resources, increase of population, 
changes in industrial methods and organization, and distribution of wealth. The causea 
and effects of modern commercial policies are examined, and an attempt is made to point 
out the economic and social conditions that are of chief importance for the determination 
of trade policy in the United States at present. 



35 



Economics 105 — The Labor Problem. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 405 K. 

The topics considered in this course are: The rise of the factory system, factory legis- 
lation, the growth of trade unions and changes in the law in respect to them, the policies 
of trade unions, strikes, lockouts, arbitration and conciliation, proposed solutions of the 
labor problem, and the future of labor in the United States. 

Economics 106 — The Trust and Corporation Problem. Professor 
Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 10. 405 K. 

In this course special attention is given to the trust problem as it presents itself in the 
United States. Among the topics considered are the rise and progress of industrial com- 
binations, the forms of organization and policies of typical combinations, the common law 
and the trusts, anti-trust acts and their results, and other proposed solutions of the problem. 
Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 107 — Fiscal and Industrial History of the United States. 

Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 

This course endeavors to present a survey of national legislation on currency, finance 
and taxation, including the tariff, together with its relations to the state of industry and 
commerce. The chief topics discussed are: The fiscal and industrial conditions of the 
colonies; the financial methods of the Revolution and the Confederation; the genesis of 
the protective idea; the policies of the Federalists and of the Republicans; the War of 
1812; the crises of 1819, 1825, and 1837; the tariffs of 1816, 1824, and 1828; the distribu- 
tion of the surplus and the Bank war; the currency problems before 1863; the era of "free 
trade"; the fiscal problems of the Civil War; the methods of resumption; the new indus- 
trial problems; the currency acts of 1878, 1890, and 1900; the loans of 1894-96; the 
tariffs of 1890, 1894. and 1897; Spanish War financiering; the crisis of 1907; the tariff 
of 1909. The course closes with a discussion of the present fiscal and industrial situation. 

(Identical with History 163.) 
Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 108 — Railroad Problems; Economic, Social and Legal. 

Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3. 10. 

These lectures treat of railroads in the fourfold aspect of their relation to the investors, 
the employees, the public and the state respectively. A history of railways and railway 
policy in America and Europe forms the preliminary part of the course. The chief prob- 
lems of railway management, so far as they are of economic importance, come up for 
discussion. Among the subjects treated are: Financial methods, railway constructions, 
speculation, profits, failures, accounts and reports, expenses, tariffs, principles of rates, 
classification and discrimination, competition and pooling, accidents and employers' 
liability. Especial attention is paid to the methods of regulation and legislation in the 
United States as compared with European methods, and the course oloses with a general 
discussion of state versus private management. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 109 — History of Socialism. Professor Simkhovitch. 
Tu. and Th. at 2 . 10. 515 K. 

The course gives an outline of the social movement during the nineteenth century, and 
a brief review of the doctrines of the leading French, English and German exponents of 
socialism, such as Babeuf, St. Simon, Fourier, Cabet, Proudhon, Louis Blanc, Robert 



36 



Owen, Thompson, the English Christian Socialists, the German "philosophical" socialists, 
Lasalle and Rodbertus. Special attention is given to the Marxian theories, as well as to 
the revolt against Marxism — the revisionist movement. 
(Identical with History 159.) 

Economics iio — Theories of Social Reform. Professor Clark. 
Tu. and Th. at 2.10. 

This course treats of certain plans for the partial reconstruction of industrial society 
which have been advocated in the United States, and endeavors to determine what reforms 
are in harmony with economic principles. It treats of the proposed single tax, of the 
measures advocated by the Grangers' and the Farmers' Alliance, and of those proposed 
by labor organizations, of the method of dealing with monopolies, and of the general 
relation of the state to industry. 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

Economics 112 — Money and Banking. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 10. 

The purpose of this course is to supply the historical and theoretical basis necessary to 
a wise solution of the monetary and banking problems that are of special interest to the 
people of the United States. 

Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 180 — The Development of the World's Commerce from the 
Sixteenth Century to the Present Time, with special reference to Germany. 

Professor Daenell. 
W. and F. at 11. 614 K. 
(Identical with History 190.) 

Economics 201 — Economic Readings: Classical English Economists. 

Professor Seager. 

F. at 9 and 10. 405 K. 

In this course the principal theories of the English economists from Adam Smith to 
John Stuart Mill are studied by means of lectures, assigned readings and reports, and 
discussions. Special attention is given to the Wealth of Nations, Malthus's Essay on 
Population, the bullion controversy of 1810, the corn law controversy of 1815, and the 
treatises on Political Economy of Ricardo, Senior and John Stuart Mill. 

Economics 203 — History of Economics to Adam Smith. Professor 
Seligman. 
Tu. andTh. at 3.10. 515 K. 

In this course the various systems of political economy are discussed in their historical 
development. The chief exponents of the different schools are taken up in their order, 
and especial attention is directed to the wider aspects of the connection between the theories 
and the organization of the existing industrial society. The writers discussed are divided 
as follows: (1) Antiquity; (2) the Middle Ages; (3) the Mercantilists; (4) the Physio- 
crats; (5) the English Precursors of Adam Smith. 

Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 204 — History of Economics since Adam Smith. Professor 
Seligman. 

Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 515 K. 



37 



The chief writers discussed in this course are: (1) The English Classical School; (2) 
the Early British Socialists; (3) the Continental Development to 1870; (4) the Early 
American Writers; (5) the German Historical School; (6) the Socialists; (7) the Austrian 
School; (8) the Leading Contemporary Economists. 

Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

Economics 205 — Economic Theory I. Professor Clark. 
M. and W. at 2. 10. 

This course discusses, first, the static laws of distribution. If the processes of industry 
were not changing, wages and industry would tend to adjust themselves according to 
certain standards. A study of the mechanism of production would then show that one 
part of the product is specifically attributed to labor, and that another part is imput- 
able to capital. It is the object of the course to show that the tendency of free competi- 
tion, under such conditions, is to give to labor, in the form of wages, the amount that 
it specifically creates, and also to give to capital, in the form of interest, what it specifically 
produces. The theory undertakes to prove that the earnings of labor and of capital are 
governed by a principle of final productivity, and that this principle must be studied on a 
social scale, rather than in any one department of production. The latter part of this 
course enters the field of Economic Dynamics, defines an economic society and describes 
the forces which so act upon it as to change its structure and its mode of producing and 
distributing wealth. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

Economics 206 — Economic Theory II. Professor Clark. 
M. and W. at 2 . 10. 

This course continues the discussion of the dynamic laws of distribution. The processes 
of industry are actually progressing. Mechanical invention, emigration and other influ- 
ences cause capital and labor to be applied in new ways and with enlarging results. These 
influences do not even repress the action of the static forces of distribution, but they bring 
a new set of forces into action. They create, first, employers' profits, and, later, additions 
to wages and interest. It is the object of the course to show how industrial progress affects 
the several shares in distribution under a system of competition, and how progress itself is 
caused, and also to determine whether the consolidations of labor and capital, which are 
a distinctive feature of modern industry, necessarily have the effect of repressing compe- 
tition and checking progress. 

It is a further purpose of the course to present the natural laws by which the increase 
of capital and that of labor are governed, and to discuss the manner in which the earnings 
of these agents are affected by the action of the state, and to present at some length the 
character and the effects of those obstructions which pure economic law encounters in the 
practical world. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

Economics 207 — Theory of Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10, and 11. 405 K. 

The aim of this course is to present the elementary principles of statistics and to illus- 
trate their application by concrete studies in the most important sources of statistical 
material. The theoretical part of the course includes the study of averages, index-num- 
bers, interpolation and the principles of the graphic method. Toward the end of the term 
a review is given of the statistical processes employed in mathematical economics and of 
the chief empirical results that have already been established. 

Laboratory exercises are required of all students attending the course. 

(Identical with Sociology 255.) 



38 



Economics 210 — Social Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10, and 11. 405 K. 

(Identical with Sociology 256. For description see page 40.) 

Economics 241 — The Economic and Social Evolution of Russia since 
1800. Professor Simkhovitch. 
M. and F. at 10. 

This course describes the economic development of the country, the growth of Slavophil, 
liberal and revolutionary doctrines and parties, and the disintegration of the autocratic 

regime. 

(Identical with History 253.) 
Not given in igio-11. 

Economics 242 — Radicalism and Social Reform as reflected in the 
Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Professor Simkhovitch. 
F. at 10 and 11. 405 K. 

An interpretation of the various types of modern radicalism, such as socialism, nihilism 
and anarchism, and of the social and economic conditions on which they are based. 

(Identical with History 260.) 

Economics 301 — Seminar in Political Economy and Finance. Pro- 
fessors Seligman and Seager. 

For advanced students. Tu., 8. 15-10. 15 p.m. 508 K. 

Economics 302 — Seminar in Political Economy and Finance. Pro- 
fessors Seligman and Seager. 

For advanced students. Tu., 8. 15-10. 15 p.m. 508 K. 

Subject B — Sociology and Statistics 

Sociology 151 — Principles of Sociology, Analytical and Descriptive. 

Professor Giddings and Dr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 515 K. 

This is a fundamental course, intended to lay a foundation for advanced work. In 
connection with a text-book study of theory, lectures are given on the presuppositions 
and the methods of the scientific study of society, and students are required to analyze and 
to classify sociological material of live interest, obtained from newspapers, reviews and 
official reports. 

Sociology 152 — Principles of Sociology, Historical. Professor Gid- 
dings and Dr. Tenney. 

M. and W. at 3.10. 415 K. 

In this course the main outlines of historical sociology are so presented as to constitute 
an introduction to the study of social evolution and to the theory of progress. The begin- 
nings of social relations in animal bands are indicated, and the successive stages of anthro- 
pogenic, ethnogenic, and demogenic association are reviewed. This course is the proper 
preparation for Sociology 251, 252, 257, and 258. 



39 



Sociology 153 — Ethnology: Primitive Culture. Lectures, papers and 
discussions. Professor Farrand. 
M. and W. at 3. 10. 505 S. 

This course consists of a detailed treatment of the questions involved in primitive 
culture, such as the origin and development of mythology, morality, and religion, education, 
art, social customs, etc. Students are expected to have taken Anthropology 1-2 or 
101-102, or to give satisfactory evidence of previous work before being admitted to this 
course. 

(Identical with Anthropology 105.) 

Sociology 154 — Ethnology: Primitive Culture. Lectures, papers and 
discussions. Professor Farrand. 
M. and W. at 3. 10. 505 S. 

A continuation of the preceding course, and admission to it is subject to the same 
conditions. 

(Identical with Anthropology 106.) 

Sociology 155 — The Races of Europe. Lectures, papers and dis- 
cussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

In this course the distribution of types of man in Europe and the history of their devel- 
opment into the modern nations are traced. The important relations of the history of 
civilization in Europe to the civilization in Asia and in Africa are discussed, and the traits 
of European civilization due to the psychologic unity of mankind are considered. 

(Identical with Anthropology 111.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

Sociology 156 — The Races of Europe. Lectures, papers and dis- 
cussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 
A continuation of the preceding course. 
(Identical with Anthropology 112.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

Sociology 157 — Ethnography of Siberia and North America. Lectures, 
papers and discussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

In this course a somewhat detailed ethnographical description is given, with especial 
reference to the development of types of culture as a result of the historical contact of 
tribes of various geographical areas, and to the characterization of culture under different 
types of geographical environment. 

(Identical with Anthropology 107.) 

Sociology 158 — Ethnography of Central and South America. Lectures, 
papers and discussions. Professor Boas. 
Tu. and Th. at 11. 505 S. 

In this course the advanced types of culture found in Central America and South 
America are discussed, and their relation to the less advanced cultural types of North 
America and South America is indicated. 

(Identical with Anthropology 108.) 



4 o 



Sociology 251 — Social Evolution: Ethnic and Civil Origins. Pro- 
fessor GlDDINGS. 
F. at 2.10 and 3.10. 515 K. 

This course in historical sociology deals with such topics as: (1) The early distribution 
and ethnic composition of western European populations; (2) the original types of mind 
and of character, the capacity for co-operation, the cultural beliefs and the economic, legal 
and political habits of western European peoples; (3) early forms of the family, the origins, 
structure and functions of the clan, the organization of the tribe, the rise of tribal federa- 
tions, tribal feudalism, and the conversion of a gentile into a civil plan of social organization 
in western Europe. Early literature, legal codes and chronicles, descriptive of the Celtio 
and Teutonic groups which combined to form the English people before the Norman 
Conquest, are the chief sources made use of in this course. 

(Identical with History 255.) 
Given in igio-11 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Sociology 252 — Social Evolution: Civilization, Liberty and Democracy. 

Professor Giddings. 

F. at 2. 10 and 3. 10. 515 K. 

This course comprises three parts, namely: (1) An examination of the nature of those 
secondary civilizations which are created by conquest, and of the policies by which they 
seek to maintain and to extend themselves; (2) a study of the growth and of the policies 
of liberty, including measures for the expansion of intellectual freedom, for the control of 
arbitrary authority by legality, for the repression of collective violence, and for the control 
of collective impulse by deliberation; (3) a study of the nature, the genesis, and the social 
organization of modern democracies, including an examination of the extent to which 
non-political associations are more or less democratic; and of the democratic ideals of 
equality and fraternity in their relations to social order and to liberty. The documents of 
English history since the Norman Conquest are the chief sources made use of in this course, 

(Identical with History 256.) 
Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

Sociology 255 — Theory of Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10 and II. 515 K. 

(Identical with Economics 207. For description see page 37.) 

Sociology 256 — Social Statistics. Professor H. L. Moore. 
S. at 9, 10 and 11. 515 K. 

This course, which presupposes a knowledge of statistical processes (Sociology 255), 
begins with a detailed study of the methods and generalizations of vital statistics, and leads 
to an examination of recent theories of population in the light of the data afforded by 
official publications. Toward the end of the term a review is given of the statistical 
methods employed in anthropometry and in eugenics, and of the chief empirical results 
that have already been established. 

Laboratory exercises are required of all students attending the course. 

(Identical with Economics 210.) 

Sociology 257 — Historical Types of Society. Ancient: The Theory 
of Progress. Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2. 10 and 3. 10. 

The object of this course, and of Sociology 258, is to examine the fundamental types 
of human society as they have appeared in history, to follow the evolution of world-society, 
and to examine the theory of progress. Attention is given chiefly to the influence of 



4 



physical environments, the early migrations and the resulting distribution ol tne white 
races, and to the social types that appeared betore the nee 01 Grecian civilization. 
(Identical with History 213.) 
Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Sociology 258— Historical Types of Society. Modern: The Theory 
of Progress. Professor Giddings. 
F. at 2. 10 and 3. 10. 

The subject-matter of this course is found in the European societies that have flourished 
since the rise of Grecian civilization, and particular attention is given to the question of 
the extent to which they present original features attributable to specific environmental 
and ethnic influences. 

(Identical with History 214.) 
Given in ign-12 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Sociology 259 — Ecclesiology. Dr. Bayles. 
Tu. and F. at 4. 10. 502 K. 

The purpose of this course is to define the present relations of the ecclesiastical institu- 
tions to the other institutions of American society: the state, the government, marriage, 
family, education and public wealth. An analysis is made of the guarantees of religious 
liberty contained in the federal and commonwealth constitutions; of the civil status of 
churches in terms of constitutional and statute law; of the methods of incorporation, of 
the functions of trustees, of legislative and judicial control; of denominational polity 
according to its type; of the functional activity of churches in their departments of legis- 
lation, administration, adjudication, discipline and mission; of the influence of churches 
on ethical standards; of the distribution of nationalities among the denominations, of 
the territorial distribution of denominational strength, of the relation of polity to 
density of population, and of the current movements in and between various organiza- 
tions tending toward changes of functions and structure. 

Sociology 260 — Primitive Institutions in Europe. Professor Shot- 
well. 

Th. at 4. 10 and 5. 10. 

(Identical with History 220. For description see page 25.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

Sociology 311 — General Seminar. Sociological Theories: Historical. 

Professor Giddings and Dr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 4. 10. 503 K. 

This is an investigation and lecture course, and is required of all students making 
sociology a major subject for advanced degrees. Fellows making sociology a minor subject 
may be admitted. 

Sociology 312 — General Seminar. Sociological Theory: Systematic. 

Professor Giddings and Dr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 4. 10. 503 K. 

This is an investigation and lecture course, and is required of all students making 
sociology a major subject for advanced degrees. Fellows making sociology a minor subject 
may be admitted. 

Sociology 315-316 — Modern Problems in Social Evolution. Dr. 

Tenney. 

Hours to be arranged. 



42 



Sociology 317 — Advanced Seminar: Problems and Methods of 
Sociological Research. Professor Giddings. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10, bi-weekly. 503 K. 

Sociology 318 — Advanced Seminar: Dissertations in Preparation. 

Professor Giddings. 
Tu. at 4.10 and 5.10, bi-weekly. 503 K. 

Sociology 319 — The Relation of Social Theory to Public Policy. Pro- 
fessor Giddings. 

M. and W. at 3.10. 405 K. 

This is an instruction and research course, conducted by seminar methods. Only 
students who have completed Sociology 311-312, or a full equivalent of graduate work in 
sociology elsewhere, and who are prepared to use elementary statistical methods are 
admitted. 

Sociology 320 — The Relation of Social Theory to Public Policy. Pro- 
fessor Giddings. 

M. and W. at 3 . 10. 405 K. 

This is a continuation of Sociology 319, and has the same character and conditions. 

Subject C — Social Economy 

Social Economy 281 — Misery and Its Causes. Professor Devine. 
Tu. and Th. at 4.10. 

This course is a survey of social mal-adjustments (e.g., congestion of population, pre- 
ventable disease, child-labor, overwork, casual employment, exploitation of employees 
and consumers, lack of playgrounds, obsolete educational systems, inefficiency in admin- 
istration of justice); the resulting privation and degeneration; the social aspects of crime; 
the causes of poverty; and the conditions which are unfavorable to a normal standard of 
living. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

Social Economy 282 — Efficiency and Relief. Professor Devine. 
Tu. and Th. at 4.10. 

This course is a study of the methods by which society undertakes to relieve distress 
and to promote efficiency. It includes the social aspects of philanthropy and of education. 
Special attention is given to constructive social movements, such as those for housing 
and sanitary reform, and the prevention of disease and of accidents. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

Social Economy 285 — The Standard of Living. Professor Devine. 
Tu. and Th. at 4. 10. 615 K. 

A study of the essentials of a normal standard of living and of the cost of supplying 
them in particular communities: Rentals, Food, Clothing, Recreation, Education and 
Insurance. Methods of raising the standard. Abnormal deviations and relief. 

Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

Social Economy 286 — Social Aspects of Crime and Abnormality. 

Professor Devine. 
Tu. and Th. at 4. 10. 615 K. 



43 



This course is a continuation of that on the Standard of Living, dealing with the more 
extreme deviations found in criminal and anti-social classes. Special attention is given 
to the preventive features of a rational penal and police system, such as juvenile courts, 
probation, indeterminate sentence, segregation of incorrigibles, education and reformation, 
and to the lessening of crime through the improvement of social conditions and the strength- 
ening of individual character by education and improved environment. 

Given in iqio-ii and in alternate years thereafter. 

Social Economy 283 — Social Legislation: (I) Workshop and Factory. 

Professor Lindsay. 
Tu. and Th. at 5.10. 

A comparative study of methods and results of recent legislation in American states 
and some European countries, dealing with social problems of the wage-earner relating to 
the place where and conditions under which he works. Topics considered are: Factory 
legislation, factory inspection, child labor, dangerous occupations, industrial accidents, 
employers' liability, workmen's compensation, industrial insurance, old-age pensions, 
regulation of wages and hours of labor, arbitration of labor disputes. 
Given in ign-12. 

Social Economy 284 — Social Legislation: (II) Family, Home and 
School. Professor Lindsay. 
Tu. and Th. at 5.10. 

A comparative study of methods and results of recent legislation in American states and 
some European countries, dealing with social problems of the home and standards of 
living. Topics considered are: Public poor relief; marriage and divorce; compulsory 
school attendance; humane treatment of children; family income and expenditures, 
including regulations for the protection of savings and of petty finance, such as temporary 
loans on goods pawned, chattels mortgaged or salary and wages pledged; sanitation and 
health of the household, including regulation of contagious diseases, vaccination, registra- 
tion of tuberculosis. 

Given in jgn-12. 

Social Economy 287 — Social Legislation: (HI) Urban and Rural Com- 
munity Life. Professor Lindsay. 
Tu. and Th. at 5.10. 615 K. 

A comparative study of methods and results of recent legislation in American states 
and some European countries, dealing with the social life and opportunities of urban and 
rural populations. Topics considered are: Congestion and town planning; parks and 
playgrounds; amusements, protection of natural resources, scenic preservation, the 
regulation of markets and the quality of food supplies and their distribution; housing 
reform; the liquor traffic; the social evil. 

Social Economy 288 — Social Legislation: (TV) Methods and Tenden- 
cies in Law Making. Professor Lindsay. 
Tu. and Th. at 5.10. 615 K. 

A comparative study of legislative procedure in American states and in the Congress 
of the United States, with special reference to the preparation and drafting of bills for 
the enactment of social legislation. Preliminary investigations of social conditions and 
the presentation of their results; the organization of public opinion; work of private 
societies with legislative programs; committee hearings; co-operation of private societies 
with public officials and the courts in the administration and the interpretation of the law; 
the police power; constitutional limitations; the organization of administrative and 
judicial machinery for the enforcement of social legislation; the education of citizens; are 
the chief topics considered. 



44 



Social Economy 321 — Seminar in Social Economy. Professor Devine. 
F., 8-10 p.m. 609 K. 

Social Economy 322 — Seminar in Social Economy. Professor Devine. 
F., 8-10 p.m. 609 K. 

Social Economy 323 — Seminar in Social Legislation. Professor 
Lindsay. 
Tu., 8-10 p.m. 609 K. 

Social Economy 324 — Seminar in Social Legislation. Professor 
Lindsay. 
Tu., 8-10 p.m. 609 K. 

COURSES IN THE SCHOOL OF PHILANTHROPY 

The New York School of Philanthropy, conducted by the Charity Organ- 
ization Society of the City of New York, under the direction of Professor 
Lindsay, is an affiliated professional school, whose facilities and courses, 
with certain restrictions, are open to regular students of Columbia Uni- 
versity, and whose courses may be credited as minors for candidates for 
higher degrees. A detailed program of the School is contained in its year 
book, which may be had gratis upon application to the Director of the 
School, United Charities Building, 105 East 22nd Street, to whom all 
inquiries about the work of the School, its diplomas and certificates, 
and credit toward University degrees should be made. The School is 
organized in three departments: 

I. The Training School, which includes 

(a) A one year course in social work, composed of supervised 
field and practice work and lecture courses, aggregating approximately 
fourteen hours a week in both terms. 

(b) The Summer Session of six weeks in June and July. 

(c) Extension Courses for both volunteer and professional work- 
ers, including an Evening Course, two hours per week throughout 
the academic year. 

II. The Bureau of Social Research (Russell Sage Foundation): a 
staff of experienced investigators and workers in training engaged in 
social research, under expert direction, in New York City. 

III. The Library. A collection of books, pamphlets and periodicals 
in economics, sociology, social economy and social questions, containing 
approximately 6,000 bound volumes and 8,000 pamphlets. Open daily 
from 9 to 5, and every Tuesday evening, Sundays and holidays excepted, 
as a reference library and as a loan library for students engaged in the 
work of the School. 

A few scholarships, awarded as loans from the Scholarship Loan Fund, 
in amounts up to $200, are available in the training school, and fellowships, 



45 



with stipends varying from $500 to $1,200, are available in the Bureau of 
Social Research for mature and advanced students. The junior fellow- 
ships ($500) include free tuition for a limited amount of work at the 
University and in the School. Application blanks for scholarships and 
fellowships will be sent upon request. 

COURSES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Economics i — Introduction to Economics. Professors Seligman and 
Mussey, and Dr. Agger. 

Section 1, M. and W. at 9 in 613 Hm., F. at 1 . 10. 
Section 2, M. and W. at 11 in 616 Hm., F. at 1 . 10. 
Section 3, M. and W. at 1 . 10 in 607 Hm., F. at 1 . 10. 
Section 4, M. and W. at 1 . 10 in 609 Hm., F. at 1 . 10. 
Prerequisite: History A1-A2. 

Economics 2 — Practical Economic Problems. Professors Seligman and 
Mussey, and Dr. Agger. 
Hours as in Economics 1. 
Prerequisite: History A1-A2. 

COURSES IN BARNARD COLLEGE 

Economics Ai — Outlines of Economics. Professor Mussey and Dr. 
Agger. 

Section-i, M. at 3; Tu. and Th. at 9. 
Sections 2 and 3, M. at 3; Tu. and Th. at 10. 
Section 4, M. at 3; Tu. and Th. at 11. 
Section 5, M. at 3; Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10. 

Economics A2 — Practical Economic Problems. Professor Mussey and 
Dr. Agger. 
Hours as in Ai. 

Economics 104 — Commerce and Commercial Policy. Professor Mus- 
sey. 

Tu. and Th. at 11. 

(For description see page 34.) 

Economics 107— Fiscal and Industrial History of the United States. 

Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 
(For description see page 35.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 

Economics 108 — Railroad Problems, Economic, Social and Legal. 

Professor Seligman. 
Tu. and Th. at 3.10. 
(For description see page 35.) 
Not given in iqio-ii. 



4 6 



Economics bus — Socialism and Social Reform. Professor Clark. 
Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10, and a third hour to be arranged. 

In this course a brief study is made of the works of St. Simon, Fourier, Proudhon, Owen 
and Lasalle, and a more extended study is made of Marx's treatise on capital. Recent 
economic changes, such as the formation of trusts and strong trade unions, are examined 
with a view to ascertaining what effect they have had on the modern socialistic movement. 
A study is made of modern semi-socialistic movements and of such reforms as have for 
their object the improvement of the condition of the working class. Municipal activities, 
factory legislation, the single tax, recent agrarian movements and measures for the regula- 
tion of monopolies are studied. 

Not given in iqio-ii. 

Economics bii7 — The Labor Problem. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10. 

Attention in this course is divided about equally between problems connected with 
labor organizations — collective bargaining, strikes, arbitration, etc. — and problems whose 
solution involves legislation — child labor, dangerous trades, the sweating system, immigra- 
tion, etc. Lectures are supplemented by assigned readings and class discussions. 

Economics bu8 — Practical Economic Problems. Professor Seager. 
Tu. and Th. at 1 . 10. 

In this course special attention is given to problems connected with money and banking 
and corporations and trusts. Lectures are supplemented by assigned readings and class 
discussions. 

Sociology 151 — Principles of Sociology. Professor Giddings and 
Dr. Tenney. 

M. and W. at 3. 10. 

(For description see page 38.) 

Sociology 152 — Principles of Sociology. Professor Giddings and 
Dr. Tenney. 

M. and W. at 3. 10. 

(For description see page 38.) 

COURSES IN TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Social Economy hi — The Life of the Industrial Family. Professor 
Mary K. Simkhovitch. 
Tu. at 3. 10 and 4. 10. 

This course is descriptive, dealing with the life of the immigrant, his housing, standard 
of living, education, health, labor and recreation. 

Social Economy 112 — Social Progress in Cities. Professor Mary K. 
Simkhovitch. 
Tu. at 3. 10 and 4. 10. 

This course consists of a study of public and private activity in improving living 
conditions. 



COURSES IN THE SUMMER SESSION* 
Economics 

si — Principles of Economics. Lectures and text-book discussion. Pro- 
fessor MUSSEY. 
Five hours a week. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
i or Ai.) 

si 03 — Money and Banking. Lectures and assigned reading. Pro- 
fessor D. R. Dewey. 
Five hours a week. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
112.) 

si 04— Commerce and Commercial Policy. Lectures and assigned 
reading. Professor Mussey. 
Five hours a week. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
104.) 

si 06 — Corporation Problems. Lectures and assigned reading. Pro- 
fessor Raper. 

Five hours a week. 

(Equivalent, when supplemented by prescribed reading, to Economics 
106.) 

Sociology 

sioi — Principles of Sociology, Analytical and Descriptive. Lectures, 
readings and papers. Professor Giddings. 
Five hours a week at 9 . 30. 

S102 — Principles of Sociology, Historical. Lectures, readings and 
papers. Professor Giddings. 
Five hours a week at 10.30. 

Sociology 152 — Principles of Sociology, Historical. Professor Gid- 
dings and Dr. Tenney. 
M. and W. at 3.10. 

*For fuller details consult the Bulletin of Information in reference to the Summer 

Session. 



SATURDAY 


Economics 207, 210 
Sociology 255, 256 
Prof. H. L. Moore 
405 K 


History 361-362 
Prof. Osgood 
614 K 


Economics 207, 210 
Sociology 255, 256 
Prof. H. L. Moore 
405 K 


History 361-362 
Prof. Osgood 
614 K 


Economics 207, 210 
Sociology 255, 256 
Prof. H. L. Moore 
405 K 


FRIDAY 


Economics 201 
Prof. Seager 
405 K 


History 260 
Economics 242 

Prof. SiMKHOVITCH 

405 K 

Economics 201 
Prof. Seager 
405 K 


Jurisprudence 161 
Prof. Munroe Smith 
401 K 


Economics 180 

History 190 
Prof. Daenell 
614 K 


History 260 
Economics 242 

Prof. SiMKHOVITCH 

405 K 

History 282 
Prof. Dunning 
615 K 


THURSDAY 


Public Law 241 
Prof. Goodnow 
405 K 


Public Law 246 
Prof. Goodnow 
405 K 


History 121-122 
Prof. Robinson 
615 K 


History 164 
Public Law 143, 144 
Prof. Goodnow 
4°5> 5°9 K 


Economics 104 
Prof. Mussey 
405 K 


History 123,124 
Sociology 155, 156 
Prof. Boas 

50s s. 


Economics 106 
Prof. Seager 
405 K 


Economics 105 
Prof. Seager 
405 K 


WEDNESDAY 




History 280 
Prof. Dunning 
615 K 


Public Law 103-104 
Prof. Beard 
405 K 


Jurisprudence 161 
Prof. Munroe Smith 
401 K 


Economics 180 

History 190 
Prof. Daenell 
614 K 


Public Law 105, 106 
Prof. Beard 
405 K 


TUESDAY 


Public Law 241 
Prof. Goodnow 
405 K 


Public Law 246 
Prof. Goodnow 


History 121-122 
Prof. Robinson 
615 K 


History 164 
Public Law 143, 144 
Prof. Goodnow 
405, 509 K 


Economics 104 
Prof. Mussey 
405 K 


History 123, 124 
Sociology 155, 156 
Prof. Boas 

505 s 


History 151-152 
Dr. Hazen 
614 K 

History 166 
Public Law 120 
Prof. J. B. Moore 

History 251 
Public Law 221 
Prof. J. B. Moore 

Economics 106 
Prof. Seager 
405 K 

Economics 105 
Prof. Seager 
405 K 


MONDAY 


Public Law 201 
Prof. Guthrie 
405 K 


History 280 
Prof. Dunning 
615 K 


Public Law 103-104 
Prof. Beard 
405 K 


Jurisprudence 161 
Prof. Munroe Smith 
401 K 


History 151-152 
Dr. Hazen 
614 K 


History 166 
Public Law 120 
Prof. J. B. Moore 
5i5 K 


History 251 
Public Law 221 
Prof. J. B. Moore 

History 282 
Prof. Dunning 
615 K 

Public Law 105, 106 
Prof. Beard 
450 K 


HOURS 1 


0 0 
0 0 10 

• • 

On O 


10.00 

to 
10.50 


11 .00 

to 
11.50 



< 
c 
£ 

D 
H 
< 



SO M 

(N H 

N w 

<D O 

j-i o X 



a, • 
•So 
fa »-* 



S-§8 

^02 



« Q. • 



35 

00 H 

0) v 



o 



"S.2 2 



O uj 

w . ^ 

W 2 



la? 

O Q. 



S3 

.52 S^o 

w 2 

Ph 



V o 

O O 

52c£ 



« < 
§2 



VO M 



Vh g S xo 

q cd ~ h 

IIS" 

14 



5 S5 



O M 



.a 



7 g 

M o os 

b m 2 



O «4-l 

o o 



vO j 

w 

„ O 

w O 



00 H 
vO 2 

*d On 
3 h O 

*C ■ 



M O U « r 

m n 2; ^ io 

M (OH Z O 

. Q (d ^- 

y o 



-J 

2 w 

m p 



° Q 

??« 

W 

>'C0 h 
to O 



O 

S 2 



° Q 

w 9 



+so5 

w 2 



VO 

V ° 
in o 

M ^ 

O o 



"4- 

It? 

O Q. 



(S « 

I O 
vNg 



-2 2 

^Ph 



vO M 

VO g 

•fi 2 



O G 



J. b 



HQ W 



< ON 



*S 9 

' P 

I> to 

M 

M H 1 

O 



VO j 

w 

r a ^ 

» 2 



I o 
rr> o 

Sri 



00 H 
vO 2 

S 5 o 



.r t3 

a 



to 



M O O 

§ 2 

W PL, 



o 

« o 



° S 
- o o 



o o 

rj- 



< 

Q 
OS 
D 
r* 

< 

CO 



.2 • »o 

oQ 
co M 



,5 



o « s 



opq 

3 3*8 



^B 

. en 

bo 

OK 
.2 to 
K'o 

Ph 



B 

B M 

W MO 
CO 



£ 

o 

o 

— 00 



M H 



O Ph 

CO 



5? 
M Q 

op4 



Ih 

Oh 



B 

^ j 

W O Tt 

> B M 

o s 



2oo 2 



8^ S 

--J 00 • vo 
CO ^ 



co 



CO 



z, 



0(5 

S 2 
fit 



N B 

hco 



H C 



w g 



o 



£2 

1° 



W CO 

H o 



? H 

M 0 

N d as 

>» o 

2 2" 



in u 

B 

So 

fit 



C q lo 

to . O 

Kg 

Ph 



In m 

ti w 

to o 

3^ 



m * Q 

w £pq to 

>» <s . o 

.$2:bPh 
Oh 



« W 

« S 

. B ^ 

IS- 8 

M O 

fflPw 



ID 

|nS 

6 J? 

on 

C0 M 



00 



0*0 



8* 

CO 



" IO H 

o 

CO 



VO 



Q 

Oh 

PQ w. 
. o 

a" 



VO Q 

to O 

£pm 



^1 >> 



O 



I 3 

^ 00 ^ vo 



Pm 



o « 
CO « 

- < 

§§S<g 



CO o 
CO 



CO 



^ o ^2 
O K! *v_3 °v 

■wo u 
CO W 



Opc^ 

S s 

Pm 



o 

I OS 

o o 

VO O 

a 

c pq vo 

CU - 

u. o 



a 

•» CO 

03 fi 



H o 



? H 

*0 as 

0 o 

I* 



o 
Pm 



S5 

§ .vS 

3 2 

Pm 



vO 



^ 1> 

2 o 2 o * eg 
*S S 2 

Ph 



o o 

m o O 



° 2 

m o O 



5i 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



Scope 

General Culture 

Graduate non-profes- 
sional courses 

Public and Private 
Law 

Practice of Medicine 



Mining Engineering 

Metallurgy 

Chemistry and Engi- 
n e e r i n g — Civil, 
Sanitary, Electrical, 
Mechanical, Chem- 
ical 

Architecture, Music, 
Design 

Education — elemen- 
tary or secondary 
teaching 
Advanced courses 



Pharmacy 

There is an annual 



Courses are offered 
both at the Univer- 
sity and elsewhere 



Columbia College 
Barnard College 
Political Science 
Philosophy 
Pure Science 
School of Law 

(3 years) 
College of Physicians 

and Surgeons 

(4 years) 
School of Mines 

(4 years) 

Schools of Chemistry 
and Engineering 
(4 years) 

Schools of Architecture, 

Music and Design 
Teachers College 
(2 years) 

Teachers College 



College of Pharmacy 

(2 and 3 years) 
Summer Session 



Extension Teaching 



Open to 

Men 
Women 
Men and 
Women 

Men 

Men 



Men 



Men 



Men 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 

Men and 
Women 



Leading to 

A.B. or B.S. 
A.B. or B.S. 
A.M. 
and Ph.D. 

LL.B. 

M.D. 



E.M. 
Met.E. 
Chem. 
C.E. 
E.E. 
Mech.E. 
Chem.E. 
B.S. or 
Certificate 
Bachelor's 
Diploma 
and B.S. 
Master's 
and Doctor's 
Diploma 
Degrees and 
Diplomas 
Suitable aca- 
demic credit 
or certification 
Suitable aca- 
demic credit 
or certification 



The normal preparation for Columbia College and Barnard College 
is the equivalent of a four-year secondary school course. The Schools 
of Political Science, Philosophy, Pure Science and Law require for en- 
trance a college course or its equivalent. Two years of collegiate work 
are prescribed for Teachers College and for the degree courses in Archi- 
tecture, Music and Design, and, while the minimum requirements do not 
at present prescribe it, the same preparation is strongly recommended 
in Medicine, Mines, Chemistry, and Engineering. 

In the Summer Session and Extension Teaching there are no entrance 
tests for non-matriculants, but before being registered as candidates 
for degrees or diplomas, matriculants must fulfil the appropriate entrance 
requirements. 

The program of studies in the College places the emphasis on the 
quality of the student's work rather than upon the time spent in residence, 
and is so arranged as to make it possible for a properly qualified student 
to complete the requirements for both the Bachelor's degree and for any 
one of the professional degrees of the University in six years, or, in some 
cases, in a shorter period. 

Students registered as candidates for non-professional degrees may at 
the same time receive credit toward a diploma in teaching and vice versa. 

Bulletins of Information regarding any of these courses may be obtained 
from the Secretary of the University, and further information will be 
furnished on request. A complete Catalogue, issued in December of 
each year, is sold for twenty-five cents.