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D  EDO?  ISflSMET  1 

California  Stale  Library 

Reference  Dept.j 
>>.»<» — 

Accession  J^To. 


4237    6-20       )M 


SHELVE  IN 
ROOM  218 


California  State  Library 


N  Ews  Notes 


OF 


California  Libraries 


VOL  21 
NOS.  1-4 

JANUARY-OCTOBER,  1926 


CALIFORNTA    STATE   PRINTING   OFFICE 

CHARLES  A.  WHITMORE,  State  Printer 

SACRAMENTO,  1927 


51300 


(Index  Supplement.) 


Vol.  21,  No.  1  JANUARY  1926 


News  Notes 


OF 


California  Libraries 


IN  THIS  NUMBER-SOME  OF  THE  ITEMS  OF  INTEREST. 


RADIO— LONG    BEACH    PUBLIC    LIBRARY,   OAKLAND    FREE    LIBRARY. 

NEVADA   CITY   FREE   LIBRARY  TO    RECEIVE   BEQUEST. 

ALAMEDA    COUNTY— TEACHERS   AND    LIBRARY  WORKERS    MEET. 

BURBANK    HIGH    SCHOOL   LIBRARY.  , 

CUSTODIANS     MEETINGS— ALAMEDA,     FRESNO,     IMPERIAL,     MERCED 
AND    STANISLAUS    COUNTY    FREE    LIBRARIES. 

MIGRATORY  SCHOOLS  IN   KINGS  COUNTY,  p.  17. 

UNION    LIST    OF    PERIODICALS    IN    LIBRARIES    OF    SOUTHERN    CALI- 
FORNIA,  p.  49. 

SALARY   RAISES— BERKELEY,  OAKLAND. 

LASSEN    COUNTY'S   ART   CLUB,   p.   18. 

BERKELEY— PACIFIC      UNITARIAN      SCHOOL      FOR      THE      MINISTRY 
LIBRARY    OFFERS    ITS    RESOURCES    TO    ENTIRE    STATE. 

FOR    SPECIAL   ARTICLES,   SEE    CONTENTS. 


California  State  Library 


CALIFOBNIA    STATE    PBHWING    OFFICE 
JOHN  B.  KING,  State  Printer 
SACEAMENTO,  1926 
43023 


CONTENTS. 


Page 

DUCKS  AND  DRAKES 1 

THE  LIBRARIES  I  VISITED  WHILE  IN  EUROPE 5 

DISCOVERING    CALIFORNIA 7 

MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA  SHOWING  COUNTIES 8 

LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARIES 9 

LIST  OF  LARGER  PUBLIC  LIBRARIES 10 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES— NEWS   ITEMS 11 

DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES    AND    OTHER    ITEMS    OP 

GENERAL    INTEREST 35 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION 42 

CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS 46 

LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC 47 

BOARD  OP  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS 50 

CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 52 

Staff,   Etc 52 

Departments    53 

Recent  Accessions 57 

Caxifoenia  State  Purlications  Received  Dubing  Octobeb,  Novembeb 

and  Decembee,  1925 86 

Caxifoenia  City  Publications  Received  Dtteing  Octobeb,  Novembeb 

AND  Decembee,  1925 89 

Books  fob  the  Blind  Added  Dubing  Octobeb,  Novembeb  and  Decembeb, 

1925 90 


Issued  quarterly  in  the  interests  of  the  libraries  of  the  State  by  the  Califobnia 
State  Llbeaey. 

All    communications    should    be    addressed    to    the    California    State  Library, 
Sacramento,   California. 

Note. — Standing  matter  is  set  solid  and  new  matter  leaded. 

Entered  as  second-class  matter  December,  1913,  at  the  post  oflSce  at  Sacramento, 
California,  under  the  act  of  August  24,  1912. 

Acceptance  for  mailing  at  the  special  rate  of  postage  provided  for  in  Section 
1103,  Act  of  October  3,  1917,  authorized  August  27,  1918. 


DUCKS  AND  DRAKES 

AT  CHICAGO  IN  MID-WINTER. 
By  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian,  California  State  Library. 


When  the  librai-y  crowd  arrived  at 
Chicago  in  mid-winter  it  became  clear 
that  the  Drake  Hotel  was  not  named  by 
majority  vote  of  our  craft.  If  it  had 
been,  then  this  great  hostelry  on  the  north 
shore  would  have  been  called  the  Duck 
Hotel,  which  probably  would  cause  a 
smile ;  and  that  would  never  do  in  the 
commercial  world.  But,  as  Abraham 
Lincoln  was  sometimes  forced  to  rule,  the 
minority  has  it ;  and  so  Drake  it  is.  If 
these  conventioners  were  real  ducks  and 
drakes,  the  big  hotel  which  housed  them 
so  comfortably,  while  glad  bells  rang  out 
the  old,  rang  in  the  new,  would  have 
missed  the  pleasure  of  their  company  ;  for 
the  far  iiying  feathered  kind  have  Cali- 
fornian  and  Floridian  instincts.  Steam 
heat,  fast  trains,  taxicabs — modernity — 
have  badly  bent  many  of  the  habits  nature 
once  taught ;  and  we  recklessly  expose 
our  ears  to  the  chilling  blasts  that  blow 
from  Lake  Michigan,  when  instinctively 
we  should  be  twining  our  brow  with 
posies  in  a  more  fragrant  zone. 

In  the  published  announcements  the 
meetings  began  December  30 ;  but  in  fact 
they  really  got  under  way  two  days 
earlier.  The  ALA  has  become  big 
business ;  with  a  budget  close  to  $200,000 
a  year,  with  diversified  interests  ranging 
from  selecting  the  right  book  for  the 
child  of  eight  and  the  adult  of  eighty- 
eight  and  beyond  to  the  intricacies  of 
authorship,  the  problem  of  library  exten- 
sion, the  burden  of  library  education  and 
the  crime  (?)  of  collecting  money  for  a 
show  to  tell  the  world  what  has  taken 
place  during  the  last  half  century.  The 
Editorial  Committee  began  the  work  by 
spending  blue  Monday  in  earnest  thought 
over  the  things  editors  think  about.  And 
on  Tuesday  the  Executive  Board,  gathered 
from  this  vast  domain  of  ours  between 
the  tea  stained  waters  of  Boston  Bay  and 
the  sun-kissed  pillars  of  the  Golden  Gate, 
took  up  the  white  woman's  burden.  It 
decided  to  make  the  visit  to  Philadelphia 
in  1926  a  long  and  pleasant  memory  for 
the  most  of  us,  and  a  definite  knock  at 
the  consciousness  of  the  average  citizen 
of  our  great  nation  ;  and  to  justify  the 
fuller  significance  of  the  first  word  in  our 
corporate  name  by  going  across  the 
imaginary  boundry  line  in  1927  to  visit 
our  Canadian  confreres.  In  selecting 
Toronto  as  its  meeting  place  more  than 
a  full  year  hence  the  ALA  enters  into 
the  class  of  the  greater  conventions  which 
always  know  where  they  are  going  long 

43023 


before  they  put  on  their  going  away  suit. 
Other  plans,  too,  it  laid  in  proof  of  the 
old  adage  that  the  second  half  century  is 
easier. 

The  following  words  I  write  especially 
for  the  information  of  my  own  associates 
in  California.  And  I  know  my  friends 
of  the  east  and  the  pacific  northwest  will 
pardon  my  intention  to  keep  California 
where  she  belongs :  among  the  foremost 
of  the  shock  troops  in  this  battle  of  books. 
Thank  you!  All  but  Californians  may 
now  skip  to  the  next  paragraph.  The 
Executive  Board,  under  the  calm  but 
sustaining  direction  of  that  admirable 
gentleman  from  Boston,  has  planned  a 
year  of  work  which  logically  readies  a 
climax  at  Philadelphia.  We  librarians 
realize  how  valuable  a  service  we  may 
give.  But  since  its  fullest  development 
is  not  dependent  upon  our  efforts  alone ; 
since  we  do  not.  in  the  patter  of  efficiency, 
sell  a  commodity  over  the  counter  and 
ring  up  the  sale  on  a  shining  and  musical 
cash  register,  we  must  gain  the  good  will 
and  financial  support  of  the  public  we 
are  created  to  serve.  Our  fiftieth  birthday 
offers  a  wonderful  opportunity  for  pub- 
licity and  an  exhibit  of  our  progress  and 
plans.  But  shows  cost  cash :  ask  the 
angel  on  Broadway,  or  the  directors  of 
the  P  P  I  E.  Shall  we  beg  the  man  in 
the  street  for  a  penny  ;  shall  we  appeal 
to  the  hard  pressed  foundations ;  shall 
we  donate  from  our  scanty  personal 
hoardings,  if  any ;  shall  we  resort  to 
festivals,  or  the  more  lucrative  gunman 
methods?  No.  For  once  the  thing  can 
be  done  quietly,  justly,  easily.  And  "  't 
were  well  it  were  done  quickly."  The 
ALA  semi-centennial  publications  will 
be  worth  having ;  every  library,  little  or 
big,  wanting  to  be  classed  as  modern  must 
have  them.  The  Executive  Board  plan 
of  purchase  is  based  on  the  system  of 
graduated  charge  now  so  successfully  used 
by  the  H.  W.  Wilson  Company  ;  except 
in  this  case  the  librarian  within  certain 
limits  fixes  the  amount,  not  the  publisher. 
Every  library  subscribing  .$25  to  $100 
will  receive  one  set  of  the  books  ;  but  if 
every  library  elected  to  pay  the  minimum 
there  would  be  no  "profit"  and  therefore 
little  chance  of  a  Avorth  seeing  show  at 
the  City  of  Brotherly  Love.  The  bars 
are  put  low  in  order  that  even  the 
smallest  may  hurdle  them  in  safety.  May 
I  urge  that  California  libraries,  remember- 
ing the  exposition  days  of  1915,  subscribe 
to    this    project    in     accord    with     their 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


Jan.,  1926 


means?  Let  us  say  :  smallest  independent 
library  $25;  small  $50;  medium  $100; 
large  and  largest  $200  and  up.  A  large 
library  wanting  two  sets — and  many  will 
need  them — will  get  them  for  $200  ;  and 
additional  sets  for  $100  each.  Take  your 
own  measure  ;  send  it  to  the  A  L  A  for 
your  subscription  bill ;  and  keep  Cali- 
fornia in  the  lead.  Yesterday  is  past ; 
tomorrow  is  to  come ;  but  today  is 
TODAY. 

Now  let  us  go  on  with  the  story.  It 
is  strange  and  interesting  hoAV  much 
luiman  nature  there  is  among  librarians. 
One  would  almost  be  justified  in  making 
the  bold  assertion  that  we  are  people, 
just  like  the  store  keepers,  and  the 
farmers,  the  Lions  and  the  Soroptimists. 
This  wise  observation  of  mine  finds  origin 
in  our  actions  when  some  new  thing  comes 
up.  Once  there  was  an  E.  P.  which  raised 
a  storm  of  protest,  was  held  over  a  year 
or  two,  then  adopted  by  practically  a 
unanimous  vote.  To  be  sure  it  was  like 
the  small  boy  in  papa's  long  pants,  who 
was  not  permitted  to  wear  them  long 
enough  to  fill  them  out.  Then  a  while 
ago  came  the  Board  of  Education  for 
Librarianship  with  its  schemes  to  make 
us  wise  and  useful.  But  we  did  not  want 
to  change  our  habits,  so  we  protested  and 
found  fault :  but  at  Chicago  we  take  pro- 
gram. And  probably  a  few  years  hence 
it  will  be  hard  to  make  us  recall  that  we 
were  not  all.  from  the  first  word,  enthusi- 
astic supporters  of  the  Education  Board. 
It  is  plain  that,  whether  the  plans  of  the 
Board  are  immediately  practicable,  ulti- 
mately the  result  of  its  activity  will  be 
better  library  schools  and  a  more  even 
distribution  of  them  over  the  United 
States  in  order  to  meet  the  requirements 
for  an  adequately  trained  library  person- 
nel. 

Am  I  mistaken  in  thinking  that  this 
meeting  produced  one  new  group  to  be 
added  to  the  already  long  list  of  sec- 
tions? The  Library  Editors  Round  Table 
is  a  piece  of  furniture  that  I  do  not  recall 
having  put  my  feet  under  in  our  profes- 
sional dining  room.  And  even  now  I  must 
confess  another  engagement  made  it  impos- 
sible for  me  to  tuck  my  napkin  under  my 
chin  at  this  new  feast.  The  menu  looked 
appetizing,  though  most  of  the  dishes  were 
apparently  dashed  with  publicity  sauce. 
.Since  Librarians  have  not  used  much  of 
that  condiment,  or  regularly,  we  ought  to 
be  able  to  consume  it  in  quantities  in 
this  year  when  we  are  half  a  hundred 
years   old. 

Speaking  of  food  makes  me  wonder 
what  we  are  going  to  do  about  the  break- 
fasts, luncheons  and  banquets  at  our 
home  coming  in   October.     I   have  heard 


of  picnics  at  which  the  crowd  broke  up 
into  small  groups,  each  one  spreading  its 
own  paper  table  cloth  in  its  own  shady 
spot  and  consuming  its  own  fried  chicken 
and  tilings  in  its  own  peculiar  way.  And 
then  again  I  have  been  a  jolly  member 
wlien  table  cloth  was  put  end  to  end  to 
table  cloth,  as  if  actually  to  demonstrate 
how  many  of  them  will  reach  from  here 
to  somewliere ;  and  the  heaping  platters 
went  indiscriminatingly  around ;  and 
everybody  was  filled  and  happy  and 
friendly. 

A  while  ago,  some  place  back  east, 
there  was  a  family.  Subject  to  the  usual 
ills  and  discouragements,  it  grew  in  size 
and  comeliness.  As  the  fledglings  came 
to  full  feather,  they  flew  far,  or  near, 
into  the  world  to  build  nests  of  their 
own.  One  caught  the  glint  of  sunshine 
beyond  the  summit  of  the  Sierra,  and 
went  to  California  for  health  and  wealth 
and  happiness.  Another  fled  to  Florida, 
lured  by  hopes  of  finding  the  fountain  of 
youth,  and  incidentally  of  writing  a  few 
realty  contracts.  A  third  sought  pros- 
perity and  position  and  fame  on  Wall 
street.  New  York  City,  or  perhaps  it  was 
in  the  Loop  District,  Chicago ;  we  hope 
he  was  not  unwi.se  enough  to  take  the 
short  cut  to  the  front  page  headlines  and 
become  a  gunman  sheik.  And  there  were 
others,  whose  personal  history  We  do  not 
remember,  who  fared  forth  with  varying 
success   into   lauds  of  opportunity 

When  fortune  came  and  the  heat  of 
youth  had  somewhat  cooled  in  their  veins, 
they,  each  and  all,  thought  of  the  old 
home  and  longed  to  gather  once  more  at 
its  cheering  fireside.  It  was  arranged, 
this  family  reunion  ;  and  at  Thanksgiving 
when  turkeys  are  ripe,  or  perhaps  it  was 
at  Christmas  when  good  will  flowers,  they 
came  trooping  back  in  their  new  clothes, 
bringing  the  wives  they  had  found,  and 
their  childi-en.  odd  and  spoiled,  smart  and 
pretty,  or  whatever  they  were.  But  do 
you  imagine  they  had  the  effrontery  to 
include,  in  their  entourage,  the  cooks  who 
knew  just  how  to  tickle  their  prandial 
fancy  :  their  Fong.  or  their  Aunt  Jemima, 
or  their  Lummox?  I  do  not.  They  may 
have  suggested  ripe  olives,  salted  almonds, 
pralines,  or  branch  celery  for  part  of  the 
fixings ;  but  mother's  way  of  doing  the 
turkey  with  dressing,  her  system  of  plum 
pudding,  her  combination  of  vegetables — 
who  would  want  anything  different. 

During  the  half  century  just  past  the 
library  family  has  grown  and  scattered. 
Some  of  its  children  are  jazzy,  perhaps, 
and  wilful  and  wild.  But  they  all  come 
home  in  October.  Would  it  not  be  a  fine 
example  of  brotherly  and  sisterly  comity 
if  they  would  all  leave  their  strange  cooks 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


DUCKS    AND    DRAKES. 


aud  meats  at  home  aud  sit  dowu  in 
family  style  around  the  old  dining  room 
table  stretched  out  with  all  the  spare 
leaves  from  the  closet  under  the  stair? 
This  very  thing  the  League  of  Librai'y 
Commissions,  as  one  of  the  elderly  sisters, 
has  decided  to  do ;  though  she  hopes  for 
the  privilege  of  putting  a-  few  of  her  own 
brand  of  chestnuts  into  the  dressing. 
Next? 

And  I  am  reminded,  at  Chicago  the 
League  had  a  very  good  constructive  pro- 
gram. It  was  built  around  our  new 
venture  in  growing  a  library  system 
where  none  grew  before.  Miss  Culver  of 
the  Louisiana  Library  Commission  re- 
counted M'hat  is  being  attempted  in  that 
fine  old  southern  state,  and  what  are  the 
prospects  of  bringing  any  of  her  hopes  to 
fruitage.  The  prompt  response  on  the 
part  of  officials  and  people  indicates  that 
the  time  has  come  for  Louisiana  to  leap 
foi-ward,  and  possibly  to  outstrip  other 
states  which  have  long  been  in  the  run- 
ning. It  is  reasonable  that  a  common- 
wealth so  rich  in  worldly  goods,  in  being 
and  to  be,  with  such  a  wealth  of  romantic 
and  cultural  background  should  be  able 
readily  to  adjust  a  system  of  library 
service  to  its  needs.  Fortunately,  the 
parish  unit  seems  to  be  the  one  most 
logical ;  so  that  whatever  is  done  will 
treat  town  dweller  and  country  dweller 
alike. 

Tennessee,  Iowa,  Illinois,  and  Nebraska 
have  problems  peculiar  to  themselves,  as 
we  learned  from  the  well  considered  ob- 
servations of  the  several  librarians  who 
spoke  thereon.  Mr  Cunningham,  for 
example,  presents  a  fascinating  piece  of 
work  worthy  of  our  best  library  talent ; 
come  into  Tennessee,  observe  our  people, 
their  industries,  their  city  and  country 
life,  their  educational  and  library  equip- 
ment ;  and  tell  us  what  is  the  best,  most 
economical  and  surest  way  to  get  book 
service  to  everyone.  It  is  a  problem  quite 
as  alluring  as  learning  to  dance  the 
Charleston,  and  more  profitable  than 
settling  (?)  the  Tacna-Arica  dispute.  I 
wish  we  could  accept  the  invitation  ;  but 
to  do  so  requires  money  to  employ  one  or 
two  of  our  best  librarians,  who  otherwise 
could  not  be  released  from  their  present 
positions,  and  to  cover  all  the  other 
expenses  incident  to  a  well  considered 
survey.  In  fact  the  League  badly  needs 
a  free  lance  to  send  on  missions  like  this, 
to  test  out  some  of  our  theories,  to  prove 
some  of  our   practices. 

Mr  Hirshberg  discussed  before  the 
League  the  operation  of  Ohio's  school 
district  public  library  law.  Apparently 
this  device  is  producing  satisfactory  re- 
sults ;   though  it  is  worthy   of  note   that 


those  most  familiar  with  it  consider  it  a 
step  toward  the  county  unit.  Another 
number  on  the  program  was  possibly  there 
"produced  for  the  first  time  on  any 
stage" :  Miss  Ethel  M.  Fair's  story  of 
the  library's  part  in  the  Better  Cities 
Contest  in  Wisconsin.  See  the  Library 
Journal  for  .lanuary  1.5,  1926  for  her 
article  which  is  significant.  When  your 
Chamber  of  Commerce  grows  expansive 
on  the  general  desirableness  of  your  town 
as  a  place  to  live,  does  it  early  record 
and  loudly  insist  upon  the  merits  of  your 
library?  If  not.  whv  not?  Whose  the 
fault? 

For  a  long  while  I  have  doubted  that 
librarians  have  a  money  sense.  Of 
course,  I  knew  they  were  never  intended 
as  hoarders ;  but  I  was  skeptical  whether 
they  could  be  getters,  when  getting  means 
the  realization  of  their  dreams.  But 
Samuel  H.  Ilanck  in  his  illustrated  story 
of  how  American  cities  spend  their  in- 
comes shattered  the  orthodox  arguments 
against  evolution :  if  the  need  be  great 
enough  the  power  will  develop.  Accord- 
ing to  this  chart,  which  was  prepared  by 
Miss  Marjorie  E.  Nind  of  the  Grand 
Kapids  Public  Library,  was  expounded 
by  Mr  lianck  before  the  Council,  and 
may  be  found  in  the  Library  Journal  of 
January  15,  248  xVmerican  cities  have 
shown  great  restraint  in  feeding  their 
public  libraries.  In  1903  they  spent  nine- 
teen cents  per  person  for  their  public  book 
service.  That  sum  gradually,  very  gradu- 
ally, rose  during  the  years  until  in  1923 
it  reached  forty-three  cents.  By  way  of 
contrast  the  schools  started  at  .$3.86, 
mounted  rapidly  to  $6.88  in  1919,  when 
a  practically  perpendicular  ascent  began 
which  in  1923  touched  the  figure  of 
$12.87.  Between  these  poor  man,  x-ich 
man  ratings  come  the  other  purposes  for 
which  cities  raise  money — none  in  the 
sack  cloth  of  the  library,  none  in  the 
royal  purple  of  the  school :  recreation, 
charities  and  hospitals,  highways,  pro- 
tection to  persons  and  property.  In  terms 
of  the  purchasing  power  of  money  the 
increase  in  library  support  has  been  about 
.05,  despite  the  unprecedented  twenty 
year  development  of  this  institution  of 
informal  instruction  and  recreation.  That 
chart  deserves  study  and  presentation  to 
boards  and  tax  levying  bodies. 

Now  I  do  not  want  to  be  taken  as  in 
the  position  toward  the  schools  of  one 
who  bitterly  hisses,  "You,  robber !" 
Rather  I  would  commend  the  public  for 
supporting  this  prop  of  our  democratic 
form  of  government,  and  admiringly  cry 
"wonderfully  played."  But  this  double 
team  of  ours,  school  and  library,  does 
not   appear   to   be   traveling   abreast.     Is 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


the  beginniug  of  education  in  the  imma- 
turity of  childhood  so  much  more  import- 
ant than  its  continuance  through  the 
later  years?  Many  of  the  high  schools 
do  not  have  the  wealth  of  books  to  be 
found  in  the  public  libraries,  yet  of  late 
years  high  school  librarians  have  all  the 
better  of  salary  and  vacation.  The  head 
librarian,  who  wants  to  hold  his  assist- 
ants offered  school  positions  stands 
greatly  in  need  of  logic  and  of  ability  in 
painting  word  pictures  of  things  to  be. 
The  results  as  a  whole  would  be  better 
if  the  library  could,  at  respectful  distance, 
follow  in  the  footsteps  of  her  big  sister. 
One  of  the  charms  of  my  trips  to 
Chicago,  during  the  past  year,  has  been 
the  return  by  way  of  Louisiana.  Recently 
I  became  slightly  acquainted  with  another 


section  of  that  state  of  many  flags  and 
romantic  background.  The  newly  organ- 
ized Louisiana  Library  Association  met, 
January  6-7,  at  Lafayette,  where  long 
ago  the  British  transplanted  Evangeline 
and  her  people.  I  had  suspected  Long- 
fellow of  poetic  license  in  the  beauty  he 
gave  this  heroine  of  our  childhood  days ; 
but  if  one  may  judge  her  by  the  grace 
and  charm  of  these  distant  cousins  he 
wrote  with  the  calmness  for  which  New 
England  is  now  famous.  However,  my 
interest  down  there  is  in  the  develop- 
ment of  a  library  system.  And  I  predict, 
now,  that  in  this  land  of  sugar  and  cotton, 
timber,  oil,  sulphur  and  salt,  fish  and 
oysters — and  what  oysters — this  land  of 
Spanish,  French  and  English  civilizations 
a  fine  new  library  growth  is  about  to 
take  place. 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


EUROPEAN  LIBRARIES  VISITED. 


THE  LIBRARIES  I  VISITED  WHILE  IN  EUROPE. 

By  Caroline  S.  M'^aters. 


It  seems  rather  a  presumption  to  write 
of  the  libraries  I  visited  while  in  Europe 
this  last  summer,  from  June  19  to  Sep- 
tember 12,  when  the  visits  were  such  that 
a  passing  tourist  gives  where  time  is  very 
limited  and  consequently  of  a  very  brief 
nature,  and  knowledge  gained  of  same, 
more  or  less  ephemeral. 

When  one  is  visiting  Europe  for  the 
first  time,  with  all  the  expectancy  of  a 
wonderful  holiday  uufolding  before  one, 
and  the  spell  and  glamour  of  the  beauty 
and  art  of  the  old  woi'ld,  the  charm  of 
line  and  form  and  color,  and  the  fasci- 
nating novelty  of  life  abroad  has  taken 
possession  of  one,  that  which  has  been 
one's  ordinary  living  life  is  apt  to  be 
swallowed  up,  and  seem  quite  remote. 
However,  the  libraries  I  visited  were  all 
most  interesting  and  seemed  types  of  their 
class. 

Naturally,  the  American  Library  in 
Paris  holds  first  interest  among  libraries 
for  all  librarians  sojourning  in  Europe, 
and  the  visit  there  was  most  enjoyable 
and  enlightening.  I  was  much  interested 
\o  learn  from  jNIiss  Parsons,  the  director 
of  the  library  school,  that  one  of  the  rail- 
roads in  France,  with  the  aid  of  the  Com- 
mittee of  Education  and  the  cooperation 
of  the  American  Library  in  Paris,  is 
[jlanuing  on  establishing  in  community 
centers  along  the  railroad,  model  garden 
homes  for  its  employees  with  a  library  in 
each  community  to  be  administered  very 
much  on  the  same  lines  as  a  county  free 
library  system,  the  wife  of  one  of  the 
officials,  as  a  matter  of  public  spirit, 
acting  as  custodian  without  pay. 

The  library  school  in  connection  with 
the  library  was  in  session  with  the  full 
(|Uota  of  students,  with  many  countries 
represented  and  many  more,  representing 
far  east,  near  east,  and  Europe,  inquiring 
for  training,  making  it  quite  international 
in  scoiDe. 

It  was  a  disappointment  not  to  be  able 
to  see  the  National  Library  of  Paris, 
but  at  tliat  time  it  was  closed  for  repairs 
to  the  building,  not  to  be  reopened  until 
September. 

The  Vatican  Library  in  the  Vatican 
Museum  in  Kome  seemed  a  typical  museum 
library  where  the  contents  are  so  valuable 
that  they  have  to  be  kejit  behind  glass- 
enclosed  shelves  or  behind  locked  doors. 
The  books  and  illuminated  manuscripts 
in  this  library  were  wonderful  to  behold. 
The  beautiful  tooled  leathers  and  deco- 
rated   bindings,     the     perfection    of    the 


bookbinding  art,  the  many  books  encrusted 
with  precious  stones  all  over  them,  dia- 
monds, rubies,  sapphires,  emeralds  and 
many  other  stones,  made  one  stand  awe 
inspired  before  them  to  think  that  books 
would  be  bound  in  such  a  lavishness  of 
material  wealth.  At  the  very  end  of  the 
cases  in  this  room,  I  stopped  sur'prised 
and  really  thrilled — something  from  home 
— for  there  in  the  glass-enclosed  case 
with  the  other  treasures  was  "Sitting 
Bull"  framed  in  his  Indian  buckskin,  just 
as  I  had  seen  him  hanging  in  the  Harvey 
houses  on  the  Mojave  desert  and  the 
Fred  Harvey  curio  stories,  only  there 
was  no  doubt  that  here  there  was  some 
valuable  manuscript  tied  up  beneath  him. 
It  was  a  long  way  between  our  Southwest 
and  the  Vatican  but  all  distance  was  for 
a  moment   eliminated. 

From  Montreaux,  that  place  so  full  of 
charm  and  beauty  on  one  of  the  Swiss 
Lakes,  made  famous  by  the  Castle  of 
Chillon,  it  is  but  a  few  hours  journey  to 
Geneva,  and  the  League  of  Nations 
Palace,  where  I  had  the  great  pleasure 
of  a  visit  with  Miss  Wilson,  the  lilirarian 
of  the  League  of  Nations  Library.  Before 
having  my  appointment  Avith  Miss  Wilson, 
.however,  one  of  the  two  American  attend- 
ants whose  special  business  it  is  to  receive 
American  visitors  and  escort  them  through 
the  palace,  explaining  the  league,  its 
functions  and  results,  conducted  us 
through  a  portion  of  the  library  and 
dwelt  especially  upon  the  important  part 
that  the  library  plays  in  ^hp  life  of  the 
league  ;  the  absolute  necessity  for  it  when 
decisions  of  questions  arising  between 
states  are  now  based  upon  facts  and  not 
upon  political  expediency.  I  would  not 
attempt  to  go  into  details  about  the 
League  of  Nations  Library  after  a  short 
visit  of  less  than  two  hours,  but  would 
refer  all  readers  to  that  very  fine  article 
on  the  subject  written  by  Miss  Wilson  in 
the  Lihrarij  Journal  of  December  15, 
1922.  The  great  scope  of  the  library  and 
the  opportunities  for  world-wide  good  and 
the  privileges  it  enjoys  in  promoting 
better  understanding  between  nations 
based  on  facts,  impresses  one  so  deeply 
that  you  wish  that  you  could  be  suddenly 
elevated  to  the  millionaire  class,  so  you 
could  ha\'e  the  privilege  of  endowing  a 
lieauliful  library  building  to  house  such 
a   distinctive  international   library. 

Heidelberg  University  Library  in  the 
beautiful  town  of  Heidelberg  is  housed 
in  a  large  gray  stone  building,  one  of  the 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


university  group.  It  i.s  built  with  a  loug 
curved  corridor  iu  the  front  and  sides  of 
the  building,  on  one  side  of  which  are 
small  seminar  r'ooms  devoted  to  special 
subjects  and  special  collections,  and  in 
the  heart  of  the  building  rise  the  several 
stoi'ies  of  .stacks  that  take  care  of  the 
several  million  volumes  that  the  library 
has.  for  this  is  one  of  the  largest  libraries 
in  Europe,  and  second  in  Germany  in 
point  of  munber  of.  volumes,  only  to  the 
library  in  Leipzig.  The  librarian  very 
kindly  showed  me  the  library  in  detail. 
The  catalog  was  in  large  volumes,  which 
we  would  probably  find  cumbersome  to 
handle  after  being  used  to  our  card  catalog 
system.  There  was  a  small  room  that 
contained  many  rare  manuscripts  and 
autographed  letters  which  held  much 
interest. 

The  library  in  the  Peace  Palace  at 
The  Hague  was  the  next  visited  in  an 
all  too  brief  a  stop  of  about  four  hours  at 
The  Hague  on  the  way  from  Amsterdam 
to  Brus.sels.  so  the  visit  to  the  Peace 
I'rtlace  Library  consisted  of  a  brief  ten 
minutes  during  the  round  of  the  Peace 
Palace,  but  it  was  made  very  enjoyable 
hy  the  cordiality  of  the  assistant  librarian, 
the  librarian  Ijeing  away  on  his  vacation. 

Naturally  one  of  the  libraries  in  'Europe 
that  interested  me  most  was  the  little 
"Joyou.s  Hour"  (L'heure  joyeuse)  in 
Brussels,  the  first  children's  library  estab- 
lished in  Europe.  I  had  not  thought  to 
make  note  of  the  address  before  leaving 
home,  so  had  to  apply  to  the  United 
States  Consul  in  Brussels  for  the  infor- 
mation. It  so  happened  that  in  most  of 
the  libraries  I  visited  it  was  vacation 
time  for  the  librarian,  so  I  did  not  meet 
Mme  Huvelle  Leve,  the  librarian,  but 
Miss  Smelten.  the  assistant  librarian,  a 
graduate  of  the  American  Library  in 
Paris,  very  graciously  made  me  welcome. 
Five  years  ago  when  this  library  was 
started  the  American  Library  Association 
gave  the  first  books  and  furniture  to 
start  with.  The  City  of  Brussels  gave 
2500  francs  for  books  and  has  done  so 
each  year  for  new  books  and  binding, 
and  pays  the  librarian  and  her  assistant. 
The  quarters  of  the  library  consists  of 
two  rooms  but  with  such  a  wide  archway 
that  it  has  the  appearance  of  one  room. 
It  is  attractively  furnished  and  has  some 
beautiful  .Jessie  Wilcox  Smith's  and  other 
illustrators'  pictures  on  the  wall,  the  gift 
of  the  artists. 

Because  there  are  not  enough  books  to 
be  circulated  every  day.  they  are  only 
loaned  on  Sunday  from  10  a.m.  to  12  m.. 


l)Ut  the  library  is  open  for  readers  every 
day  and  they  average  from  about  12  in 
the  mornings  to  121  in  the  afternoons, 
with  a  much  greater  attendance  when  it 
rains. 

The  second  Joyous  Hour  Library  was 
expected  to  be  opened  in  Bi-ussels  in  the 
Rue  du  Canal  in  September  last  with 
furniture  and  books  given  by  Mme  Lip- 
pens  and  the  location  provided  by  the 
city  :  also  2.500  francs  per  year  and  the 
salary  of  the  librarian. 

While  in  Brussels.  I  also  visited 
Louvain  and  what  is  now  left  of  the 
great  University  of  Louvain  Library.  It 
was  a  pathetic  example  of  the  results  of 
war.  Restoration  was  going  on  slowly 
and  at  the  time  I  was  there  work  had 
ceased  until  more  money  should  be  avail- 
able. A  new  university  was  being  erected, 
liowever.  a  short  distance  from  the  old 
with  funds  provided  by  the  American 
Foundation  for  Restoration  of  France. 

The  last  library  visited  in  Europe  was 
the  British  Museum  Library  in  London, 
which  was  very  impressive  with  its  mag- 
nificent collection  of  books ;  with  its  rare 
old  books  representing  the  art  of  printing 
of  many  countries  of  the  world :  its  col- 
lection representing  the  fine  art  of  book- 
binding ;  its  stamp  collection ;  and  the  fine 
collection  of  rare  manuscripts.  One  of  the 
autographed  letters  written  by  George 
Washington  particularly  thrilled  me  with 
its  ring  of  true  Americanism.  One  of 
the  official  guards  told  me  that  the  rarest 
and  most  valuable  books  and  manuscripts 
will  be  gotten  out  of  the  cases  for  refer- 
ence use  and  for  any  individual  upon 
apidication  to  the  head  of  the  department. 
This  surprised  me  as  so  many  seemed  too 
precious  even  to  touch. 

Oxford  University  Library  would  have 
been  the  last  library  visited  had  not  plans 
been  necessarily  changed.  It  was  a  dis- 
appointment not  to  have  seen  it,  but  will 
be  something  to  look  forward  to  iu 
another  visit  should  it  ever  be  made. 

In  traveling  around  Europe  you  realize 
that  one  reason  why  there  are  not  more 
public  libraries  in  Exirope  is  because  there 
are  so  many  book  stores  or  vice  versa, 
especially  in  Holland  and  Belgium.  In 
Amsterdam  and  Brussels  it  seems  as 
though  almost  every  other  store  is  a  book 
store.  One  also  is  impressed  with  what 
a  jjrivilege  the  people  of  the  United  States 
enjo.v  in  having  their  public  library  sys- 
tems, and  California  especiall.v  in  its 
county  free  library  system  of  almost 
unlimited  service. 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


DISCOVERING    CALIFORNIA. 


DISCOVERING  CALIFORNIA. 

By  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Libi'tirian,  California  State  Library. 


California  !  Who  knows  the  origin  of 
tliat  name  whose  e\'ery  letter  is  an  organ 
pipe  of  emotions,  of  adveutnre,  of  golden 
dreams  come  true !  Never  was  there  a 
time  when  California  was  not.  She  was 
always  beyond  the  horizon :  the  land  to 
be  discovered  by  those  who  followed  the 
gleam.  Before  men  knew  her  name,  they 
sought  her  out  where  she  lay  listening-  to 
the  booming  bass  of  the  Pacific's  breakers 
and  the  aeolian  harp  of  the  Sierra's 
whispering  pines.  To  find  her  has  been 
the  ambition  of  the  stout  hearts  of  the 
questing  nations  Uan  must  have  an 
ob.iective  :  when  he  ceases  to  explore,  on 
the  earth,  beneath  its  flood  of  waters,  or 
in  the  cloud  fields  of  its  steel  blue  sky, 
then  the  world  Avill  be  a  dead  clod  falling 
into  the  pit  of  time. 

Columbus  in  the  magical  year  of  1492 
moved  out  upon  an  uncharted  ocean  in 
his  little  fleet  of  duck  boats  looking  for 
C  a  1  i  f  0  r  n  i  a — and  merely  discovered 
America.  Twenty  years  later  Yasco 
Xunez  de  Balboa  was  gladdened  by  his 
i-are  good  fortune  in  being  the  first  of  the 
old  world  voyagers  to  look  upon  Cali- 
fornia's ocean,  the  Pacific.  Hernando 
Cortez.  spurred  on  by  tales  of  fabulous 
wealth,  •To-old  and  silver  and  precious 
stones,  led  expedition  after  expedition 
with  the  hope  of  setting  foot  in  that 
earthly  paradise  which  it  was  never  his 
happy  fate  to  look  upon.  Coronado, 
Ulloa.  Cardenas.  Castillo.  Pizarro.  hardy 
explorers,  pirates,  gentlemen  all.  strong 
of  heart,  facile  wielders  of  ever  thirsting 
rapier  and  broad  sword — how  they  yearned 
for  the  California  of  their  fancy. 

1.S42  saw  .Juan  Rodriguez  Cabrillo 
sailing  blithely  into  San  Diego  Bay. 
selecting  a  warm  sandy  beach  whereon 
to  careen  his  buffeted  ship  and  rid  her 
bottom  of  the  growth  of  strange  new 
seas.  He  might  have  settled  there, 
become  the  fii'st  realtor  and  president  of 
the  chamber  of  commerce :  but  instead 
he  coasted  northward  and  visited  the 
i.slands  of  Catalina,  San  Clemente  and 
Santa  Cruz.  Mayhap  he  beheld  visions 
of  rich  argosies  of  commerce  to  be.  of 
magic  marts  of  trade  in  this  new  west, 
of  the  rush  of  eager  thousands  for  a  biding 
place  on  the  ocean's  rim.  California  was 
discovered.  What  more  could  man  aspire 
to?     Cabrillo  died. 

A  century  and  thirtj-'Seveu  slow  years  i 
rolled  by ;   then  came  Sir  Francis  Drake  I 


sailing  into  the  l)ay  which  bears  his  name. 
His  lust  for  pieces  of  eight,  his  undaunted 
English  courage,  his  way  with  rich,  easily 
jiliicked  Spaniards  filled  the  strong  oak 
l)od.v  of  his  ship  with  booty  from  many 
lands.  He,  too,  sought  to  discover 
California ;  and  chance,  a  strong  wind, 
or  the  W.v  scudding  fog  drifts  just  suc- 
ceeded in  hiding  the  glory  of  the  Golden 
Gate.  Strange  it  is  that  the  second 
centur.-^'  thereafter  was  fast  dropping  the 
curtain  of  its  drama  when  Sergeant 
Ortega  came  upon  that  great  bay  whose 
broad  waters  offer  fair  anchorage  for  the 
ships  of  the  world.  :\rore  of  California 
was  discovered. 

Captain  Cook,  in  the  memorable  year 
of  177'G,  threading  his  way  through  track- 
less seas  Californiaward,  chanced  upon 
those  pearls  of  the  Pacific  Ocean,  the 
Hawaiian  Islands.  Palou  came,  and 
Father  Serra,  soul  questing,  thinking  to 
discover  the  spiritual  wealth  of  a  fair 
new  land.  .Tedediah  Strong  Smith,  cap- 
tain of  frontiersmen,  trapper,  explorer. 
first  of  the  pioneers,  heard  the  call  and 
discovered  California  by  a  new  route, 
leading  his  hardy  little  band  of  Ameri- 
cans westwai-d  over  prairie  and  desert 
and  mountain  wilderness.  Dana,  too, 
seeking  health  and  fortune  and  Cali- 
fornia, found  rich  experiences  and  gave 
us  magical  "Two  Years  Before  the  Mast." 
Sutter.  Fremont.  Beading,  Brannan.  Kit 
Carson.  Stockton — the  flood  gates  are 
ojHMi  and  the  world  moves  forward  to 
disc-over  a  new  home,  California. 

T'erhaps  the  day  of  discovery  of  a  new 
pliysical  California  is  past;  but  in  men's 
iH'arts  and  brains  the  lure  of  discovery 
remains.  If  we  are  to  vision  fairer  worlds 
and  higher  flights,  we  must  not  lose  the 
will  to  go  into  far  places.  The  circuit  of 
the  earth  has  been  completed,  yet  every 
man  would  be  a  voyager'  to  unmapped 
continents.  My  appeal  is  to  keep  up  the 
age  old  quest  for  the  unseen,  the  dreamed 
of  paradise  ;  to  find  in  the  prosaic  work 
that  gives  the  daily  bread  a  strange  con- 
tinent which  shall  disclose  rare  beauties, 
enchanting  vistas,  rich  gems.  Like  the 
sailors  who  struggled  against  terrors  of 
wind  and  tide  and  unknown  shore  that 
they  might  ride  at  last  in  quiet  waters 
of  the  California  of  their'  dreams,  modern 
man  nuist  seek  happiness  in  discovering 
such  a  California  as  his  wits  may  devise. 
Discover  and  live. 


*Presented  at  California  Library  Association  meeting,  July  1,   1925. 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA  SHOWING  COUNTIES. 


iaf   o/' >S/»e  V  DEL  NoETt 


■-/tm^J,  Ml-    »»1  FM.HC1SC0 


f^.  Ofgurlft 


3S-N.  _ 

t-at.  (hrhtltn,  S  C. 


vol.  21, 110. 1] 


LIST    OF    COUNTY    FREE    LIBRARIES. 


LIST   OF   COUNTIES    HAVING   COUNTY   FREE    LIBRARIES 

Statistics  of  July  1,  1925. 


County 


Alameda 

Amador 

Butte 

Colusa 

Contra  Costa- 
Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 

Inyo 

Kern 

Kings .-, 


Los  Angeles 

Madera 

Merced 

Modoc. 

Monterey 

Napa 

Orange 

Plumas... 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San  Benito 

San  Bernardino- - 

San  Diego 

San  Joaquin 

San  Luis  Obispo. 

San  Mateo 

Santa  Barbara..- 

Santa  Clara 

Santa  Cruz 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare- --- 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 


42. 


Librarian 


Mary  Barmby 

*BerthaS.  Taylor 

Blanche  Chalfant 

Ella  Packer 

Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeok.-. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle 

Mrs  Faye  K.  Russell 

Ida  M.  Reagan 

Evalyn  Roman 

Anne  Margrave 

Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock 

Julia  Steffa 

Lenala  A.  Martin 

Helen  E.  Vogleson 

Blanche  Galloway 

Minette  L.  Stoddard 

Anna  L.  Williams 

Anne  Hadden 

Estella  DeFord 

Margaret  Livingston 

Edith  Gantt 

Chas.  F.Woods- 

Cornelia  D.  Provines 

Florence  J.  Wheaton 

Caroline  S.  Waters 

Eleanor  Hitt 

fldaE.  Condit 

Flo  A.  Gantz 

Edna  Holroyd 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Elizabeth  Stevens 

Minerva  H.  Waterman... 

Ellen  B.  Frink 

Clara  B.  Dills 

Bessie  B.  Silverthom 

Frances  M.  Burket 

Anne  Bell  Bailey 

MrsLila  D.  Adams 

Gretchen  Flower 

Muriel  Wright 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping 

Nancy  C.  Laugenour 


Established 


Sept. 

June 

Sept. 

June 

July 

Mar. 

April 

May 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

June 

Sept. 

Sept. 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

July 

April 

Mar. 

July 

Sept. 

Feb. 

July 

Oct. 

June 

April 

Aug. 

May 

Aug. 

Sept. 

June 

July 

April 

July 


,1910 
,  1919 
,  1913 
:,  1915 
,  1913 
I,  1910 
;,  1914 
:,  1914 
i,  1912 
,  1913 
.,  1910 
,  1912 
,  1915 
i,  1912 
,  1910 
,  1910 
,  1915 
I,  1912 
',  1916 
,  1919 
,  1915 
,  1911 
,  1908 
,  1918 
,  1913 
.,  1912 
,  1910 
,  1915 
,  1912 
,  1910 
,  1912 
,  1916 
,  1915 
,  1914 
,  1911 
,  1917 
,  1916 
,  1916 
I  1910 
,  1917 
,  1915 
:,  1910 


Ol,'08-D9,'19 


Income 
1924-251 


S47,389  00 

6,144  14 

18,173  69 

10,955  55 

50,761  88 

149,874  95 

16,104  92 

27,664  44 

12,748  01 

9,300  45 

94,142  32 

30.266  87 
13,926  31 

290,000  78 

21.267  77 
41,725  76 

4,096  99 

20,.505  06 

11,421  99 

25,987  00 

10,548  59 

14,299  83 

35,028  02 

9,370  13 

33,314  71 

30,948  63 

30,260  00 

15,259  26 

15,999  03 

22,066  00 

28,635  23 

8,500  32 

18,249  01 

23,019  72 

28,898  03 

14,881  05 

10,875  50 

4,426  62 

42,209  29 

8,373  24 

27,713  60 

17,860  44 


Sl,353,094  13 


Books, 
etc. 


116,570 
14,628 
62,539 

a43,257 

142,657 

357,097 
43,549 
82,105 
75,799 
26,361 

239,226 

103,315 
37,457 

497,450 
80,447 

103,850 
12,538 
76,482 
22,823 
53,762 
33,672 
0 
61,104 
30,025 
91,100 
90,833 
0 
42,175 

a32,045 
0 
96,653 
0 
72,964 
61,430 
79,859 
31,694 
36.694 
17.152 

109,367 
23,655 
65,916 
80,725 


a3,248,975 


Branches 


256 
64 

163 
81 
43 

187 
58 
74 

338 
72 
81 
32 

1.57 
77 
57 
75 
86 

109 
76 

133 

136 

122 
98 
64 

110 
98 
92 

152 
66 
71 
42 
73 
57 

122 
61 


4,121 


Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county '' 


51 
35 
66 
33 
65 

179 
45 

111 
59 
32 

106 
40 
42 

161 
51 
73 
44 
98 
51 
58 
30 
73 
80 
37 
71 

115 
92 
93 
42 


55 


36 
55 
25 
133 
32 
57 
47 


Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 


37 
31 
59 
29 
56 

153 
41 

102 
55 
30 

104 
38 
37 

125 
49 
64 


46 
33 
30 

45 
63 
37 
60 
104 


2,404 


'The  income  as  given  does  not  include  balance  in  fund  July  1,  1924. 

-Includes  elementary  and  high. 

♦Appointed  November  2,  1925;  began  work  January  I,  1926. 

t Appointed  November  17,  1925;  succeeded  H.  0.  Parkinson  December  1, 


10 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


PUBLIC  LIBRARIES  OF  20,000  BOOKS,  ETC.,  AND  OVER. 


City 


Librarian 


Established 


Income  1924-25 


Books,  etc. 


Card- 
holders 


Alameda 

Alhambra 

Berkeley 

ElCentro 

Glendale 

Long  Beach 

Los  Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Oxnard 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San  Bernardino. 

San  Diego 

San  Francisco.- 

San  Jose. 

Santa  Ana 

Santa  Barbara -- 

Santa  Cruz 

Santa  Monica.  . 

Santa  Rosa 

South  Pasadena 

Stockton. 

Vallejo 


Mrs  Marcella  H.  Krauth  . 

Marian  P.  Greene 

Carleton  B.  Joeckel 

Agnes  F.  Ferris 

Mrs  Alma  J.  Danford 

Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt 

Everett  R.  Perry 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn 

Chas.  S.  Greene 

Ethel  Carroll.. 

Jeannette  M.  Drake 

Sarah  M.  Jacobus 

Mabel  Inness 

Norah  McNeill 

Chas.  F.Woods 

Susan  T.  Smith... 

May  Coddington 

Althea  H.  Warren 

Robert  Rea 

Mrs  Edith  Daley 

Jeannette  E.  McFadden. . 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Minerva  H.  Waterman... 

Elfie  A.  Mosse... 

Margaret  A.  Barnett 

Mrs  Nellie  E.  Keith 

IdaE.Condit. 

L.  Gertrude  Doyle 


1877: 

1893 
1907 
1906 
1895 
1872 
1905 


1882 
1887 
1893 
1907 
1879 
1857 


1868 
1886 
1869 


1883; 


as  F  P  1879 

1906 

as  F  P  1895 
as  F  P  1909 
as  F  P  1907 
as  FP  1901 
as  F  P  1891 
as  F  P  1907 
as  F  P  1878 

1906 

as  F  P  1890 
as  F  P  1902 
as  F  P  1894 
as  F  P  1909 
as  F  P  1907 
as  F  P  1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as  F  P  1880 

1891 

1882 

as  F  P  1881 
as  F  P  1890 
as  F  P  1884 
as  F  P  1895 

1880 
as  F  P  1884 


S33,487  53 
28,329  67 

110,077  64 
11,732  24 
40,159  99 

190,282  46 

776,275  00 
14,582  49 

171,784  91 
8,170  37 

125,247  29 
26,344  95 
23,212  28 
27,262  13 
44,569  27 
43,335  67 
19.565  11 
85,584  37 

264,406  33 
19,767  13 
22,343  72 
48,485  21 
17,804  21 


11,127  66 

13,848  20 

53,571  31 

12,911  65 


70,433 
26,901 

137.631 
22,007 
36,708 
91,615 

717,765 
26,675 

306,395 
27.558 

104,395 
74,826 
67,697 
70,884 

110,205 

113,325 
28,784 

152,952 

340,020 
28,837 
33,455 
90,131 
59,719 
46,161 
30,763 
25,450 

187,098 
22,861 


23,227 
11,892 
26,906 

4,965 

21,910 

43,574 

215.697 

8,225 
60,227 

3,539 
42,673 
10,426 

6,961 

8,953 

7,973 
19,705 
10,635 
61,858 
96,634 
12.575 

7,691 


5,596 


7,147 


12,312 
a  5,700 


Note:    For   public    libraries   of   less    than    20,000    books,    etc.,    see   Annual    Statistics 
r.umber  of  Neivs  Notes  of  California  Libraries,  October,  1925. 


vol.  21, 110.  1 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


11 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY    NEWS    ITEMS. 


Only  those  California  libraries  are  listed  for  which  there  were  news  items, 
complete  list  of  libraries,  see  Annual  Statistics  Number,  October,  1925, 


For 


CALIFORNIA. 

Area.  1.jS.297  sq.  mi. 

Second  in  size  among  the  states. 

Population.  3,426,-536. 

Assessed  valuation,  $7,0.35,742,630. 

Number  of  counties,  58. 

ALAMEDA  COUNTY. 

(Third  class.) 
County    seat,    Oakland. 
Area,  840  sq.  mi.     Pop.  344.127. 
Assessed    valuation   .$398,907,.567    (tax- 
able for  county  .$.3.53,9.55.912). 

Alameoa  Co.  Free  Libkary,  Oakland. 
Miss  Mary  Barmby,  Lib'n. 

An  interesting  get-together  of  teachers 
and  library  workers  of  Alameda  County 
was  an  experience  of  December.  Teach- 
er's Institute  was  being  held  in  Oakland 
and  the  County  Superintendent  of  Schools 
granted  time  to  all  teachers  for  the  after- 
noon social  affair  in  the  schoolroom  at  the 
library  headquarters.  Corners  of  the 
room  were  made  information  desks  and 
at  each  place  was  some  one  to  explain  and 
answer  questions  in  regard  to  that  special 
part  of  the  work.  Mrs  Martin,  Super- 
visor of  Primary  Education,  had  a  collec- 
tion of  most  interesting  new  primary 
books,  not  yet  in  the  manual,  to  talk  over 
with  the  primary  teachers.  Miss  Baird 
explained  the  shelving  of  the  new  collec- 
tion of  the  complete  manual.  This  collec- 
tion contains  a  copy  of  every  book  in  the 
manual  and  is  held  in  the  schoolroom  of 
the  county  office  for  the  teachers  to  con- 
sult and  to  order'  from.  Miss  Trumbly 
showed  off  the  Teacher's  Library  in  the 
Board  of  Education  room  and  created 
much  interest  in  the  collection  among 
many  of  the  teachers.  Miss  Staats  had  a 
display  of  pictures  framerl  and  unframed 
near  the  stereograph  table  which  was  also 
on  display.  The  phonograph  was  near 
her  and  once  in  a  while  she  played  a 
worth  while  record  which  at  times  could 
be  heard  above  the  other  noise.  Maps 
were  hung  about  on  display,  also  posters 
that    the    school    children    had    made    at 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continued. 

different  times.  Then  the  other  members 
of  the  staff  served  tea  and  cakes  and 
candy.  It  was  a  good  get-together  and 
both  principals  and  teachers  declared  it 
a  success. 

Miss  Amy  May,  a  member  of  the  library 
class  at  the  University  of  California,  has 
begun  her  one  hundred  hours  practice 
work  in  the  county  library.  She  is  a  very 
promising   worker. 

Mary  Barmby,  Lib'n. 

More  than  thirty  custodians  were  pres- 
ent at  the  annual  custodians'  meeting  of 
Alameda  County  Free  Library,  the  after- 
noon of  Oct.  27,  at  the  Hall  of  Records. 
There  was  a  discussion  of  the  work  of  the 
past  .vear,  each  custodian  telling  some- 
thing of  the  work  in  her  district.  Miss 
Barmby,  County  Librarian,  and  Miss 
Maryette  Wilson,  of  the  Home  Demon- 
stration Department,  were  the  s]>eakers 
of  the  afternoon. — San  Francisco  Chroni- 
cle, O  29 

Berkeley. 

I!§Berkeley  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Carleton  B.  .Joeckel,  Lib'n. 

The  Berkeley  City  Council,  Oct.  14, 
authorized  the  purchase  of  the  northwest 
corner  of  Grove  and  Woolsey  streets  for" 
a  new  South  Berkeley  branch  library. 
The  price  is  $8040. — San  Francisco 
Examiner,  O  15 

Carrying  out  recommendations  of  a 
special  committee,  the  City  Council, 
November  3,  voted  unanimously  to  in- 
crease the  pay  of  the  public  library 
employees.  Librarian  .loeckel  will  receive 
an  increase  of  .$2-5  a  month.  Assistant 
librarians  will  be  raised  $10  to  $15  a 
month,  according  to  ratings,  and  other 
employees  will  be  given  a  similar  increase. 
— Berkeley  Gazette,  N  3 

California  ScnooL  of  Arts  and 
Grafts  Library.  Frederick  H.  Meyer, 
Director. 

The  California  School  of  Arts  and 
Crafts  was  moved,  in  the  latter'  part  of 
December,  to  Broadway  at  College 
avenue,  Oakland, 


12 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continued. 

Berkeley — Continued. 

Pacific  Unit.\rian  School  for  tiik 
Ministry  Library.  Earl  Morse  Wilbur, 
Pres.     Miss  Lillian  Burt,  Lib'n. 

The  library  of  this  school,  comprising 
a  little  less  than  20,000  volumes,  and 
about  1.5,000  pamphlets,  besides  being,  for 
its  size,  unusually  well  selected  iu  all 
departments  of  theology,  and  especially 
strong  in  works  of  reference,  periodicals 
and  standard  works,  now  boasts  of  being 
the  foremost  library  in  the  world  for  its 
collection  of  materials  bearing  on  the 
history  of  Unitarianism.  Pre.sident  Earl 
M.  Wilbur,  who  has  been  working  in  this 
tield  for  twenty  j^ears,  and  whose  recent 
work,  "Our  Unitarian  Heritage,"  gives 
him  rank  as  the  first  living  authority  on 
the  subject,  has  lately  returned  fr'om 
Europe,  where  he  not  only  secured  a 
large  number  of  important  works  in  this 
line,  but  also  explored  the  resources  of 
most  of  the  important  European  libraries. 
He -reports  that  no  other  libr'ary,  either  iu 
America  or  abroad,  approaches  this  one 
in  the  extent  and  completeness  of  its 
(hiitariaiiti.  The  library  is  glad  to  be  at 
the  servici^  of  responsible  readers  through- 
out the  state,  and  to  make  inter-library 
loans  whenever  requested. 

Lillian  Burt,  Lib'n. 

J:i:§UNivERSiTY  of  California  Li- 
brary. W.  W.  Campbell,  Pres.  .J.  C. 
Rowell,  Ijib'n  Emeritus ;  Harold  L. 
Leupp,  Lib'n. 

What  is  declared  to  be  the  finest  collec- 
tion of  old  book  plates  in  existence  is  on 
exhibition  in  the  main  hall  of  the  Univer- 
sity of  California  Library.  The  collection 
numbers  some  4000  old  plates.  It  is 
shown  every  four  .years,  enabling  each 
generation  of  students  to  see  it. — Sau 
Francisco  Chronicle,  O  21 

The  University  of  California  Library 
has  on  exhibit  some  of  its  rare  books  and 
manuscripts,  displaying  a  number  of 
specimens  of  book-making  of  the  Near 
Bast.  These  include  a  Vatican  manu- 
script entitled  "The  Books  of  Anahauc," 
a  curious  edition  of  "The  Book  of  Hours," 
a  unique  Persian  manuscript  "The  Divan 
of  Hafiz  of  Shiraz"  ornamented  with 
flowers  in  Ispahan  lacquer  and  bound  in 
Persian  morocco,  "The  Four  Gospels  in 
Armenian"  on  heavy  paper  of  the  twelfth 
or    thirteenth    century,    the    Palm    Leaf 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued, 
manuscript    fr'om    a    Buddhist   monastery 
iu  northern  Siam,  and  a  facsimile  manu- 
script    on     papyrus. — Oakland     Tribune, 
D  27 

Livermore. 

LivERMORE  Free  [Public]  Library 
and  Branch.  Alameda  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Myrtle  E.  Harp,  Lib'n. 

The  children's  story  hours  will  be 
resumed  at  the  Livermore  Public  Library 
after  the  holidays,  the  first  being  held 
Saturday  morning,  Jan.  9;  with  Miss 
Evelyn  Lassen  in  charge.  These  story 
hours  were  well  attended  last  winter  and 
spring. — San    Francisco   Chronicle,   D   22 

Oakland. 

:!:§||Oakland  Free  [Public]  Library. 
Chas.  S.  Greene,  Lib'n. 

No  bids  having  been  received  for  the 
supply  of  periodicals  for  1926,  the  list 
was  placed  with  the  Franklin  Square 
Agency. 

Negotiations  lietween  the  library  board 
and  the  school  department  have  r'esulted 
in  getting  a  decision  from  the  District 
Attorney  that  it  would  be  entirely  legal 
for  the  school  department  to  lease  to  the 
library  board  laud  or  rooms  for  branch 
libraries. 

In  connection  with  Children's  Book 
Week  over  twenty  talks  were  given  to 
the  various  Parent-Teacher  Associations 
of  Oakland.  All  the  talks  were  given  by 
members  of  the  staff,  the  majority  by 
Miss  Isabel  Curtis,  who  is  continuing  her 
talks  on  the  library  to  service  clubs  and 
other  organizations. 

Miss  Curtis  is  giving  a  series  of  travel 
talks  over  the  radio,  KGO,  the  five  Thurs- 
days in  January,  at  the  Boys'  and  Girls' 
hour. 

A  general  salary  increase,  affecting 
nearly  all  the  employees  of  the  library 
goes  into  effect  January  1.  The  increases 
range  from  .$25  per  month  for  depart- 
ment heads  to  .$4  per  month  for  part- 
time  janitors. 

Mrs  Harriett  M.  Hill  found  it  neces- 
sary to  ask  for  a  demotion  from  her 
position  of  Branch  Librarian  at  Melrose 
to  the  rank  of  substitute,  owing  to  the 
uncertain  condition  of  her  health.  Miss 
Jeannette  C.  Anderson  of  the  Allendale 
Branch  was  transferred   to   Melrose,   and 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


13 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 
Miss  Helen  H.  Rand,  assistant  at  Melrose, 
was  appointed  Branch  Librarian  at 
Allendale.  Mrs  Cecilia  Feeley  and  Miss 
r.rorlei  Rothberg  have  been  appointed 
library  assistants,  and  Miss  Claire 
McConkey,  bookmender.  Miss  Florence 
Little,  Mrs  Helen  B.  Laughrey,  Mrs 
Alice  N.  Williams,  Mrs  Laura  Bar'kley 
and  Mrs  Elsie  C  Smith  have  been 
appointed  to  the  positions  of  substitute. 
Resignations  from  the  position  of  substi-' 
tute  have  been  accepted  from  Miss  Ruth 
M.  l)t)dge  and  Miss  Florence  McAuliffe. 
Ckas.   S.  Greene,  Lib'n. 

Piedmont. 

Piedmont  High  School  Library. 
Harry  W.  Jones,  Prin.  Gladys  English, 
Lib'n. 

In  November  we  held  an  exhibit  of 
children's  books  in  the  high  school  gym- 
nasium for  the  Parent-Teacher  Associa- 
tion, to  which  all  the  parents  and  children 
of  Piedmont  were  invited.  It  was  well 
attended  and  book  lists  were  distributed, 
graded  ones,  printed  by  the  high  school, 
and  the  list  prepared  by  Mrs  Mitchell  of^ 
the  Sather  Gate  Book  Shop.  The  exhibit 
was  made  possible  by  the  Sather  Gate 
Book  shop,  as  they  loaned  us  all  the 
books. 

During  November,  I  spoke  at  the 
Parent-Teacher  meeting  at  the  Havens 
and  Beach  Grammar  Schools  on  chil- 
dren's books,  and  at  that  time  gave  out 
printed  lists,  as  well  as  during  book' 
v/eek,  so  I  feel  that  all  the  parents  are 
conscious  of  the  fact  that  there  are 
people  to  guide  them  in  their  book 
selection. 

The  students  seem  to  appreciate  the 
library  and  are  using  it  more  and  more; 
all  the  time.  In  November  we  circulated 
the  largest  number  of  books  for  one  day, 
285,  and  the  daily  average  is  steadily 
increasing. 

Gladys  English,  Lib'n. 

San   Leandro. 

§San  Leandro  Free  Public  Library 
AND  Branch,  Alameda  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Mary  Brown,  Lib'n. 

During  Children's  Book  Week  the  liln-a- 
rian  addressed  eleven  different  classes  at 
the  grammar  schools  and  invited  them  to 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued. 
San  Leandro — Continued, 
use  the  library.  To  stimulate  a  taste  for 
reading  poetry,  the  children  were  encour- 
aged to  enter  a  contest  for  verse  writing. 
The  originality  and  versatility  shown  by 
many  of  them  were  wonder'ful. 

Mr  Frank  Bricker  has  been  appointed 
on  the  library  board  to  succeed  W.  O. 
Davies,   resigned. 

Mary  Brown,  Lib'n. 

ALPINE  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth  class.) 
County  seat,  Markleeville. 
Area,  I">7.5  sq.  mi.    Pop.  24;!. 
Assessed    valuation    !^S.i)(),~)fy7     (taxalile 
for  county  .$714,.521). 

AMADOR  COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  Jackson. 
Area,  .568  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7793. 
Assessed  valuation  if 7,80.8, 717    (taxable 
for  county  $0,758,127). 

Amador  Go.  Free  Library,  Jackson. 
Miss  Bertha  S.  Taylor,  Lib'n. 

At  the  meeting  of  the  Board  of  Super-' 
visors,  Nov.  2,  Bertha  S.  Taylor  was 
appointed  Amador'  County  Librarian  to 
commence  Jan.  1.  Miss  Taylor  has  been 
librarian  of  Willows  Free  Public  Library 
for  several  years. — Stockton  Record,  N  4 

BUTTE  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second  class.) 
County  seat,   Oroville. 
Area,  1764  sq.  mi.    Pop.  30,030. 
Assessed    valuation    .<i;44,966,513     (tax- 
able  for  county  .$36,480,949). 

CALAVERAS  COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth   class.) 
County  seat,  San  Andreas. 
Area,  990  sq.  mi.     Pop.  6183. 
Assessed  valuation  $8,471,515   (taxable 
for  county  $7,032,275). 

COLUSA  COUNTY. 

(Forty-second  class.) 
County  seat,  Colusa. 
Area,  1080  sq.  mi.     Pop.  9290. 
Assessed    valuation    $26,815,147     (tax- 
able for  county  .$22,071,3.55). 


14 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


CONTRA  COSTA  COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth  class.) 
County  seat,  Martinez. 
Area,  750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  .53,880. 
Assessed    valuation    $99,631, -572     (tax- 
able for  county  .'i;88,605,475). 

Contra  Costa  Co.  Free  Library, 
Martinez.  Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

The  teachers  of  the  county  have  been 
formed  in  groups,  each  taking  up  some 
special  study.  The  library  group  has  met 
in  the  county  library  office  where  they 
have  investigated  all  sources  of  informa- 
tion and  reference  material  in  the  shape 
of  pictures,  clippings,  etc.  The  rei>ort 
that  will  I)e  rendered  at  the  end  of  the 
year  will  show  the  close  connection 
between  the  school  and  library. 

At  a  meeting  of  the  Contra  Costa  Wel- 
fare Council.  Dec.  8,  Mrs  Whitbeck  was 
elected  president.  Mrs  Whitbeck  spoke 
at  a  Parent-Teacher"s  meeting  in  Yallejo 
on  children's  reading,  Dec.  14. 

Children's  Book  Week  was  observed 
through  the  months  of  November  and 
December  by  having  a  choice  collectioia 
of  new  books  and  editions  in  twenty  of 
the  largest  branches.  An  attractive  poster 
indicated  the  object  of  each  rack  collec- 
tion. They  attracted  the  attention  of  the 
children  who  reported  to  parents.  One 
branch  reported  that  every  child  borrower 
had  receivetl  a  book  for  Christmas  from 
among  the  titles  on  the  rack.  The  reports 
from  the  custodians  showed  that  the  col- 
lections had  really  been  of  greater  benefit 
than  the  talks  and  exhibits  that  have  been 
made  before  clubs  and  parent-teacher 
organizations. 

The  Pinole  new  branch  library  room 
will  be  completed  March  6.  This  is  a 
combination  of  library,  fire  house,  jail 
and  community  clubrooms.  Although  this 
may  seem  a  queer  combination,  it  prom- 
ises to  work  out  satisfactorily  in  a  very 
small  town.  The  corner  stone  bears  the 
words  Pinole  Public  Library  and  it  will 
be  referred  to  as  such. 

The  new  Pittsburg  Branch  Library  will 
be  opened  early  in  February. 

Alice  G.  Whitbeck,  Lib'n. 

The  furniture  for  the  Children's  Room 
of  the  Pittsburg  Branch  Library  is  being 
selected  by  a  committee  composed  of 
members  of  the  Pittsburg  Women's  Club 


CONTRA  COSTA  CO.— Continued, 
and  city  officials.  The  furniture  is  to  be 
a  gift  of  the  club.  Before  the  City  Council 
voted  to  build  a  library,  the  Women's 
Club  started  a  fund  for'  that  purpose. 
They  had  accumulated  .$1000  when  work 
was  undertaken  by  the  city,  so  they 
decided  to  donate  their  fund  to  the  Chil- 
dren's Room. — San  Francisco  Vhroniclc, 
D  22 

DEL   NORTE   COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth  class.) 
County  seat.  Crescent  City. 
Area,  irv4G  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2759. 
Assessed    valuation    .$10,339,847     (tax- 
abl<'  for  county  .$10,283,747). 

EL   DORADO   COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth  class.) 
County  seat,  Placerville. 
Area,  1891  .sq.  mi.     Pop.  6420. 
Assessed    vahiation    .$12,835,140     (tax- 
able for  county  .$10,.337,.340) . 

FRESNO  COUNTY. 

(Fourth  class.) 

County  seat,  Fresno. 
Area,  5696  sq.  mi.     Pop.  128,779. 
Assessed    valuation   $198,413,940    (tax- 
able for  county  $165,714,637). 

IFresno  Co.  Free  Library.  Fresno. 
Miss   Sarah   E.   McCardle,  Lib'n. 

The  annual  Custodians'  Meeting  was 
held  in  the  main  library  on  November  18, 
with  twenty-six  custodians  in  attendance, 
as  well  as  a  number  of  assistants  from 
the  main  library.  The  morning  session 
was  taken  up  with  informal  discussions 
of  the  work.  Many  interesting  i>oints 
were  brought  out,  several  of  the  assist- 
ants who  do  the  branch  visiting  leading 
the  discussions.  Luncheon  was  served  on 
the  round  tables  in  the  Children's  Room. 
This  year  the  custodians  brought  their 
sandwiches  and  the  girls  served  tea,  coffee 
and  dessert.  The  luncheon  hour  was 
much  enjoyed,  as  it  gave  the  custodians 
an  opportunity  to  talk  over  their  prob- 
lems with  each  other.  In  the  aftei-noon, 
Miss  Hurlburt,  Children's  Librarian,  gave 
an  interesting  talk  on  "Work  with  chil- 
dren," and  Miss  Keller,  one  of  the  branch 
assistants,  reviewed  one  of  the  late  chil- 
dren's books.  Several  of  the  custodians 
told   of   theiv   wor'k  with   the   children   in 


vol.  21,  no.  11 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


15 


FRESNO  CO.— Continued, 
their    commimities.      The    .session    clcsed 
with    a    very    interesting    and    instrnctive 
talk   by    Miss    Sliaw   of   the    Catalog   De- 
partment, on  "Keeping  up  with  books." 

Miss  Mary  Harris.  Head  of  tlie  Branch 
Department  for  several  years,  has  been 
given  a  year's  leave  of  absence  to  assist 
Miss  Culver  in  her  work  with  the  Library 
Commission  of  Louisiana.  We  ar'e  very 
glad  for  Miss  Harris  to  have  this  oppor- 
tunity. 

The  branch  at  Monmouth  has  been 
moved  into  larger  and  more  comfortable 
(juarters.  We  have  also  moved  the  branch 
at  Tranquillity,  a  room  having  been  built 
for  the  library  in  a  better  location  than 
the  old  one. 

Mrs  H.  K.  Fox,  who  was  our  custodian 
at  the  San  .Joaquin  Light  and  Power' 
Corporation's  construction  camp  on  King's 
Iiiver,  was  killed  by  a  fall  from  a  horse 
she  was  attempting  to  mount.  Mrs  Fox 
was  an  exceptional  custodian  and  was 
doing  fine  work  with  the  men  in  the 
camps.  Mrs  Anthony  P.  Dean,  who  had 
helped  her,  will  carry  on  the  work. 

The  staff  had  its  usual  Christmas  party 
with  a  tree  and  luncheon. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Lib'n. 

Kerman. 

Kerman  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary AND  BKANcir,  Fresno  Co.  Free 
Library.     Wm.  A.  Otto,  Prin. 

During  the  past  three  months,  we  have 
had  two  hundred  thirty-two  new  books  of 
variousN  kinds  added  to  our  collection  ;  a 
new.  up-to-date  filing  cabinet  of  fifteen 
drawers,  with  table  for  same  ;  about  one 
hundred  feet  of  new  book  shelving ;  repre- 
.senting  a  total  investment  of  about  seven 
hundred  sixty-eight  dollars. 

At  the  opening  of  the  school  year,  Mrs 
Melissa  Fuller,  head  of  the  School  De- 
partment of  the  Fresno  County  Library, 
addressed  the  student  body  on  the  im- 
portance, use  and  care  of  the  High  School 
Library,  and  has  also  instructed  our 
student  library  attendants  in  the  care  of 
the  library. 

Joseph  E.  Sterner,  Lib'n. 

GLENN   COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth  class.) 
County  seat,  Willows. 
Area,  1460  sq.  mi.    Pop.  11,853. 
Assessed    valuation    .$27,9.52,818     (tax- 
able for  county  $22,894,726). 


GLENN   CO.— Continued. 
Willows. 

Willows  Free  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  Glenn  Co.  Free  Library.  Miss- 
Elizalieth  Eubank,  Lib'n. 

At  a  meeting  of  the  city  library  trustees 
Dec.  7,  the  resignation  of  Miss  Bertha  S. 
Taylor  as  city  librarian  was  presented 
and  accepted,  and  Miss  Elizabeth  Eubank 
of  Berkeley  was  appointed  her  successor. 
Miss  Taylor  is  to  become  head  of  Amador 
County  Free  Library  Jan.  1.  Miss 
Eubank  was  formerly  city  librarian  here. 
— Willows  Journal,  D  8 

HUMBOLDT  COUNTY. 

(Twentieth  class.) 
County  seat,  Eureka. 
Area,  3.507  sq.  mi.    Pop.  37,41.3. 
Assessed    valuation    $.57,2.57,45(1     (tax- 
able for  county  .$.52,4(m:),108). 

IMPERIAL  COUNTY. 

( Seventeenth  class. ) 
County  seat.  El  Centro. 
Area,  4316  sq.  mi.    Pop.  43,383. 
Assessed    valuation    .$.52,223,716     (tax- 
able for  county  $42,-567,499) . 

Imperial  Co.  Free  Library,  El  Cen- 
tro.    Miss  Evalyn  Boman,  Lib'n. 

Our  largest  branch  library,  located  in 
Brawley,  is  now  being  remodeled  and 
enlarged,  very  much  to  our  delight.  A 
new  bi'anch  was  established  at  Plaster 
City  Oct.  2.  Tills  is  a  gypsum  deposit 
company  with  over  a  hundred  men  who 
are  miles  away  from  everything.  They 
are  most  enthusiastic  over  the  library 
and  welcomed  it  Avith  "open  arms." 

We  have  started  the  regular  monthly 
staff  meetings  and  find  it  adds  much  to 
our  pleasure  and  work.  The  second  Mon- 
day of  each  month  is  staff  meeting  day 
at  which  time  we  discuss  the  work  and 
at  least  one  book  we  have  read. 

The  librarian  has  visited  quite  a  number 
of  schools  lately,  giving  talks  on  the  "Car2 
of  P.ooks"  and  starting  reading  clubs  in  a 
few  schools  where  the  outside  reading 
was  very  lax. 

Wo  are  the  proud  possessors  of  a  new 
card  catalog  which  was  needed  badly  since 
the  old  one  was  so  full  we  couldn't  even 
read  the  cards. 

Imparial   County   was   pleased    to   have 
a    visit   from   Mrs   Henshall    in    the    fall, 
and  hopes  she  will  come  again  soon. 
Evalyn  Boman,  Lib'n. 


16 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


IMPERIAL  CO.— Continued. 
A  meeting  of  the  library  custodians  of 
Imperial  County  was  held  at  the  county 
courthouse  Oct.  19.  Mrs  May  Dexter 
Henshall  of  the  State  Library  staff  was 
one  of  the  speakers.  Miss  Boman  enter- 
tained the  custodians  at  luncheon  follow- 
ing the  meeting. — El  Csntro  Press,  O  21 

Brawley. 

Brawley  Union  High  School  Li- 
15RARY.  C.  N.  Vance,  Prin.  Olive  M. 
Potter,   Lib'n. 

The  efficiency  of  this  library  has  been 
greatly  increased  by  the  addition  of  over 
two  hundred  new  books  this  year.  The 
l)ooks  added  are  for  the  use  of  the  History, 
I'^nglish  and  Dramatics  departments.  A 
iunnt)er  of  volumes  have  also  been  add  3d 
(o  the  list  of  reference  books  used  by  the 
.Junior  College  History  Class.  This  brings 
the  number  of  books  available  for  use  up 
to  nearly  fourteen  hundred  volumes. 

Ten  magazines  and  other  periodicals 
liave  been  added  to  the  list  of  twenty-four 
in  use  last  year. 

The  new  Junior  College  building  now 
in  process  of  construction,  will  contain  a 
room  especially  constructed  for  library 
use.  This  will  add  to  the  possibilities  of 
usefulness  of  the  library  and  give  much 
needed   room   for  expansion. 

Olive  M.  Potter,  Lib'n. 

El   Centre. 

El  Centro  [Free]  Public  Eibraby 
ANj)  Branch,  Imperial  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.     Miss    Agnes    F.    Ferris,    Lib'n. 

Miss  Ferris  has  opened  a  branch  li- 
brary at  the  East  Side  School.  Five 
hundred  carefully  selected  books — juvenile 
stories,  adult  fiction,  non-fiction  volumes 
— have  been  installed,  and  Miss  Ouida 
Nelson,  a  high  school  student,  will  act 
as  librarian,  serving  as  a  volunteer  dur- 
ing certain  school  hours,  and  also  keeping 
the  library  open  for  a  limited  time  after 
school  for  the  benefit  of  the  community 
residents.  The  expense  of  this  latter 
service  is  to  be  met  by  the  Public  Li- 
brary.— El  Centro  Press,  D  4 

INYO  COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh   class.) 
County  seat,  Independence. 
Area,  10,224  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7031. 
Assessed    valuation    .$lS,730,.54jo     (tax- 
able for  county  $11,390,515). 


INYO  CO.— Continued. 

Inyo  Co  Free  Library,  Independ- 
ence.    Miss  Anne  Margrave,  Lib'n. 

Additional  shelving  has  been  placed  in 
the  reference  and  juvenile  rooms  of  the 
Bishop  Branch,  making  a  considerably 
larger  collection  of  books  possible.  For 
this  branch,  the  library  is  binding  the 
most-used  magazines,  and  a  part  of  t-h- 
extra  shelving  is  needed  for  these. 

The  Lone  Pine  Branch  has  again  ex- 
perienced the  delights  of  moving.  Miss 
Nellie  E.  Reynolds,  appointed  custodiau 
in  October,  found  room  for  it  in  her  home, 
half  a  block  from  the  main  street.  Miss 
Reynolds  is  taking  great  interest  in  the 
branch,  and  the  circulation  is  increasing 
greatly. 

Teachers'  Institute  was  held  this  year 
at  Lone  Pine,  Nov.  9  to  11.  This  cut 
into  Children's  Book  Week,  since  notice 
of  the  plan  wa.s  received  too  late  to  work 
out  anything  in  connection,  and  the 
County  Librarian's  presence  there  was 
very  necessary.  However,  the  week  was 
observed  at  Big  Pine,  with  an  exhibit 
of  fresh  new  books  all  week,  and  on  Fri- 
day tea  at  the  library  by  the  Friday 
Study  Club.  The  County  Librarian 
addressed  the  club  and  discus-sed  with' 
them  and  their  friends,  later,  the  chil- 
dren's books  and  reading. 

In  Independence  Book  Week  was 
handled  by  the  assistant,  Mrsi  Jessie 
Roeper,  and  Miss  Ina  Goudie,  one  of  the 
teachers,  with  the  help  of  other  interested 
persons.  One  of  the  most  prominent 
store  windows  was  lent  for  the  occasion, 
and  decorated  with  dolls,  posters,  and 
picture  books.  The  posters  and  slides 
of  the  National  Booksellers  Association 
were  used  in  all  the  towns,  and  the 
Independence  school  children  were  inter- 
ested in  making  others.  An  exhibit  of 
new  books,  graded,  was  increased  by  a 
selection  from  the  Sta'-e  Library,  and  an 
old  poster  of  Houghton  Mifflin,  "Heroes 
of  Other  Days,"  was  made  the  occasion 
of  a  prize  offered  for  the  most  characters 
identified.  Saturday  afternoon  the  chil- 
dren and  their  mothers  were  invited  to 
the  library,  which  was  transformed  with 
flowers  and  a  decided  rearrangement  of 
furniture.  The  book  truck  was  made  into 
a  tea  wagon,  since  simple  refreshments 
were  part  of  the  order  of  the  afternoon. 
Stories  were  told  and  readings  given  by 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


17 


INYO  CO.— Continued. 
Mrs  F.  W.  r^ete  and  Mrs  Daniel  Mc- 
Carthy of  Lone  Pine.  The  librarian 
spoke  briefly  on  the  history  and  the 
use  of  libraries,  illustrating  with  a  tablet 
from  an  ancient  Babylonian  collection. 
A  special  pleasure  was  the  exhibit  of 
dolls  from  India,  loaned  by  Mrs  Robert 
Barrett. 

Mrs  W.  G.  Dixon  has  resigned  the 
custodianship  of  Cartago  Branch,  and 
Charlotte  Mason  is  to  take  her  place. 
The  branch  is  moved  to  the  men's  reading 
room,  where  the  books  can  be  seen  and 
selection  more  easily  made.  They  have 
been  in  the  post  office,  and  necessarily 
l)ehind  locked  doors.  Lists  were  used, 
but  a  sight  of  the  books  will  be  much 
more   satisfactory. 

Mrs  Anna  E.  Glade,  custodian  of 
Manzanar  Branch,  having  moved  away, 
Mrs  Nellie  E.  Lydston  has  been  appointed 
to  take  her  place. 

New  steel  shelving  and  a  new  Library 
Bux-eau   file   for   music   records   make  the 
office    at    Independence    more    convenient 
and  sufficiently  roomy  for  the  pres-ent. 
Anne  Margrave,  Lib'n. 

An  account  of  the  celebration  of  Chil- 
dren's Book  Week  at  Bishop  Branch  will 
appear  in  an  early  number  of  Western 
.Tournal  of  Education. 

KERN   COUNTY, 

(Twelfth  class.) 
County  seat,  Bakersfield. 
Area,  81.59  sq.  mi.     Pop.  54,843. 
Assessed   valuation   $211,995,472    (tax- 
able for  county  $180,120,547). 

Kern  Co.  Free  Library,  Bakersfield. 
Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock,  Lib'n. 

The  formal  opening  of  the  new  $6000 
branch  library  building  at  Shafter 
occurred  the  evening  of  Nov.  19.  Talks 
were  made  by  Supervisor  J.  O.  Hart, 
Mrs  Babcock,  Miss  Wilhelmina  Harper, 
Children's  Librarian  of  Kern  County 
Free  Library,  F.  W.  Herbert  of  Shafter, 
and  the  local  custodian,  Mrs  Thomas 
Wedge.  The  building  is  of  brick  and  is 
well  arranged.  Furniture  and  shelving 
costing  approximately  $20(X)  have  been 
installed.  A  lawn  has  been  planted  and 
shrubs  are  being  put  out. — Fresno  Repuh- 
lican,  N  21 

Tlie  Board  of  Supervisors  at  the  meet- 
2 — 43023 


KERN  CO.— Continued. 

ing  of  Sept.  28  acted  upon  Mrs  Babcock's 
suggestion  and  appointed  D.  Ashley 
Hooker  Branch  Librarian  for  Kern 
County.  Mr  Hooker  is  a  graduate  of 
Middleburg  College,  Vermont,  and  of  the 
New  York  State  Library  School,  and 
comes  to  Bakei-sfield  from  Detroit  where 
he  was  technology  librarian  of  the  public 
library  for  six  years.- — Bakersfield  Cali- 
fornian,  S  29 

KINGS  COUNTY. 

( Twenty-ninth   class. ) 
County  seat.  Ilanford. 
Area,  1373  sq.  mi.    Pop.  22,031. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,932,326     (tax- 
able for  county  $25,088,599). 

Kings  Co.  Free  Library,  Haneord. 
Miss  .Julia  Steffa,  Lib'n. 

library  service  to  kings  county  migra- 
tory schools 

Increasing  from  one  migratory  school, 
one  teacher  and  40  pupils  two  years  ago, 
to  six  .schools,  nine  teachers  and  615 
pupils  this  year,  Kings  County  has  had  a 
difficult  problem  in  caring  for  its  floating 
school  population.  This  unprecedented 
growth  was  due  to  the  increased  acreage 
of  cotton  which  had  to  be  harvested. 
The  children  in  the  schools  changed  con- 
stantly, for  pupils  entered  one  day, 
stayed  a  brief  time  and  were  gone  again. 
They  were  largely  of  Mexican  parentage, 
although  there  were  some  Portuguese  and 
a  few  Indians   and  negroes. 

Three  school  districts  were  affected 
by  these  migratory  people — Corcoran, 
Dallas  and   Stratford. 

The  Corcoran  district  maintained  four 
schools,  with  seven  teachers,  from  nearly 
the  beginning  of  the  school  year  up  to 
the  Christmas  holidays.  The  period  of 
greatest  enrollment  was  the  last  of 
November  and  the  first  weeks  of  Decem- 
ber and  was  greater  than  the  enrollment 
at  the  regular  grammar  school. 

The  Dallas  and  the  Stratford  schools 
were  started  later  in  the  school  year 
and  each  had  an  enrollment  of  about  30 
pupils. 

Most  of  the  schools  were  held  in  large 
tents,  near  the  camps.  The  tents  were 
provided  by  the  ranch  owners  and  were 
furnished  with  temporary  tables  and  long 
benches  by  them.     One  school  was  held 


18 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


KINGS  CO.— Continued. 
in  the  old  Tensmuir  school  house.  The 
Kings  County  Library  furnished  the  nec- 
essaiy  books.  One  school  had  about  140 
pupils  in  one  tent  and  the  two  teachers 
had  a  serious  problem  in  maintaining 
order  and  a  difficult  task  in  teaching  the 
English  language  as  well  as  reading,  writ- 
ing and  arithmetic.  As  most  of  the  pupils 
were  in  the  lower  grades,  emphasis  was 
laid  on  the  fundamentals  but  for  pupils 
of  the  higher  grades,  the  regular  course 
of  study  was  followed,  enabling  pupils 
to  enter  their  regular  grades  when  trans- 
ferred to  other  districts. 

To  these  migratoiy  schools,  the  Kings 
County  Library  sent  1025  books  besides 
charts,  flash  cards  and  maps.  The  re- 
sources of  the  library  for  material  for  the 
lower  grades  and  books  suitable  for 
foreign  children  were  taxed  to  the  limit 
but  the  need  was  met  and  an  adequate 
service  was  given. 

.Julia  Steffa,  Lib'n. 

Hanford, 

Haxfoed  Uxiox  Higti  School  Li- 
brary. Jacob  T^.  Neighbor,  Prin.  Miss 
Edith  M.  Church,  Lib'n. 

The  members  of  the  advanced  Library 
Class  ai-e  compiling  bibliographies  of  his- 
torical novels — one  on  Ancient  history 
and  Medieval  and  Modern,  one  on  Eng- 
lish, and  one  on  United  States  history. 
The  girl  making  the  one  on  United 
States  history  is  also  making  a  map  of 
the  United  States  and  indicating  on  the 
map  by  pictures,  a  scene  from  the  book, 
on  the  section  covered  by  the  story.  The 
lis'ts  include  only  the  books  in  the  High 
School  Library  and  a  few  from  the  Pub- 
lic Library. 

Edith  M.  Church,  Lib'n. 

LAKE   COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first  class.) 
County  seat,  Lakeport. 
Area,  1332  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5402. 
Assessed  valuation  $7,382,585   (taxable 
for  county  $7,336,840). 

LASSEN    COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth  class.) 
County  seat,  Susanville. 
Area,  4750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  8507. 
Assessed    valuation    $17,805,368     (tax- 
able for  county  $13,400,500). 


LASSEN   CO.— Continued. 

Lassen  Co.  Free  Library.  Susan- 
ville.    Miss  T^enala  A.  Martin.  Lib'n. 

The  librarian  gave  talks  on  children's 
books  at  two  Parent  Teacher  Associations 
and  the  Women's  Club  of  the  Fruit 
Growers  Supply  Co. 

A  new  art  study  class  has  been  formed 
and  meets  once  a  week  in  the  evening. 
It  is  composed  mostly  of  teachers.  Two 
talks  on  art  were  given  by  the  librarian 
at  Parent  Teacher  Associations.  Two 
talks  on  art  were  given  by  two  members 
of  the  art  classes  to  two  meetings  of  the 
Pai'ent  Teacher  Associations. 

Lenala  a.  Martin,  I^ib'n. 

It  is  possible  other  sections  of  the  stat" 
may  be  interested  to  know  more  about 
these  art  s'tudy  classes  and  to  observe 
their   statistics. 

The  new  art  class  which  has  been 
formed  consists  mostly  of  teachers  and 
holds  its  meetings  every  Thursday  even- 
ing in  the  home  of  one  of  the  members. 

I  am  enclosing  some  statistics  on  the 
work  of  all  the  art  classes.  I  feel  that 
these  classes  are  concrete  examples  of  the 
need  and  desire  for  adult  education.  It 
just  happens  that  the  need  here  is  being 
satisfied  through  the  study  club  rather 
than  through  reading  lists  and  other 
methods.  Nevertheless  we  feel  the  work 
is  purely  along  the  lines  of  adult  educa- 
tion. 

It  seems  to  me  that  the  most  gratifying 
thing  about  the  art  classes  is  the  way  the 
iiidividual  members  enjoy  art  exhibits. 
Several  have  been  to  San  Francisco  and 
have  seen  the  Walker  collection  at  tbo 
Palace  of  the  Legion  of  Honor.  They 
have  all  said,  "The  exhibit  was  wondei- 
cul  and  you  have  no  idea  how  much  more 
we  enjoyed  the  pictures  since  having 
taken  the  art  courses."  Then  they  have 
aamed  over  the  pictures  which  impressed 
them  and  the  ones  by  the  artists  they 
recognized.  One  member  on  entering 
the  class  frankly  stated  she  was  only  tak- 
ing the  course  because  she  planned  to  go 
to  Europe  at  the  end  of  the  year  and 
wanted  to  know  something  about  art. 
The  statement  was  made  in  1923.  She  is 
still  with  the  class  and  would  not  now 
leave. 

The  principal  of  the  Susanville  Gram- 
mar   School   is  requiring  her   teachers   to 


vol.  21,  no.  IJ 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


19 


LASSEN  CO. — Continued. 
read  a  certain  number  of  professional 
books  a  month  and  also  to  hand  in  to  her 
a  written  report  about  them.  The  Super- 
visor of  Rural  Schools  is  also  doing-  all 
she  can  toAvards  getting  the  rural  teachers 
to  read  professional  books.  We  of  course 
send  out  lists  to  aid  in  the  selection  of 
books  and  supply  the  books  themselves 
through  the  State  Library  collection  or 
our  ov7n. 

We  are  getting  some  of  the  A.  L.  A. 
Reading  with  a  purpose  pamphlets  and 
hope  to  interest  our  readers  to  a  large 
extent  in  them. 

Statistics  of  Art  Classes  of  Lassen  Coiinti/. 

No.  now  in 

Class        Beginning  date    No.  entering     class.  Pall  1925 

1st        Oct.    1928         10  7 

2d         Sept.  1924         16  11 

3d         Nov.  192L5         10  10 

6  members  left  town  and  i2  dropped  out. 

Artists  studied  339  (includes  all 
classes) . 

Books  circulated  773,  all  nonfiction ; 
three-fourths  borrowed  from  State  Li- 
brary. 

No.  of  meetings  112. 

No.  of  pictures  borrowed  from  State 
Library  294. 

Art  programs  given  by  art  classes  6. 

Art  exhibits  held  at  library  6. 

All  members  are  making  a  note  book 
which  is  illustrated  by  copies  of  great 
masters  studied. 

All  classes,  besides  studying  the  history 
of  art,  are  studying  the  Art  Appreciatio!\ 
courses  given  by  the  University  of  Cali- 
fornia. Two  classes  have  finished  the 
first  course  and  are  on  the  second.  The 
third  class  is  on  the  first  course. 

LOS  ANGELES  COUNTY. 

(First  class.) 
County  seat,  Los  Angeles. 
Area  3880  sq.  mi.    Pop.  9.36,438. 
Assessed  valuation  $2,940,078,815  (tax- 
able for  county  $2,525,067,035). 

Los  Angeles  Co.  Free  Library,  Los 
Angeles.  Miss  Helen  E.  Vogleson, 
Lib'n. 

Among  other  callers  during  the  quarter 
were  Miss  Gillis,  Assistant  State  Li- 
brarian, and  Mrs  Henshall,  State  Li- 
brary Organizer,  who  visited  the  library 
officially. 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 

Miss  Luora  Wallace,  a  member  of  the 
staff,  was  married  in  November  to  Percy 
L.  Porter.  Several  other  engagements 
have  been  announced  and  wedding  bells 
promise  to  ring  frequently  in  1926. 

Two  new  branches  were  established 
during  the  quarter,  one  at  Mar  Vista 
and  the  other  at  Home  Gardens.  The 
Belvedere  Branch  was  moved  to  an  at- 
tractive new  store  room  nearer  the  busi- 
ness center.  The  Tweedy  School  Branch 
was  reestablished  in  a  very  nice  new 
school  building.  Southgate,  La  Ballomi, 
and  Woodcrest  were  all  moved  to  larger 
quarters. 

The  City  of  Venice  voted  to  become  a 
part  of  Los  Angeles  City,  but  the  branch 
of  the  County  Library  will  not  be  with- 
drawn until  there  is  no  question  that 
the  vote  will  not  be  reconsidered. 

Helen  E.  Vogleson.  Lib'n. 

Burbank. 

BuKBANK  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary. F.  S.  Moore,  Prin.  Miss  Corrie 
V.  Ziegler,  Lib'n. 

Our  new  Libi'ary  and  Science  Build- 
ing is  just  completed.  The  Library  is,  in 
some  ways,  different  from  any  other 
school  library  in  California,  being  finished 
in  the  natui'al  brick  (red  and  brown 
tones)  inside  as  well  as  out,  with  a  ceil- 
ing ^  feet  high,  and  mezzanines  at  each 
end.  The  architecture  is  Spanish.  The 
main  room  is  40  by  60  feet,  with  an 
Annex  (separated  by  5  arches)  40  by  It 
feet  at  one  end,  the  office  and  work  room 
occupying  a  space  of  equal  size  at  the 
other.  The  mezzanines  are  above  these, 
each  overlooking  the  main  room  through 
5  arches  and  an  iron  railing  (balcony 
effect).  The  main,  or  long-way  exposure 
is  to  the  southwest,  with  5  high  arched 
Avindows  (reaching  the  ceiling)  ;  the 
other  exposure  is  to  the  southeast,  giving 
us  the  morning  light  through  two  sets  of 
arched  windows  (above  and  below),  "> 
in  Annex  and  5  in  mezzanine. 

The  ceiling  is  painted,  a  conventionai 
design  of  the  fleur-de-lis,  set  in  panels, 
separated  by  heavy   blue-gray  beams. 

A  complete  installation  of  Library 
Bureau  furniture  is  being  made. 

We  are  hoping  to  decorate  with  tape.'<- 
tries,  sculpture  and  plants — tapestries  In- 
stead of  pictures. 

Corbie  V.  Ziegler,  Lib'n. 


20 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


;  Jan.,  1926 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
Long   Beach. 

§||LoNG  Beach  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt,  Lib'n. 

The  Belmont  Heights  Branch  Library 
building  was  opened  December  21.  On 
.January  4  a  new  branch  was  opened  in 
rented  quarters  in  North  Long  Beach. 
For  the  present  this  branch  will  be  open 
three  afternoons  a  week.  The  librarian, 
Mrs  Ruth  Thomson,  has  started  hou?e 
to  house  visiting  and  we  expect  to  cover 
the  entire  district  within  the  year.  This 
seems  especially  desirable  since  many  of 
the  people  in  this  community  are  not 
used  to  library  service  and  need  the 
establishment  of  personal  contacts  to  in- 
terest them. 

The  addition  to  the  staff  of  Earl  Han-i- 
son  Davis,  New  York  State  Library 
School,  191.5—16,  as  reference  assistant 
is  going  to  make  possible  more  special- 
ized reference  work  in  sociology  and 
municipal  affairs.  Mr  Davis  took  the 
special  legislative  and  municipal  reference 
course  at  the  University  of  Wiscousbi 
Library  School  and  has  had  a  number 
of  years  experience  in  this  work.  Other 
recent  additions  to  the  staff  are  Miss 
Ariel  Stephens,  Los  Angeles  Library 
School,  1922-23,  who  has  returned  to 
this  library  after  a  year  in  the  reference 
department  of  the  Seattle  Public  Ll- 
brarj-  ;  Mrs  Marie  Price  Wear,  formerly 
assistant  librarian  of  the  Sacramento 
Public  Library ;  and  Miss  Constance 
Tafel,  formerly  a  member  of  the  Phila- 
delphia Public  Library  staff. 

The  library  is  cooperating  with  a  local 
book  store  in  giving  radio  book  reviews 
each  week.  The  store  pays  for  the  broad- 
casting as  advertising  and  the  book  re- 
views are  prepared  by  the  library  staf?. 
One  period  a  month  will  be  designated 
as  "library  night"  for  any  special  library 
notices  or  for  the  reviewing  of  books 
which  may  not  be  in  the  book  store. 

In  addition  to  the  regular  monthly 
general  staff  meeting  and  the  ))ook  selec- 
tion meetings  attended  by  branch  li- 
brarians and  heads  of  departments,  the 
circulation  department  and  the  juvenile 
department  are  holding  weekly  meetings 
devoted  to  a  survey  of  books  in  their 
respective  fields.  These  meetings  are 
under  the  leadership  of  the  head  of  each 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 

Long   Beach — Continued. 

of   the   two   departments   who   plans    the 

discussion  and  the  authors  to  be  covered. 

Talks  have  been  given  by  the  librarian 
and  members  of  the  staff"  at  about  tweniy 
night  school  classes,  reaching  around  six 
hundred  adult  students.  Tlie  feature  of 
this  work  which  has  made  it  most  sati-;- 
factory  is  the  attitude  of  the  night  school 
principal  who  regards  it  as  a  joint  projec, 
in  adult  education.  The  talks  emphasized 
the  library's  educational  function  and  the 
necessity  for  following  class  room  study 
by  reading. 

The  library  had  an  exhibit  of  pul)lica- 
tions,  interesting  to  municipal  officials, 
at  the  annual  meeting  of  the  League  of 
California  Municipalities  which  was  held 
in  Long  Beach  in  October.  A  member 
of  the  library  staff  was  on  duty  there 
during  a  part  of  each  day  and  a  good 
deal  of  interest  was  shown  in  the  exhibit. 
A  bibliography  on  municipal  prol)loD)s 
was  prepared  for  distribution. 

Theodora  R.  Brewitt,  Lili'n. 

Los   Angeles. 

t§Los  Angeles  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.    Everett  R.  Perry,  Lib'n. 

The  bonds  voted  for  branch  libraries 
last  June  amounting  to  $500,000  were 
sold  in  December.  Six  sites  have  already 
been  purchased  for  new  buildings,  as 
follows  :  at  the  corner  of  Arlington  and 
18th  Streets,  for  the  Washington  Irving 
Branch,  Allison  and  Allison,  architects, 
at  the  corner  of  Fries  and  .1  Streets,  for 
the  Wilmington  Branch,  Marston,  Van 
Pelt  and  Maybury,  architects ;  on  Wabash 
Avenue  opposite  Forest  Avenue,  for  the 
Malabar  Branch,  George  M.  Lindsey, 
architect ;  on  Patridge  Street  near  River- 
side Drive,  for  the  Allesandro  Branch. 
Weston  and  Weston,  architects ;  at  the 
corner  of  Pepper  and  Romulo  Streets, 
for  the  Dayton  Branch,  Mr  Harry  K. 
Bent,  architect ;  at  the  corner  of  Sylvan 
Street  and  Vesper  Avenue,  for  the  Van 
Nuys  Branch,  architect  not  yet  selected. 

On  November  3d  the  Helen  Plunt  .Tack- 
son  Branch,  costing  about  eight  thousand 
dollars  with  its  equipment,  and  located 
at  East  25th  and  Naomi  Streets,  was 
opened  to  the  public. 

To  keep  all  branch  library  buildings  in 
repair   and    to    act   as    superintendent    of 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


21 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
Los  Angeles — Continued, 
the   main   building   when   completed,    Mr 
Dana  Q.  McComb  was  appointed  Decem- 
ber 1. 

Progress  on  the  Main  Library  has  been 
steady  and  seven  contracts  have  been 
let  during  this  quarter :  for  steel  lockers, 
to  the  Durand  Steel  Locker  Company ; 
for  the  tablet  arm  chaire.  to  the  Rucker 
Fuller  Desk  Company ;  for  the  interior 
sculpture,  to  Mr  Lee  Lawrie ;  for  tbc- 
castern  portion  of  the  boundary  walls 
and  walks,  to  the  "Weymouth  Crowell 
Company ;  for  the  western  portion  of  the 
l)0undary  walls,  walks  and  pools,  to 
Greenfield  and  Umbarger ;  for  the  ro- 
moval  of  garage  and  apartment  house  on 
Flower  Street,  to  Harvey  Bros. ;  for  the 
interior  decoration,  to  Mr  .Julian  E. 
Garnsey.  An  order  has  also  been  placed 
for  a  photostat. 

Everett  R.  Perry,  Lib'n. 

Barlow  iMedical  Library.  Dr  Wil- 
liam DuflBeld,  Pres.    Mary  E.  Irish.  Lib'n. 

Tlie  Barlow  Medical  Library  has  been 
very  fortunate  in  receiving  several  very 
valuable  gifts  the  past  few  months, 
notable  among  them,  the  Medical  Library 
of  the  late  Dr  Boardman  Reed  that  was 
left,  by  bequest,  to  the  Alhambra  Public 
Library  and  that  library,  Avith  the  con- 
sent of  the  son  and  daughter  of  Dr  Reed, 
gave  the  collection  to  the  Barlow  Medical 
Library.  Many  of  these  books  are  valu- 
able historically  and  others  filled  out  sets 
that  were  incomplete,  others  are  of  espe- 
cial interest  in  any  library  for  medical 
research. 

Through  the  generosity  of  Dr  W. 
Jarvis  Barlow  the  library  has  had  two 
gifts.  The  endowment  fund  has  been 
augmented  by  two  Life  Memberships  of 
$500  each  in  memoi^  of  the  late  Dr 
Norman  Bridge  and  in  the  name  of  Mrs 
Bridge,  given  by  Dr  Barlow.  The  li- 
brary now  has  a  book  plate  of  which  it 
is  very  proud,  the  other  gift  from  Ds" 
Barlow.  The  book  plate  shows  a  part  of 
the  front  of  the  library  with  the  door 
open  into  the  reading  room.  Opposite  the 
door  appears  the  statue  of  Galen  with 
a  background  of  books.  The  task  of 
placing  these  in  the  10,(MX)  volumes  is 
begun  and  a  complete  check  of  the  li- 
brary with  additional  cataloging  under- 
taken. 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
Los  Angeles — Continued. 
Through  the  Medical  Library  Associa- 
tion many  exchanges  have  been   received 
toward  completing  the  journal  files. 

Mary  E.  Irish,  Lib'n. 

§T.  M.  C.  A  Library.  .J.  Gustav 
White,  Director  of  Ed. 

The  (juarters  of  the  Educational  De- 
partment of  the  Central  Y.  M.  C.  A.  of 
Los  Angeles  are  proving  a  source  of  great 
satisfaction  and  efliciency.  The  library 
and  study  hall,  as  well  as  the  offices,  are 
beautifullly  furnished  and  decorated.  The 
West  Coast  Arts,  Inc.,  have  placed  an 
exhibit  of  beautiful  paintings  on  the  walls 
of  the  library. 

H.  E.  Cavanah,  Lib'n. 

Pomona. 

§||PoMONA  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss    Sarah   M.   .Jacobus,   Lib'n. 

In  October,  children  of  the  elementary 
grades  were  given  a  list  of  about  7.5  books, 
and  asked  to  record  on  a  ballot  their 
favorites  and  also  whether  each  owned  or 
desired  to  own  the  books  best  liked.  The 
2-5  books  receiving  the  highest  number  of 
votes  were  especially  featured  during 
Children's  Book  Week.  Dr  Dolittle  and 
Black  Beauty  led  the  list  of  favorites  by 
a  large  number'.  Ballots  were  accessible 
to  interested  adults,  as  a  guide  to  Christ- 
mas bu.ving. 

The  Book  Week  wound  up  with  a 
story-hour,  by  costumed  story-tellers. 
Souvenir  book  marks,  each  bearing  the 
title  of  some  juvenile  book,  were  given 
out.  The  usual  talks  to  clubs  were  made 
during  and  after  the  week. 

During  the  long  illness  of  Mrs  Donald 
Lyman,  Miss  Carol.yn  Walker  is  acting 
as  head  of  the  Circulation  Department. 
Mrs  Caroline  Walvoord  has  been  employed 
an  substitute. 

The  Pictorial  History  of  California, 
which  was  issued  this  fall  by  the  Univer- 
sity of  California,  has  been  mounted  and 
prominently  displayed.  All  the  city 
schools  and  all  the  schools  in  nearby  dis- 
tricts have  been  invited  to  visit  the  library 
to  see  the  set.  So  far,  eighteen  groups 
have  taken  advantage  of  the  opportunity, 
and  at  lea.'it  two  individuals  have  pur- 
chased sets  for'  themselves  as  a  result  of 
seeing  the  display. 

The  feature  of  the  fall  months  has  been 


22 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
Pomona — Continued, 
the  large  and  steady  demand  for  books  of 
serious  value,  not  only  relating  to  trades, 
business   and  civic  relations,   but  also  on 
science,  psychology  and  philosophy. 

Sarah  M.  Jacobus,  Lib'n. 

South   Pasadena. 

II  §  South  Pasadena  Free  Public  Li- 
BR.^KY.     Mrs  Nellie  E.  Keith,  Lib'n. 

Great  bouquets  of  garden  flowers,  which 
made  every  room  in  the  public  library 
beautiful,  were  tokens  of  affection  and 
esteem  of  hundreds  of  people  in  South 
Pasadena  to  Mrs  Nellie  E.  Keith,  Libra- 
rian, who  completed  thirty  j^ears  service 
Nov.  4.  Mrs  Keith  is  the  only  public 
librarian  South  Pasadena  has  had.  Con- 
gratulations poured  in  throughout  the 
day :  many  beautiful  letters  came  from 
school  children.  In  the  evening  Mrs 
Keith  was  the  honor  guest  of  the 
Woman's  Club  of  South  Pasadena. — 
South  Pasadena  Record,  N  G 

MADERA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Madera. 
Area,  2140  sq.  mi.     Pop.  12,203. 
Assessed    valuation    .$28,248,229     (tax- 
able for  county  $22,9O9',6O0). 

^Madera  Co.  Free  Library,  Madera. 
Miss  Blanche  Galloway,  Lib'n. 

During  Children's  Book  Week,  the 
Mader'a  County  Library  offered  prizes  to 
the  boy  and  girl  from  the  third  through 
the  fifth  grade,  and  the  boy  and  girl  from 
the  sixth  through  the  eighth  grade  in  the 
Madera  schools,  and  a  similar  set  of 
prizes  to  the  children  in  the  schools  of 
the  county  who  ^^-ould  list  the  greatest 
number  of  juvenile  book  titles,  which 
might  be  found  in  the  County  Library, 
made  from  the  slogan  "After  All — Ther'e 
is  Nothing  Like  a  Good  Book,"  which 
appeared  on  the  Book  Week  poster.  The 
contest  aroused  keen  interest  among  the 
children.  Tvvo  classes  from  a  country 
school  came  during  school  hours  to  visit 
the  library,  and  work  on  the  project. 
Some  of  those  children  had  not  been  to 
the  library  before.  In  the  county,  three 
of  the  prizes  went  to  one  school,  where 
the  teachers  had  taken  interest  in  seeing 
that  the  simple  rules  of  the  contest  were 


MADERA  CO.— Continued, 
complied  with.  The  fourth  pi-ize  went  to 
an  Indian  girl,  at  North  Pork.  Class 
instruction  in  the  use  of  the  library  has 
been  given  regularly  to  the  seventh  and 
eighth  grades  of  the  local  grammar 
school. 

Blanche  Galloway,  Lib'n. 

Madera  Co.  Law  Library,  Madera. 
Blanche  Galloway,  Lib'n. 

At  the  January  meeting  of  the  Board 
of  Supervisors,  a  new  law  library  com- 
mittee was  appointed,  consisting  of  the 
following  members :  W.  D.  Cardwell, 
Chairman  of  the  Board  of  Supervisors ; 
Stanley  Murray,  Judge  of  the  Superior 
Court ;  Mason  A.  Bailey,  District  Attor- 
ney ;  Judge  Joseph  Bareroft ;  J.  J. 
Coghlan,  attorney. 

MARIN   COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  San  Rafael. 
Area,  516  sq.  mi.     Pop.  27,-342. 
Assessed    valuation    .$29,132,9.53     (tax- 
able for  county  .$2.5,497,930). 

MARIPOSA  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third  class.) 
County  seat,  Mariposa. 
Area,  1580  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2775. 
Assessed  valuation  .$5,582,997   (taxable 
for  county  $4,71.3,177). 

MENDOCINO  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth  class.) 
County  seat,  Ukiah. 
Area,  3400  sq.  mi.     Pop.  24,136. 
Assessed    valuation    $31,059,690     (tax- 
able for  county  .$25,898,504). 

MERCED  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Merced. 
Area,  1750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  24,579. 
Assessed    valuation    $39,830,913     (tax- 
able for  county  .$32,612,022). 

Merced  Co.  i'"'ree  Library,  JMerced. 
Miss  Minette  L.  Stoddard,  Lib'n. 

The  annual  meeting  of  the  custodians 
of  the  Merced  Count.\-  Free  Library  and 
its  branches  was  held  Saturday,  October 
10,  in  the  rooms  of  the  Merced  Library. 
The  morning  session   was   given   over   to 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


23 


MERCED  CO.— Continued. 

the  discussions  of  library  problems  and 
at  the  afternoon  session  Mr  Corwin  Rad- 
cliffe,  who  conducts  the  column  in  the 
Merced  Sun-Star  known  as  "Rad's  Ram- 
blings"  on  the  subject  "What  the  library 
means  to  me."  Miss  Monica  Flannery, 
head  of  the  English  department  of  the 
Merced  High   School,  spoke  on   "Books." 

Mrs  Faj'  French  resigned  October  15 
and  Mrs  Rachel  Anderson  December  1, 
the  latter  going  to  San  Bernardino  County 
Free  Library. 

The  Los  Banos  Branch  Library  has 
recently  had  a  new  coat  of  paint  within 
and  without.  The  Atwater  Branch  moves 
into  its  new  "George  Thompson  Bloss 
Memorial  Library  Building"  .January  6. 
The  building  is  beautifully  situated  and 
thoroughly  equipped  and  an  addition  to 
any  town. 

MiNETTE  L.  Stoddard,  Lib'n. 

MODOC  COUNTY. 

(Fifty -second  class.) 
County  seat,  Alturas. 
Area,  4097  sq.  mi.     Pop.  .5425. 
Assessed  valuation  $8,140,949   (taxable 
for  county  $7,670,374.) 

tMoDOc  Co.  Free  Library.  Alturas. 
Miss  Anna  L.  Williams,  Lib'n. 

A  branch  has  been  established  at  Fort 
Bidvvell.  The  books  will  be  kept  in  the 
Civic  Club  Room.  Mrs  Susie  Peterson  is 
president  of  the  club. 

.Joseph  Creek  and  Washington  School 
Districts  have  joined  the  County  Library 
system. 

Anna  L.  Williams,  I^ib'n. 

MONO  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Bridgeport. 
Area,  2796  sq.  mi.     Pop.  960. 
Assessed  valuation  $6,049,540   (taxable 
for  county  .$.3,084,<>30). 

MONTEREY  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth  class.) 

County  seat,  Salinas. 
Area,  3450  sq.  mi.     Pop.  27,980. 
Assessed    valuation    $48,880,947     (tax- 
able for  county  .$40,182,-545). 

Monterey  Co.  Free  Library,  Salinas. 
Miss  Anne  Hadden,  Lib'n. 

The   community  branch  at   Castroville, 


MONTEREY  CO.— Continued. 

which  had  been  suspended  for  some  time, 
was  reopened  October  8  with  Mrs  J.  L. 
Sloane  in  charge.  The  hours  are  2..30  to 
5  p.m.  Monday,  Wednesday  and  Friday. 
The  County  Library  Branch  at  the 
Monterey  County  ILospital  was  revived 
November  19. 

The  County  Ijibrarian  and  Miss  Dorothy 
Ellis  attended  Teachers  Institute  at  San 
Luis  Obispo,  December  14  to  17,  and  held 
the  usual  book  exhibit  at  the  Monterey 
County  Headquarters.  Miss  Dorothy 
Ellis  and  Miss  Constance  Vasquez 
attended  the  California  Library  Associa- 
tion Second  District  meeting  in  Oakland, 
November  7. 

Miss  Kate  M.  Foley  visited  her  blind 
pupils  in  the  vicinity  of  Salinas  and 
Monterey,  November  19  and  20,  traveling 
in  the  County  Librarian's  Ford, 
"Romero." 

Anne  Hadden,  Lib'n. 

King   City. 

King  City  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary.    H.  O.  Williams,  Prin. 

The  King  City  Union  High  School 
Library  has  added  a  number  of  valuable 
books  to  its  collection  during  the  last  six 
months  and  expects  to  make  many  more' 
additions  for  the  coming  year. 

The  library  is  now  in  charge  of  a 
trained  librarian,  and  is  functioning  better 
than  at  any  time  in  the  past. 

H.  O.  Williams,  Prin. 

Pacific   Grove. 

§  Pacific  Grove  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.     Miss   Jessie    W.    Nichols,    Ijib'n. 

At  the  special  election  held  Nov.  25,  the 
proposal  for  a  bond  issue  to  add  a  new 
wing  to  the  library  failed  to  pass  by  the 
required  two-thirds  vote. — Pacific  Grove 
Rpiieir,  N  27 

NAPA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first  class.) 
(Jounty  seat,  Napa. 
Area,  800  sq.  mi.     Pop.  20,678. 
Assessed    valuation    .$26,163,972     (tax- 
able for  county  $22,079,  343). 

Napa  Co.  Free  I^ibrary.  Napa.  Miss 
Estella  DeFord,  Lib'n. 

Assistant   Librarian   Miss  Alice   Queen 

has    resigned    lier    duties    at    the    County 

I  Free  I^ibrary  and  her  place  will  be  taken 


24 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


NAPA  CO.— Continued. 

by  Miss  Frieda  Schultz,  who  has  been 
named  by  the  supervisors  to  fill  the 
vacancy.  Miss  June  Kenworthy  has  been 
appointed  second  assistant  librarian. — 
Napa  Journal,  O  1.5 

St.  Helena. 

St  Helena  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Mrs  G.  B.  Anderson,  Lib'n. 

It  has  been  necessary  to  add  more 
shelves  to  make  room  for  the  many  new 
^•ohunes  that  have  been  added  to  the 
library.  Although  many  of  the  new 
books  arc  tictiou,  several  general  refer- 
ence books,  Lippiucott's  Gazetteer  of  the 
World,  the  Harvard  Classics  and  Lippiu- 
cott's Biographical  Dictionary  are  in- 
cluded in  the  list. 

The  library  was  closed  for  three  days 
for  its  annual  waxing  of  floors  and 
retiuting. 

Mrs  G.  B.  Anderson,  Lib'n. 

NEVADA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth  class.) 
County  seat,  Nevada  City. 
Area,  982  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,8-50. 
Assessed  valuation  •$9,058,005   (taxable 
for  county  .$7,005,905). 

Grass  Valley. 

Grass  ^' alley  High  School  Library. 
W.  S.  Millar,  Prin. 

Shortly  before  Thanksgiving,  the  prin- 
cipal of  the  school  requested  pupils  and 
townspeople  to  donate  to  the  school  library 
any  books  suitable  for  such  a  library, 
which  they  could  spare. 

As  a  result  one  hundred  or  more 
volumes  were  received.  These  included 
several  sets  of  books,  such  as  Woodrow 
Wilson's  History  of  the  United  States,  a 
set  of  Shakespeare's  Works,  Poe's  Works 
and  others,  as  well  as  many  single  vol- 
umes. The.se  books,  which  had  lain  idle 
in  homes,  will  render  valuable  service 
through  the  school  library. 

Pupils  are  permitted  to  take  books 
home  for  one  night  only  and  are  fined 
5  cents  a  day  if  the  book  is  not  returned 
promptly.  No  one  is  permitted  to  take 
a  book   from  the  library  during  the  day. 

The  books  in  thj  library  are  now  being- 
cataloged. 

Elizabeth  McDole. 


NEVADA   CO.— Continued. 
Nevada  City. 

1 1  Nevada  City  Free  [Public]  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  Iva  Williamson,  Lib'n. 

Frederick  C.  Norton,  a  recluse  who 
lived  near  Nevada  City,  left  half  his 
land  to  the  Nevada  City  Public  Library, 
with  directions  that  the  land  be  sold  and 
the  money  used  to  purchase  non-fiction 
books.  His  property  consists  of  160  acres 
of  timberland. — Sacramento  Bee,  N  7 


ORANGE  COUNTY, 

(Tenth  cla.ss. ) 
County  .seat,  Santa  Ana. 
Area,  780  sq.  mi.     Pop.  61.375. 
Assessed   valuation   $166,799,710    (tax- 
able for  county  $146,732,680). 

Buena   Park. 

BuENA  Park  Library  District  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  Katharine  S.  Berkey,  Lib'n. 

I  am  glad  to  say  we  have  added  to  our 
building  and  now  have  one  worth  $1750. 
The  number  of  bound  volumes  is  2081. 

Katharine  S.  Berkey,  Lib'n. 

PLACER  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second  class.) 
County  seat.  Auburn. 
Area,  1484  sq.  mi.     Pop.  18,584. 
Assessed    valuation    .$22,378,027     (tax- 
able for  county  $15,678,205). 

Auburn. 

II  Auburn  Free  Public  Library.  Mrs 
Madeline   Kriechbaum,    Lib'n. 

District  Attorney  Orrin  J.  Lowell  of 
Placer  County  has  presented  the  Auburn 
Free  Public  Library  with  a  new  set  of 
double  copper-covered  doors,  which  were 
badly  needed.  Mr  Lowell  is  one  of  the 
library  trustees. — Auburn  Journal,  D  31 

Mrs  Louis  Chamberlain  has  presented 
a  desk  lamp  for  each  table  at  the  Auburn 
Public  Library  as  a  Christmas  gift  to 
the  institution. — Auburn  Jourtial,  D  17 

PLUMAS  COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth  class.) 
County  seat,  Quincy. 
Area,  2361  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5081. 
Assessed    valuation    $20,774,601     (tax- 
able for  county  $12,624,992). 


vol.  21,110.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


20 


RIVERSIDE  COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth  class.) 

County  seat.  Riverside. 
Area,  7008  sq.  mi.     Pop.  50,297. 
Assessed    valuation    .$63,155,539     (tax- 
able for  county  $46,121,230). 

Riverside. 

§||RivERSiDE  [Free]  Public  Libeaey. 
Ohas.   F.   Woods,   Lib'n. 

Riverside  hihrary  Service  School. 

Miss  Mary  E.  Robbins  is  serving-  a  five 
months'  engagement  with  the  Riverside 
Library  Service  School  as  instructor  in 
Reference  Work  and  Book  Selection. 

The  foster  of  long  course  students  for 
1926  contains  the  following  names  :  Gladys 
M.  Bowles,  Clarkston,  Washington ; 
Mrs  Marjorie  D.  Brown,  Santa  Ana, 
Calif.;  Mrs  Helen  L.  Clutter,  Dallas, 
Texas ;  Bertha  May  Danner,  Colton, 
Calif. ;  Elizabeth  Derby,  Riverside,  Calif. ; 
Mattie  Mae  Harris,  Oroville,  Calif. ; 
Winifred  Hawes,  Riverside,  Calif. ; 
Peggy  M.  Hudson,  Eureka,  Calif. ; 
Margaret  L.  Keith.  San  Luis  Obispo, 
Calif. ;  Mae  Kimball,  Riverside,  Calif. ; 
Lillie  M.  Myster's,  Arlington,  Calif. ; 
•Tulia  Olmstead.  Nampa,  Idaho  ;  Edith  W. 
Taylor,  Riverside,  Calif. ;  Velma  V. 
Vaniman,  La  Yerne,  Calif. 

CiTAs.  F.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

SACRAMENTO  COUNTY. 

(Seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Sacramento. 
Area,  988  sq.  mi.     Pop.  90,978. 
Assessed    valuation   $155,.360,.518    (tax- 
able for  county  $128,361,002). 

Sacramento  Co.  Free  Libeary,  Sac- 
ramento. Miss  Cornelia  D.  Provines, 
Lib'n. 

The  County  Librarian  addressed  the 
pupils  of  the  Part  Time  High  School  of 
Sacramento,  October  5  and  7,  using  as  her 
fheme  for  the  first  talk,  "Kipling  as  a 
Poet,"  and  for  the  second,  "Folk  Stories." 

The  County  Librarian  was  invited, 
October  21,  to  speak  before  the  Executive 
Committee  of  the  State  Federation  of 
Women's  Clubs  upon  the  subject  of  the 
work  of  the  Sacramento  County  Library 
with  Folsom  State  Prison,  and  made  a 
brief  address  in  the  time  which  had  been 
courteously  arranged  for  her  by  President 


SACRAMENTO   CO.— Continued. 
Bertola,  in  the  midst  of  a  busy  morning  of 
important  committee  work. 

The  same  theme  was  presented  in  a 
talk  before  the  members  of  the  Second 
District  of  the  California  Library  As.so- 
ciation,  held  in  Oakland  November  7, 
under  the  title,  "Through  Gates  of  Horn, 
or  Gates  of  Ivory?"  from  the  closing 
verse  of  the  Seventh  Book  of  the  J3neid. 

At  the  meeting  of  the  Ninth  District 
of  the  California  Library  Association, 
held  in  Oroville  November'  21,  the  County 
Librarian  of  Sacramento  County  spoke 
ui>on  the  subject  of  the  "Influence  of  the 
Negro  Upon  American  Poetry,''  using  in 
illustration  the  work  of  various  Negro 
poets. 

Both  of  these  district  meetings  were 
most  delightfnl.  and  the  County  Librarian 
greatly  appreciated  the  opportunity  of 
attending  them,  and  of  sharing  in  the 
pleasure  and  pr'ofit  derived  from  the 
programs  presented,  and  the  delightful 
hospitality  extended  to  all  who  were 
fortunate  enough  to  be  present. 

The  Sacramento  County  Free  Library 
has  been  fortunate  enough  to  secure  the 
services  of  Mrs  Gerna  Dickson,  formerly 
of  the  State  Library,  as  head  of  the 
Branch  Department,  to  fill  the  position 
left  vacant  by  the  resignation  of  Miss 
Edna  .James,  who  left  us  in  order  to 
accept  a  position  in  the  Hollywood  Public 
Li1n-ary.  Mrs  Dickson  came  to  us  on 
the  13th  of  October,  and  is  rapidly 
becoming  acquainted  with  her  new  duties 
and  her  new  territory. 

Cornelia  D.  Provines,  Lib'n. 


SAN   BENITO  COUNTY. 

(Forty-third  class.) 
County  seat,  Hollister. 
Area,  1476  sq.  mi.     Pop.  8995. 
Assessed    valuation    $14,985,021     (tax- 
able for  county  $13,-308,600 ) . 

San  Benito  Co.  Free  Library,  Hol- 
lister. Miss  Florence  J.  Wheaton, 
Lib'n. 

The  library  maintained  a  booth  at  the 
County  Fair'  which  was  held  the  first 
week  in  October.  The  exhibit  attracted 
considerable  attention. 

Miss  Blanche  Harris  resigned  Novem- 
ber 1  to  be  married  to  Mr  .John  E.  Dalton 


26 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


SAN   BENITO  CO.— Continued. 

of    Sacramento.      Her    successor    has    not 
yet  been  appointed. 

Florence  J.  Wheatox,  Lib'n. 

Sax  Bexito  Co.  High  School  Li- 
brary AXD  Branch.  Sax  Bexito  Co. 
Free  Library.  .James  P.  Davis.  Prin. 
Ruth  Tiffany,  Lib'n. 

We.  in  the  San  P.enito  County  High 
School,  are  trying  out  an  entirely  new 
method  in  our  school  library  this  year. 

At  the  beginning  of  the  year',  we  had 
installed  a  student  shelf  between  the 
Assembly  Hall  and  the  library  proper. 
Now  the  students  come  to  this  shelf  and 
ask  for  the  books  that  they  want  from 
the  library,  instead  of  searching  through 
the  shelves  for  them,  themselves.  The 
dictionaries  and  encyclopedias  are  kept 
on  these  shelves  and  the  students  have 
access  to  them  at  any  time. 

We  are  continuing  our  student  library 
plan,  and  we  find  that  the  system  works 
beautifully.  The  books  are  given  out  for 
a  period  of  from  one  day  to  two  weeks, 
with  privilege  of  renewal  except  in  the 
case  of  those  books  which  are  in  great 
demand.  No  student  is  given  the  privi- 
lege of  going  through  the  stacks.  In  the 
case  of  our  Junior  College  students,  who 
need  history  books  by  the  score  for  refer- 
ence, we  are  making  a  duplicate  set  of 
file  cards,  so  they  may  have  access  to 
them,  and  then  they  can  decide  just  what 
they  want.  We  find  that  this  works 
well,  for  both  students  and  librarians. 

We  are  planning  on  a  mending  day 
very  soon,  and  all  the  books  will  be  put 
in  excellent  shape  for  the  spring  and 
summei".  Twice  a  year  the  books  are  gone 
over  very  carefully,  and  the  number  of 
lost  ones  is  negligible. 

The  following  students  are  acting  as 
librarian.s  for  this  school  year:  Kenneth 
Young.  Margaret  Gee.  Helen  Clark,  Ger- 
trude Pacheco,  Bee  Johnson,  Laura  Voll, 
Margaret  King,  Eleanor  McCloskey, 
Lillian  Faria,  Frank  Gambetta,  Leon 
Latapie,  A'ivian  Fletcher,  Janecie  Wilson, 
Betty  Recht.  Elizabeth  Breen  and  Ken- 
neth McCray,  two  Junior  College  students, 
act  as  assistant  librarians  to  the  faculty 
librarian.  Miss  Ruth  Tiffany. 

.James  P.  Davis,  Prin. 


SAN    BERNARDINO  COUNTY. 

(Ninth  class.) 
County  seat,   San  Bernardino. 
Area.  20,0.5.5  sq.  mi.     Pop.  73,401. 
Assessed    valuation   $114,022,926    (tax- 
able for  county  .^69, 0.33, 745). 

Sax  Berxardixo  Co.  Free  Library. 
Sax  Berxardixo.  Miss  Caroline  S. 
Waters,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Caroline  S.  Waters,  County  Li- 
brarian, gave  a  talk  November;  3,  before 
the  Needles  Woman's  Club,  on  children's 
literature.  xVn  exhibit  of  children's  books 
and  also  some  good  books  helpful  to 
parents  in  relation  to  children  was 
arranged  at  that  time.  On  Sunday, 
November  S,  Miss  Waters  spoke  in  the 
evening  at  the  Congregational  Church  at 
Highlands  on  the  subject,  "County  Free 
Library,  its  service  and  privileges."  This 
was  one  of  the  series  of  civic  talks  that 
were  being  given  at  the  church.  The 
County  Librarian  attended  the  Fifth 
Conference  of  "Friends  of  the  Mexicans," 
held  in  Pomona  College,  December  5,  and 
read  a  paper  on  "The  Use  of  Books  and 
Libraries  by  Our  Mexican  Population." 
She  also  attended  the  San  Bernardino 
County  Teachers'  Institute  held  in  San 
Bernardino,  Friday,  November  6,  for  the 
valley  teachers,  and  the  institute  for  the 
desert  schools  held  in  Victorville,  Novem- 
ber 23,  and  there  gave  a  talk  on  County 
Free  Library  school  service. 

Miss  Marion  L.  Gregory,  Assistant 
Librarian  and  cataloger,  gave  a  short 
talk  on  "Children's  books  suitable  fof 
Christmas  purchase,"  before  the  Parent- 
Teacher  Association  of  the  Harding 
School,  Nov.  17.  A  brief  list  of  good 
juveniles  was  discussed  and  some  very 
attractive  books,  belonging  to  the  County 
Free  Librarj%  were  on  exhibit.  Mrs 
Rachel  Anderson.  Pratt  1911,  entered  the 
library  December'  1,  as  head  of  the  refer- 
ence department,  including  charge  of 
community  branch  shipments.  She  came 
to  us  from  the  Merced  County  Library. 
The  Barstow  branch  was  moved  Oct.  29 
from  the  telephone  exchange,  to  a  room 
in  the  grammar  school  building  in  the 
community  center  part  of  the  building. 
Mrs   Ella   Topping   is    the   new   custodian 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


27 


SAN  BERNARDINO  CO.— Continued, 
of  the  bi^anch,  taking  the  place  of  Mrs 
L.  E.  Tiernan.  The  new  hours  are  1.30 
to  5  p.m.  on  Monday,  Tuesday,  Thursday 
and  Saturday,  and  7  to  9  p.m.  also  on 
Monday  and  Saturday. 

Mr  Wm.  F.  Collins  is  the  new  custo- 
dian at  the  County  Hospital,  Old  Men's 
Home,  having-  taken  charge  November  16. 
Mr  Kneale  Smith  was  appointed  custo- 
dian, October  9,  of  the  Crestline  Branch, 
to  take  the  place  of  Mrs  Laurita  Tuttle, 
resigned.  Miss  Madonna  G.  Baker  is  the 
new  custodian  at  Harper  Lake  School 
and  Community  Branch,  having  taken 
charge  September'  14. 

The  Guasti  Branch  was  established 
December  30  in  the  Piedmont  School, 
Miss  Mai'garet  Rice,  custodian. 

The  Kingston  Emergency  School,  at 
Kingston,  which  was  closed  June  12,  192.5, 
was  reopened  November  9.  The  County 
Free  Library  is  serving  the  school  free 
this  year.  The  Lanfair  School,  which 
was  suspended  in  September,  1924,  was 
reopened  in  September,  192.5,  and  County 
Free  Library  service  continued.  The  two 
schools  in  the  Osdick  School  District, 
Osdick  and  Atolia,  have  been  consolidated, 
and  the  one  school  in  the  district  is  now 
the  Osdick  School.  There  is  one  new 
school  branch  in  the  Arrowhead  Lake 
School  District  this  year,  the  Twin 
Peaks  School,  which  opened  on  October  5. 
There  is  also  a  new  school  branch  in  the 
Victor  School  District,  the  Victor  East 
Side  Grammar  School.  This  was  estab- 
lished in  September,  and  is  a  school  for 
foreign  children,  from  the  first  to  the 
fourth   grade. 

Miss  Katherine  Ross  is  the  librarian 
at  the  Victor  Valley  Union  High  School 
this  year. 

Caroline  S.  Waters,   Lib'n. 

SAN   DIEGO  COUNTY. 

(Fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  San  Diego. 
Area,  4377  sq.  mi.     Pop.  112,248. 
Assessed   valuation   $121,179,472    (tax- 
able for  county  $100,963,361). 

San  Diego  Co.  Free  Library,  San 
Diego.     Miss  Eleanor  Hitt,  Lib'n. 

The     Kensington     Park     Branch     was 


SAN   DIEGO  CO.— Continued. 

established  October  7,  at  4538  Edgewarc 
avenue,  San  Diego,  and  the  San  Felipe 
Branch  at  Warners  Springs,  in  November. 
In  October,  the  Mountain  Empii-e  Union 
High  School  at  Campo  joined  the  County 
Library. 

Eleanor  Hitt,  Lib'n. 


San   Diego. 

4:§San  Diego  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Mrs  H.  P.  Davison,  Lib'n  Emeritus. 
Miss  Althea  H.  Warren.  Lib'n  (on  leave 
of  absence).  Miss  .Josephine  R.  Har- 
grave,  Acting  Lib'n. 

Miss  Althea  H.  Warren  has  been 
granted  a  six  months'  leave  of  absence. 
Until  May  1,  1926,  the  work  is  in  ^he 
hands  of  the  acting  librarian,  Miss 
Josephine  R.  Hargrave,  graduate  of  Sim- 
mons Library  School  and  on  a  year's 
leave  of  absence  from  Ripon  College  Li- 
brary, Ripon,  Wisconsin. 

The  outstanding  news  item  of  the  quai-- 
ter  is  the  purchase  of  two  lots  for  future 
branch  library  buildings ;  one  in  Ocean 
Beach  and  the  other  in  Logan  Heights. 

On  November  1  the  Normal  Heights 
Branch  of  the  County  Library  was  taken 
over  by  the  city  and  is  now  operated  ars 
a  branch  of  the  Public  Library.  It  is 
open  three  days  a  week.  Miss  Margaret 
Collins,  formerly  assistant  in  the  Refer- 
ence Department,  has  been  appointed  li- 
brarian. In  the  Altadena  district  a  new 
branch  is  to  be  opened  soon  and  known 
as  the  Altadena  Branch. 

A  number  of  important  changes  in  the 
personnel  of  the  staff  have  taken  place. 
Miss  Dorothy  Earl  of  the  Catolog  De- 
partment resigns  the  first  of  January. 
She  leaves  soon  for  a  four  months'  trip 
East  and  will  return  again  in  the  fall  to 
enter  the  Library  School  of  Wisconsin 
University.  With  the  beginning  of  the 
new  year  Miss  Helen  Dysart.  formerly  in 
charge  of  the  Children's  Department, 
begins  her  duties  as  a  Principal  Assistant 
and  in  charge  of  the  Book  Order  Depart- 
ment. Miss  Grace  Owen,  with  experience 
in  teaching,  journalism  and  library  work 
in  Bloomington,  Illinois,  has  been  ap- 
pointed to  take  the  place  vacated  by  Mj.=s 
Ethel  Creigh's  return  to  the  County  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Anna  Allsebrook  has'  bepn 


28 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


SAN   DIEGO  CO.— Continued. 
San   Diego — Continued, 
promoted  to  the  position  of  Principal  of 
Braneiies. 
.Josephine  R.  Hakgrave,  Acting  Lib'n. 

La  Jolla  Library  Association  Li- 
brary AND  Branch  of  San  Diego  P.  L. 
Miss  Irene  Eckis,  Lib'n. 

An  acceptable  gift  recently  received  by 
the  La  Jolla  Library  is  a  40  volume  edi- 
tion de  luxe  of  "Famous  places  and 
people."  Tlie  donor  is  Alfred  Crebbin, 
and  bis  gift  will  be  a  most  valuable  refer- 
ence work. — La  Jolla  Journal,  D  3 

The  bronze  panel  which  was  designed 
by  the  sculptor,  Merrell  Gage  of  Santa 
Monica,  for  the  fountain  in  the  patio 
of  the  La  Jolla  Library,  has  been  re- 
ceived and  put  in  place.  The  fountain 
is  to  be  unveiled  Dec.  12  with  appro- 
priate dedicatory  addresses. — La  Jolla 
Light,  D  11 

SAN   FRANCISCO. 

(Second  class.) 
City  and  county  coterminous. 
Area,  43  sq.  mi.    Pop.  .506,676. 
Assessed  valuation  $1,050,48.5,716  (ta.^- 
able  for  county  $738,603,760). 

United  States  Department  of  the 
Interior,  Geological  Survey  Library. 
H.  D.  McGlashan,  District  Engineer. 

This  library,  since  it  was  established, 
has  been  maintained  by  the  U.  S.  Geo- 
logical Survey  and  was  not  transferred 
to  the  Department  of  Commerce  on  July 
1,  1925.  On  this  date,  the  library  was 
transferred  to  the  Water  Resources 
Branch  of  the  Geological  Survey,  but  no 
change  was  made  in  the  administration 
of  it  until  the  latter  part  of  November 
when  the  office  of  the  TN'later  Resources 
Branch  was  combined  with  this  library 
and  the  Distribution  Office: 
H.  D.  McGlashan,  District  Engineer. 

SAN  JOAQUIN   COUNTY. 

(Eighth   class.) 
County  seat,  Stockton. 
Area,  1370  sq.  mi.     Pop.  79,905. 
Assessed   valuation    $122,-8,30,481     (ta::- 
al>le  for  county  .$104,620,310). 

Stockton. 

:!:§ Stockton  Free  Public  Library. 
Miss  Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 


SAN    JOAQUIN    CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued. 

Miss  Ida  E.  Condit  became  librarian 
of  Stockton  Free  Public  Library  Dec.  1 
H.  O'.  Parkinson,  who  for  over  five  years 
has  been  head  of  the  institution,  resignei 
in  order  to  become  manager  of  the  west- 
ern office  and  factory  of  Gaylord 
Brothers,  which  is  to  open  here  Jan.  1, 
at  the  corner  of  Weber  avenue  an-l 
Stanislaus  street.  Miss  Condit  has  been 
a  member  of  the  library  staff  for  twenty- 
five  years,  and  has  been  Assistant  Li- 
brarian and  head  of  the  county  branch 
department  since  1910. — 'Stockton  Rec- 
ord, D  1 

SAN   LUIS  OBISPO  COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth  class.) 
County  seat,  San  Luis  Obispo. 
Area,  3500  sq.  mi.    Pop.  i21,893. 
Assessed    valuation    $39,6.33,721     (tax- 
able for  county  $34,464,953). 

San  Luis  Obispo  Co.  Free  Library, 
San  Luis  Obispo.     Miss  Flo  A.  Gautz, 

Lib'n. 

The  Central  Coast  Counties  Institute 
was  held  in  San  Luis  Obispo  December 
14  to  17.  Four  counties,  San  Beuilo, 
Santa  Cruz,  Monterey  and  San  Luis 
Obispo  were  represented  with  a  registra- 
tion of  over  800.  It  was  a  busy  four  days 
for  the  library  and  we  had  visits  from 
teachere  from  the  remote  parts  of  the 
county,  who  never  get  to  the  county  sear. 

Miss  Henrietta  M.  Wessel,  custodian  of 
Templeton  Branch  since  its  founding  at 
the  beginning  of  the  County  Library 
operation,  was  married  December  27,  to 
Mr  Henry  Meier  of  Paso  Robles.  She 
will  continue  to  reside  in  Templeton.  but 
has  resigned  as  custodian.  Her  succes- 
sor has  not  yet  been,  appointed. 

Flo  a.  Gantz,  Lib'n. 

San   Luis  Obispo. 

San  Luis  Obispo  Free  Public  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  E.  L.  Kellogg,  Lib'n. 

After  serving  as  apprentice  and  sub- 
stitute for  the  past  eight  months.  Miss 
Margaret  Keith  has  entered  the  Riverside 
Library  Service  School  for  the  long 
course.  Miss'  Eleanor  llardie  has  begun 
a  three  months'  apprenticeship. 

The  Christmas  Story  Hour  was  un- 
usually  successful.     The  average   attend- 


vol.  21,110. 1] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


29 


SAN   LUIS  OBISPO  CO.— Continued. 
San   Luis  Obispo — Continued. 

ance  of  sixty  or  seventy  was  expected, 
but  over  one  hundred  and  thirty  children 
under  twelve  years  attended  and  listened 
with  evident  pleasure  to  Christmas  stories 
told  by  the  librarian  and  assistant,  which 
were  supplemented  by  stories  and  recita- 
tions on  the  phonograph. 

A  reading  project  planned  for  a  local 
study  club  had  excellent  results  for  both 
club  and  library.  This  club  at  every 
meeting  has  one  topic,  usually  one  of 
current  interest,  for  discussion  in  whici! 
every  member  takes  part.  The  library 
often  furnishes  subjects  for  these  discus- 
sions and  recently  the  subject  "Books 
You  May  Have  Missed"  was  chosen  from 
a  lis't  submitted.  The  library  prepared 
brief  reviews  of  books  having  special  in- 
terest or  charm,  typewritten  on  slips 
which  were  distributed  to  the  members 
who  read  them  before  the  club.  These 
little  reviews  stimulated  such  interest 
in  the  books  that  it  was  decided  each 
member  should  read  the  book,  the  review 
of  which  she  had  drawn  and  report  ou 
it  at  the  next  meeting.  That  meeting 
was  considered  the  most  interesting  of 
the  season,  and  thus  sixteen  readers  and 
sixteen  good  books  that  I'eally  had  lieeu 
missed  were  brought  together. 

Abrte   S.   KET.LOfic,   Lib'n. 


SAN   MATEO  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first  class.) 
County  seat,  Redwood  City. 
Area,  470  sq.  mi.     Pop.  36,781. 
Assessed    valuation    .$46,1  S'3. 707     (tax- 
able for  county  .$42,062,070). 

San  Mateo  Co.  Free  Liueary,  Red- 
wood City.     Miss  Edna  Holroyd,   Lib'n. 

Hilda  S.  Gear  has  been  appointed  an 
assistant  in  the  county  library. — San 
Mateo  ^V'lr.s  Loader.  O  14 

Burlingame. 

BURLINGAME    [FREE]    PuBI.IC    LIBRARY. 

Mrs  ^laiT  T.  Gervais,  Lib'n. 

The  proposal  to  bond  the  Burlingame 
library  district  for  $75,000  to  erect  a  nev.- 
library  building  and  purchase  the  site 
for  a  bi-anch  library  in  North  Burlingame 
failed  to  gain  the  necessary  two  thirds 
majority  at  the  election  Dec.  1.5 — San 
Francisco  Examiner,  D  16 


SAN    MATEO  CO.— Continued. 

Redwood    City. 

Sequoia  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary. A.  C.  x^rgo,  Prin.  Angelena 
Burns,   Lib'n. 

With  an  appropriation  for  the  library 
of  $1-500  this  year  we  are  enjoying  a  p.^i- 
iod  of  expansion.  44  magazines  are  re- 
ceived regularly.  There  are  3Sft0  volumes' 
in  the  library,  to  serve  the  31  teachers 
and  660  pupils. 

Angelena  Burns,  Lib'n. 

SANTA  BARBARA  COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth  class.) 
County  .seat,  Santa  Barbara. 
Area,  2450  sq.  mi.     Pop.  41,097. 
Assessed    valuation    $70.788.8.31     (tax- 
able for  county  $f>0,567,709 ) . 

Santa  Barbara. 

Santa  Barbara  Free  Public  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  Frances  Burns  Linn,  Lib'n. 

The  Santa  Barbara  Relief  Fund  Com- 
mittee Dec.  22.  presented  the  library 
board  with  a  check  for  $34,000  to  be 
used  in  the  reconstruction  of  the  public 
library.  To  reconstruct  the  library  wiU 
cost  approximately  $70,000,  according  lO 
Carlton  Winslow,  architect,  and  Engineer 
Derrick  who  made  a  survey  several 
months  ago. — Los  Angeles  Tim  ex.  D  23 

SANTA  CLARA  COUNTY. 

( Sixth  class. » 
County  seat,  San  .Tose. 
Area,  1.3.5i5  sq.  mi.  I'op.  1(M),5S.S. 
Asse.ssed   valuation   $124,103,301     (tax- 
able for  county  $107,9a5,29<J). 

Los  Gatos. 

Los  Gatos  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Grace  A.  Smith,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Caroline  H.  Bailey,  for  six  years 
librarian  of  Los  Gatos  Pubic  Lilirary, 
resigned  her  position  after  her  return 
in  December,  from  her  three  months" 
Eastern  tiip.  Miss  Grace  A.  Smith,  who 
has  been  in  the  Santa  Clara  County  FiC" 
Library  for  four  years,  was  appointed  to 
take  her  place,  the  appointment  taking 
effect  .Tan.  1. 

SANTA  CRUZ  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-.sixth    class.) 
County  seat,  Santa  Cruz. 
Area,  4^  sq.  mi.    Pop.  26,269. 
Assessed    valuation    .$26,314,415     (tax- 
able for  county  .$22,442,480). 


30 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


SANTA    CRUZ    CO.— Continued. 
Watsonville. 

Watsonville  High  School  Ltbeary. 
T.  S.  McQuiddy.  Trin. 

Miss  Ida  McAdam,  Librarian  of  tiiv^ 
Watsonville  Union  Hish  School  Library, 
passed  away  November  IS.  Miss  Mc- 
Adam had  rendered  efficient  service  in 
this  library  for  the  last  twelve  years. 

T.  S.  McQuiDDY,  Prin. 

SHASTA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  Redding. 
Area.  4050  sq.  mi.    Pop.  13,311. 
Assessed    valuation    $23,921,238     (tax- 
able for  county  $16,940,710). 

SIERRA  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth  class.) 
County  seat,  Downieville. 
Area,  957  sq.  mi.     Pop.  1783. 
Assessed  valuation  $3.2.56.377   ( taxable 
for  county    $2,892,010). 

SISKIYOU   COUNTY. 

(Tliirty-third  class.) 
County  .-^.eat,  Yreka. 
Area,  6079  sq.  mi.    Pop.  18,545. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,092,483     (ta.v- 
able  for  county  $21,072,870). 

SiSKiYOXT  Co.  Fbee  Library,  Yreka. 
Miss   Ellen   B.  Frink,  Lib'n. 

The  reorganized  Railroad  Camp  of  tii;^ 
McCloud  Lumber  Camp  is  known  now  as 
Pondosa  and  the  County  Library  is  serv- 
ing the  community  through  the  emergency 
school  and  a  community  branch  established 
December  8.  Dunsmuir  Branch  moved 
December  1  into  new  quarters  in  th-^ 
lately  completed  city  hall. 

In  October,  Miss  Anne  Hadden,  Li- 
brarian of  Monterey  County,  visited  us 
and  went  with  the  Librarian  on  a  trij) 
through  the  western  part  of  the  county  ; 
this  included  passing  over  the  newly  com- 
pleted piece  of  road  between  Somes  Bar 
and  Forks  of  the  Salmon. 

Miss  Emma  Revell  of  our  county  li- 
brary staff  spent  two  weeks  leave  at  the 
State  Library ;  Miss  Revell  found  much 
of  interest  both  in  the  State  Library 
Itself  and  in  the  view  it  disclosed  ol 
other  county  library  work  throughout  tiu; 
state.    For  two  months  beginning  October 


SISKIYOU  CO.— Continued. 
15,  Miss  Rae  Beri'y  worked  as  temporary 
assistant,  pai'ticularly  on  the  mending  oi' 
books. 

In  December,  through  the  courtesy  of 
the  lecturer  of  Pomona  Grange,  an  exhibit 
was  made  of  books  on  Country  Life ;  a 
number  of  books  were  lent  at  the  meeting, 
while  the  others  will  be  included  in  ship- 
ments- to  the  ranching  districts  of  tho 
county. 

Eli.en  B.  Frink,  Lib'n. 

SOLANO  COUNTY. 

( Nineteenth   cla  ss. ) 
County  .seat,  Fairfield. 
Area,  911  sq.  mi.     Pop.  40,602. 
Assessed    valuation    .$37,602,045     (t<ix- 
able  for  county  $.30,787,420). 

Solano  Co.  Fbee  Library,  Fairfield. 
Miss  Clara  B.  Dills,  Lib'n. 

For  Children's  Book  Week,  the  library 
staff  prepared  displays  of  books  and 
posters  in  the  libraries  of  the  county, 
aided  the  Suisun  City  Parent  Teacher 
Association  in  securing  the  services  oi 
Mrs  Constance  Mitchell  of  the  Sather 
Gate  Book  Shop  for  a  story  hour  in  ine 
Crystal  School,  held  an  afternoon  for 
the  youngsters  at  the  County  Library  in 
Fairfield  which  entertainment  eonsist'-d 
of  stories  told  by  members  of  the  library 
staff  and  pictures  of  famous  children 
from  history  shov.'u  with  the  new  Balop- 
tican  that  is  being  much  used  in  schools 
of  this  county  now.  Parents  and  children 
attended  this  meeting,  in  all  about  1(X). 
The  large  display  of  finely  illustrated 
books  I'eceived  much  attention  also.  Arti- 
cles in  the  newspapers  also  carried  the 
message  of  Book  Week  throughout  the 
county. 

During  December  the  county  library 
used  the  stereopticon  slides  again  in  a 
number  of  places.  The  Christmas  pro- 
gi-ams  of  many  of  the  clubs  of  the  couniy 
were  made  up  by  the  library  and  the 
County  Music  Supervisor.  This  program 
shown  at  four  clubs  consisted  of  Christ- 
mas carols,  and  a  story  taken  from  the 
Bible  and  the  Prayer  Book,  explaining  the 
carols.  The  slides,  reproductions  in 
colors  of  the  Wise  Men,  Annunciation 
scenes,  glimpses  of  the  Manger,  Madonna.s 
and  other  pictures  were  for  the  most  pai't 
taken  from  famous  canvases,  and  further 


vol.  21,110.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


31 


SOLANO    CO.— Continued. 

gave  illustration  to  the  story  and  holiday 
carols. _  This  plan  was  suggested  by  the 
urge  of  the  whole  country  to  sing  and 
use  the  carols  all  over  the  land.  This 
program  was  used  in  clubs,  libraries  and 
schools,  proving  very  entertaining  wher- 
ever given.  It  was  also  interesting  as 
a  piece  of  good  cooperation  as  shown  by 
the  clubs,  the  Music  Supervisor,  musi- 
cians of  the  county  and  the  county  li- 
brary. 

Plans  are  afoot  to  open  a  branch  in 
Bay  Terrace,  a  portion  of  the  city  of 
Vallejo  that  was,  during  the  War,  owned 
by  the  government  and  used  as  a  place  to 
house  many  of  the  navy  families. 

A  little  daughter  came  to  Mr  and  Mrs 
Elmer  Burrell  (nee  Miss  Marjorie  Chil- 
berg)   December  15. 

Clara  B.  Dill,s,  Lib'n. 

SONOMA  COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth  class.) 
County  seat,  Santa  Rosa. 
Area,  1540  sq.  mi.    Pop.  51,990. 
Assessed    valuation    .$51,110,190     (tax- 
able for  county  .?43.514,670). 

Petaluma. 

§Petaluma  [FKEn-:]  Public  Library. 
^Nliss'  Sara  Frances  Cassiday,  Lib'n. 

F.  A.  Cromwell,  Secretary  of  the  Li- 
brary Board  for  over  tvrenty-five  years, 
dropped  dead  of  heart  failure  Sept.  lo. 
Mrs  Fred  Howell  has  been  appointed  to 
fill  the  vacancy  on  the  board. 

Sara  F.  Cassiday,  Lib'n. 

Sonoma. 

Sonoma  Valley  Union  High  School 
Library.  L.  H.  Golton,  Prin.  Lyle  F. 
Campbell,  Lib'n. 

Our  library  now  contains  2.350  volume.s, 
and  we  subscribe  to  fourteen  periodicals. 
There  are  160  pupils  and  10  teachers. 
Lyle  F.  Campbell,  Lib'n. 

STANISLAUS  COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth   class.) 

County   seat,   Modesto. 
Area,  1486  sq.  mi.     Pop.  4.3. .">57. 
Assessed    valuation    $62,169,779     (tax- 
able for  county  .$53,830,075). 

Stanislaus  Co.  Free  Library,  Mo- 
desto.    Miss  Bessie  B.  Silverthorn,  Lib'n. 

A  custodians'  meeting  was  held  the 
afternoon  of  Nov.  5.     At  a  roll  call  each 


STANISLAUS    CO.— Continued. 

custodian  related  the  interesting  things 
that  had  happened  at  her  branch  dur- 
ing the  past  year.  Miss  Ida  M.  Hunting- 
ton of  the  main  library  staff  gave  some 
suggestions  for  the  observance  of  Chil- 
dren's Book  Week,  and  Miss  Alta  May 
Bennett,  also  of  the  local  staff,  reviewed 
a  group  of  the  more  worthwhile  new 
books.  Miss  Silverthorn  outlined  the  plan 
of  the  Reading  With  a  Purpose  series  of 
the  American  Library  Association  and 
ways  of  attracting  patrons  to  this  course 
were  informally  discussed  by  the  custo- 
dians. The  library  had  a  supply  of  the 
posters,  handbooks,  and  books  mentioned, 
for  distribution  to  the  custodians  at  the 
end  of  the  meeting. 

During  November  the  fifth  and  sixth 
grades  of  the  Lincoln  School  of  Modesto 
visited  the  main  library  and  Avere  in- 
structed in  the  use  of  the  library  by  Mis 
Ruth  Nankeville  of  the  county  school 
department. 

At  the  regular  monthly  luncheon  of 
the  Modesto  Woman's  Club,  Oct.  19,  Mrs 
Clemence  Parks  of  the  library  staff  gave 
a  number  of  book  reviews. 

Miss  Opal  Elwyn,  for  the  past  two  , 
years  school  ass'ktant,  resigned  to  take 
a  similar  position  in  Ventura  County 
Free  Library.  Mrs  Ruth  Nankeville,  her 
assistant,  wil  have  charge  of  this  depart- 
ment. Miss  Bessie  Chastain,  student 
in  the  Modesto  High  School,  is  acting 
a.s  page  in  the  school  department,  after 
school  hours  and   Saturdays. 

Bessie  B.   Silverthorn,  Lib'n. 

SUTTER  COUNTY, 

(Forty-first  class.) 
County  seat,   Yuba   City. 
Area,  611  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,115. 
Assessed    valuation    $22,141,102    (tax- 
able for  county  $17,853,825). 

TEHAMA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth  cla.ss.) 
County  seat,  Red  Bluff. 
Area,  .3200  sq.  mi.    Pop.  12,882. 
Assessed    valuation    $20,807,359     (tax- 
able for  county  $17,365,960). 

Tehama  Co.  Free  Library,  Red 
Bluff.      Miss   Anne  Bell   Bailey,   Lib'n. 

The  Tehama  County  Library  has  been 
rich  in  visitors  this  quarter.  Miss  Ste 
yens,  whose  loss  is  so  keenly  felt  througu- 


32 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


TEHAMA  CO.— Continued. 

out  the  county,  has  dropped  in  on  Uf^ 
twice,  but  only  long  enough  to  greet  us 
and  depart.  Miss  Hadden  flitted  by  and 
Miss'  De  Ford  renewed  acquaintance  with 
the  Court  House  one  day  while  making 
a  fleeting  visit  with  friends  in  Red  Blufr. 
Judge  Bartlett  of  Trinity  County,  a 
staunch  friend  of  the  County  Library 
System,  made  several  calls  upon  the  li- 
brary while  sitting  in  court  in  Tehama 
County.  Judge  Bartlett  is  a  student  and 
authority  on  old  California  history,  and 
casual  reminiscences  of  early  times  in 
northern  California  found  ready  listen- 
ers at  each  visit. 

Two  deposit  stations  have  been  placed 
in  ranch  homes :  one,  called  Johnson, 
where  the  group  is  sufhciently  large  to 
send  out  a  collection  of  books  to  be  cir- 
culated among  the  families  residing  on 
the  place ;  the  other  to  a  family  named 
Savercool,  living  twelve  miles  away  from 
the  nearest  rural  delivery  box.  who  are 
shut  in  all  winter. 

Several  visits  were  made  to  Gerber 
where  the.  branch  w'as  moved  from  a 
grocery  store  to  a  real  estate  office.  The 
latter  is  more  suitable  to  the  use  of  the 
lil)rary  because  it  is  open  at  night  and  the 
entire  time  of  the  custodian  is  given  to 
the  library  instead  of  being  divided  be- 
tween sugar,  flour  and  books. 

El  Camino  Branch  was  started  through 
the  interest  and  activity  of  the  Women's 
Tuesday  Club  of  El  Camino  Colony.  It 
is  located  in  the  store  of  Mrs  George 
Hart,  a  member  of  the  club,  and  prom- 
ises to  be  a  thriving  branch  before  long. 
Richfield  Branch  was  discontinued  Dec. 
30,  because  of  the  removal  from  town 
of  the  custodian.  No  suitable  place 
seemed  available  at  present,  so  the  branch 
will  be  allowed  to  lapse  for  a  time.  The 
school  has  taken  over  the  reading  matter 
for  the  children,  and  most  of  the  adults 
are  able  to  patronize  the  Red  Blu*f 
Branch  of  the  library. 

A  most  interesting  visit  was  made  to 
the  Squaw  Valley  Branch,  ]>ec.  2  with 
the  Home  Demonstration  Agent.  The 
opportunity  to  meet  many  of  the  women 
of  the  Farm  Center  was  thus  made  pos- 
sible. TTie  week  following,  the  librarian 
was  invited  to  attend  the  annual  meet- 
ing of  the  Farm  Center  with  the  Farm 
Advis'er    and    the    Home    Demonstratioa 


TEHAMA  CO. — Continued. 

Agent.  A  bountiful  dinner  received  due 
consideration  from  the  members  and 
guests  after  the  long  ride  in  the  chilly 
air,  and  the  program  was  one  that  will 
be  long  remembered  for  the  quality  and 
variety  of  its  numbers.  The  librarian 
was  accorded  a  most  cordial  welcome  to 
the  community,  which  typifies  the  atti- 
tude of  the  whole  county  toward  the  li- 
brary, and  may  justly  be  attributed  to 
the  winning  personality  of  the  former 
libi-arian. 

For  Children's  Book  Week,  the  "Map 
of  Adventure"  was  used  as  the  basis  for 
the  observance  of  the  week.  Copies  of 
the  map  were  sent  to  all  of  the  schools, 
and  collections  of  the  listed  books  (as 
far  as  possible)  made  with  suggestions 
that  books  and  reading  be  specially 
emphasized  in  all  of  the  school  programs 
for  the  week.  Visits  were  made  to  sev- 
eral schools-  during  the  week,  and  in- 
formal talks  given  to  the  children.  The 
overwhelming  response  to  the  "bait"  was 
totally  unexpected,  and  the  results  of 
the  efiicacy  of  the  map  as  a  stimulator  in 
reading  has  been  demonstrated  by  the 
continued  requests  for  books  listed  on  it. 

On  November  14  the  librarian  was 
given  an  opportunity  to  meet  most  of  the 
primary  teachers  of  the  county,  at  a 
meeting  called  by  the  Rural  Supervisor. 
A  talk  on  "The  ^Materials'  of  Reading  for 
the  Youngest  Children"  was  most  cor- 
dially received,  and  in  response  to  a  plei 
for  the  early  acquaintance  with  poetry 
through  the  careful  selection  and  reading 
of  verse  to  children,  a  flattering  demand 
for  poetry  collections  for  children  has 
been  made  on  the  library. 

The  librarian  with  two  assistants,  one 
custodian  and  the  librarian  of  the  Red 
Bluff  City  Library  motored  to  the  9th 
district  meeting  at  Oroville,  where  the 
delightful  program  prepared  by  Miss 
Chalfant  was  enjoyed  to  the  utmost. 

Anne  Bell  Bailey,  Lib'n. 

TRINITY   COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  Weaverville. 
Area,  3276  sq.  mi.     Pop.  25.51. 
Assessed  valuation  .$3,827,  208  (taxable 
for  county  $3,395,927). 

Trinity  Co.  Free  Library,  Weaver- 
-  viLLE.     ^Irs  Lila  G.  Adams,  Lib'n. 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


33 


TRINITY   CO.— Continued. 

The  Hawkins  Bar  and  Lower  Trinity 
branches  o»f  the  County  Free  Library 
have  recently  consolidated,  with  head- 
quarters at  Salyer.  A  new  branch  has 
been  established  at  Helena. — Weaverville 
Jovrnal,  O  10 

TULARE  COUNTY. 

(Eleventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Visalia. 
Area,  4863  sq.mi.     Pop.  59031. 
Assessed    valuation    $88,988,736     (tax- 
able for  county  $67,763,250). 

Tulare  Co.  Free  Library,  Visalia. 
Miss  Gretehen  Flower,  Lib'n. 

The  Kaweah  Branch  was  re-established 
Nov.  8,  with  Mrs  Laur'a  D.  Hopping  in 
charge.  A  branch  wag  established  at 
South  TuJe  Oct.  1.  Mrs  Lottie  Vincent 
is  custodian. 

During  the  quarter  there  have  been 
several  changes  in  custodians.  At  Badger 
Branch,  Mrs  Louise  Weddle  succeeded 
Miss  Louise  Stapp  Nov.  1.  Mrs  Cramer 
of  Strathmore  Branch  resigned  Oct.  1 ; 
Mrs  Lucy  Cox  filled  the  place  tempo- 
rarily until  Nov  1,  when  Mrs  Myrtle 
Beattie  took  charge.  At  Terra  Bella 
Mrs  Jennie  Whitwell  took  the  place 
of  Harry  S.  Lewis  Nov.  15,  and  at 
Traver  Isaac  Trulock  was  succeeded  by 
Mrs  Fred  Lahann  Nov.  1. 

The  Oak  Grove  School  District  joined 
the  County  Free  Library  Oct.  16 ;  Mrs 
Elsie  N.  Hart  is  custodian,  the  post  oflSce 
Visalia. 

Geetchen  Flower,  Lib'n. 

TUOLUMNE  COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth  class.) 
County  seat,   Sonora. 
Ar'ea,  2292  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7768. 
Assessed    valuation    $12,356,640     (tax- 
able for  county  $8,8.50,745). 

VENTURA  COUNTY. 

(Twenty- third  class.) 
County  seat,  Ventura. 
Area,  1850  sq.  mi.     Pop.  28,724. 
Assessed    valuation    $63,246,876    (tax- 
able for  county  $54,556,749). 

Ventura  Co.  Free  Library,  Ven- 
tura.    Miss  Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Helen  Kearney  resigned  Nov.  1 
from    Ventura    City    Brancli    and    Miss 

3—43023 


VENTURA    CO.— Continued. 

Weyanna  Lopp  of  the  County  Library 
took  her  place.  Miss  Opal  Elwyn  from 
Stanislaus;  County  Free  Library  takes  the 
place  of  Miss  Lopp.  Miss  Elwyn  began 
work  Dec.   1. 

The  Piru  Brajich  Library  has  moved 
into  a  tiny  building.  It  was  formerly  in 
the  post  office  in  charge  of  Mrs  Cornelius. 
Miss  Linda  Dominguez  is  acting  as  cus- 
todian no^^'.  The  change  in  location  gives 
an  opportunity  for  the  branch  to  have  a 
reading  room  and  also  to  be  opened  in 
the  evening. 

Mrs  Hall  and  Miss  Chatfield  had  a 
display  of  books  at  the  Athene  Club 
House  during  Children's  Week.  Talks 
were  also  given  at  the  Piru  Parent- 
Teacher  Association  and  the  Simi  Valley 
Union  High  School. 

The  library  had  its  annual  booth  at 
the  County  Fair.  Special  features  were 
made  of  the  books  on  oil,  which  attracted 
interest. 

The  library  enjoyed  a  delightful  visit 
from  Mrs  Henshall. 

Elizabeth  R.  Toppinc4,  Lib'n. 

Oxnard. 

OxNARD  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Ethel  Carroll,  Lib'n., 

Miss  Elsie  Ward  of  Montalvo,  graduate 
of  the  University  of  California  Library 
School  and  with  three  years  exijerience 
at  the  Santa  Clara  County  Library  and 
the  Long  Beach  Public  Library,  is  to 
join  the  staff  of  the  Oxnard  Library  the 
first  of  the  year,  as  assistant  to  Miss 
Carroll. — Oxnard  Courier,  D  23 

YOLO  COUNTY. 

( Thirty-fourth   class. ) 
County  seat,  Woodland. 
Area,  1017  sq.  mi.     Pop.  17,105. 
Assessed    valuation    $33,466,4.39     (tax- 
able for  county  $26,966,854). 

Davis. 

DavIvS  Free  Library  and  Branch, 
Yolo  Co.  F'ree  Library.  Miss  Hattie 
Weber,  Lib'n. 

We  have  a  great  many  new  books  for 
children. 

Hattie  Weber,  Lib'n. 

Woodland. 

Woodland  Free  [Public]  Library 
AND  Branch,  Yolo  Co.  Free  Library. 
Mrs  Ii-ma  C.  Bruton,  Lib'n. 


34 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


YOLO.  CO.— Continued. 

Woodland — Continued. 

Lackin.i;'  the  necessary  funds  to  provide 
a  much  needed  cliildven's  room  for  our 
library,  we  liave  recently  rearranged  our 
stacks  so  as  to  enlarge  our  children's 
corner  (4  by  1-5  feet)  to  a  space  9  by  15. 
New  shelving  has  been  built  in  under  the 
windows  in  the  outside  wall  of  the  stack 
room,  giving  us  some  needed  book  room. 
All  of  the  books  in  the  library  have  been 
rearranged  and  put  in  order;  our  lighting 
i  in  proved,   and   we   feel   that   library   con- 


YOLO  CO.— Continued. 

Woodland— Continued. 

ditions  at   tlie  beginning  of  this  year  are 
unusually  good. 

Ibma  Cole  Beuton,  Lib'n. 

YUBA  COUNTY. 

(Fortieth  class.) 
County  seat,  Marysville. 
Area,  62.5  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,375. 
Assessed    valuation    .$20,257,344     (tax- 
able for  county  .$16,578,575). 


vol.  21,  no,  1  I         DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,    ETC. 


33 


DIRECTORY  FOR  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES  AND  OTHER  ITEMS 
OF  GENERAL  INTEREST. 


The  following  directory  is  based  on 
recommendations  received  from  the  libra- 
ries of  California.  New  recommendations 
and  corrections  will  be  welcomed  at  any 
time. 

SUPPLIES. 
Amateur   Plays. 
Acting  Dramas  for  Amateurs. 

The   Book   Den,  464   Eighth    st,   Oak- 
land,  Calif. 

A.   L.  A. 

FTeadquarters. 

SG  E.  Randolph  St.,  Chicago,  111. 

All  A.  L.  A.  publications  sold  from 
headquarters  except  1904  Catalog  which 
can  be  purchased  for  $1  from  Superin- 
tendent of  Documents,  Washington,  D.  C. 

Binding  and    Mending. 
Binding. 
Cooperative  Bindery  Co.,  330  Jackson 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Foster  &  Futernick  Co.,  444  Bryant  St., 

San   Francisco,   Calif. 
Herring  &  Robinson,  1927  Howard  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Hicks-Judd    Co.,    460   Fourth   st.,    San 

Francisco,  Calif. 
Pacific    Library    Binding    Co.,    770    E. 

Washington   St.,   Los   Angeles,   Calif. 
Sacramento    Bookbindery,    309    J    st., 

Sacramento.   Calif. 
Silvius   and   Schoenbackler,   423   J   st., 

Sacramento,   Calif. 

•  Mending, 

Stix  Co.,  San  Jo&'e. 

Stix-Parchment  mending  tissue. 

Blind. 

Embos'sed    books,   etc.      Addresses   will 
be  furnished  by  the  State  Library. 

Book  Cases  and   Shelving. 
McKee  &  Wentwortb  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),    39    Second    st.,    San 
Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los   Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif, 


Book   Packing   Bags. 

Hoegee  Co.,  138-142   S.  Main  St.,  Los 
Angeles,   Calif, 

Book    Packing    Boxes. 

Pacific  Box   Factory,  2600  Taylor  st., 
San   Francisco,   Calif, 

Corrugated  Paper  Cartons, 

Illinois-Pacific     Glas's     Co.,     15th     and 

Folsom  sts.,  San  Fi-ancisco,  Calif. 
Richardson-Case      Paper      Co.,      1021 

Front   St.,   Sacramento,   Calif, 

Book  Plates. 
Manhattan      Photogravure      Co.,      142 

West  27th  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Sequoyah  Studio,  319  42d  St.,  Oakland, 

Calif. 
Times-Mirror     Printing     and     Binding 

House,      lis      S.      Broadway,      Los 

Angeles,  Calif, 
Western    Lithograph    Co.,    600-610    E. 

Second  st.,  Los  AngeleK,  Calif. 

Book   Pockets. 

Den^pcrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus    st., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Hicks-Judd    Co.,   460   Fourth   st,    San 

Francisco,   Calif. 
McKee  &  Wentworth    (Library   Bureau 

Distributors),    39    Second    st.,    San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los   Angeles 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
The  Zellerbach  Paper  Co.,  534  Battery 

St.,   San  Francisco,  Calif, 

Book  Stacks,  Metal  Furniture,  Etc. 

Art    Metal    Construction    Co.,    James- 

tOAvn,  N.  Y, 
McKee   &  Wentworth  ( Library  Bureau 

Distributors),    39     Second    st.,     San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los   Angeles 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif, 
J,  Niederer  Co.,  3409  S,  Main  St.,  Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Van  Horn  Iron  Works  Co.,  Cleveland, 

Ohio. 


36 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


Jan.,  1926 


Book  Supports,   Bracket  and   Pedal   for 
Perforating    Stamp    and    Other    Me- 
chanical   Appliances. 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord    Bros..    44    N.    Stanislaus    St., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
McKee  &  Wentworth    (Library  Bureau 

Distributors),    39    Second    st.,     San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los  Angeles 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,    San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Book  Varnish. 

Pacific  Library  Binding  Co.,  770  E. 
Washington  St.,   Los  Angeles,   Calif. 

Books. 

Baker  &  Taylor  Co.,  354  4tla  ave.,  New 

York  City. 
Chivers  Book  Binding  Co.,  126  Nassau 

St.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

For   books  in   Chivers   binding. 

Emporium,  835-865  Market  st.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Himebaugh  &  Browne,  471  Fifth  ave.. 
New  York,  N.  Y. 

Holmes  Book  Co.,  342  14th  st,  Oakland, 
and  152  Kearny  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

H.  R.  Huntting  Co.,  Springfield,  Mass. 

Levinson's  The  Book  Store,  1012  K  st., 
Sacramento,  Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Library  Depart- 
ment, 330  E.  Ohio  st,   Chicago,   111. 

McDevitt- Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  st., 
New  l^'ork  City. 

Newbegin's,  358  Post  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's  Book  Store  (C.  C.  Parker), 
520   W.   6th  St.,  Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Pumell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather  Gate  Bookshop,  2235  Telegraph 
ave.,  Berkeley,  Calif. 

Chas.  Scribner's  Sons,  5th  ave.  and 
48th  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

G.  E.  Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33  E.  10th 
St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Technical  Publishing  Co.,  274  I.  W. 
Hellman  bldg.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Handles  only  technical  books. 

Union  Library  Association,  225  Fifth 
ave..  New  York  City. 


Books — Continued. 

Vrc.man's  Book  Store,  329  E.  Colorado 

St.,  Pasadena. 
Harr   Wagner,    149   New   Montgomery 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Especially    western    books    by   western    authors. 

White  House,  Sutter  st,  bet  Grant 
ave.  and  Kearny  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

English  Books  and  Publications. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33  E.   10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   P.   Stevens  &  Brown,  4   Trafalgar 
Square,  London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 

Foreign   Books   and   Publications   in 

Various  Languages. 
Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  .542  S.  Spring 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33  E.  10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   Westermann  Co.,   Inc.,   30-32   East 

Twentieth  st..  New  York,  N.  Y. 

French. 

French  Book  Store,  Alfred  Blanc  &  J. 

Delabriandais,  324  Stockton  st.,  San 

Francisco,  Calif. 
J.    Terquem,    19    Rue    Scribe,    Paris. 

France. 

Italian. 

A.  Cavalli  &  Co.,  255  Columbus  ave., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Spajiish. 

Victoriano  Suarez,  Madrid,  Spain. 

Law  Books. 
Bancroft-Whitney   Co.,   200  McAllister 

st,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Matthew-Bender  &  Co.,  109  State  st., 

Albany,  N.  Y. 

School  Books. 

Milton  Bradley  Co.,  20  Second  st.,  San 
Franci&'co,  Calif. 

California  School  Book  Depository, 
149  New  Montgomery  st,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Ginn  &  Co.,  45  Second  st,  San  Fran- 
cisco,  Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Library  Depart- 
ment, 330  E.  Ohio  st.,  Chicago,  111. 

Owen  Publishing  Co.,  681  Market  St., 
San   Francisco,   Calif. 


vol.  21,  no.  1]         DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,    ETC. 


Books — Continued. 
White    House,    Sutter   st.,    bet.    Grant 
ave.  and  Kearny  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

Second-Hand  Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  st. 

New   York  City. 
Mudle's    Select    Library,    30-34    New 

Oxford  St.,  London,  Eng. 
Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Henry    Sotheran    &    Co.,    140    Strand, 

London,  W.   C.  2,   Eng. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33  E.   10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   F.   Stevens'  &  Brown,  4  Trafalgar 

Square,  London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 
A.  R.  Womrath,  15  E.  28th  St.,   New 

York,  N.  Y. 

For  used  fiction. 

Especially  Californiana. 

Dawson's    Book    Shop,    627    S.    Grand 

ave.,   TiOs  Angeles,  California. 
F.  M.  De  Witt,  020  14th  st.,  Oakland, 

Calif. 
Holmes  Book  Co.,  342  14th  st,  Oakland, 
and   1.'52  Kearny  st.,   San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

Cabinets. 
-See  FuRNiTUEE  and  Supplies. 

Catalog  Cards. 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  sr,, 
Stockton,  Calif. 

McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  3ld  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman  &  Erbe  Manufacturing  Co., 
132-140  Sutter  st.,  San  Francisco, 
and  727  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 
H.    S.    Crocker    Co.,    565-571    Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's    Press    Clipping    Bureau,    255 

Commercial   st,   San   Francisco,  and 

•      626  S.  Spring  st,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 


County    Free    Library   Signs. 

For  information,  write  Mrs  Frances 
Burns  Linn,  Santa  Barbara  County 
Free  Library,  Santa  Barbara,  Calif. 

County    Free    Library    Stickers. 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus!    st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Cutter  Tables,    Size    Rulers,   Etc. 
McKee  &  Wentworth   (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),    39     Second    st.,     San 
Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los   Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Duplicating    Appliances. 

Dandy  Duplicator. 

Dodge  &  Dent,   New  York,   N.  Y. 

Edison  Rotary  Mimeograph. 

H.  S.  Crocker  Co.  (Agents),  565-571 
Market  st.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Filing  Cases. 

See  Furniture  and  Supplies. 

Films. 

For  Rent. 

American  Red  Cross  Films,  distributed 

by  University  of  California  Library, 

Berkeley,  Calif. 
Fox     Film     Corporation,     New     York, 

N.  Y. 
National  Producers   Film  Service,   111 

Golden    Gate    ave.,    San    Francisco, 

Calif. 
Pathe   Exchange,    Inc.,    Non-Theatrical 

Dept.,    985    Market    st.,    San    Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
United    States    Forest    Service,    Ferry 

bldg.,  San  Francis'co,  Calif. 
University     of     California,     Extension 

Division,   Berkeley,    Calif. 

Furniture   and    Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth  Stationery  Co.,  737- 
739  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller  Desk  Co.,  '677  Mission 
St.,    San   Francisco,   Calif. 


38 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Furniture    and    Supplies — Continued. 
Yawman    &    Erbe    Manufacturing:   Co., 
132-140    Sutter   st.,    San    Francisco, 
and  727  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing  Cases  for  Music. 

Los  Angeles  Desk  Co.,  848  S.  Hill  st., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Globes. 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  5235-7  Ravens- 
wood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
agent :  A.  B.  Maine,  Box  635,  Arcado 
Station,   Los  Angeles,   Calif.) 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac 
ramento,   Calif. 

Rand-McNally  Co.,  125  E.  Sixth  st., 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  st., 
San   Francisco,   Calif. 

C.  F.  Weber  &  Co.,  985  Market  st., 
San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Magazine   Binders. 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 
Elbe    File    and    Binder    Co.,    215-217 

Greene  &t.,  New  York,  N.  Y, 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus    St., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Gem    Binder    Co.,    65    W.    Broadway, 

New  York. 
Wm.  G.  Johnston  &  Co.,  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
McKee  &  Wentworth   (Library  Bureau 

Distributors),    39    Second    st,     San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los  Angeles 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Magazines. 

See  Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  523.5-7  Ravens- 
wood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
agent :  A.  B.  Maine,  Box  635,  Arcade 
Station,   Los  Angeles.   Calif.) 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally  Co.,  125  B.  Sixth  St., 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  st., 
San   Francisco,   Calif, 

C.  F,  Weber  &  Co.,  985  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  Kearny  and  Sut- 
ter sts.,   San    Francisco,   Calif. 

G.  Schirmer,  3  E.  43d  st..  New  York, 
N.  Y. 


Pamphlet    and    Multi-Binders,    and 

Pamphlet   Boxes. 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus    st., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Mc-Kee  &  Wentworth   (Library  Bureau 

Distributors),    .39    Second    st.,     San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los  Angeles 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Paste. 

Pacific  Library  Binding  Co.,  770  E. 
Washington   st.,   Los  Angeles,   Calif. 

Pasting   Machines. 

A.  G.  Prior.  136  Liberty  st..  New 
York,  N.  Y. 

Perforating    Stamps. 

B.  F.  Cummins  Co.,   Chicago,   111. 
Moise-KIinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Periodicals. 

Back  Volumes  and  Numbebs. 

F.  W.  Faxon  Co.,  83-91  Francis  st.. 
Back  Bay,   Boston,   Mass. 

F.  M.  De  Witt,  620  14th  st.,  Oakland, 

Calif. 
International    Magazine   Co.,  339   Bay 

Way  North,  Elizabeth,  N.  J. 
Pacific    Library    Binding    Co.,    770    E. 

Washington   st.,   Los   Angeles,   Calif. 
H.  W.  Wilson  Co.,  958-64  University 

ave..   New  York  City. 

Subscription  Agencies. 

John  A.  Clow,  2925  N,  Lake  ave., 
Pasadena,  Calif. 

Franklin  Square  Agency,  Franklin 
Square,   New  York   City. 

Moore-Cottrell  Subscription  Agencies, 
North  Cohocton,  N.  Y. 

Mutual  Subscription  Agency,  602  Cro- 
zer  B'Idg.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st,  Sac- 
ramento,  Calif. 

San  Francisco  News  Co.,  657  Howard 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

G.  E.  Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33  E.  10th 
St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

For  foreign  peilodlcals  only. 

Sunset  Subscription  Agency,  631 
Chamber  of  Commerce  Bldg.,  Los 
.\ngeles,   Calif. 

H.  W.  Wilson  Co.,  958-64  University 
ave..  New  York  City. 


vol.  21,  no.  1]         DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,    ETC. 


39 


Pictures. 

Braun  &  Co.,  Dornach,  Alsace,  France. 
Curtis     &    Cameron,     Copley     Square, 
Boston,  Mass. 

Especially  for  reproduction  of  American  art. 

Toni  Landau  Photo  Co.,  1  E.  45th  St., 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
(Formerly  Berlin  Photographic  Co.) 
Perry  Pictures  Co.,  Maiden,  Mass. 
Vickery,  Atkins  &  Torrey,  550  Sutter 

St.,    San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Rubber  Stamps  and   Type. 

Chipron  Stamp  Co.,  224  West  First 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Los  Angeles  Rubber  Stamp  Co.,  131  S. 
Spring  St.,   Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner  Co.,  365-369  Market 
St.,    San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Sleeper  Stamp  Co.,  528  J  st.,  Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 
Fairbanks-Morse     &     Co.,     Spear     and 
Harrison  sts.,   San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Shelf    Label- Holders. 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Signs. 

Sam  H.  Harris,  631  S.  Spring  st.,  Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,   San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Tablet  &  Ticket  Co.,  604  Mission  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Slides. 
Geo.  Kanzee,  12  Geary  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp    Affixers. 
Multipost  Co.,  Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Steel  Stacks. 
See  Book  Stacks. 

Stereoscopic    Views. 

Keystone  View  Co.,  Meadville,  Pa. 

Willis  E.  Case  (Agent  Keystone  View 
Co.  and  Underwood  &  Underwood), 
1610  Grove  st.,  Berkeley,  Calif. 


Typewriter   Ribbons. 

L.  &  M.  Alexander,  444  Market  St., 
San  Francisco,   Calif. 

Remington  Typewriter  Co.,  240  Bush 
St.,  San  Francisco,  420  S.  Spring  St., 
Los  Angeles,  and  913  8th  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter  Inspection  Co.,  426  S. 
Spring  St.,  Los'  Angeles,  Calif. 

Underwood  Typewriter  Co.,  531  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  430  S.  Broad- 
way, Los  Angeles,  and  611  J  st., 
Sacramento,   Calif. 

CALIFORNIA     LIBRARY    SCHOOLS. 

Los  Angeles  Library  School.  For  full 
information,  Avrite  to  Librarian,  Public 
Library,  Los  Angeles,  California. 

Riverside  Library  Service  School. 
For  full  information  write  to  Librarian, 
Public    Library,    Riverside.    California. 

See,  also,  this  publication,  p.  2.5. 

University  of  California  Department 
of  Library  Science.  For  full  informa- 
tion write  to  Chairman,  Department  of 
Library  Science,  University  of  California, 
Berkeley,  Calif. 

AMERICAN    LIBRARY    ASSOCIA-     , 
TION. 

The  oflBcers  of  the  American  Library 
Association  for  1925—26  are  as  follows  : 

Chai-les  F.  D.  Belden,  Director,  Boston 
Public  Library,  President. 

IMrs  Elizabeth  Claypool  E'arl,  President, 
Indiana  Library  and  Historical  Depart- 
ment, 1st  Vice-President. 

Theodore  W.  Koch,  Librarian,  North- 
western University  Library,  Evanston, 
111.,  2d  Vice-President. 

Carl  H.  Milam,  Chicago,  Secretary. 

Edward  D.  Tweedell,  Assistant  Li- 
brarian, The  John  Crerar  Library,  Chi- 
cago, Treasurer. 

NATIONAL   ASSOCIATION    OF 
STATE   LIBRARIES. 

The  oflScers  of  the  National  Associa- 
tion of  State  Libraries  for  1925-26  are 
as  follows : 

Con  P.  Croniu,  Librarian,  Arizona 
State  Library,  Phoenix,  Ariz.,  President. 

H.  J.  Conant,  Assistant  Librarian, 
Vermont  State  Library,  Montpelier,  Vt>, 
1st  Vice-President, 


40 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


W.  J.  Millard,  Librarian,  Washington 
State  Law  Library,  Olympia,  Wash.,  2d 
Vice-President. 

Herbert  S.  Hirshberg,  Librarian,  Ohio 
State  Library,  Columbus,  Ohio,  Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

AMERICAN   ASSOCIATION   OF   LAW 
LIBRARIES. 

Officers  for  1925-26  are : 

Sumuer  Y.  Wheeler,  Essex  County  Law 
Library,  Salem,  Mass.,  President. 

Ralph  H.  Wilkins,  Supreme  Court  Li- 
brai'y,  Springfield,  111.,  1st  Vice-President. 

W.  J.  Millard,  State  Library,  Olympia, 
Wash.,  2d  Vice-President. 

Lucile  Vernon,  New  York  City  Bar 
Association,  Secretary-Treasurer. 

LEAGUE     OF      LIBRARY     COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

The  officers  of  the  League  of  Library 
Commissions  for  1926  are  as  follows : 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian,  Cali- 
fornia State  Library,  Sacramento,  Calif., 
President. 

Clarence  B.  Lester,  Sec.  Wisconsin 
Library  Commission,  Madison,  Wis.,  1st 
Vice-President. 

Miss  Fannie  C.  Rawson,  Sec.  Kentucky 
I^ibrary  Commission.  Frankfort,  Ky.,  2d 
Vice-President. 

Miss  Clara  F.  Baldwin,  Director  of  Li- 
brary Division.  Minnesota  State  Depart- 
ment of  Education,  St.  Paul,  Minn.,  Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. 

PACIFIC    NORTHWEST    LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The  officers  of  the  Pacific  Northwest 
Library  Association  for  1925—26  are  as 
follows': 

M.  H.  Douglass,  University  of  Oregon 
Library,  President. 

Ellen  G.  Smith,  Walla  Walla,  and 
Edgar  S.  Robinson,  Vancouver,  Vice- 
Presidents. 

Constance  R.  S.  Ewing,  Portland,  Sec- 
retary. 

Effie  L.  Chapman,  Seattle,  Treasurer. 

SPECIAL  LIBRARIES  ASSOCIATION 
OF     SOUTHERN     CALIFORNIA. 

The  officers  of  the  Special  Libraries 
Association  of  Southern  California  for 
192.5-26  are: 


B.   E.  Edwards,   Standard  Oil  Co.,   El 

Segundo,    President. 

Mrs  R.  E.  Creveling,  San  Diego  Con. 
Gas  and  Electric  Co.,  San  Diego,  Vice- 
President. 

Mildred  E.  Schaer,  Southern  California 
Telephone  Co.,  Los  Angeles,  Seci'etary- 
Treasurer. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CHAPTER,  NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL  LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers  for  192.5-26  are  : 

W.  A.  Worthington,  Pacific  Gas  and 
Electric  Co.,  San  Francisco,  President. 

Hilda  W.  Palache,  Federal  Reserve 
Bank,  San  Francisco,  Vice-President. 

Miss  H.  Britton,  State  Mining  Bureau, 
San   Francisco,    Secretary-Treasurer. 

Bonnie  E.  Strong,  Standard  Oil  Co., 
and  K.  Dorothy  Ferguson,  Bank  of  Italy, 
San  Francisco,  Executive  Committee, 

ALUMNAE  ASSOCIATION  OF  THE 
UNIVERSITY  OF  CALIFORNIA 
AND   STATE   LIBRARY  SCHOOLS. 

Officers. 

President Anita  Crelliu 

Vice  President Margaret  Girdner 

Secretary   Ivander   Mclver 

Treasurer Margaret   Dennison 

Executive  board  of  five  consisting  of 
the  above  and  ex-president  of  the  preced- 
ing executive  board   (Edna  Holroyd). 

EMPLOYMENT   BUREAU. 

The  State  Library  registers  all 
library  workers  in  California  who  are 
looking  for  positions  and  all  from  outside 
the  state  who  wish  to  come  here.  Also 
it  will  be  glad  to  know  of  libraries'  that 
want  head  librarians  or  assistants  in  any 
branch  of  their  work.  In  writing  for 
recommendations,  libraries  are  urged  to 
be  as  specific  as  possible,  especially  in 
regard  to  time  position  must  be  filled  and 
salary  offered.  A  librarian  who  wishes 
to  be  dropped  from  the  Employment 
Bureau  list  and  a  library  that  fills  a  posi- 
tion for  which  it  has  asked  a  recom- 
mendation will  help  the  work  greatly  by 
notifying  the  State  Library  at  once.  For 
further  information,  write  to  the  State 
Library,   Sacramento,   California. 


vol.  21,  no.  1]         DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,    ETC. 


11 


FREE  TO   LIBRARIES. 

At  the  expense  of  the  Trustees  of  the 
Robert  Schalkenbacb  Foundation  of  N'iw 
York,  the  i>ublishers,  Doubleday  Page  & 
Company,  are  making  a  limited  distribu- 
tion of  a  special  library  edition  of  "Prog- 
ress and  Poverty"  by  Henry  George  to 
libraries  desiring  this  book  for  their 
shelves.  Librarians  desirous  of  taking 
advantage    of    this    offer    should    addre.vS 


Walter  Fairchild,  Secretary,  Schalken- 
bacb Foundation,  15  Park  Row,  New 
York. 

The  late  Mr  Schalkenbacb  was  an  em- 
ploying printer,  ex-president  of  tho 
Typothetae,  who  left  the  greater  part  of 
a  considerable  estate  to  trustees  to  found 
a  non-political  educational  institution  for 
spreading  a  greater  knowledge  of  llie 
writings  of  Henry  George. 


SCHOOL   LIBRARY   STATISTICS. 
(From  reports  of  County  Superintendents  of  Schools,  1924-25) 

Total   school   districts 3563 

Elementary 3265 

High  (428  schools) 298 

Total  expended  for  books  for  elementary  schools . .$657,397.93 

Total  expended  for  books  for  high  schools $808,896.79 

Total  volumes  in  elementary  schools 2,850,561 

Total  volumes  in  high  schools 2,791,820 


42 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION. 


OFFICERS. 

President,  Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt, 
Public  Library,  Long  Beach. 

Vice-President,  Mabel  R.  Gillis,  State 
Library,  Sacramento. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Hazel  G.  Gibson, 
Sacramento  County  Free  Library,  Sacra- 
mento. 

Trustees  Section. 

President,  F,  H.  Pettingell,  Trustee 
Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Secretary,  Mrs  J.  Wells  Smith,  Trustee 
Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Municipal  Libraries  Section. 
President,    Mary   B  o  y  n  t  o  n,    D.    H. 
Blanchard      Memorial      Library,      Santa 
Paula. 

Special   Libraries  Section. 

Chairman,  Margaret  Hatch,  Standard 
Oil  Company  Library,  San  Francisco. 

COMMITTEES, 

Executive  Committee  —  The  President, 
Vice  -  President,  Secretary  -  Treasurer  and 
Mary  Barmby,  Jeannette  M.  Drake,  Anne 
Hadden,  Marion  L.  Horton,  Harold  L. 
Leupp,  H.  O.  Parkinson. 

Auditing — Sarah  M.  Jacobus,  Public 
L  i  b  r  a  r  j^  Pomona,  chairman  ;  Ethel 
Carroll. 

'Nominating — The  Constitution  provides 
for  a  "Nominating  Committee  consisting 
of  representatives  selected  by  the  respec- 
tive districts  at  their  district  meetings." 
Second  District,  Edna  Holroyd ;  Ninth 
District,   Frances  M.  Burket. 

Puhlications — Norah  McNeill,  Public 
Library,  Richmond,  chaii-man ;  Irene 
Smith,  Josephine  L.   Whitbeck. 

Resolutions — Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck, 
Contra  Costa  County  Free  Library, 
Martinez,  chairman ;  Charles  S.  Greene, 
Faith  E.  Smith. 

Certification — Mabel  R.  Gillis,  State 
Library,  Sacramento,  chairman  (1930)  ; 
Susan    T.    Smith     (1926),    Eleanor    Hitt 


(1927) ,  Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt  (1928), 
Mary  Barmby   (1929). 

J.  L.  Gillis  Memorial — Milton  J. 
Ferguson,  State  Library,  Sacramento, 
chairman ;   Mary   Barmby,   Eleanor  Hitt. 

Legislative — Herbert  V.  Clayton,  State 
Library,  Sacramento,  chairman ;  Marian 
P.  Greene,  H.  O.  Parkinson,  Cornelia  D. 
Provines,  Charles  F.  Woods. 

Salaries — Everett  R.  Per  r  y.  Public 
Librai-y,  Los  Angeles,  chairman  ;  Carleton 
B.  Joeckel,  Sarah  E.  McCardle. 

Seamen's  Lihrarij — Caroline  Wenzel, 
State  Library,  Sacramento,  chairman ; 
Mary  Barmby,  Gladys  English,  Chaplain 
F.  K.  Howard,  Stella  Huntington,  Mrs 
Harrison  Moore,   Mrs  Albert  W.   Stokes. 

Menihership — Gretchen  Flower,  Tulare 
County  Free  Library,  Visalia,  chairman  ; 
]  st  District,  Alice  Charlton  ;  2d  District, 
Mrs  Mary  T.  Gervais ;  3d  District, 
Estella  De  Ford ;  4th  District,  Julia 
Steffa ;  5th  District,  Nancy  Laugenour ; 
Gth  District,  Gladys  Caldwell ;  7th  Dis- 
trict, Henry  A.  Kendal  ;  Sth  District, 
Edith  Gantt;  nth  District,  Mrs  Lila 
Adams. 

Jinls — Leslie  Hood,  Vroman's  Book 
Store,  Pasadena,  chairman  ;  Jasmine  Brit- 
ton,  Clara  B.  Dills,  Gladys  English. 

P.N.L.A.  and.  G.L.A.  Cooperation — ■ 
Helen  T.  Kennedy,  Public  Library,  Los 
Angeles,  chairman ;  Sydney  B.  Mitchell. 
Helen  E.   Vogleson. 

DISTRICT  OFFICERS  AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First  District. 

President,  Helena  Critzei",  Public  Li- 
brary, Berkeley. 

Secretary,  Ivander  Mclver,  University 
of  California  Library,  Berkeley. 

The  first  district  consists  of  the  follow- 
ing cities :  San  Francisco,  Alameda, 
Berkeley,  Oakland;  and  the  following 
libraries :  Leland  Stanford  Junior  Uni- 
versity Library  and  Margaret  Carnegie 
Library,  Mills  College. 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY    ASSOCIATION. 


43 


Second  District. 

President,  Jean  D.  Baird,  Alameda 
County  Free  Library,  Oakland. 

Secretary,  Edna  Holroyd,  San  Mateo 
County  Free  Library,  Redwood  City. 

The  second  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties:  Alameda  (excepting  Ala 
meda,  Berkeley,  and  Oakland),  Contra 
Costa,  Monterey,  San  Benito,  San  Mateo, 
Santa  Clara  (excepting  Stanford  Univer- 
sity) ,  Santa  Cruz. 

Third    District. 

President,  Sybil  Nye,  Public  Library, 
Mill  Valley. 

Secretary,  Margaret  MacDonald,  Public 
Library.  San  Rafael. 

The  third  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Lake,  Marin,  Mendo- 
cino, Napa,  Solano,  Sonoma. 

Fourth  District. 

President,  Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock,  Kern 
County  Free  Library,  Bakersfield. 

Secretary,  Muriel  Wright,  Tuolumne 
County  Free  Library,   Sonora. 

The  fourth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Fresno,  Inyo,  Kern, 
Kings,  Madera,  Mariposa,  Merced,  Stanis- 
laus, Tulare,  Tuolumne. 

Fifth    District 

President,  Mrs  Olive  Tremble,  City 
Library,  Sacramento. 

Secretary,  Marie  Lamb,  Yolo  County 
Free  Library,  Woodland. 

The  fifth  district  consists  of  the  follow- 
ing counties  :  Alpine,  Amador,  Calaveras, 
El  Dorado,  Mono,  Nevada,  Placer,  Sacra- 
mento, San  Joaquin,  Yolo. 

Sixth   District. 

President,  Margaret  E.  Livingston, 
Orange  County  Free  Librai-y,  Santa  Ana, 

Secretary,  Mrs  Ethelene  M.  Kitching, 
High   School  Library,  Fullerton. 

The  sixth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Imperial,  Los  Angeles, 
Orange,  Riverside,  San  Bernardino,  San 
Diego,  San  Luis  Obispo,  Santa  Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh   District. 

President,  C.  E.  Graves,  Humboldt 
State  Teachers  College,  Areata. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Helen  Bartlett,  Public 
Library,  Eureka. 


The  seventh  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Del  Norte,  Humboldt. 

Eighth  District. 

President,  Elisabeth  C.  Haines,  Lassen 
County  Free  Library,  Susanville. 

Secretary,  Anna  L.  Williams,  Modoc 
County  Free  Library,  Alturas. 

The  eighth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Lassen,  Modoc,  Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth   District. 

President,  Blanche  Chalfant,  Butte 
County  Free  Library,  Oroville. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Edith  Shaw  Simons, 
Public  Library,  Oroville. 

The  ninth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Butte,  Colusa,  Glenn, 
Shasta,  Siskiyou,  Sutter,  Tehama,  Trin- 
ity, Yuba. 

ANNUAL    MEETING. 

The  31st  annual  meeting  will  be  held 
at  the  Virginia  Hotel,  Long  Beach, 
beginning  June  2,  1926. 

The  County  Librarians  will  meet  at 
the  same  time  and  place. 

DISTRICT   MEETINGS.        _^ 
Second   District  Meeting. 

A  meeting  of  the  Second  District  of  tho 
California  Library  Association  was  held 
November  7,  1925,  at  the  Business  and 
Professional  Women's  Club,  Oakland. 
The  charming  setting  contributed  greatly 
to  the  success  of  the  meeting.  The  audi- 
torium with  its  colorful  draperies  and 
open  fire,  and  the  hall  where  luncheon 
was   served  were   ideal   for   the   occasion. 

Miss  .lean  Baird,  president  of  the 
district,  opened  the  morning  session  at 
eleven  o'clock.  Miss  Edith  Hibberd  sang 
two  songs  from  the  Cycle  of  Life,  by 
Landon  Ronald,  accompanied  by  Mrs 
Frances  Fay.  Miss  Hibberd's  singing 
was  a  delight,  as  always. 

The  business  of  electing  a  nominator 
for  the  district  followed.  Miss  Edna 
Holroyd  was  chosen  nominator  and  Miss 
Anne  Iladden  alternate. 

"Adult  education"  was  the  subject  pre- 
sented by  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Li- 
iirarian.  He  told  of  the  work  of  the  Edu- 
cation Board  of  the  American  Library 
Association.  He  spoke  also  of  having 
seen   at   first  hand  the   work   Miss   Essae 


44 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


M.  Culver  is  doing  in  Louisiana.  An 
endeavor  is  being  made  to  teach  the  pub- 
lic the  necessity  for  spending  more  money 
for  educational  puiposes.  The  Library 
Commission,  abandoning  its  firet  plan  to 
have  traveling  libraries  is  to  help  in  each 
parish  where  a  library  is  organized  by 
giving  a  certain  numljer  of  books. 

At  the  conclusion  of  Mr  Ferguson's 
address,  Miss  Barmby  asked  if  he  would 
not  tell  something  about  the  interior  of 
the  new  State  Library  building,  so  Mr 
Ferguson  gave  a  description  of  the  build- 
ing in  which  we  all  have  such  pride  and 
interest.  The  legend  above  the  entrance 
to .  the  library  is  fitting  and  beautiful : 
"Into  the  highlands  of  the  mind  l'?t 
me  go." 

Luncheon  followed,  and  the  afternoon 
session  opened  with  a  group  of  charm- 
ing songs  by  Miss  Hibberd.  Chaplain 
Howard  of  the  Seamen's  Institute  intro- 
duced the  speakers'  of  the  afternoon.  Miss 
Vivien  Mackenzie,  whose  subject  was 
"Hospital  libraries  for  ex-service  men  and 
women"  told  how  the  work  is  conducted 
l)y  the  Veteran's  Bureau  Organization. 
Funds  are  distributed  among  the  hos- 
pitals, and  the  appropriation  covers 
everything  for  librai-y  purposes  except 
salaries.  Library  work  in  these  hositals 
is  of  a  special  nature.  Little  cataloging 
and  classification  are  required,  and  not 
much  attention  given  to  the  usual  library 
detail ;  but  much  work  is  done  with  the 
patients,  in  discovering  their  tastes  and 
finding  just  the  books  for  their  needs. 
Much  money  is  spent  on  magazines,  and 
many  duplicates  of  the  favorites  are  pur- 
chased. Most  of  the  reading  is  recrea- 
tional, fiction  forming  about  three-fourths 
of  the  circulation.  The  book  buying  is 
done  through  the  central  office  at  Wash- 
ington ;  and  although  anything  is  supplied 
that  is  requested,  a  long  wait  ensues 
after  orders  are  sent  in.  three  months 
sometimes  passing  before  books  are  avail- 
able. Publicity  for  the  new  books  i.s 
given  in  the  hospital  paper.  Miss  Mac- 
kenzie spoke  of  the  work  in  the  U.  S. 
Veterans'  Bureau  Hospital  at  Livemiore, 
which  is  very  new  and  hardly  organized. 

Chaplain  Howard  next  introduced  Miss 
Cornelia  Provines,  Sacramento  County 
Librarian,  whose  inspiring  talk  on  the 
work  of  her  library  with  Folsom  State 
Prison    was    entitled    "TTirough    Gates   of 


Horn  or  Gates  of  Ivory."  "  A  brief  his- 
tory of  the  work  was  given,  and  the  way 
in  which  the  demand  for  this  form  of  li- 
brary service  grew"  from  within  the  prison 
was  pointed  out.  The  county  library 
serves  now,  as  individuals,  four  hundred 
men. 

The  meeting  was  adjourned  at  four 
o'clock,  with  the  singing  of  a  verse  oi 
"America." 

Edna  Holroyd,  Secretary. 

Ninth  District  Meeting. 

A  meeting  of  the  Ninth  District  of 
the  California  Librarj'  Association  was 
held  in  Oroville,  November  21,  1925.  Th3 
morning  session  was  called  to  order  at 
10.30  o'clock  in  the  assembly  room  of 
the  Public  Library  by  Miss  Blanche  Chal- 
fant,  president  of  the  district. 

C.  E.  Porter,  member  of  the  board  of 
supervisor,  extended  greetings  to  the  li- 
brarians on  behalf  of  Or'oville  and  Butte 
County.  Election  of  a  nominator  and  an 
alternate  was  next  in  order.  .  Miss 
Frances  M.  Burket,  librarian  of  Sutter 
County  Free  Librai"j-.  was  elected  nomina- 
tor :  and  Mrs  Fay  K.  Russell,  librarian 
of  Glenn  County  Free  Library  was 
elected  alternate. 

As  Ninth  District  member  of  the  mem- 
bership committee,  Mrs  Lila  Adams,  li- 
brarian of  Trinity  County  Free  Librarv, 
reported  that  a  determined  effort  would 
be  made  to  enroll  all  the  library  workers 
in  the  district  as  members  of  the  associa- 
tion in  1920. 

The  president  announced  with  regret, 
that  Mrs  Jennie  Engell,  librarian  of 
Marysville  Public  Library,  who  was  to 
have  given  a  talk  on  "Life  in  the  Panama 
Canal  Zone"  had  been  detained  on  ac- 
count of  illness  in  her  home.  Mrs  May 
Dexter  Henshall  gave  a  most  interesting 
talk  on  the  personal  side  of  her  trip  t) 
Hawaii. 

Following  Mrs  Henshall's  talk  a  short 
discussion  of  methods  in  the  distribution 
of  books  to  schools  took  place.  The 
president  announced  that  a  short  auto 
trip  had  been  arranged  for  the  visitors, 
out  through  the  Wyandotte  section,  and 
that  the  machines  were  in  readiness.  The 
meeting  adjourned  for  tlie  ride  and 
luncheon. 

The  afternoon  session  was  called  to 
order  at  2   o'clock.     Mrs   Harry  Drobish 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARY    ASSOCIATION. 


45 


delighted  lipr  audience  with  a  group  of 
songs,  accompanied  by  Miss  Marie  Oben 
chain.  An  interesting  talk  on  "Art 
appreciation"  was  given  by  Miss  Mabel 
Whitmore  of  the  Chico  State  Teachers 
College.  Miss  Obenchain  gave  two  piano 
solos,  and  Miss  Cornelia  D.  Provines,  li- 
brarian of  Sacramento  County  Free  Li- 
brary  gave    a    splendid   address   on    "The 


negro  in  the  tine  arts."  Milton  J.  Fer- 
guson, State  Librarian,  was  called  on 
next.  He  told  of  having  seen  Miss  Essae 
M.  Culver  in  Louisiana,  and  described 
her  work.  He  spoke  also  of  the  plans 
for  the  Fiftieth  Anniversary  Conference 
of  the  American  Library  Association  to 
be  held  in  Atlantic  City  and  Philadelphia, 
in  October,  1»2G. 

EuiTii  Shaw  Simons,  Secretary. 


46 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS. 


Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Ex-ofBcio  Chair- 
man. 

Advisory    Committee. 

Stella  Huntington,  1707  Fremont  Way, 
Oakland,  Chairman. 

Clara  B.  Dills,  Solano  County. 

Margaret  E.  Livingston,  Orange  County. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County. 

Cornelia  D.  Provines,  Sacramento 
County,   Treasurer. 

THE  AMERICAN   COUNTY. 

It  may  be  that  all  county  librarians  are 
familiar  with  Tlie  American  County  and 
subscribe  for  it,  but  in  case  some  may 
have  overlooked  it,  the  following  infor- 
mation will  not  be  amiss. 

The  American  Cminty,  formerly  Cali- 
fornin  Supervisors  Review,  is  the  official 
publication  of  the  Western  States  County 
Officials  Association,  County  Supervisors 
Association  of  California,  County  Super- 
visors Association  of  the  San  Joaquin 
Talley  and  Washington  State  Association 
of  County  Commissioners.  Its  editor  is 
Stanley  Abel  of  Taft,  a  member  of  the 
Kern  County  Pjoard  of  Supervisors,  and 
secretary  of  the  County  Supervisors 
Association  of  California,  and  of  the 
Western  States  County  Officials  Associa- 
tion. This  last  association,  representing 
the  supervisors  of  the  eleven  westerti 
states,  held  its  first  annual  convention  in 
San  Francisco,  November  11,  1925. 


In  the  issue  of  The  American  County 
for  March.  1925,  there  is  a  review  of 
"American  State  CTOvernment"  by  J.  M. 
Matthews,  published  by  Appleton.  This 
review  is  interesting  because  it  ends  with 
the  statement  "An  excellent  book  and 
one  that  should  be  in  every  county 
library."  This  comment,  coming  from  a 
supervisor,  naturally  would  have  weight 
with  county  librai-ians. 

In  the  number  for  July,  1925,  is  an 
article  entitled  "California  Leads  in 
County  Libraries,"  and  there  have  been 
other  favorable  articles  on  the  subject. 

The  address  of  The  American  County 
is  P.  O.  Box  697,  Taft,  Califoriiia,  and 
the  subscription  price  is  $2.00  per  year. 
Since  the  periodical  is  devoted  to  matters 
of  direct  interest  to  supervisors,  it  seems 
naturally  to  afford  the  county  librarians 
a  splendid  means  of  information  on  these 
subjects.  Likewise  it  may  give  opportuni- 
ties for  keeping  the  supervisors  in  closer' 
touch  with  the  service  given  by  county 
libraries. 

COUNTY   LIBRARIANS 
CONVENTION. 

The  County  Librarians  Convention  will 
be  held  in  Long  Beach.  June  2  to  5,  1926. 
.June  2  will  be  the  special  county  library 
day.  The  rest  of  the  meeting  will  be  held 
in  conjunction  with  the  California  Library 
Association. 


vol.  21,  no.  1' 


LIBRARY    CLUBS,    ETC. 


47 


LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC. 


Under  this  heading  will  be  given 
accounts  of  meetings  of  the  various 
library  clubs  and  similar  organizations 
throughout  the  state.  Previously  such 
accounts  have  been  printed  under  the 
library  where  they  have  been  held  or  the 
library  where  the  president  or  secretary 
was  located.  This  new  arrangement 
should  make  these  articles  more  available. 
News  items  of  the  various  clubs  are 
solicited. 

ORANGE  COUNTY  LIBRARY  CLUB. 

The  Orange  County  Library  Club  met 
on  Saturday,  October  10,  at  the  Fullerton 
Public  Library  with  Miss  Minnie  Maxwell 
and  her  assistants  as  hostesses.  The 
necessai-y  routine  of  business  was  quickly 
disposed  of  to  make  way  for  an  especially 
interesting  program.  Miss  Calnon  of  the 
Anaheim  Public  Library  extended  an 
invitation  to  the  club  to  come  to  Anaheim 
for  the  next  quarterly  meeting.  Miss 
Livingston  of  the  Orange  County  Free 
Library,  Santa  Ana,  brought  for  dis- 
tribution printed  lists  of  books  which 
include  those  adopted  l)y  the  County 
Board  for  Home  Readings  of  the  Gram- 
mar School  Course  of  Study  and  the 
additional  titles  selected  by  the  librarians 
of  Orange  County. 

The  program  committee  was  fortunate 
in  securing  Mr'  Willis  H.  Kerr  of  the 
Pomona  College  Library  as  the  chief 
speaker  and  was  favored  by  being  able 
to  in\-ite  several  noteworthy  librarians 
from  other  parts  of  the  state,  who  were 
that  evening  to  meet  at  Long  Beach  in 
executive  session. 

]Mrs  Reynolds  of  the  Huntington  Beach 
Public  Library,  the  "unspeakable  program 
chairman,"  as  one  speaker  called  her, 
very  skillfully  and  suggestively  intro- 
duced the  speakers  by  means  of  original 
poetry  suited  to  each. 

yiv  Kerr  announced  his  subject  as 
"The  Adult  Education  of  the  Child"  and 
illustrated  his  meaning  by  reference  to 
the  early  lives  of  Raleigh,  Alfred  the 
Great  and  others.  He  divided  his  dis- 
cussion by  introducing  headings,  such  as 
personality  in  books,  too  many  books,  too 
busy    to    read,    unsystematic    system    of 


reading,  reading  as  fundamental  (not 
outside  or  supplementary),  reading  one's 
own  experiences  in  books,  atmosphere 
(referring  to  the  congenial  place  for  read- 
ing, the  book  itself:  print,  binding,  etc.), 
and  the  book  problem  :  to  buy  well  illus- 
trated, more  expensive  books  read  many 
times  or  to  buy  cheap  editions  read  few 
times.  In  conclusion  he  urged  the  coop- 
eration of  child,  parent,  librarian  and 
teacher  to  make  book-reading  fun,  not 
drudgery.  All  who  heard  Mr  Kerr  at 
Eureka  can  imagine  this  a  very  helpful, 
inspirational  talk. 

Miss  Gillis,  assistant  librarian  of  the 
California  State  Library  at  Sacramento, 
brought  greetings  from  ]Mr  Ferguson,  pur 
State  Librarian,  and  described  the  new 
State  Library  building  as  it  is  to  be. 

Miss  Susan  Smith  of  the  Sacramento 
Public  Library  gave  quite  in  detail  the 
program  and  exhibits  for  Good  Book 
Week  in  November :  display  of  books  in 
good  editions,  pictures,  book-plates, 
artists'  exhibits,  exhiljits  from  schools 
and  bookstores,  prizes. 

Mrs  Brewitt  of  the  Long  Beach  Public 
Library,  new  California  Library  Associa- 
tion president,  helped  in  the  Round  Table 
talk  and  asked  for  suggestions  for  her 
now  work. 

There  were  also  present  Mr  Parkinson, 
the  retiring  California  Library  Associa- 
tion president.  Miss  Barmby  of  Alameda 
County,  Miss  Hadden  of  Monterey 
County  Free  Library,  and  Miss  Reba 
DAvight  of  the  Librai-y  Bureau,  Los 
Angeles. 

The  Round  Table  went  the  rounds  as 
to  subjects:  books  (Carpenter's  set;  the 
Book  of  Knowledge ;  books  and  bills  sent 
by  publishers;  authors'  copies,  etc.)  ;  "the 
A.  L.  A.  Reading  Lists  ;  The  Cosmopoli- 
tan, pro  and  con ;  library  insurance,  .  .  . 
and  Good  Book  Week. 

.Just  before  adjournment  the  president 
whispered  to  the  secretai-y  that  a  certain 
report  gave  it  that  "there  were  2000  odd 
librarians  at  Eureka." 

Luncheon  was  served  at  the  Mary 
Louise,  and  all  voted  the  Fullerton  Public 
librarians  very  gracious  hostesses. 

Lulu  I.  Rumsey,  Secretary. 


48 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


Jan.,  1926 


COLLEGE  AN DUNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIANS  OF  SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA. 

The  sixth  meeting  of  the  Southerii 
California  Conference  of  College  and 
University  Librarians  was  held  at  Occi- 
dental College  October  17. 

The  morning  session  was  taken  up 
with  an  informal  round  table  discussion, 
open  vs.  closed  shelves  for  collateral 
reading,  and  recreational  reading  for 
students.  Special  collections  in  the  libra- 
ries were  discussed  and  among  these  wer'e 
History  of  the  Quakers,  being  collected 
by  Whittier  College,  Historical  works  on 
Astronomy  by  Mt.  Wilson  Observatory, 
Spanish  history  by  Occidental  College, 
and  Western  history  and  "Mary,  Queen 
of  Scots"  by  the  University  of  Southern 
California   Library. 

At  the  after'noon  session  Mr  Willis  H. 
Kerr,  the  new  librarian  of  Pomona  Col- 
lege, read  a  stimulating  and  suggestive 
paper  on  "What  makes  a  college  library." 
Mr  Kerr  reminded  his  hearers  that, 
although  the  aim  of  the  library  is  to 
have  a  spirit  and  soul,  it  must  have  a 
strong  body  in  order'  that  the  spirit  may 
grow.  He  stated  that  50,000  volumes 
might  be  a  fair  minimum  for  a  college 
library  serving  200  to  500  students,  and 
a  minimum  of  perhaps  75,0€O  volumes 
for  1000  students,  and  that  ten  to  twelve 
per  cent  of  a  college  budget  should  be 
used  for  the  support  of  the  library.  In 
an  ideal  library  staff  Mr  Kerr'  would 
have  one  librarian  to  every  ten  teachers 
with  several  staff  members  receiving 
salaries  of  $3,000  and  none  less  than 
$2,000.  He  suggested  a  "Reading  Host" 
and  an  intelligence  officer  to  keep  staff, 
alumni  and  friends  of  the  library  in- 
formed of  the  extent  of  the  library 
service. 

Charlotte  M.  Bkown,  Secretary. 

PASADENA   LIBRARY  CLUB, 

The  Pasadena  Library  Club  held  a 
Bookworm  Supper  at  the  Simpkinsou 
Hotel  on  Tuesday  evening,  November  IT. 

A  cut  of  Spitweg's  "The  Bookworm" 
decorated  the  place  cards,  for  the  dinner 
of  the  sixty  members  and  guests  present. 

Miss  Jeannette  M.  Drake,  librarian  of 
the  Pasadena  Public  Library  and  presi- 
dent  of   the    club,    as    toastmistress   pre- 


sented Samuel  S.  Hinds,  raconteur  and 
dilettante  actor  of  the  Pasadena  Com- 
munity Playhouse,  who  gave  some  of  his 
characteristic  and  popular  readings.  Mrs 
Theodora  R.  Brewitt  of  Long  Beach, 
president  of  the  California  Library  Asso- 
ciation, Miss  Althea  Warren  of  San  Diego 
and  W.  H.  Kerr  of  Pomona  College, 
respectively,  were  introduced  and  re- 
sponded with  short  talks. 

Mrs  Grace  Moon,  author,  spoke  about 
her  recent  book  "Chi-Wee."  She  said 
that  "Chi-Wee"  .iust  wrote  herself,  the 
story  being  the  real  adventures  of  a  little 
Indian  girl,  and  that  further  happenings 
of  Chi-Wee  in  Indian  fairyland  are  being- 
written.  Mrs  Moon's  Indian  storyland, 
the  Pueblo  land,  where  Chi-Wee  lives  is 
an  enchanted  desert  where  the  author  with 
her  husband,  Carl  Moon,  illustrator,  lived 
for  years. 

Mr  Carl  Moon  concluded  the  evening's 
program  by  telling  of  the  interest  and 
difficulty  experienced  in  illustrating  a 
book.  Mr  Moon  with  his  thorough  knowl- 
edge and  understanding  of  the  Indians 
portrays,  through  the  eyes  of  an  artist, 
the  Navajos  and  Hopi  and  the  mesas 
where  they  live. 

Anne  Teittipoe, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

SAN    ANTONIO    LIBRARY    CLUB. 

The  San  Antonio  Library  Club  members 
were  the  guests  of  Miss  Edna  Hester  of 
the  Pomona  High  School  Library,  Octo- 
ber 31.  Our  president,  Miss  Reese,  called 
the  meeting  to  order.  Minutes  of  the 
previous  meeting  were  read  and  approved. 

A  letter  from  Rebecca  Burdorf,  who 
taught  last  year  at  the  Instituto  Colon 
in  Mexico,  was  read.  Miss  Burdorf 
expressed  her  appreciation  to  the  club 
for  the  gift  they  sent  her  to  buy  books 
for  her  library. 

Miss  Eager  announced  an  Art  Exhibit 
to  be  held  at  the  Ebell  Club  in  Pomona 
November  6.  All  members  of  the  club 
were  invited  to  visit  the  exhibit. 

Mrs  Neals  invited  the  club  to  meet  at 
the  Chaffey  Union  High  School  Library 
some  time  the  latter  part  of  February. 
This  closed  the  business  meeting,  which 
was  followed  by  a  progr'am  arranged  by 
Miss  Hester,  our  hostess.  ^ 

Mr     Whalej',     superintendent     of     city 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


LIBRARY    CLUBS,    ETC. 


49 


schools,  was  the  first  speaker,  his  subject 
being  "The  School's  Attitude  Toward  the 
Library  and  Children's  Reading."  Mr 
Kerr  of  Pomona  College  Library  talked 
on  "Adult  Education  of  the  Child."  Miss 
Vogleson,  County  Librarian  of  Los 
Angeles  County  talked  of  "The  Library  in 
Relation  to  the  School."  Miss  S.  M. 
.Tacobus  asked  to  be  excused  and  that  her 
time  for  speaking  be  given  to  discussing 
the  various  talks.  A  lively  discussion  fol- 
lowed. 

After  the  meeting  was  adjourned,  we 
were  served  lunch  in  the  Pomona  High 
Sehool  Cafeteria. 

Ermine  R.  Groves,  Secretary. 

SPECIAL     LIBRARY     ASSOCIATION 
OF    SOUTHERN    CALIFORNIA. 

On  December  11  the  Special  Library 
Association  of  Southern  California  held 
an  evening  meeting  at  the  Mount  Wilson 
Solar  Observatory  Library,  and,  in  addi- 
tion to  the  regular  business,  heard  a  talk 
on  the  observatory  and  its  work  by  Dr 
R.  F.  Sanford  of  the  observatory  staff. 
This  meeting  was  very  similar  to  one 
held  at  the  observatory  last  May  by  the 
College  and  University  Librarians  of 
Southern   California. 

Elizabeth  Connor. 

A  Valuable  Reference  Tool. 

The  growing  recognition  of  magazines 
as  sources  of  authentic  information  in 
matters  of  a  historical,  scientific  and 
technical  nature  has  led  an  increasing 
number  of  communities  to  make  a  survey 
of  their  periodical  resources  for  the  bene- 
fit of  their  students  and  technical  workers. 

The  result  of  such  a  survey  of  material 
in  and  about  Los  Angeles  has  just  been 
made  available  by  the  Special  Libraries 
Association  of  Southern  California  with 
the  financial  backing  of  the  local  univer- 
sities, the  public  library  and  many  indus- 
trial firms  of  the  city. 


The  fact  that  the  Los  Angeles  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  three  large  i)etroleum  com- 
panies and  an  important  electrical  com- 
pany were  willing  to  join  the  more  purely 
learned  institutions  in  making  the  publi- 
cation of  this  list  possible  is  significant 
of  the  growing  place  of  research  in  the 
conduct  of  modern  business. 

The  TInion  List  of  Periodicals  in  Libra- 
ries of  iSontJtern  California  is  a  carefully 
prepared  volume  of  about  200  pages  con- 
taining the  titles  of  about  3000  periodi- 
cals to  be  found  in  southern  California 
libraries,  the  volumes  and  dates  being 
indicated  in  each  case.  The  printed  mat- 
ter' is  contained  in  the  left-hand  column, 
while  the  right-hand  margin  is  left  blank 
for  insertions  and  corrections.  An  ex- 
tension sheet  gives  a  key  to  the  symbols 
and  abbreviations  employed,  thus  obviat- 
ing the  necessity  of  turning  back  each 
time  an  interpretation  of  the  symbols  is 
desired. 

The  twenty-four  libraries  represented 
include  pei-iodicals  on  a  wide  range  of 
subjects.  Not  only  the  general  subjects 
of  history,  literature  and  art,  but  the 
specialized  files  of  petroleum  and  public 
utility  libraries,  law  and  medical  collec- 
tions, the  valuable  astronomical  files  of 
the  Mount  Wilson  Solar  Observatory,  as 
well  as  the  commercial  publications  found 
in  the  banks  and  the  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce. 

Those  interested  in  the  preparation  of 
union  lists,  in  the  accumulation  of  biblio- 
graphical data  for  periodical  material,  as 
well  as  those  seeking  the  exact  location 
of  special  files,  will  find  this  publication 
worthy  of  their  attention. 

Copies  of  the  Union  List  may  be  pur- 
chased at  .$2.50  from  Miss  Mildred  E. 
Schaer,  Secretary-Treasurer  of  the  Spe- 
cial Libraries  Association  of  Southern 
California,  Southern  California  Telephone 
Company.  740  South  Olive  street,  Los 
Angeles. 


4—43023 


50 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS,  CALIFORNIA. 


MEMBERS  OF  THE   BOARD. 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert  Rea,  Librarian,  San  Francisco 
Public  Librarj',   Seci'etary. 

Everett  R.  Perry,  Librarian,  Los  An- 
geles Public  Library. 

Sections  6  and  7  of  the  County  free 
library  law  (Chap.  68,  Cal.  Statutes 
1911)    read  as  follows: 

Sec.  6.  A  commission  is  hereby  cre- 
ated to  be  known  as  the  board  of  library 
examiners,  consisting  of  the  state  libra- 
rian, who  shall  be  ex  officio  chairman  of 
said  board,  the  librarian  of  the  public 
library  of  the  city  and  county  of  San 
Francisco,  and  the  librarian  of  the  Los 
Angeles  public  library. 

Sec.  7.  Lq^on  tlie  establishment  of  a 
county  free  library,  the  board  of  super- 
visors shall  appoint  a  county  librarian, 
who  shall  hold  office  for  the  term  of  four 
years,  subject  to  prior  removal  for  cause, 
after  a  hearing  by  said  board.  No  per- 
son shall  be  eligible  to  the  office  of 
county  librarian  unless,  prior  to  his 
appointment,  he  has  received  from  the 
board  of  library  examiners  a  certificate 
of  qualification  for  the  office.  At  the 
time  of  his  appointment,  the  county 
librarian  need  not  be  a  resident  of  the 
county  nor  a  citizen  of  the  State  of 
California. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHAIRMAN. 

There  has  been  no  meeting  of  the  board 
this  quarter. 

CERTIFICATE   HOLDERS. 

Note. — First-grade  certificates  are  valid 
for  use  throughout  the  state  ;  second  grade, 
in  counties  of  the  twenty-first  to  the  fifty- 
eighth  (except  twenty-fifth,  thirty-third, 
tliirty-flftli  and  forty-second)  class,  in- 
clusive ;  third-grade  in  counties  of  the 
forty-ninth  to  the  fifty-eighth  class,  in- 
elnsive. 

The  new  certificate,  issued  for  the  first 
time,  December  22,  1920,  is  valid  for  use 
throughout  the  state. 

New  Certificates. 

Adams,    Mrs    Lila    (Dobell),    Ln.    Trinity 

County  Free  Library,  "Weaverville. 
Anderson,    Mrs    Rachel     (Rhoads),    Asst. 

San   Bernardino   County   Free   Library, 

San  Bernardino. 
Babcock,   Mrs   Julia  G.,   Ln.   Kern   County 

Free   Library,   Bakersfield. 
Bailey,    Anne    Bell,    Ln.    Tehama    County 

Free  Library.  Red  Bluff. 
Barmby,  Mary,  Ln.  Alameda  County  Free 

Library,    Oakland. 
Beardsley,  Mrs  Arline  Davis,  Asst.  Orange 

County  Free  Library,   Santa  Ana. 
B  e  e  m  a  n,    Mrs    Anne     (Madison),    Mrs 

Thomas    Beeman,    Ln.    Sawtelle    High 

School  Library,    Sawtelle. 


Boman,  Evalyn,  Ln.  Imperial  County  Free 

Library,  El  Centre. 
Brackett,    Thelma,    Ln.    Newark    Museum, 

Newark,  N.  J. 
Brewitt,  Mrs  Theodora  R.,  Ln.  Public  Li- 
brary, Long  Beach. 
Burden,    Melba    C,    Asst.    Public    Library, 

Stockton. 
Burket,    Frances    M.,    Ln.    Sutter    County 

Free  Library,  Tuba  City. 
Chalfant,  Blanche,  Ln.  Butte  County  Free 

Library,   Oroville. 
Chatfield,     Marguerite,     Asst.    Public    Li- 
brary, Ventura. 
Coulter,  Mabel,  Asst.  Contra  Costa  County 

Free  Library,  Martinez.      (On  leave  of 

absence.) 
Culver,    Essae    M.,    Exec.    Sec.    Louisiana 

Library  Commission,  Baton  Rouge,  La. 
Dalton,   Mrs   Blanche    (Harris),   Mrs   John 

E.   Dalton,   Asst.   State  Library,   Sacra- 
mento. 
Davis,    Edna    D.,    Asst.   Humboldt    County 

Free    Library,    Eureka. 
De  Ford,  Estella,   Ln.   Napa  County  Free 

Library,   Napa. 
Dills,    Clara  B.,    Ln.    Solano   County  Free 

Library,   Fairfield. 
Duff,   Marcella   Carmelita,   Asst.   State   Li- 
brary,  Sacramento.      (On  leave  of 

absence.) 
English,    Gladys,    Ln.    Piedmont   High 

School   Library,   Piedmont. 
Ferguson,  K.  Dorothy,  Ln.  Bank  of  Italy 

Library,  San  Francisco. 
Ferguson,    Milton    J.,    Ln.    State    Library, 

Sacramento. 
Flower,    Gretchen    L.,    Ln.    Tulare    County 

Free  Library,  Visalia. 
Frazier,   Hubert  B.,  Asst.  Public  Library, 

Los  Angeles. 
Frink,  Ellen  B.,  Ln.  Siskiyou  County  Free 

Library,    Treka. 
Fuller,  Mrs  Melissa,  Asst.  Fresno  County 

Free  Library,  Fresno. 
Galloway,    Blanche,    Ln.    Madera    County- 
Free  Library,  Madera. 
Gantt,    Edith,    Ln.    Plumas    County    Free 

Library,   Quincy. 
Gantz,  Flo  A.,  Ln.  San  Luis  Obispo  County 

Free  Library,   San  Luis  Obispo. 
Gibson,    Hazel   G.,   Asst.    Sacramento 

County  Free  Library,  Sacramento. 
Greene,  Charles  S.,  Ln.  Free  Library,  Oak- 
land. 
Gregory,  Marion  L.,  Asst.  San  Bernardino 

County  Free  Library,  San  Bernardino. 
Hadden,  Anne,  Ln.  Monterey  County  Free 

Library,    Salinas. 
Haines,   Alice   J.,   Head  Documents  Dept., 

State  Library,  Sacramento. 
Harris,  Mary  W.,  Asst.  Louisiana  Library 

Commission,  Baton  Rouge,  La. 
Hitt,  Eleanor,  Ln.  San  Diego  County  Free 

Library,  San  Diego. 
Holroyd,   Edna   S.,   Ln.   San  Mateo  County 

Free  Library,   Redwood  City. 
Kennedy.    Helen    T.,    2d    Asst.    Ln.    Public 

Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Kitching,   Mrs  Ethelene  M.,  Ln.  Fullerton 

High  School  Library,  Fullerton. 
Kobler,     Marjorie    H.,     Asst.     San    Diego 

County  Free  Library,   San  Diego. 
Kyle,      Eleanore,      Ln.      San      Bernardino 

Polytechnic  High   School  Library,   San 

Bernardino. 
Laugenour,    Nancy    C,    Ln.    Yolo    County 

Free   Library,   Woodland. 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


BOARD    OF    LIBRARY    EXAMINERS. 


51 


Linn,  Mrs  Frances  Burns,  Ln.  Santa  Bar- 
bara Free  Public  Library  and  Santa 
Barbara  County  Free  Library,  Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston,  Margaret  E.,  Ln.  Orange 
County  Free  Library,  Santa  Ana. 

McCardle,  Sarali  E.,  Ln.  Fresno  County 
Free  Library,   Fresno. 

Margrave,  Anne,  Ln.  Inyo  County  Free 
Library,   Independence. 

Martin,  Lenala  A.,  Ln.  Lassen  County 
Free  Library,  Susanville. 

Mereditli,  Roberta,  Asst.  Fresno  County 
Free  Library,  Fresno. 

Middleton,  Maude,  Asst.  Kings  County 
Free   Library,  Hanford. 

Miller,  Mabel  V.,  School  Library,  Los 
Angeles. 

Morse,  Marion,  Ln.  Maui  County  Free 
Library,  Wailuku,   T.   H. 

Mumm,  Beulah,  Reference  Ln.  State  Li- 
brary,  Sacramento. 

Packer,  Ella,  Ln.  Colusa  County  Free 
Library,   Colusa. 

Perry,  Everett  R.,  Ln.  Public  Library,  Los 
Angeles. 

Provines,  Cornelia  D.,  Ln.  Sacramento 
County  Free  Library,  Sacramento. 

Rea,  Robert,  Ln.  Public  Library,  San 
Francisco. 

Reagan,  Ida  M.,  Ln.  Humboldt  County 
Free  Library,  Eureka. 

Russell,  Mrs  Faye  (Kneeshaw),  Mrs  Ralph 
H.  Russell,  Ln.  Glenn  County  Free 
Library,    Willows. 

Silverthorn,  Bessie  B.,  Ln.  McHenry  Pub- 
lic Library  and  Stanislaus  County  Free 
Library,    Modesto. 

Smith,  Susan  T.,  Ln.  City  Library,  Sac- 
ramento. 

Steffa,  Julia,  Ln.  Hanford  Public  Library 
and  Kings  County  Free  Library,  Han- 
ford. 

Stevens,  Elizabeth,  Ln.  Santa  Clara 
County  Free  Library,  San  Jose. 

Stoddard,  Minette  L.,  Ln.  Merced  County 
Free  Library,  Merced. 

Taylor,  Bertha  S.,  Ln.  Amador  County 
Free  Library,   Jackson. 

Thomas,  Mabel  W.,  Asst.  Ln.  Free  Li- 
brary, Oakland. 

Topping,  Elizabeth  R.,  Ln.  Ventura 
County  Free  Library,  Ventura. 

Vogleson,  Helen  E.,  Ln.  Los  Angeles 
County  Free  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Warren,  Althea  H.,  Ln.  Public  Library, 
San  Diego. 

Waterman,  Minerva  H.,  Ln.  Santa  Cruz 
Public  Library  and  Santa  Cruz  County 
Free  Library,  Santa  Cruz. 

Waters,  Caroline  S.,  Ln.  San  Bernardino 
County  Free  Library,  San  Bernardino. 

Wheaton,  Florence  J.,  Ln.  San  Benito 
County  Free  Library,   Hollister. 

Whitbeck,  Mrs  Alice  G.,  Ln.  Contra  Costa 
County  Free  Library,  Martinez. 

Worden,  Mrs  Dorothy  (Clarke),  Asst. 
Solano  County  Free  Library,  Fairfield. 

Wright,  Muriel,  Ln.  Tuolumne  County 
Free  Library,  Sonora. 

Yates,  Mrs  Bess  (Ranton),  Mrs  John  D 
Yates,  Asst.  Public  Library,  Long 
Beach. 


Third  Grade. 

Williams,  Anna  L.,  Ln.  Modoc  County 
Free   Library,    Alturas. 

At  Present  Out  of  Library  Work. 

Alexander,  Mrs  Lela  (Clapperton)  (New 
certificate). 

Burrell,  Mrs  Marjorie  (Chiltaerg),  Mrs 
Elmer  Edward  Burrell  (New  certifi- 
cate). 

Ferris,  Katharine  Post    (New  certificate). 

Gleason,   Celia    (New  certificate). 

Heffner,  Mrs  Martha  June  (Coleman), 
Mrs  Harold  V.  Heffner  (New  certifi- 
cate). 

Herrman,  Mrs  Jennie  (Herrman),  Mrs 
James  White  Herrman  (New  certifi- 
cate). 

Huntington,    Stella    (New  certificate). 

Lewis,  Mrs  Anna  Jean  (Thomson),  Mrs 
R.  B.  Lewis    (New  certificate). 

McDonald,  Mrs  Ora  Regnart,  Mrs  Charles 
E.   McDonald    (New  certificate). 

Parkinson,  H.  O.    (New  certificate). 

Smith,   Margaret  W.    (New   certificate). 

COUNTY   FREE   LIBRARY  LAW. 

The  "California  county  free  library 
law  and  circular  of  information  for 
applicants  for  certificates  of  qualification 
to  hold  office  of  county  librarian  in  Cali- 
fornia" was  published  in  Neios  Notes  of 
California  Libraries,  April,  1911,  and 
later  reprinted  in  pamphlet  form.  The 
edition  being  exhausted,  a  revised  edition 
of  the  circular  was  printed  in  News  Notes 
of  California  'Libraries,  January,  1914. 
This  has  been  reprinted  as  a  pamphlet. 
The  fifth  edition  was  issued  December, 
1921.  (Circular  of  information  only.) 
The  fifth  edition  of  the  County  free 
library  law  was  issued  in  September, 
192.").  Copies  of  both  of  above  pamphlets 
will  be  furnished  on  request. 

NEXT   EXAMINATION. 

The  next  examination  will  be  held  at 
the  Public  Library,  Los  Angeles,  on  .Tune 
7,  and  at  the  State  Library,  Sacramento, 
on  .Tune  12.   1920. 

APPLICATION   BLANKS. 

All  who  wish  to  take  the  examination 
should  file  applications  with  the  Chairman 
of  the  Board.  For  application  blanks  or 
further  information  address  the  Chairman 
of  the  Board,  Milton  .T.  Ferguson,  State 
Librarian,  Sacramento,  California. 


52 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY. 


The  bill  establishing  the  California 
State  Library  was  signed  by  Governor 
Peter  H.  Burnett,  January  24,  1850. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
established  by  resolution  adopted  Sep- 
tember 4,  1913. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
discontinued  by  motion  adopted  May  22, 
1920. 

Biennial  income  for  1925-27,  $253,490. 

Total  accessions  260,564  (less  3386 
lost  and  discarded=257,178)  exclusive  of 
18.226  accessions  in  Books  for  Blind 
Department  and  of  the  Sutro  Branch  in 
S;in  Francisco. 

STAFF. 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian. 

Mabel  R.  Gillis,  'Assistant  Librarian 
and  Head  of  Books  for  the  Blind  Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert  V.  Clayton,  Law  and  Legisla- 
tive Reference  Librarian. 

Eudora  Garoutte,  Head  of  California 
Department. 

Alice  J.  Haines.  Head  of  Documents 
Department. 

Mrs  May  Dexter  Hen&hall,  County 
Library  Organizer. 

Annie  Lowry,  in  chai-ge  of  Periodicals 
and  Binding. 

Wm.  H.  Lugg,  Head  of  Shipping,  Re- 
pairs, etc..  Department. 

Beulah  Mnmra,  Reference  Librarian. 

Ida  G.  Mmison,  Head  of  Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle  Ruhl,  in  charge  of  Order 
Department. 

Beryl  Andrews,  Assistant. 

Helen  M.  Bruner,  Assistant,  Siitro 
Branch,   San  Francisco. 

Sarah  Carder,  Assistant. 

Ella  A.  Clark.  ludexer. 

Mrs  Blanche  Harris  Dalton.  Assistant. 

Mae  Davies.  Assistant. 

Margaret  Dennison,  Assistant,  Sutro 
■  Branch.  San  Francisco. 

Mrs  Marguerite  Walker  Duggins,  Ste- 
nographer. 

Kate  M.  Foley,  Home  Teacher  of  the 
Blind.  146  McAllister  st..  San  Francisco. 

Zilla  Grant.  Assistant. 

Lyndall  Harmon.  Assistant. 

Mrs   Dorothy  Puffer  Isaacs,   Assistant. 

Florence  Lamb,  Bookkeeper. 

Rachel  Look.  Assistant. 

Mavis  A.  McCampbell,  Tvpist. 

Mrs  Bessie  Heath   McCrea,   Assistant. 

Anna  G.  McNamee,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch,   San  Fi-ancisco. 

Alicia  W.  Manning.  Assistant. 

D.  Florence  Montfort.  Assistant. 

Catharine  J.  Mor'rison.  Home  Teacher 
of  the  Blind,  951  El  Molino  st..  Los 
Angeles. 

Mrs  Helen  G.  Nelson,  Assistant. 

Irene  E.  Ryan,  Assistant. 


Blanche  L.  Shadle.  Assistant. 

Lily  M.  Tilden,  Assistant. 

Mrs  Corinue  R.  Tracy,  Assistant. 

.Tune  A^ladyka,  Assistant. 

Mrs  .Julia  M.   Waldron.  Assistant. 

Caroline  Wenzel,  Assistant. 

Mrs  Ina  Brosseau,  Book  Repairer. 

Emma    F.   de   Merritt.   Book   Repairer. 

Adeline  Martin.  Book  Repairer. 

Kenneth  Curtright,  Assistant  Shipping 
Clerk. 

Arden  Hall,  Assistant  Shipping  Clerk. 

Wm.  G.  Lyons,  Assistant  Shipping 
Clerk. 

Lois  Little.  Messenger. 

Addalbert  Morris,  Messenger. 

Vera  Palermo,  Messenger. 

^largaret  Schilling,  Messenger. 

,T.  L.  Foss,  Janitor. 

G.  A.  Klees,  Janitor. 

Harry   A.    Simons,   Elevator   Operator. 

STAFF  NEWS  ITEMS. 

Mrs  Bessie  Heath  McCrea  returned  to 
the  Staff  on  October  13,  Mrs  Gerna  R. 
Dickson  beginning  on  the  same  day  at  the 
Sacramento  County  Free  Library.  Mr's 
Helen  G.  Nelson  began  work  on  Octo- 
ber 13  as  successor  of  Dorothy  Geeslin, 
who  resigned  September  30.  Carmelita 
Duff,  who  had  been  in  charge  of  the  work 
for  the  blind,  took  a  leave  of  absence  in 
December  in  order  to  have  a  complete 
rest.  She  was  succeeded  by  Mrs  Blanche 
Harris  Dalton,  recently  of  the  San  Benito 
County  Free  Library.  Charles  Tevis 
Edwards  resigned  October  30  and  was 
succeeded  by  Kenneth  Curtright.  Mar- 
garet Schilling  was  added  to  the  messenger 
service  on  November  2. 

Miss  Emma  Revell,  of  the  Siskiyou 
County  Free  Library,  spent  two  weeks 
in  the  State  Library,  begining  Novem- 
ber' 2.  Miss  Revell  was  here  for  study 
and  observation. 

Miss  Gillis  attended  a  meeting  of  the 
Orange  County  Library  Club  at  Fullerton 
on  October  10,  and  a  meeting  of  the 
Executive  Committee  of  the  California 
Library  Association  in  Long  Beach  that 
same  evening.  Mrs  Henshall  attended  the 
meeting  of  the  City  and  County  School 
Superintendents  in  Pasadena  during  the 
week  of  October  12. 

Mr  Ferguson  spoke  at  the  Oakland 
Rotary  Club  October  15  on  "Rotary  in 
Relation  to  the  Library."  He  attended 
a  meeting  of  the  Executive  Board  of  the 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


53 


American  Library  Association  in  Chicago 
in  October  and  also  a  meeting  of  the 
Louisiana  Library  Commission  in  New 
Orleans.  -  He  was  a  speaker  at  the  meet- 
ing of  the  Second  District  of  the  Cali- 
fornia Library  Association  at  Oakland 
on  November  7.  Mr  Ferguson,  Miss 
Haines  and  Mrs  Henshall  attended  the 
meeting  of  the  Ninth  District  in  Or'oville 
on  November  21,  where  Mrs  Henshall  was 
on  the  program.  Mr  Ferguson  left 
December  26  for  Chicago  to  attend  the 
midwinter  meeting  of  the  American  Li- 
brary  Association. 

LIBRARY    HOURS. 

Week   days 9  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

Legislative  session  : 

Week  days 9  a.m.  to  9  p.m. 

Sundays 10  a.m.  to  3  p.m. 

During  July  and  August  the  Library 
closed  at  noon  on  Saturdays. 

LAW  AND   LEGISLATIVE   REFER- 
ENCE   DEPARTMENT. 
Herbebt  V.  Clayton,  in  charge. 

The  Law  and  Legislative  Reference 
Department  is  fully  equipped  with  the 
latest  reports,  digests,  encyclopedias  and 
textbooks,  the  statutes  of  other  states, 
the  United  States,  Great  Britain,  Can- 
ada, Australia  and  certain  other  foreign 
countries,  and  briefs  of  counsel  in  cases 
decided  in  the  California  Supreme  and 
Appellate  courts.  State  officers  are  en- 
titled to  borrow  books,  and  private  indi- 
viduals are  accorded  the  same  privilege 
upon  presentation  of  a  request  signed  by 
a  Supreme,  Appellate  or  Superior  Judge, 
or  other  state  officer.  Books  may  be  kept 
three  weeks',  and  will  be  once  renewed 
for  two  weeks.  All  books  are  subject  to 
recall,  if  required  by  a  state  officer,  or  if, 
in  the  opinion  of  the  Librarian,  a  recall 
is  fair  and  expedient. 

In  addition  to  special  service  to  mem- 
bers of  the  Legislature,  information  on 
the  laws  of  California  and  other  states 
and  countries  is  given  on  inquiry  from 
libraries   or  individuals. 

Recent  accessions  to  the  department 
will  be  found  listed  under  the  heading 
"Law"  in  the  section  on  "Recent  Acces- 
sions." 

A  new  edition  of  Library  Laws  of 
California  has  been  prepared  and  will 
soon  be  ready  for  distribution. 

DOCUMENTS    DEPARTMENT. 

Alice  J.  Haines,  in  charge. 

The  Documents  Department  aims  to 
collect,  arrange  and  make  available  gov- 
ernment publications,  federal,  state,  city 
and  foreign. 

Recent   accessions   of   California   State 


and   City   publications  will  be   found   on 
pp.  86  and  89. 

Copies  of  24  California  State  publica- 
tions have  been  received  for  distribution 
to  libraries  during  October,  November'  and 
December,  1925. 
Agriculture    Dept.      Special    publications 

nos.  59MjO. 
Banks    Superintendent.      Annual    report. 

1925. 
Building  &  Loan  Comm.     Annual  report. 

1925. 
Chiropractic      Examiners      Bd.       Report. 

1925. 
Controller.       Financial     transactions     of 

municipalities  and  counties  for  1924. 
Fish    »&    Game    Comm.      Abstract   fish    & 

game  laws.  192.5-27. 
Forestry    Bd.      Proceedings    of   the    sixth 

annual    meeting    of    Assoc,    of     State 

Foresters.     1925. 
Grand    Army    Republic.      Dept.    of    Cali- 
fornia &  Nevada.     Journal  of  proceed- 
ings.    1925. 
Harbor  Bd.     Tariff  charges.     1925. 
Highwav   Comm.     Cal.   highways,  vol.   2, 

nos.  10-12. 
Industrial  Accident  Comm.     Boiler  safety 

orders.     1925. 

Cal.  safety  news.  vol.  9,  no.  4. 

Insurance  Dept.     Insurance  brokers.  1925. 
Public  School  Teachers  Retirement  Salary 

Fund  Bd.     List  of  Teachers  confidential 

personal  reports  filed  in  1919.     1925. 
Public     Instruction     Supt.      Cal.     jubilee 

rear  in  her  schools.     1925. 
School  law.     1925. 


Public  Works  Dept.  Div.   of  Engineering' 

&  Irrig.     Bull.  10. 
Railroad     Comm.      Public     utilities     act. 

1925. 
Secretary  of  State.     Constitution.     1925. 
Veterans  Welfare  Bd.     Veterans  farm  & 

home  purchase  act.     1925. 
Veterans"  Home.     Report.     1925. 

REFERENCE    DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah  MujMM,  in  charge.. 

The  Reference  Department  furnishes 
information  to  any  inquirer.  It  furnishes 
Ijooks  to  public  libraries  on  request  of 
the  librarian,  and  to  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  on  request  of  its  official 
head  or  its  librarian ;  to  individuals 
through  the  signature  of  a  state  officer, 
of  the  Librarian  of  the  local  library  or 
of  the  official  head  of  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  or  on  receipt  of  a  $5.00 
deposit ;  to  a  club  or  grange  on  request 
of  its  president,  secretary  or  librarian. 
In  counties  having  county  free  libraries, 
all  requests  must  be  made  through  the 
cotinty   free   library. 

ORDER  AND  ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

Myrtle  Ruhl,  in  charge. 

During  October,  November  and  Decem- 
ber 1665  books  and  15  prints  were 
accessioned. 


54 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


CATALOG  DEPARTMENT. 

Ida  G.   Munson,   in  charge. 

During-  October,  November  and  Decem- 
ber 1178  books  were  cataloged  and  8029 
cards  were  added  to  the  file.  11.21.3  cards 
were  filed  in  the  Union  Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA    DEPARTMENT. 

EuDOEA  Garoutte,  in  charge. 

The  California  Department  aims  to 
have  a  thoroughly  good  collection  of 
books  on  the  history  and  description, 
resources  and  industries  of  the  State,  as 
well  as  the  works  of  California  authors 
in  all  departments  of  literature.  These 
are  made  accessible  by  means  of  a  card 
catalog.  Full  names'  and  biographical 
sketches  of  California  authors,  artists, 
musicians,  pioneers  and  early  settlers  are 
being  secured,  together  with  their  photo- 
graphs. The  collection  of  bound  peri- 
odicals is  quite  large.  The  Department 
also  contains  about  10,000  bound  volumes 
of  newspapers,  a  file  of  which  is  being 
indexed  with  reference  to  the  history  of 
the  State.  Students  will  be  assisted  in 
their  work. 

Pioneers  and   Early  Settlers. 

A  large  number  of  cards  has  been 
received  this  quarter ;  among  them  several 
of  our  honored  '49ers,  whose  experiences 
are  most  interesting.  Thej'  as  as  follows  : 
Josiah  Alkire,  .Julius  Clinton  Beach.  Mr 
and  Mrs  Samuel  Stewart  Carlisle,  Wil- 
liam Xewton  Meeks  and   .John   Satterlee. 

Those  arriving  later  are  Mary  E.  Beach, 
Drury  Melone,  Benjamin  Fairbanks.  Mr 
and  Mrs  Frank  J.  French,  William 
Howard  Lawrence,  Mr  and  Mrs  John 
Rodeck,  Mr  and  Mrs  William  Satterlee, 
John  p-aust  Storer,  William  George 
Walker. 

California   Authors. 

The  following   author   cards  have  been 

received    since    the    last    issue    of    Neivs 

Notes  of  California  Lrihi-aries  : 

Blanch,   Josephine   Mildred 
Brun,   Mrs  Hanna    (Otis) 

(Mrs   Samuel   Jacques   Brun) 
Farquhar,    Francis   Peloubet 
Hamlin,  John  H. 
Holaday,  Mrs  Alice  May   (Cusick) 

(Mrs  Oren  P.  Holaday) 
*0'Day,  Edward  Francis 
Pavellas,  Constantinos  Harpending 
Stanley,  Frank  Arthur 

California   Artists. 

The    following   artist    cards    have    been 

received    since    the    last    issue    of    News 

Notes  of  California  Libraries  : 

*L,ion,  Henry 
Theiss,  John  "William 


*Native  Californians. 


Newspaper   Index. 
The    index    covers    the    period    from 
August  15,  1846,  to  date. 

Catalog. 

431  cards  have  been  added  to  the  Cali- 
fornia catalog  during  the  last  quarter. 

Exhibit. 

A  very  interesting  exhibit  of  early  Cali- 
fornia material  in  the  rotunda  of  the 
Capitol  continues  to  attract  much  atten- 
tion. 

BOOKS  FOR  THE   BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 

Mabel  R.  Gillis,  in  charge. 

Embossed  books  in  the  varioixs  types 
are  sent  to  any  blind  resident  in  Cali- 
fornia upon  application.  Circular  and 
finding  list,  with  Call  slip  postal,  will  be 
sent  on  request.  Writing  appliances  and 
games  for  the  blind  are  loaned  as  samples 
to  those  wishing  to  buy  such  articles,  so 
that  the  different  kinds  can  be  tried  be- 
fore thej^  are  ordered.  Addresses  of  firms 
supplying  all  articles  loaned  will  be  fur- 
nished on  request. 

Books  sent  to  individuals  from  an  in- 
stitution distributing  embossed  literature 
are  carried  free  through  the  mails. 

Embossed  catalogs  of  the  earlier  mate- 
rial in  American  Braille.  Moon,  and  New 
York  point  are  available.  They  will  be 
loaned  to  borrowers  wishing  them  for  use 
in  book  selection. 

The  State  Library  will  be  glad  to  have 
borrowers  who  care  to  do  so  write  any 
letters  or  requests  for  books  to  the  Li- 
brary in  Braille  or  New  York  point. 

The  first  book  was  loaned  June  13, 
190.5.  There  are  now  2320  blind  borrow- 
ers, 49  borrowers  having  been  added  dur- 
ing October,  November  and  December, 
and  52  borrowers  lost  by  death  during 
1925.  Total  accessions  are  18,226  as  fol- 
lows :  New  York  point  books  2582 ;  New 
York  point  music  186 ;  American  Braille 
books  3027 ;  American  Braille  music 
1269;  European  Braille  books  2938; 
European  Braille  music  183 ;  Esperanto 
Braille  books  3 ;  Moon  books  4284 ; 
Moon  music  .5;  Revised  Braille  books 
2809 ;  Revised  Braille  music  121 ; 
Standard  dot  books  14 ;  Line  books  193  ; 
Line  music  21  ;  Ink  print  books  425 ; 
''■Appliances  84:  *Games  49;  Maps  33. 

During  October,  November  and  Decem- 
ber S662  books,  etc.,  were  loaned  as 
follows  :  New  Y'ork  point  407 ;  American 
Braille  215 ;  European  Braille  1109 ; 
Moon    .3570 :    Revised    Braille    Grade    1* 


*Applianees    and    games    are    loaned    as 
samples  to  anyone  wishing  to  try  them. 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


3358  ;  Ink  print  1  ;  Appliances  2  ;  Games 
0 ;  Maps  0.  The  loans  were  divided  by 
class  as  follows :  Philosophy  and  religion 
G1<S  ;  sociology  35  ;  language  62  ;  primers 
41;  science  110;  useful  arts  48;  fine  arts 
2 ;  amusements  1 ;  music  70 ;  literature 
140  ;  fiction  5744  ;  travel  and  history  462  ; 
biography  230  ;  periodicals  1084. 

Copies  of  magazines  have  been  donated 
(luring  the  last  three  months  by  Lucien 
Xyev,  Mrs  F.  A.  Bacher,  F.  B.  Beans, 
Mrs  H.  O.  Buker,  Mrs  A.  H.  Clise,  Anna 
Courade.  Kate  M.  Foley,  Mrs  F.  W. 
Foster,  Ruby  Holtz,  Miss  Rosa  Laxsou, 
Bessie  Long.  ^Nlrs  M.  McCabe,  Mrs  Rose 
McComb,  W.  A.  Miller,  Hattie  B.  New- 
man, Mrs  M.  E.  Phillips,  Carl  Richardson, 
J.  Sanchez,  Mrs  L.  Sargent,  George  W. 
Shoemaker',  William  Thomas,  Amy  Weihe, 
George  Zedeker,  American  Braille  Press 
for  War  and  Civilian  Blind,  Inc.  (for- 
merly The  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc.),  Canadian  National  Institute 
for  the  Blind,  Christian  Record  Publish- 
ing Company,  Free  Gospel  Library  for 
the  Blind,  National  Institute  for'  the 
Blind,  New  York  Association  for  the 
Blind,  Society  for  Aid  to  the  Sightless, 
Western  Pennsylvania  Institute  for  the 
Blind,  Xavier  Braille  Publishing  Com- 
pany,  Ziegler  Publishing  Company. 

Other  gifts  are  indicated  in  the  list  of 
books,  etc.,  which  have  been  added  to  the 
library  during  the  last  three  months.  See 
p.  90. 

Home  Teaching. 

Kate  M.  Foley,  home  teacher  of  the 
blind,  is  at  the  Argyle  Apartments,  146 
McAllister  street,  San  Francisco,  every 
Thursday  from  9  a.m.  to  5  p.m.  Her 
telephone  number  is  Market  690.  She 
gives  lessons  regularly  in  the  bay  region 
and  the .  Santa  Clara  Valley,  with  occa- 
sional trips  to  other  parts  of  the  state. 
Catharine  J.  Morrison,  home  teacher  of 
the  blind,  is  at  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Free  Library,  Broadway  Annex,  Hall  of 
Records,  every  Wednesday.  Her  home 
address  is  951  El  Molino,  Los  Angeles. 
Her  telephone  number  is  Drexel  5339. 
She  gives  lessons  regularly  in  Los  Angeles 
and  vicinity  and  makes  occasional  trips  to 
San  Diego. 

From  October  1  to  December  30,  the 
home  teachers  gave  428  lessons  in  the 
homes  of  the  blind  and  51  lessons  at  libra- 


ries. They  made  110  visits  and  calls  in 
connection  with  the  work  for  purposes 
other  than  giving  lessons,  and  have 
received  36  visits  in  connection  with  the 
work. 

During  the  quarter  Miss  Foley  and 
Miss  Morrison  spent  220  hours  on  corre- 
spondence and  preparing  lessons.  They 
wrote  346  letters  and  162  postals  and 
received  255  letters  and  36  postals.  They 
also  answered  and  made  478  telephone 
calls.  They  made  3  addresses.  Miss 
Foley  teaches  regularly  in  Oakland,  in 
Alameda  and  in  San  Francisco  classes  of 
seeing  people  to  write  Braille.  She  spent 
43  hours  in  proofreading  hand-copied 
books.  The  various  other  activities  in 
connection  with  the  work  of  the  home 
teachers  can  not  be  easily  tabulated. 

SUTRO   BRANCH. 

The  Sutro  Branch  occupies  space  in  the 
Public  Library,  Civic  Center,  San  Fran- 
cisco,' and  is  open  every  day,  except  Sun- 
day, from  9  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

CALIFORNIA     STATE     LIBRARY 
SCHOOL   GRADUATES. 

Esther  M.  Bomgardner,  '15 

Asst.  Public  School  L,.,  Los  Angeles 
Thelma  Brackett,  '20 

Ln.  Newark  Museum,  Newark,  N.  J. 
Helen  V.   Briggs,  '14 

46  Fairview  ave.,  Los  Gatos 
Agnes  E.  Brown,  '15 

Asst.    San    Diego    High    School    L.,    San 

Diego 
Helen  M.   Bruner,   '14 

Asst.  in  cliarge,  Sutro  Branch,  State  L., 

San  Francisco 
Mis   Lucile    Huff    Buchan    (Mrs    Dean   W. 
Buclian),  '20 

1631  Cowper  St.,  Palo  Alto 
Mrs    Virginia    Clowe    Bullis     (Mrs    James 
S.  Bullis),  '17 

1314  Alameda  Padre  Serra,  Santa  Bar- 
Ruth  E.   Bullock,   '15 

Ln.    Belvedere    Junior    High    School    L., 

Los  Angeles 
Elta  L.  Camper,  '17 

Asst.  Univ.  of  Cal.  L.,  Berkeley 
Blanche  Chalfant,  '14 

Ln.  Butte  Co.  F.  L.,  Oroville 
Marguerite  Chatfleld,  '20 

Asst.  Ventura  P.  L.,  Ventura 
Nellie   E.   Christensen,  '19 

Ln.   Selma  Higli  School  L.,   Selma 
Mabel  Coulter,  '14 

Asst.  Contra  Costa  Co.  F.  L.,  Martinez. 

(On  leave  of  absence.)      Temporarily  in 

Lange  Library  of  Education,  Berkeley 
Helen  Esther  Crawford,  '20 

Watsonville  High  School,  Watsonville. 
Dorotha  Davis,  '17 

Ln.   Fresno  High  .School  L.,   Fresno 
Tillie  de  Bernard!,  '18 

Smith  College,  Northampton,  Mass. 
Estella  De  Ford,   '15 

Ln.  Napa  Co.   F.  L.,  Napa 


56 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Margaret  Dennison,  '17 

Asst.  Sutro  Branch,  State  L.,  San  Fran- 
cisco 
Abbie  Doughty,  '20 

Ln.  Garfleld  High  Scliool  L.,  Los  Angeles 
Mrs  Vivian  Gregory  Douglas    (Mrs  James 
R.  Douglas),  '14 

Barbara  Hotel,  Los  Angeles 
Ellen  B.  Frink,  '19 

Ln.  Siskiyou  Co.  F.  L.,  Yreka 
Flo  A.  Gantz,  '20 

Ln.    San    Luis    Obispo    Co.    F.    L.,    San 

Luis  Obispo 
Beatrice  Y.  Gawne,  '17 

Asst.  Monterey  Co.  F.  L.,  Salinas 
Hazel  G.  Gibson,  '19 

Asst.  Sacramento  Co.  F.  L.,  Sacramento 
Margaret  V.   Girdner,  '17 

Asst.  Pasadena  Jr.  College  L.,  Pasadena 
Mary  E.  Glock,  '15 

Died,  March   6,   1922 
Bernice  L.  Goff,  '14 

Asst.  P.  L.,  New  York  City 
Mrs    Jennie    Rumsev    Gould     (Mrs    J.    A. 
Gould),    '14 

746  Elm  St.,  "Woodland 
Mrs  Mildred  Kellogg  Hargis  (Mrs  William 
H.  Hargis),  '18 

570  S.   Fifteenth  St.,   San  Jose 
Mrs    Louise    Jamme    Harriss    (Mrs    Frank 
U.   Harriss),   '15 

2  9  S.  State  St.,  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah 
Margaret  Hatch,  '15 

Ln.   Standard  Oil  Co.  L..   San   Francisco 
Mrs   Hazel   Meddaugh  Heffner    (Mrs'  Roy 
J.   Heffner),    '18 

152  8  Channing  way,  Berkeley 
Cecilia  Henderson,  '14 

Santa  Paula 
Edna  S.  Holroyd,  '15 

Ln.  San  Mateo  Co.  F.  L.,  Redwood  City 
Mrs    Helen    Hop  wood    Judd    (Mrs    Wilber 
Judd).   '20 

Out   of  library  work 
Mrs    Winona    McConnell     Kennedy     (Mrs 
John  Elmer  Kennedy),  '15 

1320   39th  St.,   Sacramento 
Mrs    Marguerite    Ryan    Kirschman     (Mrs 
Orton  A.  Kirschman).   '19 

2839  Forest  ave.,  Berkeley 
Mrs   Algeline    Marlow    Lawson    (Mrs   Iver 
N.    Lawson,   Jr.),   '18 

Asst.    P.    L.,    San    Diego    (On    leave    of 

absence)      3231  Front  St.,  San  Diego 
Marjorie  C.  Learned,  '20 

Asst.  P.  L.,  New  York  City 
Mrs  M.  Ruth  McLaughlin  Lockwood   (Mrs 
Ralph    L.    Lockwood),   '17 

93  8  CJeary  st.,  San  Francisco 
Amy  G.  Luke.  '15 

Beaumont 
Mrs    Bessie    Heath    McCrea    (Mrs    Robert 
W.   McCrea),   '19 

Asst.    State   L.,    Sacramento 
N.  Ruth  McCullough,  '17 

24   N.    Sheridan   Road.   Lake   Forest.   111. 
Mrs  Ruth  Beard  McDowell    (Mrs  Roy  F. 
McDowell).   '14 

914  11th  St.,  Modesto 
Mrc    Everett    McCullough    McMillin     (Mrs 
James  M.  McMillin),  '19 

Potomac     Park    Apts.,     21st    &    C    sts., 

"^"ashington,  D.   C. 
Anne  Margrave,  '14 

Ln.  Inyo  Co.  F.  L.,  Independence 
Lenala  Martin,  '14 

Ln.  Lassen  Co.  F.  L.,  Susanville 
Mrs    Georgia    Pearl    Seeker    Meyers    (Mrs 
Robert  K.   Meyers).   '19 

Ln.  Tulare  Joint  Union  High  School  L., 

Tulare 


Vera  V.  Mitchell,  '19 

Ln.  Biggs  High  School  L.,  Biggs 
Marion  Morse,  '17 

Ln.  Maui  Co.  F.  L.,  Wailuku.  T.  H. 
Mrs   Alice    Moore   Patton    (Mrs   James    L. 
Patton),  'IS 

Out  of  library  work 
Mrs     Helen     Katherine     Kellogg    Peabody 
(Mrs  Roger  Peabody),  '19 

48  Winthrop  st.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Mrs    Marion    Schumacher    Percival     ( Mrs 
H.  Frederic  Percival),  '15 

1633   3Sth  St..   Sacramento 
Mrs  Miriam  Colcord  Post,  '14 

157  East  Seventh  St.,  Claremont 
Margaret  L.  Potter,  '16 

Asst.  Lane  Medical  L.,  San  Francisco 
Mrs    Eunice    Steele    Price     (Mrs    Jay    H. 
Price),  '16 

1054  Cragmont  ave.,  Berkeley 
Mrs  Beatrice   Brasefleld   Rakestraw    (Mrs 
Norris  "W.  Rakestraw),  'IS 

Asst.  Oberlin  College  L.,  Obeiiin,  Ohio 
Esther  L.  Ramont,  '20 

Ln.  Modesto  High  School  L.,  Modesto 
Mrs  Frances  Haub  Raymond  (Mrs  George 
J.   Raymond),    '20 

2005   22d  St.,   Sacramento 
Anna  Belle  Robinson,  '18 

Died,  June   22.1920 
Myrtle  Ruhl,  '14 

Head   of   Order  Dept.,    State   L.,    Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth  Seymour,  '18 

Ln.    Tamalpais    Union    High    School    L., 

Mill  Valley 
Blanche  L.   Shadle,  '17 

Asst.   State  L.,  Sacramento 
Mrs   Edith    Edenborg   Smalley    (Mrs    Carl 
J.  Smalley),  '18 

Ln.  Art  Institute  L.,  Kansas  City,  Mo. 
Mrs    Edna    Bell    Smith    (Mrs    William   A. 
Smith),  '17 

1225   42d  St.,  Sacramento 
Mrs  Elizabeth   Snyder  Smith    (Mrs  Joseph 
K.   Smith),  '20 

3100  19th  St..  Bakersfield 
Mrs  Rosamond  Bradbury  Waithman   (Mrs 
Joseph  de  L.  Waithman),  '18 

Out   of  library  work 
Caroline  "V^''enzel,  '14 

Asst.  State  L..  Sacramento 
Josephine  L.   Whitbeck,    '16 

Asst.  P.  L.,  Richmond 
Essie  T.  WTiite,  '19 

Asst.  Sacramento  High  School  and  Jun- 
ior College  L.,   Sacramento 
Mrs  Katharine  (jahoon  Wilson  CMrs  Lloyd 
R.  Wilson),  '17 

1125  Grand  ave.,  Seattle,  Wash. 
Aldine  Winham,  '20 

Ln.    State    Teachers    College    L.,    Santa 

Barbara 
Mrs  Dorothy  Clarke  Worden,  '15 

Asst.  Solano  Co.  F.  L..  Fairfield 
Mrs  Bess  Ranton  Yates  (Mrs  John  DeWitt 
Yates),  '18 

Asst.  P.  L.   Long  Beach 

News   Items. 

We  are  grateful  for  the  corrections 
which  have  come  in  for  this  column. 
Can  anyone  give  ns  the  address  of  any  of 
these  three  people,  whom  we  have  lost? 

Mrs  Helen  Hopwood  Judd,  '20. 

Mrs  Alice  Moore  Patton,  '18. 

Mrs  Rcsamond  Bradbury  Waithman,'18. 


vol.  21,110. 1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


57 


RECENT  ACCESSIONS. 
Additions  to  the  Library  During  Octo- 
ber, November  and  December,  1925. 
The  last  number  of  the  Quarterly 
Bulletin  of  the  California  State  Library 
which  was  issued  was  no.  4  of  vol.  4, 
covering  the  accessions  for  September- 
December,  1905.  The  Bulletin  has  been 
discontinued  and  the  matter  contained  in 
it  is  now  appearing  in  Netos  Notes  of 
California  Libraries. 

The  last  list  of  recent  accessions 
appeared  in  the  October,  1925,  issue  of 
this   publication. 

GENERAL    WORKS. 

[American    library    association] 
Planning    the    school    library.     [1925] 
X027.8  A51 

BiBLioGKAPHiCAi,    essays ;     a    tribute    to 
Wilberforce  Eames.     1924.      010  B5822 

Borah,   Leo   Arthur. 

News  writing  for  high  schools.     cl92.5. 

070  B72 
First  edition  club,  London. 

Bibliographical    catalogue    of    first    edi-  i 
tions,    proof    copies    &    manuscripts 
of   books   by    Lord   Byron.     1925. 

q012  B9 
Fitzmaukice-Kelly,    James. 

Spanish  bibliography.  1925.  (His- 
panic notes  &  monographs,  essays, 
studies,  and  brief  biographies  issued 
by  the  Hispanic  society  of  America. 
Bibliography    series)  016.86  F55 

GoSvSE,  Edmund  William. 

The  library  of  Edmund  Gosse.     1924. 
016.82  G67 

Greene,   Amy  Blanche,  (C-  Gould,  Frede- 
ric A. 
Handbook-bibliography   on   foreign   lan- 
guage   groups    in    tlie    United    States 
and   Canada.     cl925.      01.6.3251   G79 

Harrington,   Harry  Franklin. 
Chats  on  feature  writing.     1925. 

029  H31 
HuTCHiNS,    Henry    Clinton. 

Robinson  Crusoe  and  its  printing, 
1719-1731.     1925.  q012  D3 

Langstaef,    John   Brett. 

David    Copperfield's    library.      [1924] 

>c021   L28 


Long,   Harriet   Catherine. 

County   library   service.     1925. 

x021   L84 
Odum,  Howard  Washington. 

Sociology  and  social  problems.  1925. 
(Reading   with   a  purpose) 

028  027 

Rossi,   William  Harrison,   <£-  Rossi,  Mrs 
Diana  Isabella   (Powers),  comps. 
Personnel     administration ;     a     bibliog- 
raphy.      1925.        (Human    relations 
series)  016.658  R83 

Sawyer,  Mrs  Harriet  Price,  cd. 

The    library    and    its    contents.     1925. 

x021  S271 
Sharp,  Dallas  Lore. 

Some  great  American  books.  1925. 
(Reading  with  a  purpose) 

028  S53 

Special    libraries    directory.       (2d    ed.) 
1925.  x026  S741 

Sweet,  Mrs  May  McDaniel. 

The  Italian  immigrant  and  his  read- 
ing. 1925.  (Library  work  with 
the    foreign    born)  x021   S97 

White,    William    Allen,    &    Myer,    Wal-, 
ter  E. 
Conflicts    in    American    public    opinion. 
1925.      (Reading    with    a    purpose) 
028  W58 
Williams,    lolo   Aneurin. 

Seven  XVIIIth  century  bibliographies. 

1924.  016.82  W72 

Contents  :  John  Armstrong. — Wil- 
liam Shenstone. — Mark  Akenside. — 
William  Collins. — Oliver  Goldsmith. — 
Charles  Churchill. — Richard  Brinsley 
Butler  Sheridan. — Index  to  biblio- 
graphical entries. 

Wilson,  Martha. 

School    library    management.      4th    ed. 

1925.  x027.8  W75a2 

Selected  articles  on  school  library 


experience.     1925.     (The  Librarians' 
round  table)  x027.8  W75s 

A  World  list  of  scientific  periodicals 
published  in  the  years  1900-1921. 
192.5.  rq  01 6.05  W9 

PHILOSOPHY  AND   ETHICS. 

CusuMAN,    Herbert   Ernest. 

A     beginner's     history     of     philosophy. 
Rev.    ed.     cl918-20.     2   v.      109_C98 


58 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


Hendel,  Charles  William,  jr. 

Studies  in  the  philosophy  of  David 
Hume.     1925.  192  H92zhe 

PIerman,   Emma    (Mrts  Meyer   Herman). 

The   meaning   and   value   of   mysticism. 

3d  ed.      [1925]  149.3  H55 

Jacks.  Lawrence  Pearsall. 

The  challenge  of  life.  [1924]  (The 
Hibbert  lectures,   1924)  170  J122 

Keyseklino,    Hermann    Alexander,    giaf 
von. 
The     travel     diary     of     a     philosopher. 
cl925.     2  V.  193  K44 

Kbout,   .John   Allen. 

The    origins    of    prohibition.     192.j. 

178  K93 
Mandeville,   Bernard. 

The  fable  of  the  bees.     1924. 

170  M27 
[Paget,    Violet] 

Proteus  ;  or.  The  future  of  intelligence. 
192.5.  151   PI  3 

Patxen,   Charles  .Joseph. 

The  passing  of  the  phantoms ;  a  study 
o  f  evolutionary  psychology  and 
morals.  1924.  (To-day  and  to- 
morrow  series)  171   P31 

Polakov,   Walter  Nicholas. 

Man  and  his  affairs  from  the  engi- 
neering point  of  view.     1925. 

120  P77 
Rand,   Benjamin,   comp. 

Modern   classical   philosophers.     cl924. 

190  R18a 
Satomi,  Kishio. 

Discovery  of  .Japanese  idealism.  1924. 
(Trubner's  oriental   series)     181   S25 

Stokes,  Adrian. 
The  thread  of  Ariadne.     1925. 

192  S87 

Surendranatiia,  Dasa-Gupta. 

Yoga  as  philosophy  and  religion.  1924. 
(Trubner's  oriental  series)  181   S96y 

Taylor,   Margaret  Elizabeth  .Jane. 

Greek  philosophy,  an  introduction. 
1924.      (The  world's  manuals) 

180  T24 


White,   Stewart   Edward. 
Credo.     1925. 


110  W58 


MIND  AND   BODY. 

Kretschmer,  Ernst. 

Physique  and  character,  tr.  by  W.  J. 
H.  Sprott.  1925.  (International 
library  of  psychology,  philosophy 
and  scientific  method)  137  K92 

McBride.  Peter. 

Psycho-analysts    analysed.     1924. 

130  Mil 

Social  aspects  of  mental  hygiene.     1925. 

131   S67 

CHILD  STUDY. 

Andrus,  Ituth. 

A  tentative  inventory  of  the  habits  of 
children  from  two  to  four  years  of 
age.  19  24.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to   education)  136.7  A57 

Bailor,  Edwin  Maurice. 

Content  and  form  in  tests  of  intelli- 
gence. 1924.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  q  136.7  B15 

Bere,  May. 

A  comparative  study  of  the  mental 
capacity  of  children  of  foreign  par- 
entage. 1924.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  q136.7  B4 

Bbinkley,  Sterling  Gardner. 

Values  of  new  type  examinations  in 
the  high  school  with  special  refer- 
ence to  history.  1924.  (Teachers 
college,  Columbia  university.  Con- 
tributions to  education)     q136.7  B85 

Cleveland,  Elizabeth. 

Training  the  toddler.     cl925. 

136.7  C63 

Fenton,    Mrs   .Jessie   M.    (Chase). 
A    practical    psychology    of    babyhood. 
1925.  136.7  F34 

Herring,  .John  I^. 

Herring    revision    of    the    Binet-Simon 

tests   &   verbal   &   abstract   elements 

in    intelligence    examinations.      1924. 

136.7  H567h 

Kamm,  Mrs  Minnie  Elizabeth   (Watson). 
The   pre-school    age;    a   mother's   guide 
to  a   child's  occupation.     1925. 

136.7  K15 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


59 


RiCHMO^^D.    Winifred. 
The    adolescent    girl.     1925.    136.7  R53 

Teagarden.  Florence  M. 

A    study    of    the    upper    limits    of    the 
development    of    intelligence.     1924. 
(Teachers     college,      Columbia     uni- 
versity.    Contributions  to  education  I 
136.7  T25 

OCCULTISM.     SPIRITUALISM. 

Bird.  .J.   Malcolm. 

"Margery'*    the    medium.     cl925. 

133.9  B61m 
Bragdon,  Claude  Fayette. 

Old,  lamps  for  new ;  the  ancient  wisdom 
ill  the  modern  world.     1925. 

133  B81o 
Ferguson.  Ian. 

The  philosophy  of  witchcraft.      [1924] 

133  F35 
Harper,   Charles   George. 

Haunted  houses.      [1924]  133  H29 

Karma,  pseud. 

Astrology    of    the    ancient    Egyptians. 

1924.  133.5  K18 

Read,  Carveth. 

Mau     and     his     superstitions,     2d     ed. 

1925.  133   R28m 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

Broad,  Charlie   Dunbar. 

The  mind  and  its  place  in  nature. 
1925.  ( International  library  of 
psychology,  philosophy  and  scientific 
method)  150  B86 

Deiesch,   Hans  Adolf  Eduard. 
The  crisis  in  psychology.     1925. 

150  D779 
Laird,   Donald  Anderson. 

Increasing  personal  efficiency,  the 
psychology  of  personal  progress. 
1925.  150  L18i 

Pierce,  Edgar. 

The  philosophy   of  character.     1924. 

150  P61 

Problems  of  personality.  1925.  (In- 
ternational library  of  psychology,  phi- 
losophy and  scientific  method) 

150  P96 
Stuart,  Mary. 

The  psychology  of  time.  1925.  (In- 
ternational library  of  psychology, 
philosophy    and   scientific   method) 

150  S936 


RELIGION. 

Athear>-.  Clarence  R. 
Interchurch   government. 


cl925. 

260  A86 


Brunner,  Edmund  de  Schweiuitz. 

Tested    methods    in    town    and    country 
churches.     cl923.  260  B89t 

Buchanan,    Mrs    Isabella    (Reid). 
Women   of  the  Bible.     cl924. 

220.9  B918 

[CoNANT,   Albert  Francis],   comp. 
A     complete     concordance     to     Science 
and  health.     1916.  289.9  E21cs 

Crane,  Frank. 

Why  I  am  a  Christian.     1925. 

230  C89 
Darrow,  Floyd  Lavern. 

Through  science  to  God.     cl925. 

215  D22 

De  Bardeleben,  Mary  Christine. 
Better    Americans,    no.    2.     cl924. 
(The  better  America  series.     Junior 
home  mission  courses)  266  B56 

E  w  I  N  G,     William,     d    Thomson.     -John 
Ebenezer   Honeyman. 
The    Temple    dictionary    of    the   Bible. 
1910.  r220.3  E95 

Gates,  Herbert  Wright. 

Better  Americans,   no.   3.     cl925. 

(The  better  America  series.     Junior 
home   mission   courses)  266  B56 

Goodspeed,    Edgar  .Johnson. 

The     making     of     the     English     New 
Testament.     cl925.  225  G65 

Hannah,    Ian    Campbell. 

Christian    monasticism ;    a    great   force 
in  history.     1925.  271   H24 

Jayne.   Walter  Addison. 

The    healing    gods    of    ancient    civiliza- 
tions.     1925.  291  J42 


King,   Basil. 

Faith   and  success. 


192.: 


264  K52 


Knox,   Wilfred  Lawrence. 

St.  Paul  and  the  Church  of  Jerusalem. 
1925.  225.9  P32k 

Peabody,  Francis  Greenwood. 

The     apostle     Paul     and     the     modern 
world,     1923.  225.9  P32pe 


60 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Remey,   Charles  Mason. 

The  universal  consciousness  of  the 
Baha'i  religion.     1925.  299  R38u 

Gift. 

Slossox.   Edwin  Emery. 

Sermons    of    a    chemist.     cl925. 

252  S63 

The   theosophical   mo\-oment.   IST.t— l!>2y  ; 
a   history  and  a  survey.     cl92.5. 

212  T39m 
Tillett,  Wilbur  Fisk. 

The   paths    that    lead    to    God.     cl924. 

204  T57 
Waldo,   Howard   Lansing. 

God  is  writing  a  book.     cl92.5. 

215  W16 
AViLBUE.   Earl  Morse. 

Our  Unitarian  heritage,  an  introduc- 
tion to  the  history  of  the  Unitarian 
movement.     cl92.5.  288  W66 

JEWS. 
Brown,  Brian,  ed. 

The   wisdom    of   the   Hebrews.     cl92.5. 

296  B87 
KlTTEL,   Rudolf. 

The    religion    of   the    people    of    Israel, 
trans,   by   R.   Caryl   Micklem.     192.5. 
296  K62 
Roth,  Samuel. 

Now  and  forever;  a  conversation  with 
Mr  Israel  Zangwill  on  the  Jew  and 
the  future.     1925.  296  R84 

SOCIOLOGY:   GENERAL. 

Barnes,  Harry  Elmer,  ed. 

The     history     and     prospects     of     the 
-     social   sciences.     1925.  309  B26 


COBLENTZ.   Stanton  A. 

The   decline   of   man.     192i 


301   C65 


Ellwood,    Charles    Abram. 
The  psychology  of  human  society.    1925. 

301   E47p 
Fry,    Charles   Luther. 

A  census  analysis  of  American  vil- 
lages ;  being  a  study  of  the  1920 
ceiisus  data  for  177  villages  scat- 
tered over  the  United  States.  cl925. 
.  (Institute  of  social  and  religious 
research.  American  village  s^tudies ) 
312  F94 
GiDDlNGS,    Franklin    Henry. 

The  scientific  study  of  human  society. 
1924:  301   G45sc 


Hunt,  Edward  Eyre. 

Conferences,     committees,     conventions, 
and  how  to  run  them.     192.5. 

306  H93 
Hunter,  Allan  A. 
Youth's  adventure.     1925.  301    H94 

Keller,  Albert  Galloway. 

Starting-points     in     social     science. 
cl925.  301   K294 

Langdon-Davies.  John. 

The  new  age  of  faith.     1925. 

301    L27 
LiPPMANN,  Walter. 

The   phantom   public.     cl925. 

301   L76ph 
LuiiLEY,   Frederick  Elmore. 

Means  of  social  control.     1^5.      (The 
Century  social  science  series) 

301    L95 

Queen.   Stuart  Alfred,  &  Mann,  Delbert 
Martin. 
Social    pathology.      cl92.5.      (Crowell's 
social   science  series)  301  Q3 


Stote,  Amos. 

Why   we   live.     1925. 


301  S88 


Turner,  Ralph  E. 

America    in    civilization.     192.5. 

301  T95 
Wright,  Henry  Wilkes. 

The     moral     standards     of    democracy. 
1925.  301  W94 

POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

Blakeslee,  George  Hubbard. 

The  recent  foreign  policy  of  the'  United 
States.      cl925.      (Wesleyan    univer- 
ity.      George    Slocum    Bennett   foun- 
dation.   Lectures.    6th  ser.    1923-24) 
327.73  B63 

Boyd.  Ernest  Augustus,  cf-  Sumner,  .John 
Saxton. 
Debate   on  censorship  of  books.     1924. 

323  378 
Bradshaw,  Cathi-ine  A. 

Americanization   questionnaire.     cl925. 

323.6  881 
Daavson.    Samuel   Arthur. 
Freedom   of  the  press.     1924. 

323  D27 
Gukrard,   Albert   Leon. 

Beyond  hatred,  the  democratic  ideal  in 
France   and  America.     1925. 

321   G92 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


61 


Hughes,   Edward   Wakefield. 

Hughes'  manual,  American  parlia- 
mentary   law.     1924.  328.1   H89 

.Toad,   Cyril  Edwin  Mitchinson. 

Introduction  to  modern  political  theory. 

1924.  (The  world's  manuals) 

320  J 62 
.ToHJsrsoN,  Julia  K.,  comp. 

Japanese  exclusion.  1925.  (The 
reference  shelf)  325.252  J 65 

McCoMBS,   Vernon  Monroe. 

From  over  the'  border,  a  study  of  the 
Mexicans  in  the  United  States. 
(■192;-).  325.73   M129 

MfLLER,    Kenneth    Dexter. 
Peasant   pioneers.     cl925. 

325.73  M64p 

Phelps,  Edith  M.,  comj). 

A    single    six-year    term    for    president. 

1925.  (The   reference  shelf) 

324.73   P53 
Ugarte,  Manuel. 

The  destiny  of  a  continent.     1925. 

327.72  U26 

ECONOMICS. 

American    bankers'    association,       Com- 
mission   on    commerce    and    marine. 
The    South    American    west    coast. 
1925.  330.98  A51s 

Rerridge,   William  Arthur. 

Purchasing  power  of  the  consumer. 
1925.  331   B53 

Blum,  Solomon. 

Labor  economies.  cl925.  (American 
business    series)  331.8  B658 

Burns,  Cecil  Delisle. 

Industry  and  civilisation.     [1925] 

331    696! 
Campbell,  Clarence  Gordon. 

Common  wealth.     1925.  331   CIS 

Carver,  Thomas  Nixon. 
.    The  present  economic  revolution  in  the 
United   States.     1925.       330.973  C33 

Chase,  Stuart. 

The   tragedy   of   waste.     1925. 

330  C48t 
Dataller,  Roger. 

From    a    pitman's    note    book.      [1925] 

331.8  D23 


DiBBLEE,   George  Binney. 

The     psychological     theory     of     value. 

1924.  330.1   D54 

Douglas,  Paul  Howard. 

Wages  and  the  family.     cl925.     (Mate- 
rials for  the  study  of  business) 

331.2  D73 
Feldman,  Herman. 

The      regularization      of      employment. 

1925.  331.8  F312 

Foster,    William   Trufant,    d    Catchings, 

Waddill. 

Profits.      1925.       (Publications    of    the 

Pollak      foundation       for      economic 

research )  331 .  F75 

FuRNiss,     Edgar     Stevenson,     d     Guild, 
Lawrence   Ridge. 
Labor    problems ;    a    book   of    materials 
for   their   study.     cl925.      331.8  F98 

Knowiles,    Mrs    Lilian    Charlotte    Anne 
(Tomn). 
The     economic      development      of      the 
British    overseas    empire.      v.    1 . 

1924.  (Studies    in    economics    and 
political   science)  330.942  K73 

Lewisohn,  Sam  Adolph  [cC-  others.] 

Can    business    prevent    unemployment. 

1925.  331.8  L67 

Moulton,  Harold  Glenn,  <&  Lewis,  Cleona. 
The  French  del)t  problem.     1925.     (The 
Institute    of    economics.       Investiga- 
tions   in    international    economic    re- 
construction) 330.944  IVI92 

National  industrial   conference  board. 
The    inter-ally    debts    and    the    United 
States.     1925.      (National  industrial 
conference   board.      Studies   of  Euro- 
pean  industrial  conditions) 

330.94  M277 

Norway.      Norges     oph/sningskontor    for 
noeringsveiene. 
Norway  :    foreign    trade.     1924  ? 

330.948  N89 
Gift. 

Robson,  William  A. 

The    relation    of    wealth    to    welfare. 
[1924]  330.1   R6.6 

Sanford,  Hugh  Wheeler. 

The  business  of  life.     1924.     2  v. 

330  S22 


62 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Tawney,   Richard  Henry. 

The  British  labor  movement.  1925. 
(The  Institute  of  politics  publica- 
tions, Williams  college,  Williams- 
town,   Mass.)  331.8  T23' 

TuGWEix,  Rexford  Guy   [d  others.^ 

American  economic  life  and  the  means 
of   its  improvement.     1925. 

930.973  T91 

BANKING.     FINANCE. 

BAiXiER,   Ralph  Eastman. 

Valuation  of  industrial  securities. 
1925.  332.6  B13 

Harding,  William  Proctor  Gould. 

The  formative  period  of  the  federal 
reserve  system.     1925'.  332.1   H26 

Hallman,  ,J.  W. 

Organizing  the  credit  department. 
cl924.      (Ronograph  library) 

332.7  HI 92 
AIajor,   Frederick  Lee. 

The  duties,  responsibilities  and  liabili- 
ties of  bank  directors.     1925. 

332.1    M23 

MiNTY,   Leonard   Le   Marchant. 
English  banking  methods.     1925. 

332.1   M66 

Olson,    Emery     E.,    c6    Hallman,    .John 
Walter. 
Credit   management.     cl925. 

332.7  052 
Parkinson,   Hargreaves. 

The  A  B  C  of  stocks  and  shares. 
1925.  332.6  P24 

COOPERATION.  SOCIALISM. 
P>t;er,  Max. 

^social  struggles  and  socialist  forerun- 
ners.     [1924]  335  841  ss 

Social     struggles     in     antiquity. 

[1925]  335  841 s 

-^ •    Social    struggles    in    the    middle 

ages.     1924.  335  841  sm 

Landis,  Benson  Y. 

Social  aspects  of  farmers'  co-operative 
marketing.     cl925.  334.6  L25 

Wagener,  Clarence  W. 

What    the    small    town    needs.     cl924. 
334.9  W13 


LAW.     ADMINISTRATION. 

American    bar    association.      CommiftPf' 

on  American  citizenship. 

American    citizenship,    by    John    W. 

Davis,     Philip     Cook     [and     others]. 

cl925.  342.73  A51 

Anderson,  William. 

American     city     government.        cl925. 
(American    political    science    series) 
352  A552 
Baker,  Newton  Diehl. 

Progress    and    the    Constitution.     1925. 
342.73  81 68 

Beman,  Lamar  Taney,   comp. 

Selected  articles  on  capital  punishment. 
1925.      (The   handbook   series) 

343  845 
Buck,  Arthur  Eugene. 

Municipal  budgets  and  budget  making. 
1925.  (National  municipal  league 
monograph  series)  351.7  892m 

Buell,   Raymond   Leslie. 

International    relations.      cl925. 
(American    political    science    series) 
341   892 
Callender,    Geoffrey  A.    R. 

The  naval  side  of  British  history. 
[1924]  359.09  CI 5 

Clarke,  John  Hessin. 

America     and     world  peace.       cl925. 

(Brown      university.  The      Colver 

lectures,  1925)  341.1   C59 

Green,  Fitzhugh. 

Our  naval   heritage.      cl925. 

359.09  G79 
Johnsen,  .Julia  E.,  comp. 

Selected  articles  on  marriage  and 
divorce.  1925.  (The  handbook 
series)  347.6  J 65 

Judson,   Harry   Pratt. 

Our  federal   republic.     1925. 

342.73  J  93 
Lodge,  Henry  Cabot. 

The  Senate  and  the  League  of  nations. 
1925.  341.1   L82 

MtiNRO.   William   Bennett. 

The'   governments   of   Europe.      1925. 

350  M96g 

Playground    and    recreation    association 
of    America. 
The  normal   course  in   play.     1925. 

352.9   P72n 


vol.  21,  no.  i 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


63 


Wakken,   Charles. 

The  Supreme  court  aud  sovereign 
states.  1924.  (The  Stafford  Little 
lectures)  348.99  W28 

ASSOCIATIONS.      INSTITUTIONS. 
Detzer,   Karl   ^Y. 

True   tales    of   the   D.    C.    I.     cl92.5. 

364   D48 

An  International  year  book  of  child  care 
and  protection.     1925.  r362.7  161 

Lee,  Tolman. 

Funds  and  friends.     cl92.'5.        361    L48 

Purse,  Ben. 

The  blind  in  industi-y.     1925. 

362.4  P98 

Ruggles-Brise,    Sir   Evelyn    John. 

Prison  reform  at  home  and  abroad. 
1924.  365  R93p 


Shaw,   George  Bernard. 
Imprisonment.     cl925. 


365  S53 


Stevenson,   Jessie  L. 

A  community  trust  survey  of  crippled 
Children  in  Chicago,  May-December, 
1924.     [1925]  362.7  S84 

Gift. 

Webster,   Mrs   Nesta  H. 

Secret  societies  and  subversive'  move- 
ments.    1924.  366  W38 

INSURANCE. 

ACKERMAN,     Saul     Beuton,     d-     Neuner, 
.John  J. 
Credit   insurance.      1924.      (Ronograph 
library)  368.8  A18 

Hood,  Frazer. 

Everyman's  insurance,  a  necessity  for 
home   protection.     1925.  368   H77 

Vaegren,  Victor  Nelson. 

Farmers'  mutual  fire  insurance  in  the 
United  States.  cl924.  (Materials 
for  the  study  of  business) 

368.1   V16 

EDUCATION. 

Andersen,  William  Niclaus. 

A  manual  for  school  officers,  superin- 
tendents, principals,  and  board  mem- 
bers. 1925.  (The  Century  educa- 
tion series)  371.2  A54 


Bowman,   Clyde   A. 

Graphic   aids   in   occupational    analysis 

for    guidance    and    teaching.      cl924. 

q370.01    B7 

Columbia   university.      Teachers    coUccjc. 
Intcriiatioiuil  institute. 
Educational  yearbook.      1924. 

r370.3  C72 
Comfort.   William  Wistar. 

The   choice  of   a   college.     1925. 

378  C732 

Cox,  Philip  Wescott  Lawrence. 

Curriculum-adjustment  in  the  second- 
ary school.  cl925.  (Lippincott's 
educational   guides)  375  C87 

De  Lima,  Agnes. 

Our   enemy   the   child.      1925. 

372  D35 
Edwards,   Austin   Southwick. 

The  psychology  of  elementary  educa- 
tion. cl925.  (Riverside  textbooks 
in  education)  370.1    E26 

Ellis,  Mabel  Brown. 

The  visiting  teacher  in  Rochester. 
1925.  (Joint  committee  on  methods 
of  preventing  delinquency.  Publi- 
cation) 371    E47 

Hamilton,   Frederic  Rutherford. 

Fiscal  support  of  state  teachers  col- 
leges. 1924.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  370.73  H21 

Hammond,  S.  E.  Evalyn. 

Paper   craft   problems.      cl925. 

371.4  H22 
Heinmiller.  Louis  E. 

A  first  book  in  education.  192.5.  (The 
Century  education  series) 

371   H46 
Henzlik,    Frank   Ernest. 

Rights  and  liabilities  of  public  school 
boards  under  capital  outlay  con- 
tracts. 1924.  (Teachers  college. 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  q379.1    H52 

Johnson,   Franklin  Winslow. 

The  administration  and  supervision  of 
the  high  school.     cl925.        371.2  J67 

Kallen,   Horace   Meyer. 

Education,  the  machine  and  the  worker. 
1925.  371.9  K14 


64 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


"Jan.,  1926 


Kandel,  Isaac  Leou. 

The  reform  of  secondaiy  education  in 
France.  1924.  (Studies  of  the 
International  institute  of  Teachers 
college,   Columbia  university) 

373.44  K33 

KiLPATBiCK,  William  Heard. 

Foundations?  of  method  ;  informal  talks 
on  teaching.  1925.  (Brief  course 
series   in   education)  370.1    K48 

KiRKPATRiCK,   Marion   Greenleaf. 

Teaching.     1925.  371.1   K59 

Koos,  Leonard  Vincent. 

The    junior-college    movement.      cl92.5. 

378  K82 

The  L-W-L  life.     Lick  Wilmerding  Lux. 
1915-  qc378.794  LwQ 

Gift. 

LOBINGIER,  John  Leslie. 

Projects  in  world-friendship.  cl925. 
(The  University  of  Chicago  publica- 
tions in  religious  education.  Prin- 
ciples and  methods  of  religious  edu- 
cation) 377  L79 

McMuRRY,   Charles  Alexander. 

I'ractical  teaching :  Large  projects  in 
geography.     1925.  371.3  M16p 

Martin,   George  Currie. 

The  adult  school  movement ;  its  origin 
and    development.     1924. 

379.42  M38 
Mads,   Cynthia   Pearl. 

Teaching  the  youth  of  the  church. 
cl925.  377  M45 

Mort,  Paul  R. 

The  measurement  of  educational  need. 

1924.  (Teachers  college,  Columbia 
university.  Contributions  to  educa- 
tion) 379.747  M88 

Nearing,  Scott. 

Educational     frontiers,    a  book    about 

Simon     Nelson     Patten  and     other 

teachers.     1925.  371   N35 

Opeix,  Charles  Walters. 

Educational  statistics.  1925.  (The 
Century    education    series) 

371.2  023 
Pillsbury,   Walter  Bowers. 

Education   as   the  psychologist   sees  it. 

1925.  370.1   P64 


PouLssoN,  Emilie. 

Father  and   baby   plays.     cl925. 

372.2  P87f 
Pyle,  William  Henry. 

Psychological  principles  applied  to 
teaching.     1924.  371   P99 

Rensselaer   polytechnic    institute.    Troy, 

N.  Y. 

The    centennial    celebration    of    Rens- 

.selaer    polytechnic    institute.       1925. 

378.747  ReE 

Gift. 

RiTTEB,  Elmer  L.,  d  Wilmarth,  Alta  L. 
Rural  school   methods.     cl925. 

379.73  R61 
Ross,  Clay  Campbell. 

The  relation  between  grade  school 
record  and  high  school  achievement. 
1925.  (Teachers  college,  Columbia 
university.  Contributions  to  edu- 
cation) 371.2  R82 

Sharlip,    William,    d   Owens,   Albert   A. 
Adult   immigrant   education.     1925. 

371.9  S53 
Smith,    Walter    Robinson. 

Constructive  school  discipline.  cl924. 
(American   education  series) 

371.5  S66 
Trow,   William   Clark. 

Scientific  method  in  education.     cl925. 
(Riverside   educational    monographs) 
371  T86 
I'hl,   Willis  r^emon,  comp. 

Principles  of  secondary  education,  a 
textbook.     cl925.  379.17  U31 

Vaughn,  Samuel  Jesse,  d  Mays,  Arthur  B. 
Content  and  methods  of  the  industrial 
arts.      1924.      (The    Century    educa- 
tion series)  371.4  V37 

COMMERCE.     COMMUNICATION. 
Bauer,  John. 

Effective   regulation  of   public  utilities. 
1925.  380  B34 

Jones,   Wellington   Downing,   d   Whittle- 
sey, Derwent  S. 
An  introduction  to  economic  geography. 
cl925.      (Materials  for  the  study  of 
business)  380  J 79 

Lubbock,  Alfred  Basil. 

The  log  of  the   "Cutty   Sark."     1925. 

387  L92e 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


65 


Xational  coufereiice  oil  stre<^t  and  high- 
way safetj".     1st,   Washington,  D.  C. 
First  national  conference  on  street  and 
highway  safety.     Washington,  D.  C. 
1924.  380.6  N27 

Wermuth,  Charles  E. 

Railroad  accounts  and  statistics.     1924. 

385  W48 
AViiERRY,  William  Mackey. 

Public  utilities  and  the  law.     192.5. 

380  W567 

LAW. 

Abbott,   Austin. 

A  brief  for  the  trial  of  criminal  cases. 
1925. 

American       honey      producers'      league, 
Madison,   Wis. 
A  treatise  on  the  law  pertaining  to  the 
honeybee.     1924. 

Benedict,  Erastus  Cornelius. 

The  American  admiralty.     1925.     2  v. 

Berezniak,  Leon  A. 

The  theatrical  counselor.     cl923. 

Blake,  Clinton  Hamlin. 

The  architect's  law  manual.     1924. 

Burgess,    Kenneth    Farwell,    d    Lyons, 
James  A. 
Burgess'  commercial  law.     cl921. 


Cady,  Edwin  Welling. 
Outlines    of    insurance. 


1925. 


California.    Laics,  statutes,  etc. 

The    Civil    code    of    the    state    of    Cali- 
fornia.    cl925. 

The  Code  of  civil  procedure  of  the 


State  of  California.     cl925. 

The     Penal     code     of     California. 

cl925. 

California.     Superiar  courts. 

California  Superior  court  decisions. 
1924. 

Costigan,   George   Purcell. 

Cases  and  other  authorities  on  legal 
ethics.  3917.  (American  casebook 
series) 

Evans,  Lawrence  Boyd. 

Leading    cases    on    American    constitu- 
•     tional  law.     1925. 

5 — 43023 


Foulke,  Roland  Roberts. 

The   philosophy  of  law.     1925. 

Glueck,  Sol  Sheldon. 

Mental  disoi'der  and  the  criminal  law. 
1925. 

Holmes,     George    Edwin.     cC-     Brewster, 
Kingman. 
Procedure     and     practice     before     the 
L'nited  States  Board  of  tax  appeals. 
1925. 

International  law  association. 

Transactions  of  the  International  law 
association,  1873-1924.     1925. 

.Tessup,    Henry  Wynans, 

The  professional  ideals  of  the  lawyer. 
1925. 

Kelly,    ILirry   Eugene. 

Regulation  of  physicians  by  law. 
cl925. 

KixMiLLER,     William,     &    Baar,    Arnold 
Rudolph    Ruprecht. 
L'nited     States    income    and    war    tax 
guide  for  1925. 

The  Legislative  compendium ;  the  blue 
book  of  the  American  common- 
wealths.    el925. 

Leopold,  Nathan  Freudenthal,  defendant. 
The   amazing   crime   and   trial   of   Leo- 
pold and   Loeb.     1924. 

Lewis,  Yancey. 

Lectures  on  real  estate.     1925. 

Lust,  Herbert  Canfield. 

Consolidated  digest  of  decisions  under 
the  Interstate  commerce  act.  (1887 
to  1924)    vol.   1.     1925. 

McGiNNis,   Charles  Edward,  &   Ragland, 
Rufus  Ely,  comps. 
McGinnis  forms,  pleading  and  practice, 
California    and    all    western    states. 
cl925. 

McKay,  George. 

A    treatise    on    the    law    of    community 
])roioerty.     2d  ed.,  rev.,  rewritten  and 
•    eul.     ci925. 

Needham,   Charles  Willis. 

Cases  on  foreign  and  interstate  com- 
merce.    1925.     2  V. 


66 


NEWS   iSIOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


PHILIPPINE  Islands.     Laws,  statutes,  etc. 
The   nt'w   auuotatud   code   of  civil    pro- 
cedure.    cl!>2.5. 

The  Quecuslaud  criminal  reports;  being- 
a  reprint  of  all  criminal  cases  re- 
ported in  the  Supreme  court  reports. 
1913. 

Ravensceoft,  Byfleet  G. 

International  trade  mark  law  and 
practice.     1925. 

Kemington,  Harold. 

.V  treatise  on  the  elements  of  bank- 
ruptcy law.     2d  ed.     1924. 

IJooENBECK,   Adolph   Julius. 

The  anatomy   of   the  law.     1925. 

ItosE,   Walter  Malins. 

Rose's  notes  on  the'  United  States 
supreme  court   reports.     1925. 

Scopes,  John  Thomas,   defendant. 

The  world's  most  famous  court  trial, 
Tennessee    evolution    case.     cl925. 

Spain.     Laws,  statutes,   etc. 

The  Civil  code  of  Spain.     1925. 

IJ.    S.  District  Court.     CaUforiiia. 

Rules  of  practice.  United  States 
district  court.  Northern  and  south- 
ern   districts   of    California.     392.S. 

T'.   S.  Laws,  statutes,  etc. 
The   Judicial   code.     1925. 

W'AMBAUGH,   Eugene. 

A  selection  of  cases  on  agency.  2d  ed. 
1925. 

White,   Frank. 

White's  corporation  annual.     1924. 

Who's  who  in  jurisprudence ;  a  biograph- 
ical dictionary  of  contemporary 
lawyers  and  jurists.     cl925. 

LANGUAGE. 

Bird,    .James   Pyper. 

Essentials   of  French.     1925.    445  B61 

Chamberlain,  Basil  Hall. 

A  simplified  grammar  of  the  Japanese 
language.     cl924.  495  C44 

CoRNYN,  Juan  Humberto,  ed. 

Cuentos  mejicanos,  1925.  (American- 
Spanish  series)  468  C82 


Cousins,     Clarence     Edwin,     <G     Ward, 
Charles  Frederick. 
Student's  handbook  of  French  pronun- 
ciation.    cI024.  441  C86 

DeWitt,  Margaret  E. 

Euphon    English    in    America.      [1924] 

421   D52 

English  evidence ;  teacher-testimony 
from  the  summer  session.  University 
of   California,    1924.     cl925. 

428  E58 
(JoLDiN,    Hyman    Elias. 

The    Yiddish    teacher.  cl924. 

492.4  G61 
Smith,  Logan  Pearsall. 
Words  and   idioms.     1925.       423  S65w 

NATURAL   SCIENCE:    GENERAL. 

Curtis,  Francis  Day. 

Some    values    derived    from    extensive 
reading    of    general    science.       1924. 
(Teachers     college,      Columbia     uni- 
versity.    Contributions  to  education) 
q507  09 
Watson.   E.   L.   Grant. 

Moods   of  earth   and  sky.  504  W33 

Wolf,    Abraham. 

Essentials   of   scientific   method.     192.5. 

507  W85 
ASTRONOMY. 

Abbot,  Charles  Greeley. 

The  earth  and  the  stars.     1925.      (Li- 
brarv   of   modern   sciences)     520  A12 


Olivier,   Charles  Pollard. 
Meteors.     1925. 


523.5  049 


Proctor.   Mary. 

Evenings  with  the  stars.     1925. 

523  P964 

PHYSICS.     CHEMISTRY. 

Benedicks,  Carl  Axel  Fredrik. 

Space  and  time,  an  experimental 
physicist's  conception  of  these  ideas 
and   of   their    alteration.      [1924] 

530  B46 
Cranston,  John  Arnold. 

The  structure  of  matter.  1924. 
(Manuals  of  pure  and  applied 
chemistry)  530.1   C89 

Denton,   Francis  Medforth. 

Relativity    and    common    sense.      1924. 

530  D41 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


67 


SiLBKKSTiiiN,    Liulwik. 

The   theory   of    relativity.      2d    ed.    euL 
1924.  530  S582 

Smith,   John  David   Main. 

Chemistry  and  atomic  structure.     1924. 

541.2  S65 

AERONAUTICS. 
Hodgson,  J.  E. 

The    history    of    aeronautics    in    Great 
Britain.     1924.  q533.6   H6 


Lewitt,  Ernest  Henry. 

The      rigid      airship. 

Specialists'    series ) 


192.5.         (The 
533.6  L67 


Mitchell,  William. 

Winged  defense ;  the  development  and 
possihilities  of  modern  air  power — 
economic    and    military.     1925. 

533.6   M68w 

GEOLOGY. 

FiNNEMOEE,  Hilda. 

A  history  of  the  earth  from  star-dust 
to   man.     1924.  551    F51 

.Jordan,    David    Starr,    &  Gather,    Mrs 
Katherine   Dunlap. 

North    America.      192.5.  (High    lights 

of  geography)  551.4  J82 

Wegener,   Alfred   Lothar. 

The  origin  of  continents  and  oceans. 
[1924]  551.8  W41 

BIOLOGY. 

Rkyan,    William   Jennings. 

The  last  message  of  William  .Jennings 
Bryan.     cl925.  575  B99 

Ei-DRiDGE,  Seba. 

The    organization    of   life.     1925. 

570  E37 

Geddes,      Patrick,      d     Thomson,      John 
Arthur. 
Biology.       cl925.        (Home     university 
library   of   modern  knowledge) 

570  G29 
GOLnSMiTii,   William   Marion. 

The   laws  of  life ;   principles   of   evolu- 
tion,  heredity   and   eugenics.      cl922. 
575  G62 
Haddon,  Alfred  Cort. 

The  races  of  man  and  their  distribu- 
tion.    1924.  572  H12 


Jennings,    Herbert    Spencer. 

Prometheus ;  or.  Biology  and  the  ad- 
vancement of  man.  cl925.  (To-day 
and  to-morrow  series)  570  J54 

More,  Lwuis  Trenchard. 

The  dogma  of  evolution.     1925. 

575  M83 

INlULiiALL,    Mrs    Marion    McMurrough. 
Beginnings    or    Glimpses    of    vanished 
civilizations.     1911.  572  M95 


Redfield,   Casper  Lavater. 
Dynamic   evolution.     1914. 


575  R31 


SiNNOTT,  Edmund  Ware,  &  Dunn,  I^eslie 
Clarence. 
I'rinciples  of  genetics;  an  elementary 
text,  with  problems.  1925.  (Mc- 
Graw-Hill publications  in  the  agri- 
cultural   and    botanical    sciences). 

575.2  S61 
Spence,  T^ewis. 

The   problem   of  Atlantis.      [1925] 

572.4  S74 

VULLIAMY,    C.    E. 

Our    prehistoric    forerunners.     1925. 

571   V99 
WiGGAM,   Albert   Edward. 

The   fruit  of  the   family   tree.     cl924. 

575.1  W65 

BOTANY. 

Bennett,  Frederick  T. 

Outlines    of   fungi   and    plant    diseases. 
1924.  589.2  B47 

Fabre,   Jean   Henri   Casimir. 

The  wonder  book  of  plant  life,   tr.   by 
Bernard    Miall.     [1924]  580  F12 

McDouGALL,  Walter  Byron. 

Mushrooms  ;   a  handbook  of  edible  and 
inedible  species.     1925.        589.2  M13 

Stevens,  Frank  Lincoln. 
Plant  disease  fungi.     1925. 

581.2  S84p 
Wilson,   Ernest  Henry. 

America's  greatest  garden  ;  the  Arnold 
arboretum.     1925.  582  W74am 


ZOOLOGY. 

The  Book  of  fishes.     1924. 


q597  B7 


Imms,   Augustus   Daniel. 

A     general     textbook     of     entomology. 
1925.  q595.7  13 


68 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


I  Jan.,  1926 


Setchell.   William  Albert. 

American     Samoa.       1924.       (Depart- 
ment    of     marine     biology     of     the 
Carnegie  institution  of  Washington) 
q591.92  C2 
SxoDGRASs,  Robert   Evan.s. 
Anatomy  and  physiology  of  the  honey- 
bee.     1925.      (Agricultural   and    bio- 
logical   publications )  595.7  S67 

WiEMAX,   Harry  Lewis. 

General  zoology.  1925.  (McGraw- 
Hill  publications  in  the  zoological 
sciences)  590  W64 

WY^^AN,    Luther    E..    d-    Buruell,    Eliza- 
beth  F. 
Field  book  of  birds  of  the  soutliwestern 
United    States.     1925.         598.2  W98 


Yerkes,   Robert  Mearns. 
Almcst  human.     cl925- 


599.8  Y47 


USEFUL  ARTS. 
MEDICINE  AND   HYGIENE. 

Beaumont,     George     Ernest,     cC-     Dodds, 
Edward   Charles. 
Recent    advances    in    medicine,    clinical 
laboratory  therapeutic.     1925. 

.610  B37 
Browning,   Carl  Hamilton. 

Bactei'iology.      cl925.      (Home   univer- 
sity   library    of    modern    knowledge) 
616.01   B88 
Campbell,   Charles  Macfie. 

A  present-day  conception  of  mental 
disorders.  1925.  (Harvard  health 
talks)  616.84  C18 

Chettne,  Sir  William  Watson,   iart. 
Lister  and   his   achievement.     1925. 

610.9  C53 
Collins,  Mary. 

Colour-blindness.  1925.  (Interna- 
tional library  of  psychology,  philoso- 
phy   and    scientific    method) 

617.75  C71 
FiNOT,  Jean. 

La  philosophie  de  la  longevite.     [1900] 
612.6  F51a 
FiSHBEiN,  Morris. 

The  medical   follies.     1925.     610.4  F53 

GiBBS,   William  Edward. 

The    dust    hazard    in    industry.     1925. 
(Chemical      engineering     library. 
Second  series)  613.6  G44 


HAfKETT,    .James   Dominick. 

Health  maintenance  in  industry.    1925. 

613.6  H12 
JOBGENSON,  George  Ellington. 

Veterinarj'     diagnosis     and     treatment. 
1925.  619  J82 

The    Journal    of    organotherapy.     1920- 

1923.  612.05  J  86 

Gift. 

Kaupp,  Benjamin  F. 

Animal  parasites  and  parasitic  diseases. 
1925.  619  K21 

McCullough.   Grace  A.,  cC-  Birmingham, 
Agnes  Y. 
Correcting   speech    defects    and    foreign 
accent.     cl925.  612.7  M13 

McCuRi>Y,  .Tames  Huff. 

The  physiology  of  exei-cise.  1924. 
(The    physical    education    series) 

613.7  M13 
Masters,  David. 

The  conquest  of  disease.     1925. 

610.9  M42 

:  New  cancer  facts.      [192.5] 

616.99  M42 
Myerson,  Abraham. 

The  inheritance  of  mental  diseases. 
1925.  616.84  IVI99 

The  Practitioners'  digest.     1910. 

qc610.5   P8 
Resnick,  Louis 

Eye  hazards  in  industrial  occupations. 

1924.  (National   committee   for  the 
prevention  of  blindness.    Publication) 

617.7  R43 
Seelig,   Major   Gabriel. 

Medicine  ;  an   historical  outline.     1925. 

610.9  S45 

Stetson,  Raymond  Herbert,  ed. 

Studies  from  the  Psychological  labora- 
tory of  Oberlin  college,  [1923] 
(Psychological  review  publications. 
Psychological   monographs) 

q612.8  S8 
Way^man,  Agnes  Rebecca. 

Education   through   physical   education. 

1925.  613.7  W35 

Wood,     Thomas     Denison,     d     Dansdill, 
Theresa. 
Byways      to      health ;      detouring      the 
scrap-heap.     192.5.  613  W87 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


69 


ENGINEERING. 
Baetojn',  William  Henry,  cf-  Doaue,  Louis 
Henry. 
Sampling     and      testing      of      highway 
materials.  1925.  625.7  B29 

Carpenter,   Leonard. 

IMechauical  mixing  machinery.  192.5. 
■(Chemical  engineering  library.  2d 
series)  621.9  C29 

Ci.ARK,  .Tauet  Howell. 

Lighting  in  relation  to  public  health. 
1924.  621.32  C59 

Cleveedon,   Walter  Sherman   Lyle. 

The  water  supply  of  buildings  and 
rural   communities.     192.5. 

628.1   063 

DowD,  Albert  Atkins,  &  Curtis,  Frank  W. 
Modern  gaging  practice.     cl925.      (In- 
dustrial management  library) 

621.9  D74m 
Hull,  Harry  Blair. 

Household    refrigeration.      cl924. 

621.5  H91 
Knott,  Ernest  W. 

Carburettor  handbook.     1925. 

625.6  K72 
Leete,   Frederick  Alexander. 

Regulation  of  rivers  without  embank- 
ments.    1924.  q627  L4 

LiNLEY,    C.    M. 

Recent  progress  in  engineering  pro- 
duction.    1925.  q621.9  L7 

Lowe,  Joseph  M. 

The  national  old  trails  road.     cl925. 

625.7  L91 
LucKiESH,  Matthew. 

Light  and  work.     1924.     621.32  L94lw 

MuMFORD.   .John   Kimberly. 

Anthracite.      1925.       (Romance    of    in- 
dustry   series)  622.33   M96 
Gift. 

XoRMAN,  Carl   Adolph. 

Principles  of  machine  design.  192.5. 
(Engineering  science  series) 

621   N84 
Phelps,  Earle  Bernard. 

The  principles  of  public  health  engi- 
neering.    192.5.  628  P53 


PooRMAX.  Alfred  Peter. 

Strength  of   materials.     192." 


620.1   P82s 


Redjiayne,       (S'tr      Richard       Augustine 
Studdert. 
Modern  practice  in  mining.     1925.  2  v. 

622  R31 

Richards,   Robert   Hallowell    [cC-   others] 
A  text  book  of  ore  dressing.     1925. 

622.7  R51a 

Taylor.     William     Thomas,     ct     Xeale, 
Reginald  Edgar. 
Electrical    design    of    overhead    power 
transmission   lines.      1924. 

621.31   T24el 
Thayer,  Horace  Holden. 

A  pocket  book  of  ship  materials  and 
their  uses.     cl924.  623.8  T371 

Vedder,  Edward  Bright. 

The  medical  aspects  of  chemical  war- 
fare.    1925.  623.45  V41 

World  power  conference. 

Transactions  of  the  first  World  power 
conference.     1924.     4  v.     621.8  W92 

AGRICULTURE. 

Douglas,   Charles   E. 

Rice,  its  cultivation  and  preparation. 
(Pitman's  common  commodities  and 
industries)  633.1   D73 

Fox,   Leigh   Eden. 
Adam's  garden.     1925.  635  F79 

Gras.  Norman  Scott  Brien. 

A  history  of  agriculture  in  Europe  and 
America.     1925.  630.9  G76 

Harding,  Richard  .Joseph  Anthony. 

Cotton  in  Australia.     1924.       633   H26 

International   institute   of  agriculture. 
Htatistical   hureau. 

Cotton-growing    countries ;  production 

and   trade.     1922.  633  161 

Sammis,   .John  Langley. 

Cheese  making.     1924.  637  S18 

Schmidt,  Gustavus  Adolphus. 

New  methods  in  teaching  vocational 
agriculture.  1924.  (The  Century 
vocational    series)  630.7  S35 

Smith,  Robert  Henry. 

Agricultural  mechanics.  cl925.  (Lip- 
piucott's  farm  manuals)  630  S65 

Strowd,   Wallace  Headen. 

Commercial  feeds ;  a  hand  book  for 
the  buyer  and  seller.     1925. 

636  S92 


70 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Taylor,  Heury  Charles. 

Outlines      of     agricultural      economics. 
1925.      (Social    science    text-books) 
630  T24o 
ANIMALS. 
Allen,   William  Haskell. 

Allen's  trapping  secrets.     cl924. 

639.1  A43 
Brockwell,  David. 

The  police  dog.     cl924.  636.7  B86 


Edwards,  James  L. 
Mink  farming.     1924. 


636.9   E26m 


KoLLET,  Fred. 

Training  the  police  dog.     cl92.5. 

636.7  K81p 
Thompson,   Raymond. 

The  wilderness  trapper.     cl924. 

639.1  T47 

DOMESTIC   ECONOMY. 

Crane,  Ross. 

The  Ross  Crane  book  of  home  furnish- 
ing and  decoration.     cl925.     645  C89 

Cloag.  .John. 

Colour  (&  comfort  in  decoration.    [1924] 

645  G562 

Goldstein,   Harriet    Irene,   c6    Goldstein, 
Yetta. 
Art  in  every  day  life.     1925.     645  G62 

Heard,   Gerald. 

Narcissus,     an     anatomy  of     clothes. 

cl924.         (To-day      and  to-morrow 

series)  646  H 43 

PniLLips,   Mrs  Anna   M.   Laise. 

Hooked  I'ugs  and  how  to  make  them. 
1925.  645  P55 

liiCLiARDSON.  Frank  Howard. 
Simplifying    mothei'hood.      1925. 

649  R522 
Stratton,  Florence,  comp. 

Favorite  recipes  of  famous  women,  with 
a  foreword.     1925.  641   S91 

PRINTING.     PUBLISHING. 

Carter,  Thomas  Francis. 

The  invention  of  printing  in  China. 
1925.  655.1   C32 

Chicago.     University.     Press. 

A  manual  of  style,  containing  typo- 
graphical rules  governing  the  publi- 
cations of  the  University  of  Chicago. 
cl925.  655.2  C53a 


Koch,  Theodore  Wesley. 

Notes    on    the    German    book    exhibit, 
Chicago.     1925.  655  K76 

MoRisoN,    Stanley. 

Modern  fine  printing.     1925. 

f 655.2  MSm 

Princeton  university.     Press. 

A  handbook   of   style   of  the  Princeton 
university   press.     1925.       655.3  P95 

Updike,  Daniel  Berkeley. 

In  the  day's  work.     1924.      655.2  U66i 

ADVERTISING.     ACCOUNTING. 

The    Accountants"    directory    and    who's 


who.     192.5- 


p657  A172 


Advertising     arts    &     crafts.      Western 
edition,   Chicago,     v.   1.     1925. 

659  A24ac 

Barton,  Howard  Allan. 

How  to  write  advertising.     cl925. 

659  B293 

Bell.     William     Ilansell,     <€     Powelson. 
.John  Abrum. 
Auditing.     1925.  657  B435 

Bennett.   George   Edward. 

Basic  accounting.     cl925.       657  B471b 

Bliss,   .James  Harris. 

Management    through   accounts.      1924. 

657  B64 

Curtis,     Arthur     B.,     d-     Cooper,     John 
Hurlie. 
Mathematics   of   accounting.      1925. 

657  C97 

Gifford,  Ward  C. 

Real  estate  advertising.  1925.  (Land 
economics   series)  659  G45 

Higham,  8ir  Charles  Frederick. 

Advertising,  its  use  and  abuse.  cl925. 
(Home  university  library  of  modern 
knowledge)  659  H63ad 

Kleppner,   Otto. 

Advertising   procedure.      1925. 

659  K64 

Swindell,   Walttn-  B. 

Newspaper    accounting    and    cost    find- 
ing.     1924.       (Ronograph    library) 
657  S97 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


:;alifornia  state  library. 


71 


BUSINESS   METHODS. 

Bingham,  Robert  F.,  <&  Andrews,  Elmore 
Lynuwood. 
Financing    real    estate.      1924.       (The 
Realty   library)  ,658  B613 


Book,   William  Frederick. 

Learning  to   typewrite.     cl925. 

Brown,  Edmund. 
Marketing.     1925. 


652  B72 
658  B87 


DULIN,   Robert  M. 

Collection  letters.     1924.      (Ronograph 
series)  658  D88c 


Credit  letters.     1924.     (Ronograph 

series)  658  D88 

Fitting,  Ralph  U. 

Report  writing.  1924.  (Ronograph 
series)  658  F54 

Frederick,  .Justus  George, 
ilodern   salesmanship.     192.5. 

658  F852m 
Fri,  James  Lloyd. 

Retail  merchandising,  planning  and 
control.     192.5.      (Retailing  series) 

658  F89 
Fhick,  Minnie  De  Motte 

Analytical  lessons  in  Gregg  shorthand, 
with  dictation.     cl924.  653  F89 

Gaixoway,  Lee. 

Organizing  the  stenographic  depart- 
ment.    1924.      (Ronograph  series) 

658  G17o 
Kester,  Roy    Bernard. 

Depreciation.  cl924.  ( Ronograph 
series)  658   K42 

Kneeland,  Natalie. 

Cases  in  retail  salesmanship.  1924. 
(Merchandise  manuals  for  retail 
salespeople)  658  K68c 


—  Hosiery,  knit  underwear,  and 
gloves.  1924.  (Merchandise  manuals 
for  retail  salespeople)  658  K68h 

—  Millinery.  1925.  (Merchandise 
manuals   for    retail   salespeople) 

658  K68m 

—  Waists.        1924.         (Merchandise 


manuals  for  retail  salespeople) 

658  K68 
Leffingwell,   William  Henry. 

Office      management,      principles      and 
practice.     1925.  658  L,49p 


McMiciiAEL,  Stanley  L. 

How    to    make    money    in    real    estate. 
cl924.      (Realty   library)  658   M16 

McNair,  Malcolm  Perrine. 

The  retail  method  of  inventory.     1925. 

658  M169 

Marshall,  Leon  Carroll,  &  others. 

Business    cases    and    problems.      cl92.5. 
(Materials  for  the  study  of  business) 
658  M36b 
Nelson,  Herbert  U. 

The  administration  of  real  estate 
boards.  1925.  (Land  economics 
series)  658  N42 

Ringo,   Fredonia  .Jane. 

China  and  glassware.  1925.  (Mer- 
chandise' manuals  for  retail  sales- 
people) .658  R58c 

Girls'  and  juniors'  ready-to-wear. 

1924.        (Merchandise     manuals     for 
retail  salespeople)  658  R58 

Men's     and     boys'     clothing     and 

furnishings.        1925.        ( Merchandise 
manuals  for  retail  salespeople) 

658  R58m 
Savage.  Winfield  A. 

Graphic  analysis  for  executives.     1924. . 

658  S26 
Snow,  Adolph  .Tudah. 

Psychology  in  business  relations.     1925. 

658  S674 
Wallace,  Eugenia. 

Filing  methods.  1924.  (lionograph 
series)  651   W18 

TRANSPORTATION. 

Cartwright,  Charles  E. 

The  boys'  book  of  ships.     cl925. 

656.8  C32b 
Dayton,   Fred   Erving. 

Steamboat  days.     1925.  656.9   D27 

Knauer,  Henry. 

Tests  for  railway  material  and  equip- 
ment. cl925.  (Railwaymen's  hand- 
book series)  656  K.67 

CUGLE,   Charles  Hurst. 

Cugle's    practical    navigation.      cl924. 
656.8  C96c 

CHEMICAL  TECHNOLOGY. 

Anderson,   Robert  John. 

The  metallurgy  o  f  aluminium  and 
aluminium  alloys.     1925.      669.7  A54 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Elliott,  Cyril. 

Distillation  principles.     1925.      (Chem- 
ical  engineering  library.     2d  series) 
668.7  E46 

Gas  engineers'  compendium ;  a  collection 
of  statistics,  formulse.  rules  and  data. 
1924.  q665.7  G2 

Greaves,    Richard    Henry.    c(-    Wrighton, 
Harold. 
Practical    microscopical    metallography. 
1924.  669  G78 

Heyn,  Bmil. 

Physical  metallography,  translated  by 
Marcus  A.  Grossmann.     1925. 

669  H61 
MoREELL,  Robert  Selby. 

Varnishes  and  their  components.  1923. 
(Oxford    technical   publications) 

667.7  M87 
Smith,  .Tames  Cruickshank. 

The  manufacture  of  paint ;  a  practical 
handbook.  3d  rev.  and  enl.  ed. 
1924.  667.6  S65 

Stocking,   George  Ward. 

The  oil  industry  and  the  competitive 
system.  1925.  (Hart,  Schaffner  & 
Marx  prize  essays)  665.5  S86 

MANUFACTURES. 
MECHANIC  TRADES. 

Ajialoajiated       clothing       workers       of 
America. 
Documentary    history    of    the    Amalga- 
mated clothing   workers   of   America. 
1922-1924.  ,687  A48 

Blake.  Ernest  G. 

The  seasoning  and  preservation  of 
timber.     1924.  674  B63 

DooLEY,  William  Heury. 

Textiles  for  commercial,  industrial,  and 
domestic  arts  schools.  Rev.  and  enl. 
cl924.  677   D69a 

Eraser,  Chelsea  Curtis. 

The  practical  book  of  home  repairs. 
cl92.5.  680  F84 

M  AKIN  SON,  John  T. 

Toy    manufacture.      [1923?]      680   M23 

BUILDING. 

.Vndrews,   Ewart   Sigmuud. 

Elementary  principles  of  reinforced 
concrete  construction.  1924.  (The 
Broadway  series  of  engineering 
handbooks)  693.5  A56e 


Kelly,  Albanis  Ashmun. 

The  painting  trade  hand-book.     cl92o. 

698  K29p 

Taylor,  Frederick  Winslow,  &  otlners. 
Concrete,  plain  and  reinforced :  Theory 
and    design    of    concrete    and     rein- 
forced structures.     192.5— 

691.3  T24a1 

Wheeler,   Charles  Gardner. 

A   manual  of   woodworking.     1925. 

694  W56m 

FINE  ARTS:    GENERAL. 

The     Artist's     repository     and     drawing 
magazine.     1784—    .5  vols.       705  A79 

Association     pour     la     publication     des 
monuments  de  Tart  flamand. 
Le    chef-d'oeuvre    de    I'art    flamand    a 
I'exposition    de   la    Toison    d'Or. 

f709.493  A8 
Binyon,   Laurence. 

Asiatic    art    in    the    British    museum. 
1925.  q709.5   B6 

Dey,   Sri  Mukul   Chandra. 

My    pilgrimages    to    Ajanta    &    Bagli. 
[1925]  709.54  D52 

Winslow,   Leon   Loyal. 

Organization     and     teaching     of     art. 
1925.  707  W77 

TOWN    PLANNING.     GARDENING. 
BissET.  Peter. 

The   book  of   water  gardening.     cl924. 

q716   B6 
Holmes,  Thomas  Cole. 

Holmes'   gardenbook.     cl02."i.  c716  H75 

Lanchester.   Henry  Vaughan. 

The     art     of     town     planning.       192.'i. 
(Universal    art    series)  710  L24 

ilAcDoNALD,   .James. 

Lawn,   links  &  sportsfields.     1923. 
(Country  life  library)  712   M13 

Martineau.     Mrs     Alice      (Vaughn-Wil- 
liams). 
The    secrets   of    many   gardens.      1924. 

710  M38 

Wright.    Horace    .J.,    i(-    Wright.    Walter 
Page. 
Beautiful    flowers    and    how    to    grow 
them.     1909,  q716  W9 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


73 


ARCHITECTURE. 

BODiJJGTON,   Oliver   E. 

The  Romance  chuix-hes  of  France. 
1925.  726  B66 

Brooks,    Alfred   Mansfield. 

Architecture.  cl924.  (Our  debt  to 
Greece  and  Rome)  723  B87 

GoODWi^-,   Philip  Lippincott. 

French    provincial    architecture.      1924. 

f728  G65 

.Jackson,  .Joseph  Francis  Ambrose. 

American  colonial  architecture.     cl924. 

728  J 13 

MONUIIENTOS  arquitectonicos  de  Espaiia. 

Masterpieces    of    Spanish    architecture. 

192.5.         (Library      of     architectural 

documents)  q723.4  MS 

Xaedo,  Antonio  di. 

Farm  houses,  small  chateaux  and 
country  churches  in  France.     1924. 

f728  N2 
IiEiiEY.   Charles  Mason. 

The  Indian  style  of  architecture.    102-5. 

726  R38 
Gift. 

Wateehouse,  Percy  Leslie. 

The  story  of  architecture  throughout 
the   ages.      [1924]  720.9  W32 

SCULPTURE.     PORCELAIN. 

Barnard.  Harry. 

Chats  on  Wedgwood  ware.  [1924] 
(Books    for   collectors)  738  B25 

Blacker,  J.  F. 

The  A  B  C  of  collecting-  old  English 
china.  [1921]  (A  B  C  series  for 
collectors)  738  B62ab 

Chase,  George  Henry,  d  Post,  Chandler 
Rathfon. 
A  history  of  sculpture.     1924.      (Harp- 
er's fine  arts  series)  730  C48 

Hannover,  Emil. 

Pottery  &  porcelain.     1925.     3  v. 

q738  H2 
Hobson,    Robert  Lockhart. 

The  later  cei-amic  wares  of  China. 
192.5.  q738  H68I 

MooEE,    Mta    >v.    Hudsou    ( Woodbridge) . 

Old    glas.s,     European    and    American. 

1924.  738  M82g 


ScuDDEE,  Janet.     ■ 

Modeling  my  life.     cl925.  735  S43 

DRAWING.    DECORATION.    DESIGN. 

Baskin.    .Janet. 

Artificial  flower  making.     192.5. 

745  B31 
Blake,  Vernon. 

The  way  to  sketch,  notes  on  the  essen- 
tials  of   landscape   sketching.      1925. 
741   B62 

Brooke,  Mrs  Margaret  I^. 

T^ace  in  the  making  with  bobbins  and 
needle.  1923.  (Routledge's  modern 
trade-book  series)  746  B87 

CovAREUBiAS,   Miguel. 

The  Prince  of  Wales  and  other  famous 
Americans.     1925.  741  C87 

Caricatures. 

P^UNCK.    M. 

Le  livre  Beige  a  gravures.     1925. 

q741    F97 

Kauffer.   E.  McKnight,   ed. 

The  art  of  the  poster.     1924.    q741    K2 

Matasek,  Ray  J. 

Drawing  for  zinc  etching.     cl925. 

741   M42 
Rohan,  Thomas. 

Confessions  of  a  dealer.     [1925] 

749   R73 

RouiLLiON,    Louis,    cC-    Ramsey,    Charles 
George. 
Architectural   details.     1924.     744  R85 

FURNITURE. 

liEACKETT.  Oliver. 
Thomas   Chippendale.  q749  B7 

Haywaed,  Charles  H. 

English  furniture  at  a  glance.     ]924. 

749   H427 

MACQUOin,  Percy,  d  Edwards.  lialph. 
The    dictionary    of    English    furniture. 
V.  1.     1924-  rf749   Mid 

PAINTING. 

Aenold,  Sir  Thomas  Walker. 

Survivals  of  Sasanian  &  Manichaoan 
art  in  I'ersian  ])ainting.     1924. 

759.9  A75 
Barnes,  Albert  C. 

The  art  in  painting.     1925,        759  826 


74 


NEWS   NOTES    O^    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


:  Jan.,  1926 


DiMiBR,  Louis. 

Histoire  de  la  iieinture  de  portrait  en 
France  au  xvi^  si§cle.  1924-1925. 
2  V.  q757  D5 

FuBST,  Herbert  E.  A. 

The  decorative  art  of  Frank  Brangwyn 
[1924]  q759.2  B82f 

Menzies,  Lucy. 

A  book  of  saints  for  the  young.     [1923] 

q755   M5 
Stokes,  Adrian. 
Landscape  painting.     192.5.      (The  new 
art  libraiT)  758  S87 

Tabaeant,  Adolphe. 

Pissarro.  1925.  (Masters  of  modern 
art)  759.4  P67t 

Ward,     Henrietta     Mary     Ada     (Ward) 
"2Irs  E.  M.  Ward." 
Memories  of  ninety  years.     [1924] 

759.2  W258 

ENGRAVING. 

Bastelaer,  Rene. 

Les  es'tampes  de  Peter  Brvegel  I'ancien. 
1908.  q769  B88 

Bewick.  Thomas. 

Memoir  of  Thomas  Bewick,  1822-1828. 
[1924]  761   B57 

Bkaxgwyx,  Frank. 

Frank  Brangwyn  1924.  (Modern 
masters   of   etching)  q767  88 

Delen,  a.  .J.  .J. 

Histoire  de  la  gravui'e  dans  les  anciens 
Pays-Bas  et  dans  les  provinces 
beiges.     1924.  q760  D3 

Forain,  .Jean  Louis. 

•J.  L.  Forain.  1925.  (Modern  masters 
of  etching)  q767  F6 


Sandzen.  Birger. 

In  the  mountains.     1925. 


q769  S2 


SiroRT,   Sir   Frank. 

Sir   Frank    Short.      1925.  (The    mod- 
ern masters  of  etching)  q767  S55 

Siltzer,   Frank. 

The   story   of   British    sporting    prints. 

1925.  760  S58 

Smith,  Ralph  Clifton. 

The   wood   engraved    work  of  Timothy 

Cole.      1925.  q761   C6 


ZoR?^,  Anders  Leonard. 

Anders  Zoru.     1925.     (Modern  masters 
of  etching)  q767  28s 

MOVING   PICTURES. 

Fox,   Charles  Donald. 

Famous    film    folk :    a    gallery    of    life 
portraits  and  biographies.     cl925. 

c778  F79 

Griffith,  Linda  (Arvidson)  "J/rs  D.  W. 
GrifBth." 
When  the  movies  were  young.     cl925. 

c778  G85 
McKay,  Herbert  C. 

Motion    picture    photography    for    the 
amateur.     cl924.  778  M15 

[RiciiARDSOx,  Frank  Herbert]. 

Richardson's    handbook     of    projection 

for     theatre    managers     and     motion 

picture  projectionists.   4th  ed.   cl92o. 

778  R52p 

Screen  news.       v.  1-2.     1922i-23. 

qc778.05  S4 
MUSIC. 

Carse,  Adam  von  Ahn. 

The  history  of  orchestration.     ]925. 
(The  international  library  of  music) 
785  C32 

Cox.    Mrs    Alethea    Brinckcrhoff    (Craw- 
ford), d-  Crawford,  Rebekah. 
Pictured     lives     of     great     musicians. 
cl924.  780.19  C87 

Fox-Straxgways,  Arthur  Henry,  c6  Wil- 
son, Steuart,  eds. 
Schubert's   songs.      [1924]       784.4  S38 

Hall.     Gertrude     [Mrs     William     Crary 
Brownell]. 
Tlie  Wagnerian  romances.     1925. 

782.2  H17 
Hamilton,  Clarence  Grant. 

Piano  music.     cl925.  786  H21 

McDermott,  Mrs  Leila  (France). 
Happy  holidays'  for  children.     cl925. 

qc784  M1h 

[Meynell,    Mrs   Esther    Hallam    (Moor- 
house)  ] 
The  little  chronicle  of  Magdalena  Bach. 
1925.  780.2  B118m 

Rapee,   Erno. 

Erno    Rapee's    encyclopaedia    of    music 
for  pictures.     1925.  780.3  R21 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


75 


Watkins,  Mary  Fitch. 

Behind  the  scenes  at  the  opera.     1925. 
782  W33b 
White.   William   Braid. 

Piano  playing-  mechanisms.     c192.5. 

786  W58 
Wood,  Mary  Wollaston. 

New  song  plays  to  old  tunes.     1924. 

q784  VV8 

DANCING,  THEATRE. 

Banta,  Nathaniel  Moore,  ed. 

Autumn  and  winter  festivals.     1924. 

793  B21 


—  Spring     and     summer     festivals. 
1924.  793  B21s 


Bernhardt,  Sarah. 

The  art  of  the  theatre. 


792  B52 


Bubchenal,  Elizabeth,  ed. 

Rinuce  na  Eirann,  National  dances  of 
Ireland.     1924.  q793.1   B9r 

Clark,  Imogen. 

Suppose  we  play ;  a  collection  of  indoor 
and  outdoor  games  for  young  and 
old.     C192.5.  793  C593 

The  Drama  year  book.     1924. 

r792  D76 
Frost,  Helen. 

Clog  and  character  dances.     1924. 

q793.1    F9c 
IIoRTON.  Douglas. 

A  legend  of  the  Graal.     cl925. 

793  H82 
Howard,   Sidney  Coe. 

"T^xington."  a  pageant  drama.     cl924. 

792.7  H85 
Lsman,  Felix. 

Weber  and  Fields,  their  tribulations, 
triumphs  and  their  associates.     1924. 

792  183 
Lawrence,  .John  E. 

Dixie  minstrel   first-part.     cl924. 

793  L42 
RusSErx,  Mary  M. 

How  to  produce  plays  and  pageants. 
cl923.  792  R96 

RECREATION. 

Boy  scouts  of  America. 

The  scout  swimming  and  water  safety 
program.     c]924.  796  B78 

Corsan,  George  Hebden. 

The  diving  and  swimming  book.     1924. 

796  C82d 


Curtis.    Charles    Pelham,   jr.,  cC-    Curtis, 
Richard   Carj'. 
Hunting    in    Africa    East    and    West. 

192.5.  799  0978 

Kennedy,   Charles  William. 

College  athletics.     192.5.  796  K35 

Meanwell,  Walter  Ernest. 

The    science    of    basket    ball  for    men. 

1924.  796  M48s 


Mitchell,   Elmer  Dayton. 
Intramural  athletics.     1925. 


796  M68 


Staley,   Seward  Charles. 

Individual  and  mass  athletics.    1925. 

796  S78i 
Thomas,  Sir  George. 

The  art  of  Badminton.  796  T45 

Thompson,  Winfield  Martin. 
The  yacht  "America."     1925. 

797  T47 
Williams.  A.  Bryan. 

Game  trails  in  British  Columbia.    192.5. 

799  W72 

LITERATURE. 

Alden,    Raymond   Maedonald,   ed. 
A  Shakespeare  handbook.     1925. 

822.33  Fa 
Barrow,  Sarah  Field. 

The  medieval  societ.y  romances.  1924. 
(Columbia  university  studies  in  Eng- 
lish and  comparative  literatur'e) 

820.9  B27 
Beach,   Joseph   Warren. 

Meek  Americans.     cl925.  814  B36 

Black,  Alexander. 

American  husibands  and  other  alterna- 
tives.    C19125.  814  B627am 

Christie,  O.  F. 

.Johnson  the  essayist,  his  opinions  on 
men,  morals  and  manners,  a  study. 
1924.  824  J69zc 

Coleman,  Arthur  Prudden. 

Humor  in  the  Russian  comedy  from 
Catherine  to  Gogol.  192.5.  (Colum- 
bia university  Slavonic  studies) 

891.72  C69 
Coleridge,  Hartley. 

Essays,  on  parties  in  poetry  and  on  the 
character  of  Hamlet.  1925.  (Little 
nineteenth  century  clas.s'ics)   824  C69 


76 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [Jan.,  1926 


Couch,  Sir  Arthur  Thomas  Quiller- 
Charles  Dickens   and  other  Victorians. 
1925.  824  C85c 

Crock,   Benedetto. 

European  literature  in  the  nineteenth 
century,  translated  by  Douglas  Ain- 
slie.     1924.  804  C93 

Crow,  Charles  Sumner. 

Evaluation  of  English  literature  in  the 
high  school.      1921.      (Teachers   col- 
lege, Columbia  university.     Contribu- 
.     tions  to  education).  q807  C9 

CUNLIFFE,  John  William,  d   Showerman, 

Grant,  eds. 

Century    readings    in    ancient    classical 

and     modern     European     literature. 

1925.  870.8  C97 

DOBREE,  Bonamy. 

Restoration  comedy,  1660-1720.  1921. 
822.09  D63 
Douglas,  Norman. 

Experiments.     1925.  824  D73 

Fleg,   Edmond. 

The  Jewish  anthology,  translated  by 
Maurice  Samuel.     cl92.j.      892.4  F59 

FoEESTER,     Norman,     <£-     Lovett,     Robert 
Morss,  eds. 
American  poetry  and  prose,  a  book  of 
readings,  1607-1916.     cl925. 

810.8  F65 

Frontinus,  Sextus  Julius 

The  Stratagems,  and  the  Aqueducts  of 
Rome,  translated  by  Charles  E.  Ben- 
nett.    1925.  878  F93 

Gaines,  Francis  Pendleton. 

The  southern  plantation.  19  2  5. 
(Columbia  university  studies  in 
English   and   comparative   literature) 

810.9  G14 
Gaselee,  Stephein,  camp. 

An  anthology  of  medieval  Latin.  ,  1925. 

870.8  G24 
Gerwig,  Henrietta,  ed. 

Crowell's  handbook  for  readers  and 
writers.      cl925.  r803  G38 

Gould,  Gerald. 

The  English  novel  of  to-day.     1925. 

823.01   G69 
Haigiit,    Elizabeth   Ilazelton. 

Horace  and  his  art  of  enjoyment. 
cl925.  874  H81zh 


Hazlitt,  William. 

New  writings,  collected  by  P.  P.  Howe. 
1925.  824  H43n 

Heaen,  Lafcadio. 

Occidental  gleanings.     1925.     2  v. 

814  H43o 
Heliodorus,  of  Emesa. 

An  Aethiopiau  history  (Underdowne's 
translation,  1587)  (The  Abbey  clas- 
sics) 888  H47 

HiBBARD,  Laura  Alandis. 

Mediaeval  romance  in  England.     1921. 

820.9  H62 
HiLLEBRAND,  Harold  Newcomb. 
Writing  the  one-act  play.     1925. 

808.2  H65 
HoLLiDAY,  Robert  Cortes. 

Literary  lanes  and  other  byways. 
cl925.  814  H73e 

Hudson,  William  Henry. 

A  Hudson  anthology,  arranged  by 
Edward  Garnett.     1921.    824  H886h 

Huxley.  Aldous   Leonard. 

Along  the  road  ;  notes  and  essays  of  a 
tourist.     cl925.  824  H9861a1 

Johnston,  William  Thomas,  ed. 

Bill  .Johnston's  second  joy  book.     1925. 

817  J73b 
Jones,   Llewellyn. 

First  impressions ;  essays  on  poetry, 
criticism,   and  prosody.     1925. 

824  J 77 

Lassalle,    Ferdinand    Johann    Gottleib. 
Gesammelte      Redeu      und      Schriften. 
1919-20.     12  V.  838  L34 

Law,   Frederick  Houk. 

Mastery   of  speech.      cl925.    808  L41m 


Lynd,  Robert. 

The   peal   of  bells. 


[1924] 


824  L988pe 


Massingham,    Henry   William. 

H.  W.  M.  A  selection  from  the 
writings  of  H.  W.  Massingham. 
1925.  824  M4182 

Montague,   Charles   Edward. 

The  right  place ;  a  book  of  pleasures. 
1925.  824  M75 

Morton,  Lena  Beatrice. 

Negro  poetry  in  America.     1925. 

811.09   M88 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY, 


77 


Nathan,   George  Jeau. 

The  autobiography  of  au  attitude. 
1925.  814  N27 

Newton,  Alfred  Edward. 

The  greatest  book  in  the  world  and 
other  papers.     cl92.5.  814  N56g 

NicoLL,  Allardyce. 

A  history  of  early  eighteenth  century 
drama,  1700-17.50.     l!>2.j. 

822.09  N64h 

Partington,    Wilfred    George,    comi}. 
Smoke   rings    and    roundelays.      [1924] 

820.8  P27 
I'osner,  George  A. 

The  world's  best  humor.     1925. 

827  P85 

Prescott,    Frederick  Clarke,    tC-    Nelson, 

John   H.,  eds. 

.    Prose    and    poetry  of    the    revolution. 

cl925.  810.8  P92 

Priestley,  John  Boyntou. 

The  English  comic  characters.      [1925] 
820.9   P949e 

Rich,  Frank  Merritt,  tC-  Burchill,  Eliza- 
beth Durkin. 
Projects  for  all  the  holidays.     1924. 

820.8  R498 
Rusk,  Ralph  Leslie. 

The  literature  of  the  middle  western 
frontier.  1925.  (Columbia  univer- 
sity studies  in  English  and  compara- 
tive literature)  810.9  R95 

Saintsbury,    George    Edward    Bateman. 
A  last  scrap  book.     1924.  824  S15I 

ScHELLiNG,  Felix   Emmanuel. 
Elizabethan    playwrights.      192.5. 
(Plays  and  playwrights  series) 

822.09  S42 
SCHOFIELD,  William  Heliry. 

English  literature,  from  the  Norman 
conquest  to  Chaucer.     1921. 

820.9  S36 
Shurter,  Edwin  Du  Bois. 

The  science  and  art  of  effective 
debating.     cl925.  808.5  S56s 

The  Spectator. 

The  mind  of  the   Siiectator   under  the 
editorship  of  Addison  «&  Steele.   1923. 
828  S741 
Stidger,  William  Le  Roy. 

Finding  God  in  books.     cl925. 

804  S85 


SuGDEN,  Edward  Holdsworth. 
A     topographical     dictionary     to     the 
works  of  Shakespeare  and  his  fellow 
dramatists.        1925.        (Publications 
of  the  University  of  Manchester) 

rq822.33  Gsu 
Tandy,   Jeannette  Reid. 

Crackerbox  philosophers  in  American 
humor  and  .satire.  1925.  (Colum- 
bia university  studies  in  English 
and    comparative   literature) 

817  T16 
TUELL,   Anne  Kimball. 

Mrs  Meynell  and  her  literary  genera- 
tion.    cl925.  824  M61zt 

Van  Doren,  Carl  Clinton,  <G  Van  Doren, 
Mark. 
American    and    British    literature   since 
1890..    cl925.  810.9  V24 

Van  Doren,  Carl  Clinton. 

Other  provinces.     1925.  814  V246o 

Walkey,  Arthur  Bingham. 
Still   more   prejudice.     1925. 


Ward,  Christopher. 
Foolish  fiction.     1925. 


824  W18s 
817  W25f 


Weigand,  Hermann  J. 
The  modern  Ibsen.     cl925. 

839.22  I14zw 
Xenophon. 

Scrip  ta  minora,  with  an  English 
translation  by  E.  C.  Marchant. 
19  2  5.  (Loeb  classical  library 
[Greek  authors] )  888  X5ma 

Greek  and  English  on  opposite  pages. 


POETRY. 

Adams,  Leonie. 

Those   not   elect.     1925. 


811   A214 


Aiken,  Conrad  Potter. 

Priapus  and   the  pool.      1925. 

811   A29pr 
Aldington,  Richard. 

A  fool  i'  the  forest,  a  phantasmagoria. 
1925.  821   A36f 

Burt,  Maxwell   Struthers. 

When  I  grew  up  to  middle  age.     1925. 
811   B973w 

Burtchaell,    Mrs    Clara   G.    (Dolliver). 
From  youth  to   age.     cl924. 

c811   B9732 
Bynner,   Witter. 
.   Caravan,     1925.  811   B99ca 


78 


NEWS   NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


"Jan.,  1926 


Carpentek,    Eflwarrl,  d    Barnofielfl, 
George. 

The    psychology    of    the  poet    Shelley. 

[1925]  821  S542ca 


Cole,  Cornelius. 

Ideals  in  verse.     1924. 

CuLLEN,  Coimtee. 
Color.     192.5. 

Deutsch,  Babette. 

Honev  out  of  the  rock.     1925. 


c811   C68 
811   C96 

811    D48 


McCreary,  Frederick  R. 

The   northeast   corner ;    poems.     1925. 

811   M13 
Marquis,   Don. 

The  awakening  &  other  poems.     1925. 
811   M35aw 


Masters,  Edgar  Lee. 
Selected  poems.     1925. 


811    M42se 


Mathers.  Edward  Powys,  tr. 

Sung  to   Shahryar.     1925.        891    M42s 


Mearns,   Hughes. 

Creative    youth.     1925. 


808.1    M48 


Neihardt,  .John   Gneisenau. 

The  song  of  the  Indian  wars.     1925. 

811   N39so 

Nicolson,   John  U. 

King  of  the  black  isles.     1925. 

811   N65 

XiVEN,   Frederick  .John. 

A  lover  of  the  land,  and  other  poems. 
1925.  821   N73 

Proctor,  Edna  Dean. 

The  complete  poetical  works.     1925. 

811   P964c 


Sarett,  Lew  R. 

Slow   smoke.     1925. 


811   S24s 


SiTWELL,    Sacheverell. 

The  thirteenth  Caesar  and  other  poems. 
1924.  821   S623t 

TowNE,   Charles  Hanson. 

Selected  poems.     1925.  811  T744s 

Untermeyer,  Louis,  ed. 

Modern     British     poetry :     a     critical 
anthology.     cl925.  821.08  U61a 

Widdemer,   Margaret. 

Ballads  and  lyrics.     cl925.    811  W63b 


DRAMA. 

Alexander,  Hartley  Burr. 

Manito  masks ;  dramatizations,  with 
music,  of  American  Indian  spirit 
legends.     cl925.  812  A37 

Chapiis%  Harold. 

Art  and  opportunity ;  a  comedy  in 
three  acts.  cl924.  (Fi'ench's  stand- 
ard library  edition)  822  C463ar 

CoPEAU,  Jacques. 

The  house  into  which  we  are  born. 
cl924.      (Theatre  arts  plays) 

842  C782 
Coward,  Noel. 

The  vortex,  a  play  in  three  acts. 
1925.      (Harper's  modern   plays) 

822  C87 
DONDO,   Mathurin  Marius. 

Two  blind  men  and  a  donkey.  1925. 
(Appleton   modern   plays)     842  D67t 

Doyle,  Arthur. 

Exile';  a  drama  of  Christmas  eve. 
1925.      (Appleton  short  plays) 

812  D75e 
Everyman. 

Acting  versions  of  Everyman  and  The 
second   shepherds'   play.     cl925. 

822  E93ci 
Ferber,  Maurice. 

Lord  Byron ;  a  play  in  eight  scenes. 
1924.      (Appleton   modern  plays) 

812  F346 

Goodman,    Kenneth  Sawyer,    d    Hecht, 

Ben. 

The    wonder    hat,  and    other    one-act 

plays.     1925.  812  G65w 

Contents :  The  wonder  hat. — The 
two  lamps. — An  idyll  of  the  shops. — 
The  hand  of  Siva. — The  hero  of  Santa 
Maria. 

Gordon,  Leon. 

White  cargo ;  a  play  of  the  primitive. 
cl925.  822  G66 

Green,  Paul. 

The  Lord's  will,  and  other  Carolina 
plays.     1925.  812  G797 

Megrue,  Roi  Cooper. 

Honors  are  even  ;  a  play  in  three  acts. 
1924.  812  M49h 

Parish,   Ray 

Suburbanism.  1925.  (Appleton  short 
plays)  812  P233 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CAIJFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


79 


Le  pate  ct  la  tarte    (Farce). 

The  pie  and  the  tart,  adapted  \>y 
Mathurin  Dondo.  1925.  (Appleton 
modem   plays)  842  P295 

Tetrova,  Olga. 
The  ghoul ;  a  play  iu  one  act.     cl92.o. 
(The   players'    series)  812  P49g 

Pollock,  Channing-. 

The  enemy  ;  a  play  in  four  acts.    cl92.5. 

812  P77e 
Rapp,    William    Jourdan. 

Osman  Pasha  ;  a  play  in  four  acts. 
cl925.  812  R22 

RiDEOUT,   Ransou. 

P.oots.     192.5.      (Appleton  short  jilays) 

812  R54 
Sinclair,   Upton  Beall. 

Bill   Porter.     cl92.5.  c812  S61b 

\YiLC0X,   Constance   Crenelle. 

The  heart  of  Frances.  1925.  (Apple- 
ton  short  plays)  812  W66h 

Young,   Stark. 

The  saint ;  a  play  in  four  acts.  1925. 
( Provincetown-Greenwich    plays ) 

812  Y76s 

CALIFORNIA   FICTION. 

A  T  H  E  R  T  o  N,    Mrs    Gertrude    Franklin 
(Horn). 
The  crystal  cup.     1925.  cA868cr 

De  Bra,  Lemuel. 

Ways  that  are  wary.     cl925.        cD288 


Porter,  Mrs  Gene   (Stratton). 
The  keei)er  of  the  bees.     1925. 

Rising,  Lawrence. 
Proud  flesh.     cl924. 


cP845k 
cR595 


BIOGRAPHY:    COLLECTIVE. 

Bishop,    .Joseph    Bucklin. 

Notes    and    anecdotes    of    many    years. 
1925.  920.07  B62 

Box,  Pelham  H. 

Three     master    builders     and     another. 
1925.  923.2  B78 


Bradford.  Gamaliel. 
Wives.     cl925. 


920.7  B79w 


Contevts:  Confessions  of  a  biogra- 
pher.—Mrs  Abraham  Lincoln. — Mrs 
Benedict  Arnold. — Theodosia  Burr. — 
Mrs  .James  Madison. — Mrs  Jefferson 
Davis. — Mrs  Benjamin  P.  Butler. — 
Mrs  James  Gillespie  Blaine. 


Mayne,  Ethel  Colburn. 

Enchanters  of  men.      [1!:K)9] 

920.7  M47 

Sainte-Beuve,  Charles  Augustin. 

Portraits  of  the  seventeenth  century ; 
histoi'ic  and  literary.  Trans,  by 
Katharine  Prescott  Wormeley.    cl904. 

920  SI 5 
Seitz,  Don  Carlos. 

Uncommon  Americans,  pencil  portraits 
of  men  and  women  who  have  broken 
the  rules.     cl925.  920.07  S46 

BIOGRAPHY:    INDIVIDUAL. 

Asquith.     ASQUITH,    Mrs    Margot     (Ten- 
nant) . 
Places  and  per-sons.     [1925]     B  A8431p 

Barres.     Barres,  .Jean  Baptiste  Auguste. 
Memoirs  of  a  Napoleonic  officer,  trans- 
lated by  Bernard  Miall.     [1925] 

B   B272 

Baxter.     Powicke,    Frederick    .James. 
A  life  of  the  Reverend  Richard  Baxter, 
1615^1691.     [1924]  B  B3554p 

Bena rente  y  Mo7'tine~.     Starkie,  Walter 
Fitzwilliam. 
Jacinto  Benavente.    1924.  B  B456 

Bok.     BOK,  Edward  William. 

Twice  thirty ;  some  short  and  simple 
annals  of  the  road.     1925. 

B   B686tvy 

Brannan.     Scherer,  .James  Augustin 
Brown. 
The  first  forty-niner-.     1925.     cB  B821s 

Burr.     Wandell,  Samuel  Henry,  &  Min- 
nigerode,  Meade. 
Aaron  Burr,     1925.     2  v.         B  B968w 

Butler.    .JoAD,  Cyril  Edwin  Mitchinson. 
Samuel     Butler     ( 183.S-1902 ) .      1924. 
(The  Roadmaker  series)     B  B9861jo 

Bi/ron.     Symon,  James  David. 

Byron  in  perspective.     1925.      B   B996s 

Calhoun.     Meigs,  William  Montgomery. 
The    life    of    John    Caldwell    Calhoun. 
1917.     2  v.  B  C152m 

Casanova.     Buck,  Mitchell  Starrett. 
The    life    of    Casanova    from    1774    to 
1798 ;  a  supplement  to  the  Memoirs. 
1924,  B  C335bl 


so 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Casanova  de  Seingalt.  Giacomo 

Girolamo. 
The  memoirs  of  Giacomo  Casanova  de 
.   Seingalt.     1922.     12  v.        qvB  C335 

Cavour.      Whyte,    Arthur    .Tames    Beres- 
ford. 
The   early   life   and   letters    of   Cavour. 
1925.  B  C383w 

('ha  III  plain.     Flenley,  Ralph. 

Samuel  de  Champlain,  founder  of  New 
France.  1924.  (Canadian  men  of 
action)  B  C453f 

Charriere.     Scott,  Geoffrey. 
The   iiortrait  of   Zelide.     19'2o. 

B  C485s 

Ohatfield-Tai/lor.      Ciiatfield-T  a  y  l  o  e, 
Hobart  Chatfield. 
Cities  of  many  men.     192."'k        B  C4924 

Clemens.     Lawton,  Mary. 
■  A  lifetime  with  Mark  Twain.    cl925. 

B  C625I 

Cleveland.     Davis,  Royal  Jenkins. 

The  boys'  life  of  Grover  Cleveland. 
cl925.  (Biographies  for  boys  and 
girls)  B  C635da 

Cohhett.     Cole,  George  Douglas  Howard. 
The  life  of  William  Cobbett.     [1925] 

B  C654CO 

Coolklge.     Johnston,  Thomas  T. 

Have  faith  in  Calvin  Coolidge.     [1925] 

B  C774J 

Belter.    Maequand,  John  Phillips. 

Lord  Timothy  Dexter  of  Newburyport, 
Mass.     1925.  B  D527m 

Diecy.     Dicey,  Albert  Venn. 

Memorials  of  Albert  Venn  Dicey.    1925. 

B   D546 
Dreiser.     Rascoe,  Burton. 

Theodore  Dreiser.  1925.  (Modern 
American  writers)  B  D771r 

Diise.     Boedeux,  Jeanne. 

Eleonora  Duse :  the  story  of  her  life. 
1925.  B  D972b 

Eliot.       Haevaed     university.       Harvard 
alumni  association. 
The  ninetieth  birthday  of  Charles  Wil- 
liam Eliot.     1925.  B  E423h 

Faraday.     Randall,    Wilfrid    L. 

Michael  Faraday  (1791-1867).  1924. 
(The  Roadmaker  series)         B  F219r 


Fuwrett.     Fawcett,  ]\rilileent   (G-gfrett), 
"'Mrs  Henry  Fawcett." 
What  I  remember.     [1925]        B  F2782 

Flecker.    Hodgson,  Geraldine  Emma. 
The  life  of  James  Elroy  Flecker.    1925. 

B   F593h 

Forhes-Rohertson. .   Fobbes-Robebtson, 
Sir  Johnston. 
A  player  under  three  reigns.     1925. 

B  F6942 

Forgan.    Fobgan,  James  Berwick. 
Recollections  of  a  busy  life.     1924. 

B   F721 

Francisco     d'     Assisi.       Egan,     Maurice 
Francis. 
ICverybody's  St  Francis,     el 91 2. 

B   F815e 

(lUrji.     Taebell,  Ida  Minerva. 

The  life  of  Elbert  H.  Gary  ;  the  story 
of  steel.     1925.  B  G244t 

Oodtvin.     LiNFOED,  Madeline. 

Mary   Wollstonecraft    (17  5  9-1797). 
[1924]      (The    Roadmaker    series) 
B  G592I 

Gordon.     GoEDON,  George  Angler. 

My    education    and    religion,    an    auto- 
biography.    1925.  B  G663 

Gould.     Gould,    Sabine   Baring- 
Early  reminiscences,  1834-1864.    [1923] 

B  G698 

■  Gould,    Sabine .  Baring- 


Further     reminiscences,    18o4-lS94. 
[1925]  B  G698a 

Grant.    Stevens,  William  Oliver. 

The  boy's  life  of  General  Grant.    cl925. 
(Biographies  for  boys  and  girls) 

B  G763S 

Haliburton.  Chittick,  Victor  Lovitt 
Oakes. 
Thomas  Chandler  Haliburton  ("Sam 
Slick").  1924.  (Columbia  univer- 
sity studies  in  English  and  compara- 
tive literature)  B   H172 

Harhord.     Haebobd,    James    Guthrie, 
Leaves  from  a  war  diary.     1925. 

B   H255 

Hardy.     Brennecke,  Ernest. 

The  life  of  Thomas  Hardy.    1925. 

B   H272b 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


81 


ffoirci/.     Wyatt,  Kayiuond  Benedict 
Hervey. 
William  Harvey  (1578-1657).     [1924] 
(The  Roadmaker  series)  B  H341 

Heinz.     McCaffekty,  E.  D. 

Henry  .J.   Heinz ;    a   biography.     1923. 

B    H472 

Gift. 

HoUand.     Holland,  Henry  Edward  Vas- 
sall  Fox,  Jitli  haron. 
The  journal  of  the  Hon  Heni\y  Edward 
Fox     (afterwards     fourth     and     last 
Lor'd  Holland),  1818-1830.     [1923] 

B   H7353 

Hiiiitiiif/ton.     SUTER.  John  Wallace. 

Life  and  letters  of  William  Reed  Hunt- 
ington, a  champion  of  unity.     cl925. 
B   H953s 
Kelli/.    Kelly,  Samuel. 

Samuel    Kelly,    an    eighteenth    century 
seaman.     1925.  B   K299g 

Len-is.     Lewis,    Rosa    (Ovenden). 

The   queen    of   cooks   and   some   kings, 
recorded  by  Mary  Lawton.     1925. 

B   L675 

TAncoln.     Lincoln,  Abraham,  pres.  U.  S. 
Lincoln's   last  speech  in   Springfield  in 
the  campaign  of  1858.     1925. 

qB   L73 

Lister.     Dukes,  Cuthbert. 

Lord  Lister  ( 1 827-1912 ) .    [  1924  ]    ( The 
Roadmaker  series  )  B  L7737d 

Lii.reiiihiirg.     Luxemburg,  Rosa. 

Letters    to    Karl    and    Luise    Kautsky 
from  1896  to  1918.     1925.       B  L977 

jlfacDonald.     [Hamilton,  Mrs  Mary 
Agnes  (Adamson)] 
J.    Ramsay    MacDonald    (1923-1925). 
1925.  B   M 1351  ha 

McGee.     Brady,  Alexander. 

Thomas  D'Arcy  McGee.     1925.     (Cana- 
dian statesmen)  B  M  1452b 

MacNeill.  MacNeill,  John  Gordon  Swift. 
What  I  have  seen  and  heard.     1925. 

B   M169 

Mason.     Draper,  John  William. 

AVilliam  Mason.     3924.  B  M4124d 

Mencken.     Boyd,  Ernest  Augustus. 

H.      L.      Mencken.       1925.        (Modern 
American  writers)  B   M536b 

6—43023 


.1/(7/.     Mill.  John  Stuart. 

Autobiography    of    John    Stuart    Mill. 
1924.  B  M645a1 


Millivard.    Millward,  Jessie. 
Myself  and  others.     1923. 


B   M657 


Minto.    BucHAN,  John. 
Lord  Minto,  a  memoir. 


[1924] 


B  M667 

Mitford.     MiTFORD,  Mary  Russell. 

The  letters  of  Mary  Russell  Mitford. 
[1925]  B   M683J 

Newman.     Newman,  Bertram. 

Cardinal  Newman  ;  a  biographical  and 
literary  study.     1925.  B   N553n 

Osier.     CusiiiNG,  Harvey  Williams. 
The  life  of   Sir   William   Osier.      1925. 
2  V.  B  082c 

Owen.    Cole,  George  Douglas  Howard. 
Robert  Owen.      1925.      (Curiosities   in 
politics)  B  097c 

Patin.    Packard,  Francis  Randolph. 
Guy  Patin  and  the  medical   profession 
in  Paris  in  the  XYIIth  century.    1925. 
B  P298p 

Pepijs.    Lucas-Dubreton,  Jean. 

Samuel  Pepys.  trans,  by  II.  J.  Sten- 
ning.     [1924]  '        B   P425lu 

— Tanner,  .Joseph  Robson. 

Mr  Pepys ;  an  introduction  to  the  Diary 
together  with  a  sketch  of  his  later 
life.     1925.  B   P425t 

Poc.     POE,  P]dgar  Allan. 

Ii^dgar  Allan  Poe  letters  till  now  unpub- 
lished.    1925.  qB   P74 

Stanard.  Mrs  Marv  Mann   Page 


( Newton ) . 
The  dreamer  ;  a  romantic  rendering  of 
the    life-story    of    Edgar    Allan    Poe. 
1925.  B  P743st 

Poivell.     Wade,  E.  K. 

The  Piper  of  Pax ;  the  life  story  of  Sir 
Robert  Baden  Powell,  bt.     1924. 

B   P8862 

Quick.     Quick,  Herbert. 

One  man's  life,  an  autobiogiaphy.  c1925. 

B  Q61 

Roosevelt.    Davis,  Oscar  King. 
Released  for  publication.     1925. 

B   R781d 


82 


iSTEWS   iSTQTES    Ot^    CALIFORNtA_  LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Savery.     Taylor,  Francis  Richards. 
Life  of  William  Savery  of  Philadelphia, 
1750-1804.     1925.  B  S266t 

Sheltoii.     Shelton,  Mrs  Flora  Beal. 
Shelton  of  Tibet.     cl923.         B  S5458s 

Smith-Dorrien.         Smith-Dorrien,        Sir 
Horace  Lockwood. 
Memories  of  forty-eight  years'   service. 
1925.  B  S6649 

Teresa.     Teresa,  Sister. 

Soeur  Therese  of  Lixieux,  the  little 
flower'  of  Jesus.     [1924]         B  T316t 

Vincent.     Vincent,  Leon  Henry. 

•John  Heyl  Vincent ;  a  biographical 
sketch.     1925.  B  V772v 

Walpole.     Walpole.  Horace,  -)^/i  eorl  of 
Orford. 
Reminiscences.     1924.  qB  W218t 

Young.     Werner,  Morris  Robert. 

Brigham  Yonng.      [1925]  B  Y682w 

VOYAGES  AND  TRAVEL. 

Butler,  Frank  Hedges. 

Round  the  world.  910.4  B986 

Clement,  Rex. 

A  gipsy  of  the  Horn.     [1925]    910  C62 

EiSEN,  Gustav. 

Map  of  Baja  California.     qc912.722  E3 

Hope,  Stanton. 
Rolling  round  the  world — for  fun.     1925. 

910   H791 
HuLBERT,  Archer  Butler,  ed. 

The  American  transcontinental  trails. 
1925.     2  v.     Maps.  q912.73  H9 

MacDonald,  .James  Ramsay. 

Wandei'ings  and  excursions.     [192.5] 

910  M13 
Putnam,  David  Binney. 

David  goes  voyaging.     1925.        910  P98 

DESCRIPTION   AND  TRAVEL. 
EUROPE. 

Belloc,  Hilaire. 

Hills  and  the  sea.      [1925]        914  B44 

Brown,   Horatio   Robert  Foi-bes. 

Dalmatia,  painted  by  Walter  Tyndale. 
[1925]  (Black's  popular  series  of 
colour  books)  914.36  B87 

Cadman,   Samuel  Parkes. 

The  lure  of  London.     1925.    914.21   C12 


Clarke,  Moma  E. 

Regarding     the     French ;     cameos     of 
French  life.     192.5.  914.4  C59 

GoLDRiNG,  Douglas. 

Gone  abroad.     19G5.  914.5  G62 

Hamilton,    Clayton. 

Wanderings.      1925.  q914  H2 

Hopkins,  R.  Thurston. 

The  Kipling  country.     1925. 

914.22  H79 

Maria,  queen  consort  of  Ferdinand,  king 
of  Rumania. 
The  country  that  I  love.     [1925] 

914.98  M33 

OssENDOWSKi,  Ferdynand  Antoni. 

The  shadow  of  the  gloomy  East,     trans, 
by  F.  B.  Czarnomski.     cl925. 

914.7  084 
[Paget,  Violet] 
The   golden   keys   and   other  essays   on 
the  genius  loci.     [1925]       914  P13g 

Sheridan,  Mrs  Clare  Consaielo  (Frewen) 
Across    Europe   with    Satanella.      1925. 
914  S55ac 
Sitwell,  Osbert. 

Discursions    on    travel,    art    and    life. 
1925.  914.5  S.62 


Speakman,  HaroM. 

Here's    Ireland.      1925. 


914.15  874 


Stapleton,  Alan. 

London      alleys,      byways      &      courts. 
[1921]  914.21   S79 

Thynne,  Roger. 

The  churches  of  Rome.     1924. 

914.56  T54 
Wagner,  Leopold. 

London  inns  and  taverns.      [1924] 

914.21   W13 

Waters,  Helena  L. 

Lago     di     Garda     and     neighbourhood. 
1925.  914.52  W32 

Wilstach,  Paul. 

Along  the  Pyrenees.     cl925. 

914.4  W75 
ASIA. 
Buxton,  Leonard  Halford  Dudley. 

The  eastern  road.     1924.  915.1   B99 

Carpenter,  Frank  George. 

China.        1925.        (Carpenter's     world 
travels)  915.1   C29 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE  LIBRARY. 


83 


Japau  aud  Korea.     1925.      (Car- 
penter's world   travels)        915.2  C29 

Collins,  Gilbert. 

Far  Eastern  jaunts.     [1924]     915  C71 

Edmonds,  Paul. 

Peacocks  and  pagodas.  1924. 

915.92  E24 

Endees,  31rs  Elizabeth  Crump. 
Temple  bells  and  silver  sails.     19l2i.5. 

915.1  E56t 

.Japanese  igovernment  railways. 

Guide  to  China.    3924.  915.1  J36 

Macnicol,  Nicol. 
The  making  of  modern  India.     1924. 

915.4  Ml 6 
Nicholson,  John  Henry. 
The  re-making  of  the  nations.     11125. 

915  N62 

Seton,    Grace    (Gallatin)    "Mrs    Ernest 
Thompson   Seton." 
"Yes,  Lady  saheb,"  a  woman's  adven- 
turings  with  mysterious  India.    192.5. 
915.4  S49 
AFRICA. 
CouDENHOVE,  Hans. 

My  African  neighbors.     1925. 

916.8  086 
Forbes,  Mrs  Rosita  (Torr). 

From  Red  Sea  to  Blue  Nile ;  Abyssin- 
ian adventure.     cl925.  916.3  F69 

Millais,   .John   Guille. 

Far  away  up  the  Nile.    1924. 

q916.2  M6 
I'owell,   Edward  Alexander. 

The  map  that  is  half  unrolled,  equato- 
rial Africa  from  the  Indian  Ocean 
to  the  Atlantic.     cl925.      916.7  P882 

NORTH   AMERIOA. 

Airman,  Duncan,  ed. 

The  taming  of  the  frontier.     1925. 

917.3  A29 
Bartlett,  Alden  Eugene. 

Least  known  America.     el925. 

917.89  B28 

Cameron,  Mrs  Charlotte   ( Wales- Almy ) . 
Mexico  in  revolution.     1925. 

917.2  0182 

Dayton,  Helena  Smith,  d  Barratt,  Louise 
Bascom. 
New  York  in  seven  days.    1925. 

917.471   D276 


Gray,  Eunice  T. 

Cross  trails  and  chaparral.     1925. 

c91 7.9476  G77 
Greene,  Mrs   (Bosworth). 

Dipper  Hill.     cl925.  917.43  G79d 

Hungerford,  Edward. 

Tlie     story     of     the     Waldorf-Astoria. 
1925.  917.471   H93 

James,  Will. 

The  drifting  cowboy.     1925. 

917.8  J29d 
Livingston,   William. 

A    brief    consideration    of    New    York. 
1925.     (He'artman's  historical  series) 
917.47  L78 
Gift. 

Lorraine,   Madison   Johnson. 
The  Columbia  unveiled.     1924. 

917.95  L87 
LuMMis,  Charles  Fletcher. 

Mesa,  caiion  and  pueblo.     cl9i25. 

C917.89  L95m 

MacKay,  Malcolm  Sutherland. 

Cow  range  and  hunting  trail.     1925. 

917.8  M15 
McKenna,  Stephen. 

By   intervention   of  Providence.      1923. 
917.296  M15 
Mason,  Michael  Henry. 

The  Arctic  forests.     1924.     917.98  M41 

Murray,  James. 

Letter  of  James  Murray  of  New  York 
to     Rev     Baptist     Boyd     of     county 
Tyrone,     Ireland.       1925.        (Heart- 
man's  historical  series)     917.47  M982 
Gift. 

Pacific    underwriter   and    banker.      Dia- 
mond jubilee  edition.     1925. 

qc917.9461   P11 
QuiNN,  Vernon. 

Beautiful  Canada.     1925.  917.1   Q7 

San   Francisco   news  letter.      Diamond 
jubilee  edition.     [1925] 

qc91 7.9461   S19 
Smith,  Joshua  Toulmin. 

Journal  in  America,  1837-1838.     1925. 
(Heartman's  historical  sei'ies) 

917.3  S653 
Smith,  Wallace. 

Oregon  sketches.     1925.  917.95  S66 

Speranza,  Gino  Charles. 

Race   or  nation ;    a   conflict   of  divided 
loyalties.     cl925.  917.3  S74 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES, 


[Jan.,  1926 


[ViVANCO,  Aurclio  de]. 
Baja    California    al    dia ;    Lower    Cali 
fornia  up  to  date.     cl924. 

qc917.22  V8 

Wakefield,  Sir  Charles  Cheers,  hart. 
America      to-day     and      to-morrow,      a 
tribute  of  friendship.     2d  ed.     1924. 
917.3  W14 

Wheeler,  Homer  Webster. 

Buffalo  days ;  forty  years  in  the  old 
West.     ci92o.  917.8  W563 

White,  Owen  Payne. 

Them  was  the  daj's  ;  from  El  Paso  to 
prohibition.      192.5.  917.64  W58 

SOUTH   AMERICA. 

Brown,    Lilian    Mabel    Alice    (Roussel), 
ladij. 
L^nknown  tribes,  uncharted  seas.    1925. 

918.6  B87 

Carpenter,  Frank  George. 

Along  the  Parana  and  the  Amazon. 
1925.     (Carpenter's  world  travels) 

918  C29p 

OCEANICA.     POLAR   REGIONS. 

Blitndell,  Peter. 

On  the  fringe  of  Eastern  seas.     1924. 

919.11   B69 
Browx,  .Jolm  MacmiHan. 

The  riddle  of  the  Pacific.      [1924] 

q919.6   B8 

Dahl,  Kai  R. 

The  "Teddy"'  expedition,  among  the  ice 
floes  of  Greenland.     1925.    919.8  D13 

HORNE,  George,  d  Alston.  G. 

Savage  life  in  central  Australia.    1924. 

919.4  H81 
Hurley,  Frank. 

Argonauts  of  the  south.     1925. 

919.9   H96 

HISTORY:    GENERAL. 

Barnes,  Harry  Elmer. 

The  new  histoid  and  social  studies. 
1925.  901   B26n 

Childe,  Yere  Gordon. 

The  dawn  of  European  civilization. 
1925.  (The  history  of  civilization. 
Pre-history  and  antiquity) 

901   053 


Hayward,   William   Richart,   i(   Johnson, 
Gerald  White. 
The  story  of  man's  work.     1925. 

901   H42 

HISTORY:    ANCIENT. 

Delaporte.  Louis  .Joseph. 

Mesoix)tamia.  trans,  by  Y.  Gordon 
Childe.  1925.  (The  history  of 
civilization.  Pre-history  ami  an- 
tiquity) 936.8  D33 

Hill,  .l/rs  Ida  Carleton  (Thallon). 

Rome  of  the  kings ;  an  archaeological 
setting  for  Livy  and  Yirgil.     cl925. 

937  H64 
Lanciani,  Rodolfo  Amedeo. 

Ancient  and  modern  Rome.  cl925. 
(Our  debt  to  Greece  and  Rome) 

937  L24 
Mills,  Dorothy. 

The  liook  of  the  ancient  Greeks.     1925. 

938  M65 

EUROPE. 

Aubert,  Theodore  William. 

Bolshevism's  terrible  record.     cl925. 

947.08  ASS 

Berkman,  Alexander. 

The  "anti-climax."     [1925] 

947.08  B51a 
BlIILMANS.  Alfr. 

Latvia  in  the  making.     1925. 

947.4  B59 

Bonn.  Moritz  Julius. 

The  crisis  of  European  democracy.    1925. 

(The  Institute  of  politics  publications, 

Williams    college,     Williamstown. 

Mass.)  940.98  B71 

Demangeon,  Albert. 

The  British  empire.     [1925]      942  D37 

Dieiil,  Charles. 

History  of  the  Byzantine  empire,  trans- 
lated from  the  French  by  George  B. 
Ives.     1925.  949.5  D55 

Dyboski,  Roman. 

Outlines  of  Polish  history.     [1925] 

943.8  D99 

Graham,  Stephen. 

The  dividing  line  of  Europe.     1925. 

947.08  G74d 

Halevy,  Elie. 

A  historv  of  the  English  people  in  1815. 
1924.  '  942  H 16 


vol.  21,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


High,  Stanley. 

Europe  turns  the  coruer.     cl925. 

940.98   H63 

OssENDOWSKi,      Ferdyuaud     Antoni,      i(- 
Palen,  Lewis  Stanton. 
From  president  to  prison.     cl92.5. 

947  084 

I'l.AYNK,  Caroline  P]. 

The  neuroses  of  the  nations.     [192.3] 

940.912  P72 

SciiEViLL,  Ferdinand. 

A  history  of  Europe  from  the  reforma- 
tion to  the  present  day.     cl02o. 

940  S32 

Tempekley,  Harokl  William  Yazeille. 
The  foreign  policy  of  Canning. 

942.07  T28 
VissciiER.  Charles. 
The  stabilization  of  Europe.    cl924. 

940.98  V83 

Webster.  Charles  Kingsley. 
The  foreign  policy  of  Castlereagh.    192.5. 
942.07  W37 


NORTH   AMERICA. 

Adams.  Ephraim  Douglas. 

Great  Britain  and  the  American  civil 
war.    192.5.    2  v.  973.72  A21 

Bayer,  Henry  G. 

The  Belgians,  first  settlers  in  New  York 
and  in  the  middle  states.     1925. 

974.7  B35 

BiTTiNGER,  Frederick  William. 

The  stoi-j-  of  the  Pilgrim  tercentenary 
celebration  at  Plymouth  in  the  year 
1921.    1923.  974.4  B62 

Caldwell.  Robert  Granville. 

A  short  history  of  the  American  people. 
192.5.  973  014 

The  Cambridge  tribune ;  a  Saturday 
morning  record  of  Cambridge  and 
Harvard  affairs.     1925.     q974.41   017 

Chamberlain,  Allen. 

Beacon  Hill,  its  ancient  pastures  and 
early  mansions.     192.5. 

974.41    B74ch 

Crane,  Leo. 

Indians  of  the  enchanted  desert.     1925. 

970.3  089 


Du  Pont,  Henry  Algernon. 

The  campaign  of  1864  in  the  Valley  of 
Virginia  and  the  expedition  to  Lynch- 
burg.    1925.  973.7  D93 

Faris,  .John  Thomson. 

When  America  was  young.     1925. 

973  F22 
Fowle,  Otto. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie  and  its  great  water- 
way.    1925.  977.4  F78 

GcTiiE.  Carl  Eugen. 

Pueblo  pottery  making.  1925.  (Papers 
of  the  Southwestern  expedition) 

q970.6  G9 
HOCKETT,  Homer  C. 

Political  and  social  history  of  the 
United  States.  1492-1828.    1925. 

973   H68 

Marshall,  Martha  Lebaud. 

A  pronouncing  distionary  of  California 

names  in  English  and  Spanish.   cl925. 

C979.4  M36 

XoRRis,  Walter  Blake. 
Annapolis,   its  colonial  and  naval  story. 
cl925.  975.21   A61n 

ScHLESlNGER.  Arthur  Meier. 
Political  and  social  history  of  the  United 
States,  1829-1925.     1925.     973  S34p 

ASIA. 
Chibol,  Sir  A'alentine. 

The  Occident  and  the  Orient ;  lectures 
on  the  Harris  foundation,  1924. 
C1924.  950  O54o 

Dodwell,  Henry. 

A  sketch  of  the  history  of  India  from 
18.58-1918.     1925.  954  D64s 

Dutcher,  George  Matthew. 

The  political  awakening  of  the  East. 
cl925.  ( Wesleyan  university.  George 
Slocum  Bennett  foundation.  Lec- 
tures) 950  D97 

Koxaldshay,     Lawrence     John     Lumley 
Dundas,  carl  of. 
The  heart  of  Aryavarta.     1925. 

954  R76h 

OOEANIOA. 

Boy.son,  V.  F. 

The  Falkland  Islands.     1924.     997  879 


Reeves,  William  Pember. 
New  Zealand.     1925. 


993.1    R33 


86 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED  DURING 
OCTOBER,  NOVEMBER  AND 
DECEMBER,  1925.t 

Many  of  the  administrative  depart- 
ments of  the  state  are  from  time  to  time 
publishing  reports,  bulletins,  etc.,  which 
are  of  considerable  interest.  Copies  can 
usually  be  obtained  free  by  writing  to  the 
departments  issuing  them.  The  publica- 
tions of  the  University  of  California  are 
offered  for  sale  or  in  exchange  by  the 
University  Press,  Berkele.y,  with  the  ex- 
ception of  the  publications  of  the  Agri- 
cultural Experiment  Station  and  some  of 
the  administrative  bulletins,  which  are 
distributed  free.  Most  of  the  publications 
of  the  State  Mining  Bureau  are  required 
by  law  to  be  sold.  Price  is  given  after 
each  entry.  The  titles  are  listed  in  l^ev^s 
Notes  of  California  Libraries  as  they  are 
received  at  the   State  Library. 

Agkicultube  Department.  Special 
publication,  no.  59.  Report  of  stallion 
registration  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 
June  30,  192.5.     1925.     22  p. 

Same,   no.    60.      Dairy   laws  of 

California     with     regulations     for     their 
enforcement.      Revised    to    .July   1,    1925. 

1925.  60  p. 

Banks,  Superintendent  of  (San 
Francisco).*  Sixteenth  annual  report 
showing  the  financial  condition  of  state 
banks  at  the  close  of   business  June  30, 

1926.  1925.     S12  p. 

Building  and  Loan  Commissioner 
(San  Francisco).  Thirty-second  annual 
report,  1925.     1925.    252  p. 

Chiropractic  Examiners,  Board  of. 
Second  annual  report,  1924-1925.  1925. 
16  p. 

Controller.  Annual  report  of  finan- 
cial transactions  of  municipalities  and 
counties  of  California  for  the  year  1924. 
1925.     213  p. 

■  Statement   no.   16.      Values   in. 


and  indebtedness  of,  each  county  for  the 
year'  1925.     1  sheet  16*  x  11  in. 


*The  location  of  an  office  or  institution 
is  in  Sacramento,  except  when  otherwise 
noted. 

tExcept  when  otherwise  noted,  publica- 
tions are  TJrinted  at  the  state  printing 
office,  Sacramento,  and  are  octavo  in  size. 


Education,  Department  of.  Bulletin 
no.  lO-G.  S.  Regulations  governing  the 
granting  of  general  secondary  school  cre- 
dentials and  certificates.  Revised,  April, 
1925.    Effective  May  1,  1925.     1925.    7  p. 

Same,  no.  lO-Mus.    Regulations 

governing  the  granting  of  special  creden- 
tials and  certificates  of  the  music  type. 
Revised  April,  1925.  Effective  May  1, 
1925.     1925.     7  p. 

Fish  and  Game  Commission.  Laws 
relating  to  fish  and  game,  1925-1927. 
Twenty-fourth  edition.  1925.  215  p. 
map.     16°. 

Abstract    1925    fish    and    game 


laws  1926.     1925.     sheet. 

Forestry,  Board  of.  Proceedings  of 
the  sixth  annual  meeting  of  the  Associa- 
tion of  State  Foresters  held  at  Sacra- 
mento, San  Fi*'ancisco  and  other  points  in 
California,  October  5-8,  1925.  1925. 
16  p. 

Grand  Army  of  the  Republic,  De- 
partment OF  California  and  Nevada. 
Journal  of  proceedings  of  the  fifty-eighth 
annual  encampment,  held  at  city  of  Sac- 
ramento, California,  May  18^22,  1925. 
1925.     206  p.  illus. 

Harbor  Commissioners,  Board  of 
(San  Francisco).  Tariff  charges,  port  of 
San  Francisco,  dockage  tolls,  demurrage 
and  rentals,  and  rules  and  regulations  for 
operation  of  the  State  Belt  Railroad  and 
State  Grain  Terminal.  No.  2.  Effective 
December  1,  1925.     1925.     52  p. 

Health,  Board  of.  Weekly  bulletin, 
vol.  4,  nos.  34-46,  October-December, 
1925. 

Special  bulletin,  no.  6.    Typhoid 


fever,  regulations  for  the  prevention  and 
control  of  typhoid  fever.  Adopted  June  1, 
1914.     [Reprinted]     192.5.    8  p. 

Same,    no.    15.       Poliomyelitis, 


regulations  for  the  prevention  of  poliomye- 
litis (infantile  paralysis).  Revised  July 
11,  1925.    1925.    7  p. 

H  iG  II  w  A  Y  Commission.  California 
highways,  vol.  2,  nos.  10-12,  October- 
December,  1925.    illus.    maps. 

Industrial  Accident  Commission 
(San  Francisco).  California  safety  news, 
vol,  9,  no.  4j  December',  1925.    illus.    15  p. 


vol.  21,  no.  1' 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


87 


Boiler    safety    orders,    effective 

January     1,     1917.       Revised,     effective 
November  1,  192.5.     1925.    32  p.    illus. 

Insurance  Department  (San  Fran- 
cisco). List  of  persons,  partnerships  and 
corporations  licensed  as  insurance  brokers 
and  insurance  adjusters  in  California, 
term  ending  July  1,  1926,  including- 
licenses  issued  to  August  1,  192-5.  1925. 
75  p. 

Library,  State.  News  Notes  of  Cali- 
fornia Libraries,  vol.  20,  no.  4,  October, 
192.5.     p.  26.5^489.     map. 

An    outline    of    State    Librarv 


service  to  other  libraries.  Reprinted  from 
Neivs  Notes  of  California  Liiraries,  .July, 
1925.     3  p. 

Books  for  the  blind  department. 


News  Notes.  Reprinted  from  News  Notes 
of  California  Libraries,  October,  1925. 
20  p.     32°. 

Mining  Bureau  (San  Francisco), 
^lonthly  chapter  of  report  XXI  of  the 
State  Mineralogist  covering  mining  in 
California  and  the  activities  of  the  State 
Mining  Bureau,  vol.  21,  no.  3,  .July,  1925. 
illus.    p.  275-411. 

Summary  of  operations  Cali- 
fornia oil  fields,  vol.  10,  no.  12,  .June, 
1925.     illus.     maps. 

Same,  vol.  11,  no.  1,  -July,  1925. 


illus.     maps. 

Prison,  State  (San  Quentin).  Bulle- 
tin, vol.  32,  nos.  9-12,  .June-September, 
1925  ;  vol.  13,  nos.  1-2,  October-November, 
1925. 

A  monthly  journal  devoted  to  inmate 
welfare. 

Public  Instruction,  Superintendent 
OF.  California's  jubilee  year  in  her 
schools.  A  suggestive  outline  and  a  few 
sources  of  information  and  inspiration. 
Arranged  by  Cora  Paine  McKay,  Mar- 
guerite Squire.     1925.     31  p. 

School  law  of  California.    1925. 


416  p. 

Public  School  Teachers'  Retire- 
ment Salary  Fund  Board.  List  of 
teachers  confidential  personal  reports  to 
State  Board  of  Education  filed  in  1919. 
1925.    306  p. 


Public  Works  Department.  Division 
of  Engineering  and  Irrigation.  Bulletin 
no.  10.  California  irrigation  district  laws, 
1925.     1925.     273  p. 

Railroad  Commission  (San  Fran- 
cisco). Public  utilities  act  of  the  State 
of  California  and  constitutional  provisions 
and  other  enactments  relating  to  public 
utilities  (with  1925  amendments).  1925. 
94  p. 

Secretary  of  State.  Constitution  of 
the  State  of  California.     [1925]     69  p. 

University  of  California  (Berkeley). 
Bulletin,  third  series,  vol.  19,  no.  6.  Cata- 
logue of  the  publications  of  the  University 
of  California  press,  December,  1925. 
Berkeley,  1925.    123  p.    12°. 

Calendar,  vol.  LXIII,  nos.  8-16, 

October-November,  1925.     8  p.    folder. 

A    weekly    bulletin    of    ofRcial    Uni- 
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Price  25  cents  a  half  year,  postpaid. 

■  Chronicle,  vol.  28,  no.  1,  Janu- 
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Price   $2.00   per  year;   single  copies 

50  cents. 

Publications.  College  of  Agri- 
culture, Agricultural  Experiment  Station. 
Bulletin  no.  391.  Machines  for  coating 
seed  wheat  with  copper  carbonate  dust, 
by  A.  H.  Hoffman  and  H.  L.  Belton. 
Bei'keley,   September,  1925.     16  p.     illus. 

Sa)iie.    no.    392.      Fruit 


juice    concentrates,    by    .John    H.     Irish. 
Berkeley,  September,  1925.     20  p.     illus. 

Same,    no    393.      Crop 


sequences  at  Davis,  by  John  W.  Gilmore. 
Berkeley,  October,   1925.     36  p.     illus. 

■  Same,      no.      394.        I. 

Cereal  hay  production  in  California,  by 
Geo.  W.  Hendry.  II.  Feeding  trials  with 
cereal  hays,  by  F.  W.  "Woll.  Berkeley, 
October,  1925.     71  p.     illus. 

Same,    no.    -395.      Bark 

diseases  of  citrus  trees  in  California,  by 
Howard  S.  Fawcett.  Berkeley,  October, 
1925.     61  p.     illus. 

Same,    no.    396.      The 

mat  bean  phaseolus  aconitifolius.  by 
P.  B.  Kennedy  and  B.  A.  Madson. 
Berkeley,  November,  1925,     33  p.     illus. 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Same,  no.  397.  Manu- 
facture of  Roquefort  type  cheese  from 
goat's  milk,  by  S.  A.  Hall  and  C.  A. 
Phillips.  Berkeley.  November,  192o. 
20  p.     illus. 

.sv<;;(f>,  no.  398.    Orchard 

heating  in  California,  by  Warren  P. 
Schoonover  and  Robert  W.  Hodgson,  in 
co-operation  with  Floyd  D.  Young  of  the 
United  States  Weather  Bureau.  Berke- 
ley, December,  192o.     G9  p.     illus. 

Circular  no.  294.  Prop- 

agaliou    of    deciduous    fruits,    by  -T.    L. 

Stahl.  Berkeley.  August.  192.1.  24  p. 
illus. 

Sa)iie,     no.     29-5.      Tlie 

growing  and  handling  of  head  lettuce  in 
California,  by  H.  A.  .Jones  and  E.  Ij. 
Garthwaite.  Berkeley,  September,  192.j. 
30  p.     illus. 

Same,  no.  296.    Control 

of  the  California  ground  squirrel,  by 
-Joseph  Dixon.  Berkeley.  September, 
192.5.     15  p.     illus. 

Same.  no.  297.     A  stir- 


vey  of  beekeeping  in  California,  by  G.  H. 
Vansell,  and  The  honeybee  as  a  pollinizer. 
by  E.  R.  DeOng.  Berkeley,  October, 
1925.     22  p. 

Same,    no.   298.      Possi- 


uilities  and  limitations  of  cooperative 
marketing,  by  H.  E.  Erdman.  Berkeley, 
October.  1925.     19  p. 

Same,  no.  299.     Poultry 

breeding  records,  by  William  A.  Lippin- 
cott.  Berkeley.  October.  1925.  31  p. 
illus. 

Same-  no.   300.     Cocci- 


diosis  of  chickens,  by  J.  R.  Beach  and 
D.  E.  Davis.  Berkeley,  December,  1925. 
15  p.     illus. 


American     Archaeology 
Vol.  17.  no.  7.     Archaic 


and  Ethnology 
culture  horizons  in  the  Valley  of  Mexico, 
by  A.  L.  Kroeber.  Berkeley,  1925. 
p.  373-408.  plate  20.  182  figure.s  in  text, 
voy.   8°. 

Price  45  cents. 

Same,  Vol.  21.  nos.  5-0. 

The  Uhle  pottery  collections  from  Moche  ; 
and    The    TJhle    pottery    collections    from 


Supe,  by  A.  L.  Kroeber.     Berkeley,  1925. 
p.  191-2^.  plates  50-79.     roy.  8°. 
In  one  cover.     Price  $1.25. 

Astronomy.      Lick    Ob- 


servatory bulletin  no.  368.  Azimuth  cor- 
rections for  sunset  and  sunrise  transits, 
by  R.  H.  Tucker.  Berkeley.  November 
12,  1925.     p.  65-70.     4°. 

Same,     no.     309.      The 


radial  velocities  of  twenty  southern  vari- 
able stars  of  class  Me,  by  Ijeali  B.  Allen. 
Berkeley,  November  12.  1925.  p.  71-75. 
4°. 

Same,    no.    370.      Pre- 


liminary elements  and  ephemeris  of  comet 
;1925  (Van  Biesbroeck),  by  A.  D.  Max- 
well and  L.  C.  Damsgard.  Berkeley, 
November  20,  1925.     p.  76-78.     4°. 

Same,  no.  371.     Second 


elements  and  ephemeris  of  comet  j  1925 
(Van  Biesbroeck),  h\  A.  D.  Maxwell  and 
L.  C.  Damsgard.  Berkeley,  December  4. 
1925.     p.  79-80.     4°. 

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■  Engineering,  vol.  2.  no. 


0.  The  Santa  Barbara  earthquake  of 
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The  spokesman,  vol.  3,  no.  9,  October, 
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ber. 1925. 

Geography,  vol.  2,  no.  2. 


The  morphology  of  landscape,  by  Carol 
O.  Sauer.  Berkeley.  October  12,  1925. 
p.  19-.53.     roy.  8°. 

Price  45  cents. 

History,  vol.  14,  no.  ]. 

The  imperial  domains  of  Africa  Procon- 
sularis :  an  epigraiihical  study,  by  John 
James    Van    Nostrand.      Berkeley,    1925. 

p.  1-88. 

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vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


89 


Mathematics,  vol.  2,  no. 

2.      The    normal    quar'tic    curve    of    four- 
space,    bj'    Marcus    Skarstedt.      Berkeley, 
1925.     p.  19-34.     roy.  S°. 
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Modern    philology,    vol. 

13.  no.  2.     Spanish  ballad  problems  ;   the 
native   historical   themes,   by   S.   Griswold 
Morley.     Berkeley,  192.5.     p.  207-228. 
Price  25  cents. 

Philosophy,  vol.  7, 

Studies  in  the  problem  of  norms  :  lectures 
delivered  before  the  Philosophical  Union, 
University      of      California,      1924-192.J. 
Berkeley,  1925.     207  p. 
Price  $3.00. 

Seismographic   stations, 

vol.  2,  no.  6,  The  registr'ation  of  earth- 
(luakes  at  the  Berkeley  station  and  at 
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B.  Macelwane  and  William  L.  Appleford. 
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Same,     vol.     2,     no.     7. 

The  registration  of  earthquakes  at  the 
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tory station  from  October  1,  1923,  to 
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and  Perry  Byerly.  Berkeley,  1925. 
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Zoology,    vol.    28,    nos. 

1-2.  Mitochondria  and  golgi  bodies  in 
endamoeba  gingivalis  (Gros)  Brumpt  and 
Mitochondria  in  Leishmania  brasiliensis 
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1925.  p.  1-28,  plates  1-4.  roy.  8°. 
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Same,    vol.    28,    no.    3. 

Mitosis  in  Ceratium  hirundinella  O.  F.  M., 
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encysted  forms  and  the  question  of  sexual 
reproduction,  by  Richard  P.  Hall. 
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5  figs,  in  text.  roy.  8°. 
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Same,    vol.    28,    no.    4, 

The   cultivation    of   endamoeba   gingivalis 
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ley,   1925.      p.    65-12f>,    plates    10-12,    4 
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Same,  vol.  28,  nos.  5-6. 

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Berkeley,  1925.  p.  127-166,  plates  13-15. 
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Same,    vol.    28,    no.    7. 

Some  new  and  some  previously  unre- 
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Whittier  State  School.  Journal  of 
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1925. 

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The     Sentinel      (new     series), 

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192.5. 

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CALIFORNIA  CITY  PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED  DURING  OCTOBER, 
NOVEMBER     AND     DECEMBER, 

1925. 
Berkeley.     Public  Library.     Bulletin, 
vol.    9,      nos.    10-12,    October-December, 
1925. 

Los  Angeles.  Board  of  Education. 
Educational  research  bulletin,  vol.  5, 
nos.  1-2,  September-October,  1925. 

Engineering    Department. 

Annual  report.     1925. 

Board  of  Public  Service  Com- 
missioners. Twenty-third  annual  report. 
1924. 

Chamber  of  Commerce.    Southern 

California  business,  vol.  4,  nos.  7-11, 
Angust-Decemter,  1925. 

Municipal     League.      Light    on 

your  city's  affairs,  bulletin,  vol.  3,  nos. 
1-4,  August-November,  1925. 


90 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


Oakland.     Auditor.     Thirtj'-sixth  an- 
nual report.     1925. 

Free   Library.      Annual   report, 


1924-25. 


Pasadena.  Municipal  Light  and  Power 
Department.  Eighteenth  annual  report, 
1924-25.     1925. 

History    of    Pasadena's 


municipal  light  and  power  plant.     1925. 

Richmond.  Health  Board.  Monthly! 
report,  June-December,  1925. 

Public  Library.  Monthly  bulle- 
tin, vol.  12,  nos.  3-5,  September-Novem- 
ber, 1925. 

Sacramento.  Health  Department. 
Statement  of  vital  statistics,  August- 
December,  1925. 

San  Diego.  Health  Department. 
Monthly   report,   August-December,   1925. 

San  Fbancisco.  Board  of  Supervisors. 
Journal  of  proceedings,  vol.  20,  nos.  30-48, 
August-November.  1925. 


■ Municipal   Record,   vol. 

IS,  nos.  32-52,  August-December,  1925. 

Bureau    of    Governmental    Re- 


search.    The    City,    vol.    5,    nos.    9-13, 
August-December,  1925. 

BOOKS  FOR  THE  BLIND  ADDED 
DURING  OCTOBER,  NOVEMBER 
AND   DECEMBER,  1925. 

In   American   Braille. 

Books  marked  c  are  printed  with 
contractions. 

MAGAZINES. 

cIlluminatoe  for   September. 

In  European  Braille. 

books. 
Beebe,   Charles  William.     Galapagos ; 
world's  end.     6  vols. 

A  fascinating  account  of  a  scientific 
expedition  to  the  Galapagos  archi- 
pelago, in  the  equatorial  Pacific,  the 
home  of  strange,  gigantic  reptiles. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

Brown,   Irving   Henry.     Gypsy   fires  in 
America.     2  vols. 

Gypsy  ways  and  character  delight- 
fully and  sympathetically  interpreted 
by    one    who    claims    to    be    of    their 


blood,  who  speaks  their  language,  and 
has  lived  in  their  camps  from  New 
York   to  California. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

CuRWOOD.  James  Oliver.  A  gentlemen 
of   courage.     8  vols. 

A  story  of  the  woods  of  the  northern 
shore  of  Lake  Superior,  with  plenty 
of  action,  good  description  and  wilder- 
ness atmosphere. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

Hildebrand,  Arthur  Sturges.  Magel- 
lan.    2  vols. 

A    biograpliy    that    gives    new    life 
and    color    to    the    facts,    now    almost 
legendary,   of   the  first  circumnaviga- 
tion of  the  world. 
Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
,    Fund,  Inc. 

Hurley,    Frank.      Pearls    and    savages. 
Adventures    in    the    air,    on    the    land 
and  sea  in  New  Guinea.     2  vols. 

Vivid  descriptive  matter  and  a  fine 
pictorial  record  of  a  remarkable  trio 
into  New  Guinea,  where  the  author, 
"with  camera,  wireless,  and  seaplane., 
explored  the  tropical  interior  of  this 
savage  country. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

Mason,  Alfred  Edward  Woodley.  The 
house  of  the  arrow.     4  vols. 

A  poison  mystery  puzzle,  above  the 
average  in  construction  and  style. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

Otto,  Emil.  French  conversation 
grammar ;  a  practical  method  of  learn- 
ing the  French  language.  Revised  by 
C.   Talbot   Onions.     6  vols. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

Reymont,  Wladyslaw  St.  The  peas- 
ants ;   Part  I,  Autumn.     3  vols. 

The  first  part  of  four  by  a  Polish 
writer  of  the  first  rank. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Bhnd  Relief  War 
Fund.  Inc. 

Sedgwick,  Anne  Douglas.  The  little 
French  girl.     5  vols. 

A  carefully  wrought  novel  in  which 
the  contrast  between  the  English  and 
the  French  social  standpoint  is  shown 
with  unerring  insight  and  with  sym- 
pathy ior  both. 

(xift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

Swedenborg,    Emanuel.      The    doctrine 

of  life  for  the  New  Jerusalem  from  the 

Ten    Commandments. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  the  American 
Swedenborg  Printing  and  Publishing 
Society. 


vol.  21,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


91 


Weyman,    Stanley   John.     The   travel- 
ler in  the  fur  cloak.     4  vols. 

A  clever  mixture  of  romance  and 
adventure,  based  upon  a  famous  mys- 
tery of  the  year  1809 — the  disappear- 
ance of  a  British  envoy  durine  the 
Napoleonic  occupation  of  Germany. 

Gift  of  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc. 

German  Text. 

AVoRiNGEN,   Fkanz   VON.     Die  geschichte' 

vom   blinden   Kathrinchen. 

A  fairy  story  about  little  blind 
Kathrine.  Hand  copied  by  and  gift 
of  Mrs  W.  H.  Bruning. 

MAGAZINES. 

Le    Braille    magazine     for     September- 
November. 

Braille  mail  for  October-December. 

Braille  musical  magazine  for  September- 
November. 

Braille  packet  for  September-November. 

Channels  of  blessing  for  October. 

Le    Courrier    musical    et    litteraire    for 
September-December. 

Hampstead    for   September-November. 

HoRA   jocunda    for    November-December. 

Interallied  Braille  magazine   for   Octo- 
ber-December. 

LiGHTBRiNGER      for      September,      192.5- 
February,  1926. 

Literary   journal   for   September-Decem- 
ber. 

Le   Louis    Braille    for    October-Decem- 
ber. 

Progress   for  October-December. 

Santa    Lucia    for    September-December. 

Tribune    for    September-December. 

In   Moon  Type. 

books. 

Chesterton,      Gilbert     Keith.        The 

innocence  of  Father  Brown.     6  vols. 

Series  of  fantastic  mystery  stories 
In  which  a  Catholic  priest,  the  exact 
opposite  of  the  conventional  detective 
type,  plays  that  part. 

JowETT,    John    Henry,      'llie    spiritual 
uplands.     4  vols. 


MAGAZINES. 

Dawn,  part  157. 

The  Moon,  weekly  newspaper,  for  Octo- 
ber-December. 

Moon   magazine   for   October-December. 
In  New  York  Point. 

MAGAZINES. 

Catholic    transcript    for   August-Decem- 
ber. 

Christian   record  for   September-Decem- 
ber. 

GosPEX    trumpet    for    August-December. 

Lux    vera.    Catholic    monthly,    for    Octo- 
ber-December. 

Matilda   Ziegler   magazine    for   October- 
December. 

Sunday     School     monthly     for    October- 
December. 

Weekly  review  for  October-December. 

In   Revised   Braille. 

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BOOKS. 

cBibIjE.      Old    Testament.      The    Psalms. 

American     standard     revised     version. 

vol.  2. 

Duplicate   copy.      Gift   of   Hermann 
Alber. 

c New     Testament.       John.       The 


gospel    according    to    John.      American 

standard  revised  version. 

Duplicate   copy.     Gift   of   Hermann 
Alber. 

•  Luke.  The  gospel  accord- 
ing to  Luke.  American  standard  revised 
version. 

Duplicate   copy.     Gift   of  Hermann 
Alber. 

The  Ten  Commandments  and  the 


Sermon  on  the  mount,  with  Twenty- 
third  and  Ninety-first  psalms  and 
other  helpful  scriptures.  (King  James 
version.) 

cByrne,  Donn.     The   changeling. 

Stories  marked  by  delicacy  of 
imagination  and  charming  style. 
Some  of  the  tales  are  of  New  York, 
some  fanciful  tales  and  two  are 
original  interpretations  of  Bible 
stories. 


92 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1926 


cCameron,  Maegabet.  The  mighty  trifle 
and  The  way  to  the  wedding. 

Gift  of  American  Brotherliood  of 
Free  Reading'  for  tlie  B]ind. 

Duplicate  copy  gift  of  Kate  M. 
Foley. 

cCox,  Coleman.     Just  plain  talk. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
M.   L.   Brereton. 

c Listen   to    tliis. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
M.  L..  Brereton. 

cCkessy,  Will  Martin.  Cressy's  His- 
tory of  California.  Includes  the  Cali- 
forniacs,   by   Inez   Haynes  Irwin. 

A  satirical  description  of  California 
and  lier  "native  sons." 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Miss 
Marguerite  Murphy. 

cDana,  Richard  Henry,  ./;■.  Two 
years  before  the  mast ;  a  personal 
narrative  of  life  at  sea.     5  vols. 

Leads  all  others  as  a  book  best 
descriptive  of  the  life  of  the  American 
sailor,  and  has,  deservedly,  become  a 
sea  classic. 

Put  into  Revised  Braille  grade  IJ 
for  the  use  of  the  blind  people  of 
America  through  the  generosity  of 
Mrs  Thomas  R.  Proctor,  Utica,  New 
York,  under  the  auspices  of  the 
American  Foundation  for  the  Blind 
in  memory  of  Thomas  R.  Proctor. 

cDuMAS,  Alexandre.  The  black  tulip. 
7  vols. 

A  love  romance  with  which  are 
interwoven  scenes  from  Dutch  history 
in  the  years  1672-1675,  when  William 
the  Silent  lent  himself  to  the  agita- 
tion directed  against  the  brothers  de 
Witt,  the  patriotic  defenders  of  Dutch 
liberty.  The  Harlem  tulip  craze  is 
the  theme  of  some  of  the  episodes. 

cFox,  John,  Jr.     The  little  shepherd  of 

Kingdom    Come.     3  vols. 

Pictures  sympathetically  boy  life 
among  the  Kentucky  mountaineers; 
life  at  a  blue  grass  college  before  the 
war  ;  class  feeling  between  the  moun- 
taineer and  the  "furriner" ;  the  way 
in  which  Kentucky  was  rent  asunder 
by  the  Civil  War ;  and  the  romantic 
glory  of  Morgan's  men. 

c A  mountain   Europa. 


cGates,    Eleanor.      "Doc"    and    "Son." 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland,   California. 

c The  justice  of  Gideon  and,  Tex. 


Hand    copied    by   and    gift   of   Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland.   California. 

cGemmill,    Elsie.     Essentials    of    Eng- 
lish  grammar.     2  vols. 


cGoODiEB,  Rev  Alban.     About  the  Bible, ' 
in   12  booklets.     12  vols. 

Gift  of  Kenwood  Alumnae  Braille 
Centre  (under  the  Alumnae  Associa- 
tion of  the  Convent  of  the  Sacred 
Heart;  Kenwood,  Albany,  New  York). 

cHouGH,  Emerson.     The  covered  wagon. 

6  vols. 

To  these  pioneers  on  the  long  west- 
ward journey  to  Oregon  in  '48  come 
all  the  dangers  of  the  way,  unhridged 
rivers,  prairie  fires,  an  attack  of 
Indians,  and  coupled  with  this  are 
discontent  and  treachery  among  them- 
selves. 

cKyne,  Peter  Bernard.  The  heart 
exchange  and  Captain  Scraggs'  fili- 
buster. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland,   California. 

cLe  Gallienne,  Richard.  Pieces  of 
eight.     4  vols. 

The  story  of  a  treasure  hunt. 
Beautifully  descriptive  of  the  tropic 
Bahamas. 

cLuTz,  Mrs  Grace  (Livingston)  Hill. 
Exit  Betty.     2   vols. 

cMoRRis,  Joseph,  and  Adams,  St.  Clair. 
It  can  be  done.     2  vols. 

Inspirational  poems,  mostly  recent, 
but  with  a  few  standard  selections. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland,  California. 

cO'HiGGiNS,  Harvey  Jerrold.  From  the 
life :  Owen  Cary  and  Sir  Watson 
Tyler. 

Characteristic  sketches  written  as 
though  a  friend  were  filling  in  inti- 
mate and  little  known  facts  of  a 
biography.  Done  with  vividness, 
dramatic  alertness  and  human  interest. 

cPupiN,  Michael  Idvorsky.  From  im- 
migrant to  inventor.     8  vols. 

The  autobiography  of  one  of 
America's  contributors  to  the  science 
of  electricity. 

cRamakrishnananda,  swanil.  The  soul 
of  man.     2  vols. 

Vedanta  philosophy. 
Hand    copied    by    and    gift    of    Mrs 
Kate  Chalmers. 

cReese,  Lowell  Otus.  Teeter-snipe 
brains. 

A  good  detective  story  for  men. 
Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland,  California. 

cRicE,  Mrs  Alice  Caldwell  (Hegan). 
Mrs  Wiggs  of  the  cabbage  patch. 

Chec-  and  homely  humor  in  the 
midst  of  poverty. 

cR  I  c  h  M  o  N  D,  Mrs  Grace  Louise 
(Smith).     Brotherly  house. 


vol.  21,  no.  1. 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


93 


clilNEIIAKT,        Mrs        iMARY 

The  altar  on  the  hill. 


(  IlOBEKTS ) . 


Hanrl    copied    by    and    gift    of    Mrs 
Louis  Scheeline. 

The  circular  staircase.     4   vols. 


Humorous  detective  story  centering 
iround  a  murder  on  tlie  circular  stair- 
case in  a  large  country  liouse. 


A    midsummer    knight's    dream. 

A     western     story     tliat     men     will 
enjoy. 

Hand  copied  by  and 


rift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oaliland,  California. 

cSawyer,  Ruth.  Seven  miles  to  Arden. 
2  vols. 

A  bright  Irish  girl,  an  actress, 
starts  out  on  a  wild  goose  chase  to 
find  a  young  man  she  has  never  seen 
who  needs  to  know  some  one  still  has 
faith  in  him.  It  is  seven  miles  to 
Arden  and  on  the  road  she  meets  and 
makes  amusing  and  pitiful  adventure. 

cSiNG-MASTEE,  Elsie.     The  courier  of  the 

Czar,  and  Salt  of  the  earth. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland,  California. 

cTraiis^,  Arthur.     The  status  quo. 

Another  Tutt  and  Mr  Tutt  story. 
Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland,  California. 

cChild,   Richard   Washburn.     The   de- 
serters.    Includes   Beautiful   little   one. 
Hand    copied    by    and    gift    of    Mr.s 
Louis    Scheeline. 

cWard,  Henshaw.  Inventive  germ- 
cells.  Includes  Should  marriage  be 
monotonous  "P-by  Elton  Mayo. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
W.  W.  Sawyer. 

cWashington,  George.  Farewell  ad- 
dress, and  The  first  Bunker  Hill  oration 
by  Daniel  Webster. 

cWiLEY,  Hugh.     Minted  gold. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland,  California. 

cWiLLiAMS,    Henry    Smith.      Conjuring 

with  plants.     3  vols. 

Duplicate  copy.  Gift  of  Catharine 
J.  Morrison. 


<WiiJ.iAi\i.s,  Jesse  Lynch.     Not  wanted. 

A  touching  little  story  of  a  mutually 
misunderstanding     father     and      son. 

Appeared  in  the  Saturday  Evening- 
Post. 

Gift  of  the  New  York  county  chap- 
ter of  the  American  Red  Cross. 

Reproduced  by  the  Garin  process 
from  a  hand  copied  volume. 

cWieloughby,    Barrett.      The    king    of 
the  Arctic  trails. 

Adventures  of  Scotty  Allan,  famous 
Alaskan  dog-racer,  and  the  story  of 
Baldy,   the  greatest  of  racing  dogs. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
W.  W.  Sawyer. 


cWoethington,    Louisa    Skinner. 
her   official   capacity. 


In 


cWright,  Harold  Bell.     The  mine  with 
the   iron  door.     3  vols. 

Search  for  a  lost  mine  and  the  for- 
tunes of  a  small  foundling,  brought 
up  by  two  naive  old  pioneers,  make 
up  the  plot  of  this  Western  story. 

MAGAZINES. 

c-The    Braille    courier    for    October-De- 
cember. 

cCatholic  review  for  October-December. 

cCheistian  record  for  October-December. 

cGosPEL    trumpet    for    August-December. 

cInternational   Lions    .Juvenile    Braille 
monthly  for  September. 

cMatilda  Ziegler  magazine  for  October- 
December. 

cMessenger  to  the  sightless  for  Septem- 
ber-December. 

cSearchligiit  for  December. 

In    Ink    Print. 

magazines. 

The    Beacon    for    September-December. 

The  Outlook  for  the  blind  for  December. 


St.     Dunstan's 
November. 


review      for     August- 


4302S 


2-26     1400 


Vol.  21,  No.  2  APRIL  1926 


News  Notes 


OF 


California  Libraries 


IN  this  number-some  of  the  items  of  interest. 


DEDICATION  OF  NEW  BUILDINGS— HOLBROOK  MEMORIAL  LIBRARY, 
university  of  REDLANDS  LIBRARY,  UNIVERSITY  HEIGHTS 
BRANCH  OF  SAN  DIEGO  PUBLIC  LIBRARY,  PINOLE  BRANCH  OF 
CONTRA  COSTA  COUNTY   FREE   LIBRARY. 

WILD  FLOWER  EXHIBITS— RIVERSIDE  PUBLIC  LIBRARY,  UKIAH 
PUBLIC    LIBRARY. 

BEGINNING  OF  RECONSTRUCTION  ON  SANTA  BARBARA  PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 

SAN  JOSE  PUBLIC   LIBRARY'S  SERVICE  TO  SHUT-INS. 

CALIFORNIA  STATE   FISHERIES   LABORATORY   LIBRARY,   p.  142. 

FIELD  WORK  OF  FRESNO  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARY'S  REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT. 

ART  EXHIBITS— KINGS  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARY,  SACRAMENTO  FREE 
PUBLIC    LIBRARY. 

PUBLICITY— POMONA   PUBLIC    LIBRARY. 

VENTURA  COUNTY   LIBRARIAN'S   BRANCH    VISIT. 

FOR  SPECIAL  ARTICLES,  SEE  CONTENTS. 


California  State  Library 


44805 


CAIilFOKNIA    STATE    PBINTINa    OFFICE 

JOHN  E.  KING,  State  Printer 

SACRAMENTO.  1926 


CONTENTS. 


Page 
AN   IDEA   ABOUT   MUSEUMS 95 

STYLE  IN  CHILDREN'S  BOOKS 97 

CALIFORNIA   FICTION   LIST 101 

JUDICIAL  COUNCILS 128 

MAP   OP   CALIFORNIA   SHOWING  COUNTRIES 131 

LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARIES 132 

LIST  OF  LARGER  PUBLIC  LIBRARIES 183 

CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES— NEWS   ITEMS 134 

DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES    AND    OTHER    ITEMS    OF 

GENERAL    INTEREST 157 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION 164 

CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS 171 

LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC 173 

BOARD   OF   LIBRARY   BXAMINT]RS 175 

CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY 177 

Staff,   Etc 177 

depaktme^tts    178 

Recext  Accessions 183 

California  State  Publications  Received  Dubing  January,  Febbttaby 
AND  Mabch,  1926 209 

California  City  Publications  Received  During  January,  February 
AND   March,    1926 213 

Books  fob  tee  Blind  Added  During  January,  Febbuaey  and  March, 
1926   214 


Issued  quarterly  in  the  interests  of  the  libraries  of  the  State  by  the  California 
State  Libbary. 

All    communications    should    be    addressed    to    the    California    State    Library, 
Sacramento,  California. 

Note. — Standing  matter  is  set  solid  and  new  matter  leaded. 

Entered  as  second-class  matter  December,  1913,  at  the  post  ofiBce  at  Sacramento, 
California,  under  the  act  of  August  24,  1912. 

Acceptance  for  mailing  at  the  special  rate  of  postage  provided  for  in  Section 
1103,  Act  of  October  3,  1917,  authorized  Augnist  27,  1918. 


AN  IDEA  ABOUT  MUSEUMS. 


By  Thelma  Brackpttt,   Librarian,   Newark   Must 


^■■\varl<,    ,\.    .J, 


On  March  17,  just  three  mouths  after 
the  completion  of  its  new  building,  the 
Newark  Museum  opened  its  doors  to  the 
public.  For  fifteen  years  the  Museum 
lias  been  housed  with  the  Newark  Public 
Library,  and  now,  for  the  first  time,  it 
can  adequately  exhibit  the  collections  it 
has   accumulated, 

Tn  1909  .John  Cotton  Dana,  Public  Li- 
lirarian,  organized  the  Newark  Museum 
Association.  For  years  he  had  been 
watching  and  helping  Newark  develop 
from  an  overgrown  village  to  a  powerful 
industrial  city.  He  had  been  holding  in 
the  library  various  exhibits  that  con- 
vinced him  of  the  desirability  of  a 
museum  in  Newark.  Yet,  an  hour  dis- 
tant, in  New  York  City,  were  museum 
collections  a  duplication  of  Avhich  would 
1)6  not  only  impossible  but  unjustifiable. 
Thus  the  collection  and  display  of  objects 
was  an  insufficient  purpose  for  establish- 
ing a  museum  in  Newark. 

Mr  Dana,  however,  is  nothing  daunted 
by  the  need  for  originality.  He  saw  un- 
limited possibilities  for  service  to  New- 
ark in  the  right  kind  of  museum.  But 
I  doubt  if  he  would  have  defined  his  idea 
of  the  sort  of  museum  that  Newark 
should  have.  He  is  letting  experiments, 
circumstances,  local  conditions  define  it 
for  him.  The  Museum  has  accordingly 
developed  in  many  directions,  can  be  re- 
garded as  no  one  type  of  museum,  is 
embarrassed  by  no  demand  upon  it,  how- 
ever unusual. 

Indeed,  to  me  the  New^ark  Museum  is 
singularly  like  the  California  county  free 
library  system.  It  OAves  its  inception  to 
the  public  spirit  and  insight  of  one  man. 
It  has  become  what  it  is  because  it  has 
not  hesitated  to  change  and  experiment 
in  order  to  fulfill  the  needs  of  the  city 
as  they  arise.  It  has  grown,  and  has 
won  the  respect  of  those  whom  it  serves, 
because  it  has  proved  its  worth.  It  is, 
however,  no  static  thing ;  what  it  will 
be  and  do  tomorrow,  only  the  morrow  can 
tell.  It  is  original,  it  follows  no  set 
course,  it  is  hampered  by  no  traditions. 

As  I  compare  the  California  county 
free  libraries  and  the  Newark  Museum, 
I  find  myself  speculating  on  the  length 
of  time  that  will  elapse  before  Cali- 
fornia develops  county  museums.  Log- 
ically when  they  come  they  will  be 
born  of  the  county  libraries,  as  the 
Newark  Museum  was  born  of  the 
public  library.  The  step  seems  the  most 
natural  in  the  world — from  my  present 
point  of  view.    I  forget  crowded  quarters, 

44805 


problems  of  finance,  heavily  burdened 
staffs,  I  remember  only  tlie  eagerness  to 
serve,  the  readiness  to  experiment,  the 
gratitude  earned,  especially  through 
work  with  the  teachers. 

For  it  is  in  behalf  of  schools  particu- 
larly that  I  believe  the  (Jaliforuia  (Jouuty 
Free  Museums  will  come  into  being. 
Let  me,  to  explain  m.y  conviction,  draw 
a  comparison,  A  class  in  Happy  Camp, 
Siskiyou  County  (or  in  Julian,  San 
Diego  County,  for  that  matter),  is  study- 
ing Japan.  The  teacher  has  from  the 
County  Library  well_  illustrated  books 
and  texts,  maps  and  magazine  articles. 
She  considers  herself  fortunate  with  her 
wealth  of  material.  A  similar  class  in 
Newark.  New  Jersey,  has,  besides  these 
things  from  the  Public  Library,  actual 
objects  borrowed  from  the  Museum,  The 
teacher  who  knows  the  resources  of  the 
Museum  will  probably  be  specific  in  her 
requests.  But  she  need  state  only  her 
grade  and  subject,  and  material  will  be 
selected  for  her,  as  is  California  countj' 
library  material.  How  much  more  vividly 
will  Japan  come  alive  to  the  Newark 
class,  who  will  see  and  can  handle  Japan- 
ese objects  :  costumes  to  try  on,  toys  for 
the  children,  dishes  to  eat  from,  books, 
prints,  writing  material,  toilet  articles — 
everything  possible  to  make  vividly  real 
the  life  of  the  Japanese  people. 

The  variety  and  extent  of  the  collection 
for  lending  is  heart-warming.  Mounted 
birds  and  animals ;  models  for  physical 
geography  ;  miniature  sawmills ;  types  of 
houses  from  an  Eskimo  igloo  to  a  Swiss 
chalet ;  dolls  dressed  in  the  costumes  of 
many  countries  ;  flags  of  all  nations  ;  habi- 
tat groups ;  copies  of  famous  statues ; 
physiological  models ;  mosses,  ferns,  min- 
erals— it  would  be  hard  to  think  of  a 
neglected  subject.  Even  toys  may  be 
borrowed  for  classes  of  children  in  a  part 
of  the  city  where  poverty  stalks',  toys 
Avhich,  however,  have  an  educational  as 
well   as   a   recreational   value. 

The  lending  collection  is  but  a  part  of 
the  museum  whole,  as  big  a  part,  perhaps, 
as  are  phonograph  records  in  the  county 
libraries  in  California.  Yet,  during  six 
mouths  of  last  year,  under  unfavorable 
conditions  caused  by  moving  into  the  new 
building,  11,023  objects,  all  carefully 
labeled,  were  lent.  The  place  that  these 
objects  fill  in  the  city's  educational 
scheme  is  hardly  realized  even  bj^  the 
museum  staff,  until  some  unusual  condi- 
tion threatens  to  deprive  the  teachers  of 
their  use.     During  the  rush  of  prepara- 


or; 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


tion  foi"  opening:  tlie  new  building,  for 
instance,  it  was  flecidec]  tliat  for  two 
weeks  tlie  Erlncatioual  Department  sliould 
be  closed.  What  au  outcry  the  teachers 
made  I  It  would  appear  almost  that  the 
schools  too  might  as  well  have  closed,  so 
dependent  did  the  teacher.s  seem  on  the 
^Museum.  And  why  shouldn't  they  be? 
Tlie  system  is  as  logical,  as  necessary, 
as  the  California  county  free  library 
system,  and,  I  believe,  destined  in  time 
to  as  wide  an  adoption  in  California. 

The  other  activities  of  the  Museum 
liave  kept  pace  with  the  development  of 
the  lending  collection.  A  children's  mu- 
seum,  a  collector's  league,  exhibitions  in 


the  fields  of  art.  science  and  industry — 
anything,  everything  is  being  fostered 
that  seems  to  till  Nev.'ark's  needs  or  to 
stimulate  Newark's  intellectual  interests. 
Metropolitan  museums  are  possible  to 
but  few  communities ;  "a  museum  of 
everyday  life"  is  within  the  reach  of  any 
community  interested  enough  to  grasp  its 
opportunities. 

Well — I  am  a  Californian  still  and. 
obviously,  still  a  booster.  But  to  any 
California  librarian  who  questions  my 
enthusiasm  I  issue  a  challenge :  come  and 
see  the  work  of  the  Newark  Museum, 
and  then  deny  if  you  can  that  you  are 
secretly  planning  soon  to  be  fostering  a 
baby  museum  of  your  own. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


STYLE  IN  CHILDREN  S  BOOKS. 


97 


STYLE  IN  PRESENT-DAY  CHILDREN'S  BOOKS.* 


By  Althea  H.  Warren,   Formerly  Librarian,   San  Diego  Public  Library, 
San  Diego,  California. 


When  I  boast  of  style  in  the  best  of 
the  children's  books  of  today,  I  use  the 
word  in  the  sense  of  a  dressmaker  rather 
(han  as  a  literary  critic.  I  would  define 
"style"  in  this  application  as  "art  diluted 
'>y  fad."  It  is  not  t;iven  to  many  of  us 
(ihrarians  to  achieve  "style"  in  our  own 
/•lothins'.  but  every  one  of  us  knows  what 
it  means  and  recognizes  it  when  other 
people  attain  it.  A  really  stylish  dress, 
it  seems  to  me.  possesses  four  qualities 
related  to  art — richness  of  material  (when 
it  is  gingham  it's  the  best  French  ging- 
ham) :  beauty  of  line:  appropriateness 
(no  dancins  frock  is  stylish  on  a  tennis 
court)  :  and  craftsmanship. 

In  this  country  and  this  day  style  is 
more  prevalent  than  ever  before  in  the 
world's  history.  Also,  Agnes  Repplier, 
Ellen  Key,  and  lots  of  other  spinsters 
assure  us  that  this  is  the  era  of  the  child. 
Then  why  not  stylish  children's  books? 
Certainly  the  catalogs  of  the  best  ]iub- 
lishers  list  increasing  numbers  of  juve- 
niles each  year  which  in  physical  make-up 
at  least  equal,  and  often  excel,  any  other 
group  of  pvTblications.  Consider,  for 
example,  the  type,  binding  and  illustra- 
tions of  snch  series  as  "Windermere," 
"Rittenhouse  Classics,"  "Boys'  and  Girls' 
Bookshelf  and  "The  Little  Library."  Of 
course  it  is  not  fair  to  use  these  series 
as  examples  of  our  stylish  contemporary 
authoi's  of  juveniles,  for  their  titles'  are 
usually  chosen  from  the  brief  list  of  chil- 
dren's classics.  Any  librarian  wishing  to 
buy  "Treasure  Island,"  "Alice  in  Wonder- 
land" or  "Hans  Brinker"  is  bewildered 
by  the  choice  to  be  had  in  delightful 
editions  from  !f2..o0  to  ^.S.aO.  It  is  cer- 
tain, however,  that  the  attractively 
printed  classics  have  set  a  higher  fashion 
for  the  popular  writer  of  today.  It  must 
be  admitted,  moreover,  that  when  racing 
with  a  classic  for  the  favor  of  that 
objectionable  bandit,  the  average  Amer- 
ican child,  the  popular  author  of  the 
hour  is  apt  to  have  the  inside  track. 

It  is  astonishing  to  realize  how  short 
a  time  English  literature  has  had  in 
which  to  manufacture  classics  for  chil- 
dren. "Goody  Two-Shoes,"  attributed  to 
Oliver  Goldsmith  and  published  at  St. 
Paul's  Chui'chyard  by  John  Newbery  in 
1730,  is  usually  considered  the  first  book 
written  designedly  for  the  young.  It  is 
commemorated  by  the  Newbery  Medal, 
recently    given    by   Frederick   Melcher    of 


New  York  to  be  awarded  each  year  by  the 
Children's  Librarians  Section  of  the 
American  Library  Association  "for  thi^ 
most  distinguished  contribution  to  Amer- 
ican juvenile  literature  of  the  year." 
George  Pierce  Baker  recently  said  that 
"English  drama  began  at  the  high  altai* 
of  the  church,  gradually  emerged  into  the 
street,  and  landed  in  the  gutter."  Chil- 
dren's books  seem  to  have  had  a  similarly 
precipitous  evolution.  Beginning  with  the 
school  mistress  or  rector,  they  spread  to 
authors  of  first  merit  like  Dickens  in  his 
"Child's  History  of  England,"  Thackeray 
in  his  "Rose  and  the  Ring,"  and  Kipling 
in  his  "Jungle  Books."  Now  they  leap 
off  precipices  and  slink  down  alleyways 
dark  to  include  a  riff-raff  of  society 
women,  newspaper  correspondents,  movie 
actors,  officers  of  the  army  and  navy, 
and  even  the  children  themselves.  Their 
first  era  might  be  termed  "Homiletic." 
Such  small  square  volumes  as  "The  Cow- 
slip" and  "The  Daisy"  were  printed  Avith 
the  moral  in  large  type  at  the  end  of 
each  narrative.  Their  woodcut  illustra- 
tions determined  their  price — "Penny, 
plain ;  tuppence,  colored."  The  next 
species  might  be  designated  as  "Litter 
Litterature,"  since  it  came  to  birth  by 
dozens,  breaking  the  record  with  'The 
Elsie  Books."  Contributors  to  its  ranks 
were  Jacob  Abbott  of  the  "Rollo  Books," 
Oliver  Optic,  Sophie  May,  "Pansy," 
Horatio  Alger,  Susan  Coolidge  and  Laura 
E.  Richards.  They  were  wisely  addicted 
to  pseudonyms.  Their  descendants  pros- 
per to  the  present  day.  Indeed  these 
prolific  authors  rise  victorious  over  death, 
for  when  the  originator  of  a  series  dies, 
his  hero  or  heroine  is  carried  on,  like  a 
Greek  torch,  by  other  eager,  ink-stained 
hands,  as  in  the  cases  of  "The  Texas 
Blue-Bonnet"  and  "Billy  Whiskers." 
Literature's  contribution  to  the  develop- 
ment of  childi-en's  books  has  been  im- 
portant. It  has  made  them  a  commercial 
success. 

The  first  claim  to  style  in  juvenile  liter- 
ature appeared  in  the  1880's,  through 
the  colored  illustrations  of  Kate  Green- 
away  in  England,  and  the  pen  and  ink 
work  of  Howard  Pyle  in  America.  Both 
these  illustrators  happened  to  write  their 
own  text.  Neither  has  ever  been  sur- 
passed in  his  field.  The  happiest  child  is' 
still  the  one  who  begins  his  reading  with 
"Marigold     Garden"     and     "Under     the 


*A  talk  given  at  the  meeting  of  the  Sixth  District.  California  Library  Association, 
at  Pullerton,   Feb.  6,  1926. 


98 


NEWS   NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Window,"  and  progresses  to  "The  AYonder 
Clock,"  "Robin  Hood,"  "Otto  of  the 
Silver  Hand"  and  the  Arthur  series. 
The  books  of  both  of  them  fulfilled  in  far 
contrasting-  ways  the  four  requirements 
for  style  in  my  first  paragraph.  Richness 
of  material  is'  felt  in  the  daintiness  and 
finish  of  Kate  Greenaway's  tiniest  book, 
the  blue  bowl  filled  with  roses  which  is 
one  of  her  vignettes,  and  the  pink-fringed 
English  daisy  at  each  corner  of  a  page  in 
her  "Mother  Goo«e.  '  Secondly  there  is 
grace  of  line  in  the  way  she  moulds  each 
tiny  lyric,  where  print  is  made  the 
smallest  part  of  every  page.  Because  her 
readers  are  from  three  to  six  years  old,  her 
appropriateness  in  choosing  the  garden, 
toys,  older  children  and  "our  clothes"  as 
her  themes  is  unquestioned,  though  she 
writes  so  seldom  about  animals  that  I  am 
sure  she  sought  an  audience  of  little  girls 
rather  than  boys.  Lastly,  her  crafts- 
manship has  made  b.er  the  very  patron 
saint  of  picture  books,  imitated  by  hun- 
dreds but  never  equaled,  and  as  individual 
as  the  fi'escoes  of  Pompeii  or  Aubrey 
Beardsley's  posters. 

Unlike  Kate  Greenaway.  Howard  Pyle 
is  even  more  of  a  writer  than  au  artist. 
He  is  responsible  for  all  that  most  of  us 
know  of  the  jargon  of  "Merrie  Englande" 
in  the  13th  century,  and  we'd  cherish 
the  rhymes  of  "Pepper  and  Salt"  if  there 
were  not  a  picture  in  the  book.  Granted 
that  he  writes  even  better  than  he  draws, 
however,  what  "richness  of  material"  in 
the  physique  of  his  best  books !  What 
spacious  margins,  what  boi-ders  of  fruit, 
leaf  and  thorn,  what  strange,  romantic 
size  in  cover  and  page,  what  princesses 
with  hair  in  sheaves  of  pearls,  or  blowing 
about  them  like  clouds !  The  "beauty  of 
line"  in  his  storie.s,  the  dash  and  grace 
and  vigor  of  their  narrative,  never  lets 
us  imagine  we  are  being  taught  legend 
or  history  in  "King  Arthur"  or  "Robin 
Hood."  No  one  has  ever  known  better 
what  is  "appropriate"  to  a  boy's  loves 
from  eight  to  twelve  years  old.  The 
writers  who  follow  him  can  only  copy 
his  themes.  And  as  for  "craftsmanship!" 
In  addition  to  knowing  how  to  draw,  and 
write,  how  much  time  and  trouble  he 
took !  His  whole  life  went  into  a  dozen 
volumes,  for  of  course,  his  "grown-up" 
books   don't  count. 

After  Howard  Pyle  had  set  the  stand- 
ard came  Andrew  Lang,  with  his  several 
good  illustrators,  and  then  other  magical 
draftsmen  such  as  Rackham,  Maxfield 
Parrish,  Dulac,  Kaye  Neilseu  and  Walter 
Crane.  More  than  half  of  the  style  in 
modern  children's  books  belongs,  after  all, 
to  the  illustrators. 

In    selecting    the    juvenile    authors    of 


the  hour  whose  books  conform  to  my 
four  mandates  of  style,  I  have  used  only 
my  own  likes  as  a  measuring  ring,  and 
have  grouped  them  into  five  types,  chrono- 
logically. First  come  what  the  children 
themselves  call  the  "Lil'  Books."  Their 
s'ize  was  made  classic  by  Helen  Banner- 
man's  "Little  Black  Sambo,"'  Avhich  re- 
mains King  of  them  all.  How  futile  was 
the  effort  of  a  publisher  who  tried  to 
print  him  in  a  larger  volume!  Next  in 
supremacy  in  this  group  are  the  incom- 
parable thirteen  by  Beatrix  Potter.  I 
wish  I  knew  something  about  this  beloved 
artist  and  author  in  addition  to  the  fact 
that  she  was  an  Englishwoman  who  is 
now  dead.  She  realized,  beyond  all  others 
who  have  aimed  to  entertain  babies,  that 
tiny  animals  loom  more  heroically  on 
their  level  than  humans.  She  also 
realized  that  her  readers-  were  primarily 
"lookers"  who  preferred  a  picture  after 
every  line  of  type.  Anyone  who  tries  to 
imitate  the  creator  of  "Mrs  Tiggy 
Wrinkle"  will  learn  what  masterpieces  of 
action,  realitj',  humor  and  pathos  these 
stories  are.  Do  not  laugh !  It  is  an 
epic  moment  when  the  Flopsy  bunnies  are 
imprisoned  in  Mr  McGregors  bag,  as 
you  will  know  if  you  watch  the  little  four- 
year-old  face  to  whom  you  are  reading 
aloud. 

Another  English  woman  who  can  draw 
sweeter  babies  and  almost  as  fluffy 
kittens  as  Beatrix  Potter,  is  Constance 
Heward.  Her  three  "Lil'  Books"  are 
"Ameliar  Ann  and  the  Green  Umbrella," 
"The  Twins  and  Tabiffa"  and  "Grandpa 
and  the  Tiger.''  She  has  a  talent  for 
caricature  in  doing  cooks,  maiden  aunts 
and  pot  boys,  and  her  plots  are  exciting. 
Another  great  advantage  is  that  she's 
still  alive,  and  will  probably  have  another 
for  next  Christmas. 

A  third  author  of  "Lil"  Books"  who, 
I  am  proud  to  say,  is  an  American,  is 
rumored  to  be  a  combination  of  two 
librarians,  one  with  the  first  name  of 
Margery,  and  the  other  with  the  last  name 
of  Clark.  A  poetic  pyramid  of  hers 
called  "The  Cook's  Surprize"  is  con- 
structed on  the  "House  that  Jack  Built" 
pattern.  I  bought  it  for  all  the  little 
girls  I  knew  named  Jane  at  Christmas 
time  in  1024.  It  had  the  glaring  fault, 
for  all  librarians,  of  being  bound  in 
boards,  but  it  has  been  followed  by  a 
sturdier  young  brother,  "Poppy  Seed 
Cakes,"  with  the  heartiest  s-ort  of  Rus- 
sian pictures  in  reds  and  blues  and  greens. 

The  Goops  of  Gelett  Burgess  are  a 
true  American  classic  who  belong  hei-e 
although  they  are  "out  size"  for  "Lil' 
Books."  They  have  to  be  admitted  in 
spite  of  this  because  their  incidents  smack 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


STYLE    IN    CHILDREN  S   BOOKS. 


99 


too  realistically  of  our  daily  lives  to 
permit  them  in  the  next  group  which  is 
Fairy  Tales. 

From  helping-  Peter  Rabbit  into  a  little 
blue  coat  it  is  only  one  step  more  to  bring 
the  velveteen  rabbit  of  our  own  nursery 
to  life,  and  then  we  are  in  fairyland. 
Mrs  Marjorie  Williams  Bianco  is  the 
one  who  did  it  to  the  velveteen  rabbit. 
She  is  an  English  woman,  married  to 
an  Italian,  who  has  a  little  daughter 
Pamela  to  illustrate  her  story  of  "The 
Little  Wooden  Doll."  Her  new  book  is 
"Poor  Cecco,'  an  odyssey  of  the  inhabit- 
ants of  a  toy  closet  which  recalls  Peggy 
and  the   Golliwog  of  my   own   childhood. 

Most  children  prefer  their  fairies  in 
a  more  orthodox  form.  Rose  Fylerman 
understands,  as  Irish  people  iTsually  do. 
She  makes  hers  little  enough  to  rock  in 
a  fox-glove,  with  "peaches'  skins  for 
fairy  flannel,"  just  as  Shakespeare  did. 
Her  two  delectable  books  of  fairy  tales  are 
not  tiresomely  poetic,  though.  They  are 
full  of  fun  and  inventiveness  and  excite- 
ment, too.  "The  Rainbow  Cat"  and 
"Forty  Goodnight  Tales"  are  the  best  in 
junior  size  fairy  stories  since  Mary  E. 
Wilkius  wrote  "The  Pot  of  Gold," 

Marj-  and  Margaret  Baker  have  scored 
a  yellow  and  -black  success  each  season 
for  the  last  three  years  with  a  story 
written  by  one  sister  and  illustrated  in 
silhouettes  by  the  other.  "Black  Cats-  and 
the  Tinker's  Wife"  was  their  first  book, 
and  its  success  was  assured  from  the 
minute  you  found  the  littlest  kitten  on 
the  margin.  "The  Dog,  the  Brownie  and 
the  Bramble  Patch"  was  the  second  book, 
and  "Pedlar's  Ware,"  the  third,  differs 
from  its  predecessors-  in  that  it  is  several 
short  stories  instead  of  one  long  one. 

W.  Heath  Robinson  has  done  both  the 
story  and  the  pictures  for  "The  Adven- 
tures of  Uncle  Lubin"  whose  little  nephew 
Peter  is  carried  off  by  the  wicked  Bag- 
bird.  It  requires  a  trip  to  the  moon, 
another  to  the  North  Pole  and  the  inven- 
tion of  a  submarine  to  get  little  Peter 
back,  and  the  typesetter  must  be  cross- 
eyed by  the  time  the  happy  ending  is- 
reached,  but  Uncle  Lubin  is  victorious. 

The  winner  of  the  Newberj'  Medal  this 
year  is  a  fairy  book,  I  am  ashamed  to 
admit  that  I  did  not  know  Charles 
Finger's  "Tales  from  Silver  Lands"  until 
the  American  Library  Association  called 
it  up  to  receive  the  prize  at  Seattle,  but 
its  discoveiw  is  one  more  of  the  debts 
all  lovers  of  style  in  children's  books  owe 
to  Miss-  Annie  Carroll  Moore  and  Miss 
May  ]\Iassee  who  have  been  working  long 
and  effectively  with  the  New  York  pub- 
lishers    to     get     children's     books     which 


justify  the  existence  of  children's  rooms 
and  children's  librarians, 

"Dr  Dolittle"  is  another  Newbery 
prize  winner  in  the  fairy  tale  group. 
Some  of  the  more  conscientious  of  us  ai'e 
beginning  to  fear  that  Hugh  Lofting  is 
making  more  money  than  an  author  is 
entitled  to  seciire  from  the  creation  of  a 
single  character.  "The  Zoo"  is  number 
five  which  seems  to  be  bringing  the  series 
close  to  the  verge  of  "Litterature,"  I 
have  not  read  it,  but  I  am  forced  to 
admit  that  I  loved  "Sophie,  the  seal"  in 
the  fourth  volume  best  of  it  all,  so  I  can 
not  assert  that  .John  Dolittle  is  in  his 
dotage  yet. 

Because  all  children  can  be  divided 
into  two  classes  of  those  who  like  fairy 
tales  and  those  who  do  not,  there  must 
be  a  third  group  of  stories  for  readers 
under  ten  to  include  adventures  of  solid 
fact.  I  have  called  it  "The  Day-by-Day 
Play  type,"  It  is  found  in  its  most 
aggravated  form  for  little  girls  in 
Margaret  Ashman's  newest  book,  "No 
School  Tomorrow,"  It  suggests  that 
"Little  Prudy"  was  its  grandmother. 
The  home  atmosphere  in  such  tales  is 
seraphic,  with  a  "gentle"  mother  who 
will  leave  her  household  duties,  of  which 
she  always  has  many,  at  any  moment  to 
suggest  games  or  remedy  the  difficulties  of 
her  young,  and  a  father  to  whom  the 
adjectives  "merry,"  "tender,"  and  "br'ownr 
eyed"'    or    "blue-eyed"    cling    like    limpets. 

Books  of  this  groTip  so  yearn  to  run 
into  series  that  the  least  we  can  do  is 
to  honor  and  to  buy  them  when  they 
resist  as  has  Anne  Phillips  in  "Wee  Ann" 
and    "The   Blue  Aunt." 

A  recent  story  much  more  original  in 
plot  and  craftsmanlike  in  execution  than 
its  sisters  is  "Che-Wee"'  by  Grace  ]Moon, 
It  is  a  loosely  connected  dozen  of  adven- 
tures in  the  life  of  a  little  Hopi  Indian 
girl  of  today  on  an  Arizona  mesa.  ^Irs 
Moon  lives  in  Pasadena  and  often  goes 
to  the  pueblo  country  with  her  husband 
who  is  an  artist,  so  that  her  material 
is  authentic. 

Dorothy  Canfield  Fisher  in  her  "Made- 
To-Order  Stories"  uses  a  device  which 
gives  almost  a  fairy  touch  to  a  number 
of  these  wholesome,  oatmeal  cracker  kind 
of  stories.  Her  little  boy,  who  doesn't 
like  foolish  tales  of  things  that  couldn't 
happen,  gives  her  the  ingredients  to  use 
in  making  each  chapter.  "Tell  me  a 
story  about  a  grandfathers'  clock,  a  bottle 
of  ink,  a  red  and  white  stone,  and  a  bag 
of  popcorn,'  And  she  does  it,  throwing  in 
a  family  of  skunks  for  good  measure. 

Looking-  over  these  three  groups  for 
younger  children  it  is  interesting  to  note  ; 


100 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


(1)  That  all  but  four  of  the  fifteen 
authors  mentioned  are  women.  Men 
evidently  do  not  feel  themselves  experts 
on  Fairyland  and  its  Antipodes.  (2) 
Many  of  the  authors  are  their  own  illus- 
trators which  goes  to  bear  out  Carl  Van 
A'eohten's  theory  that  an  artist  is  seldom 
a  failure  as  a  writer.  (3)  Incident  and 
humor  spangle  these  stories  with  more 
originality  than  are  found  in  books  for 
older  children  because  youngsters  read 
simply  and  solely  to  be  amused. 

Indeed  appallingly  few  of  the  books  for 
the  adolescent  boy  and  girl  can  lay  claim 
to  style.  I  have  divided  their  vacuum 
into  two  groups — "Tlie  Love  Plot  in  the 
Bud"  which  is  what  the  girls  stay  up 
until  four  o'clock  in  the  morning  to  read, 
and  "The  Historical  or  Piratical  Ad- 
venture," devoured  by  both  girls  and  boys. 

One  example  of  the  first  type  is  enough. 
A  new  one  is  "Fireweed"  by  Ethel  Cook 
Eliot.  Undoubtedly  it  is  sentimental, 
improbable  and  over  decorated  with 
clothes,  country  estates  and  soul  crises, 
but  how  the  female  of  fifteen  does  crave 
just  STich  a  diet !  In  I'etrospect  it  is  to 
me,  I  grieve  to  say,  ridiculous,  but  I  must 
admit  that  I  enjoyed  it  while  I  was 
reading  it.  I  can  recall  my  palpitations 
over  "Queen  Hildegarde,"  "Gipsy  Bren- 
ton"  and  "Katy-Did"  too  clearlj'  to  wish 
to  decoy  any  loiterers  in  such  pink  and 
gilt  soda  parlors  up  to  sterner  heights 
and  purer  draughts  of  real  literature 
before   their   "pop"    days   are   done. 

Since  Stevenson  no  one  has  done  better 
with  the  sea  tale  than  Charles  Boardman 
Hawes,  a  young  New  Englander  who  died 
in  his  thirties  a  few  years  ago.  His 
three  books.  "The  Mutineers."  "The  Dark 
Frigate,"  and  "The  Great  Quest."  have 
been  so  successful  that  the  Atlantic 
Monthly  Press  offered  a  prize  for  more 
stories  of  the  same  strain.  Two  winners 
in  this  contest  were  "The  Scarlet  Cock- 
erel"   by    Sublette,    and    "Clutch    of    the 


Corsican"  by  Albert  Bill,  both  more  sug- 
gestive of  Stanley  Weyman  than  of 
Hawes.  Best  of  all  the  recent  historical 
tales  for  older  boys  and  girls  I  should 
rate  "Rain  on  the  Roof"  by  Cornelia 
Meigs,  a  spiritedly  written  collection  of 
short  stories  told  to  three  children  in  a 
workshop  in  the  attic. 

As  a  final  proof  of  the  dash,  vitality,  or. 
in  one  word,  style,  which  is  coming  to 
characterize  many  of  the  children's  books 
of  today  it  is'  wise  to  consider  the  child 
authors  themselves.  There  are  half  a 
dozen  whose  books  make  money.  Daisy 
Ashford  and  Opal  Whitely  are  now 
rather  in  disrepute  as  infant  prodigies, 
but  they  fooled  us  at  first  because  they 
sounded  so  clever  as  to  be  like  the  modern 
child.  David  Binney  Putnam,  who  is 
eleven,  in  his  record  of  a  trip  to  the 
Galapagos  Islands  with  William  Beebe, 
writes  a  traveler's  diary  so  monotonous 
and  informative  as  to  fool  any  reader  into 
thinking  he  is  grown-up.  It  is  fashion- 
able just  now  to  disbelieve  Nathalia 
Crane's  "Janitor's  Boy''  and  "Lava  Lane," 
but  they  are  no  more  incredible  than 
the  pictures  of  Pamela  Bianco  for  which 
Walter  De  La  Mare  wrote  verses,  when 
Pamela  was  nine  j  ears  old.  Nathalia 
Crane  is  to  me  incarnate  modernity.  She 
makes  me  understand  the  swirl  of  the 
younger  generation,  and  love  it.  Most 
marvelous  of  all  is  Hilda  Conkling.  Her 
poems  of  a  New  England  garden  are 
miracles  of  loveliness,  whatever  her  age, 
and  will  last  as  long  as  dandelions  do. 
Surely  she  finds  such  rainbow  tints  in 
earth  and  life  partly  because  she  has  had 
the  finest  children's  books?  of  the  last  two 
hundred  years  of  English  literature  to 
nourish  her  childhood.  She  is  the  best 
pledge  of  what  may  be  hoped  for  the 
children's  books  of  the  future.  Her  work 
attains,  more  than  any  of  the  other 
wi'iters  listed,  not  style,  but  art  itself. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


C^U^IFORNIA    FICTION    LIST. 


101 


FICTION  IN  THE  STATE  LIBRARY  HAVING  A 
CALIFORNIA  COLORING.* 

Compiled  by  the  California  Department. 


Note. — 'I'liis  is  not  a  complete  list  of 
books  of  fiction  having  a  local  California 
coloring — merely  those  in  the  State  Li- 
brary collection  of  Californiana.  Such 
books  do  not  circulate  from  the  State 
Library.  Many  of  them  can  doubtless  be 
found  in  local  libraries,  but  all  can  be 
used  for  reference  and  research  purposes 
at    the    State    Library. 

Adventures  of  a  gold  finder,  written  by 
himself.    3  vols.   1850 

Fortunatus  Thomiins,  an  English 
Lord,  tells  of  his  adventures,  first  in 
an  orphan  asylum,  then  as  an  English 
marine,  and  later  as  a  gold  finder  in 
the  New  El  Dorado.  Only  vol.  3 
relates    to    California. 

Aiken,    Afrs    Ednah     (Robinson).      If 
today  be  sweet.    1923 

Deals  with  the  prohibition  question. 
The  action  centers  about  the  family 
of  a  California  winemaker  in  the 
Napa  Valley. 

The  river.    1914 


Tlie  harnessing  of  the  Colorado 
River  and  vivid  pictures  of  desert 
life  are  featured  in  this  interesting 
story  in  which  remarkable  feats  of 
engineering    are    given    prominence. 

AiMARD.    GusTAVE.      The    gold    seekers, 
a  tale  of  California.     1888 

Life  in  Mexico  and  California  dur- 
ing the  gold  excitement  is  portrayed. 
In  a  note  at  the  end  of  tiie  volume, 
we  are  told  that  Gustave  Aimard  was 
the  adopted  son  of  a  powerful  Indian 
tribe  and  wrote  of  his  personal 
experiences. 


Allen,  Mrs  Emma  (Gage). 
1914 


Afterwards. 


A  story  of  a  Californlan  who  lost 
his  identity  through  a  railroad  acci- 
dent. The  many  entanglements 
caused  by  this  event  are  adjusted 
and  clarified  by  the  purifying  fires 
of   the    San   Francisco   disaster. 

The  awakening  of  tlie  Hartwells. 


1913 

A  family  of  wealth  and  social  posi- 
tion is  aroused  from  a  life  of  frivolity 
and  selfishness  by  the  changes  that 
came  through  the  San  Francisc(j 
earthquake    and   Are. 

Allen    Crane,    the    gold    seeker,      n.    d. 

A    collection    of    short    stories    and 

poems     for     children,     "Allen     Crane" 

being  the  only  one  with   a  California 


setting.       The    illustrations    are    mo.st 
amusing. 

Anderson,  Olive  Santa  Louise.  Stories 
and  sketches.     1886 

A  tale  of  Santa  Barbara,  The  Cali- 
fornia flea,  An  opium  dream.  The 
white  heart  of  the  Sierras,  Air  castles 
in  California,  and  A  race  lor  life  are 
the  titles  of  some  of  the  sketches. 
The  author  was  drowned  in  the  Sac- 
ramento River  before  the  last  sketch 
was  completed. 

Atherton,  Mrs  Gertrude  Franklin 
(  Horn  ) .  American  wives  and  English 
luisbauds.     1903 

A  beautiful  San  Francisco  girl,  half 
Creole,  marries  the  son  of  an  English 
peer  and  their  life  is  not  immediately 
successful.  Criticizes  Americans  as 
severely  as  English  artistocrats. — 
Baker. 

Ancestors.     1907 

A  story  which  has  its  beginning  in 
England  and  is  later  transferred  to 
San  Francisco,  where  it  reaches  its 
climax  in  the  dramatic  setting  made 
possible  by  the  San  Francisco  earth- 
quake  and   fire. 


The    bell    in    the    fog    and    other 

stories.     1905 

Only  two  of  the  ten  stories  have  a 
California  coloring :  "Monarch  of  a 
small  survey"  is  undoubtedly  an  Oak- 
land story,  while  "Talbot  of  Ursula" 
has  southern    California  as   a   setting. 


The  Californians.     1898 

Magdalena,  a  daughter  of  old 
Spanish  California,  lives  and  loves 
and  suffers  in  her  Non  Hiil  home, 
San  Francisco,  and  at  the  family 
country  place  at  Menlo  Park.  The 
luxurious  life  of  the  Spanish  dons  is 
contrasted  with  the  austere  and 
strenuous  life  of  the  Yankee  invaders. 


Los  Cerritos.     1890 

A  San  Francisco  millionaire  pur- 
chases an  old  Spanish  grant,  from 
which  the  Californians  are  evicted, 
only  to  be  allowed  to  return  through 
the  efforts  of  the  girl,  Carmelita. 
who  later  marries  the  millionaire. 
Carmelita  is  the  daughter  of  Joaquin 
Murieta,   the  bandit. 


A  daughter  of  the  vine.     1899 

The  downfall  of  a  woman  through 
di'ink.  She  was  the  daughter  of  a 
wealthy  San  Francisco  pioneer  and 
is  the  personality  around  which  is 
woven   a   morbid   and   repulsive   story. 

*This  includes  the  titles  listed  in  News  Notes  of  California  Libraries  for  April,  1914, 
and  October,  191S,  and  those  added  to  the  library  since  the  latter  date. 


102 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192(1 


The   doomswoman ;    an    historical 

romance  of  old  California.     1901 

Alvarado  was  Governor  at  the  time 
the  historical  incidents  took  place. 
Every  phase  of  the  life  of  the  times 
is  touched  upon  and  most  interest- 
ingly portrayed.  Monterey,  Santa 
Barbara  and  the  big  ranches  furnish 
the  settings  for  this  story  of  love- 
making,  l)u!l  fights  and  gay  cabal- 
leros. 

Patience  Sparhawk  and  her  times. 


1000 


The  heroine,  an  undisciplined  Cali- 
fornia girl,  goes  to  New  York.  Her 
many  and  varied  experiences  while 
there  are  woven  into  a  highly  colored 
romance.  Book  1  has  a  decidedly 
local  coloring,  Monterey  and  vicinity 
furnishing   the    background. 


Rezauov.     190G 

An  historical  romance  of  early  days 
— the  love  story  of  Rezanov,  a  Rus- 
sian nobleman  and  diplomat,  and 
Concha  Arguello,  daughter  of  the 
Comandante  of  the  Presidio,  San 
Francisco.  Bret  Harte  has  also  im- 
mortalized the  same  love  tale  in  his 
poem   entitled   "Concepcion  Arguello.'' 


Sleeping  fires.     1922 

The  action  takes  place  in  San  Fran- 
cisco and  New  York.  The  eternal 
triangle,  treated  in  an  unusual  man- 
ner,  is  the  motif  of  the  storv. 


The    splendid   idle    forties ;    stories 

of  old  California.     1902 

Thirteen  stories  of  California  life 
just  prior  to  and  at  the  time  of  the 
American  conquest.  Most  of  the 
tales  are  founded  upon  tradition  ; 
several  upon  historical  facts.  It  is  an 
enlarged  and  revised  edition  of 
"Before   the   Gringo    came." 


The  valiant  runaways.     1898 

Old  California  days  just  before  the 
conquest.  A  story  of  adventure  and 
political  feuds. 


A  whirl  asunder.     1895 

Contains  numerous  references  to 
California  customs  and  manners. 
Guerneville  and  the  Bohemian  High 
.Jinks    furnish   the    local    setting. 


Austin,    Mis    Mary     (Hunteb).      The 

ford.     1917 

A  story  of  the  San  Joaquin  Valley, 
teeming  with  local  atmosphere.  The 
love  of  the  soil,  oil  speculation, 
failure,  social  plots  follow  closely 
one  upon  the  other.  Out  of  it  all 
the  new  woman  at  her  best  comes 
forth   triumphant. 

Isidro.     1905 

A  tale  of  the  loves  of  Isidro  and 
the  Comandante's  daughter  during 
the  last  days  of  the  Missions.  Mon- 
terey and  Carmel  furnish  the  back- 
ground   for    this    charming   story. 

Lost  borders.     1909 

Stories    of    a    country    "Where    the 


boundary  of  the  soul  and  sense  is  as 
faint  as  a  trail  in  a  sandstorm." 
We  are  told  by  the  author  that  "All 
the  trails  in  this  book  begin  at  Lone 
Pine"  and  they  lead  into  the  desert, 
the  valleys  and  mountains  of  our 
Eastern  border. 

Santa    Lucia,    a    common    story. 


1908 

Depicts  ordinary  life  in  a  small 
California  college  town.  The  descrip- 
tion of  Santa  Lucia  Valley  has  an 
unmistakable  likeness  to  that  of 
Santa   Clara  Valley. 

Bacon,   Frank.     Lightnin'.  1920 

A  novel  made  from  the  play  by 
the  same  name.  The  setting  is  a 
hotel  on  the  California-Nevada  line 
conducted  for  the  convenience  of 
seekers  of  divorce.  There  are  many 
humorous  situations  in  which  "Light- 
nin' "  Bill  Jones,  named  for  his  slow- 
ness, is  at  once  the  comic  and 
sympathetic  actor.  The  other  char- 
acters revolve  around  this  unique 
and   lovable    host    of    the    "Calivada." 

Ballantyne,    Robert    Michael.      Dig- 
ging for  gold.     1869 

An  English  boy  comes  to  California 
and  has  numerous  adventures  in  the 
"gold  diggings"  before  fortune  smiles 
upon  him.  The  description  of  Cali- 
fornia scenery  is  decidedly  English 
in    style. 

Ballou,   John.     The  lady  of  the  west ; 
or.  The  gold  .seekers.     1855 

The  hero  goes  to  California  on 
hearing  of  the  discovery  of  gold. 
After  the  arrival  in  California  the 
scenes  are  laid  in  Sacramento,  Marys- 
ville  and  the  gold  fields.  The  law- 
lessness of  the  times  is  pictured  in 
detail. 

Bam  FORD,  Mary  Ellen.     Ti.     1899. 

Ti,  a  boy  of  San  Francisco's  China- 
town, furnishes  the  title  for  this 
book  which  presents  an  interesting 
picture  of  this  "bit  of  old  China." 
The  missionary  vi^ork  among  the 
Chinese  of  this  quarter  is  featured. 

Bancroft,    Griffing,      The    interlopers. 
1917 

The  desolation  that  came  to  Eden 
Valley,  southern  California,  through 
the  establishment  of  a  Japanese 
colony  within  its  peaceful  borders  is 
graphically   pictured. 

The  plot  is  merely  a  thread  on 
which  the  author  has  hung  together 
a  rather  interesting  essay  on  the 
Japanese  in  California. — Neio  York 
Times. 

Barra,  Bzekiel  I.    A  tale  of  two  oceans  ; 

a    new    story    by    an    old    Calif ornian. 

1893 

A  narrative  of  a  trip  from  Phlla- 
deljjhia  to  San  Francisco  by  water  in 
1849-50.  The  landing  in  San  Fran- 
cisco   is   described. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    FICTION    LIST. 


103 


Babry,  IliCHiiJiD  Hayes.  Sandy  from 
the   Sierras.     1906 

Sandj',  a  red-headed  Scotch  boy, 
goes  from  the  Sierras  to  San  Fran- 
cisco, where  lie  becomes  a  political 
boss,  makes  a  prominent  citizen 
United  States  Senator,  and  wins  the 
hand  of  the   latter's   daughter. 

Beadle's    Dime   Library. 

Beadle's  dime  library  i.s  a  series 
ot  short  sensational  stories  issued  in 
the  SO's.  The  six  listed  below  are 
examples  of  those  dealing  with  Cali- 
fornia ; 

Aiken,  Albert  'W.  Red  PJchard ; 
or,  Tlie  band  of  the  crimson  cross. 
1885 

Badger,  Joseph  B.,  Jr.  .Joaquin 
the  saddle  king.  (Joaquin  Murieta). 
ISSl 

Joaquin  the  terri'ole.  (Joa- 
quin Murieta.)      1881 

Holmes,  Howard.  California  Claude 
the  lone  bandit.      1884 

Warne,  Philip  S.  Cheeky,  the 
special ;  or.  The  Life  racket  at  Rattle- 
snake  ridge.      1880 

Wliittaker,  Fred.  The  whitest  mar 
in  the  mines  ;  a  storv  of  the  gold 
fever.      1885 

Beaumont.    Gerald.      Hearts    and    the 

diamond.     1921 

Introduces  tlie  reader  to  an  inti- 
mate understanding  of  the  profes- 
sional ball  player,  "his  private  life, 
viewpoint,  pleasures  and  sorrows." 
A  story  of  the  men  of  the  Pacific 
Coast    Baseball    League. 

Bechdolt,  Frederick  Ritchie.  When 
the  west  was  young.     1922. 

True  stories  dealing  with  the  west, 
principally  California,  Arizona  and 
Texas.  Three  of  the  stories  have  a 
California  interest  and  atmosphere  : 
"How  Death  Valley  was  named," 
"Joaquin  Murieta"  and  "The  over- 
land mail." 

Beckman,  Mrs  Nellie  (Sims).  Un- 
clean and  spotted  from  the  world. 
190G 

A    story    of    travels    in    many   lands 
and  of  unhallowed  loves.      San  Fran- 
-  Cisco   furnishes  the   local   coloring. 

Belasco,  David.     The  girl  of  the  golden 

west.     1911 

Novelized  from  the  play.  Life  in 
an  early  mining  camp  portrayed  after 
tlie  Bret  Harte  style.  The  many 
adventures  cluster  around  "The  girl" 
who  ran  the  Polka  saloon  at  Cloudy 
Mountain  camp. 

Benson,  Stella.     The  poor  man.     1923 

Scenes  in  Bohemian  literary  circles 
of  San  Francisco  with  a  shift  to 
China  and  a  fantastic  picture  of 
Chinese  life  are  the  coloring  in  tiiis 
unusual  story. 

BiERCE,  Ambrose.  Can  such  things  be? 
1903 

A  collection  of  most  gruesome  tales, 


in  which  the  setting  is  inconsequen- 
tial. A  few  of  them,  however,  have 
a  local  coloring.  "Tlie  death  of 
Halpin  Frayser"  occurred  in  the 
Napa  woods.  "The  man  out  of  the 
nose"  has  a  San  Francisco  setting, 
while  "The  realm  of  the  unreal" 
gives  a  picture  of  Auburn  and 
vicinity. 

In  the  midst  of  life.    1901 

Same  as  Tales  of  soldiers  nnd 
civilians  with  additions  and  altera- 
tions. 

Tales    of   soldiers    and    civilians. 

1891 

'Stories  both  weird  and  super- 
natural, but  with  a  strange  haunting 
power.  A  number  of  them  have  a 
California  setting,  but  the  local  color- 
ing is  unimportant  to  the  theme  of 
the   story. 

Big    Goliath  ;    or,    The    terror    of    the 

mines.     1862 

As  the  title  infers,  the  Ijook  is  full 
of  unlawful  and  outrageous  acts, 
such  as  were  common  during  the 
early  days  of  the  gold  excitement. 

Biggebs,     Earl     DeiXR.      Fifty     candJes. 

1926 

A  mystery  story  by  the  author  of 
"Seven  Keys  to  Baldpate."  San 
Francisco  is  the  place  where  the 
action  takes  place  and  the  mystery 
is  unraveled. 

BiGHAM,  Robert  W.  California  gold- 
field  scenes.     1886 

The  title  suggests  the  setting.  The 
book  is  for  juvenile  readers  and  is  a 
reminder  of  the  early  Sunday  School 
Library. 

Blades^  Paul  Harcourt.  Dr-n  Sagasto's 
daughter ;  a  romance  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia.    1911 

Tlie  story  has  to  do  with  what 
may  be  termed  the  final  transitioii 
period — the  passing  of  the  Spaniard, 
the  financial  conquest  of  Spanish 
California  expressed  in  the  construc- 
tion of  the  first  California  railroad, 
cementing  the  political  acquisition, 
the  years  from  1870  to  1885. — 
Preface. 

Blasco  Ibanez,  Yicente.  Queen  Calafia. 
1924. 

Although  the  heroine  is  a  Cali- 
fornian,  giving  the  author  the  oppor- 
tunity of  mingling  the  early  history 
of  California  with  an  appreciation  of 
modern  California  cities,  the  story  is 
in  reality  laid  in  present-day  Madrid. 

BoHAN,  Elizabeth  Baker.  Un  Ameri- 
cano, a  story  of  the  mission  days  of 
California.     1895 

The  San  Luis  Rey  mission  is 
abandoned  by  the  Padre,  and  the 
people  are  suffering  at  the  hands  of 
the  Americans.  "Un  Ajnericano"  is 
an  artist  who  helps  two  native  lovers 
to  retain  their  home  by  painting  and 
selling  the  girl's  picture. 


104 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Bone,     David     Wiixiam.       The     brass- 
bounder.     1921 

A  sea  classic.  The  voyage  of  a 
vessel  from  Glasgow  to  San  Francisco 
and  back  again  to  Falmouth.  About 
forty  pages  are  devoted  to  San  Fran- 
cisco water  front,  Chinatown  and 
other  attractions.  .  The  ship  goes  to 
Port  Costa  to  load  for  the  return 
trip. 

Bonner,  Geraldine.    The  emigrant  trail. 
IDIO 

A  live  story  with  the  prairie,  the 
mountains,  the  desert  and  California, 
the  promised  land,  as  settings  for  the 
shifting  scenes. 

Hard-pan,  a  story  of  bonanza  for- 


tunes.    1900 

A  novel  of  San  Francisco  life  in  the 
days  of  bonanza  fortunes.  The 
heroine  is  the  daughter  of  a  mining 
king,  long  since  fallen  upon  evil 
times. 

The  pioneer,  a  tale  of  two  states. 


1905 

The  scenes  are  placed  first  in  the 
mining  sections  of  El  Dorado  and 
Amador  counties,  then  in  San  Fran- 
cisco, where  a  brief  and  interesting 
description  of  social  life  is  given, 
then  in  the  Santa  Clara  "Valley,  and 
finally  in  Virginia  City,  Nevada, 
where  the   story  ends. 

— : —  Rich  men's  children.     1906 

The  unnatural  and  artificial  lives 
led  by  the  children  of  some  of  the 
bonanza  kings  of  the  seventies  are 
liere  depicted.  The  mother  lode  coun- 
try and  San  Francisco  furnish  the 
local  coloring. 

To-morrow's  tangle.     1903 

A  vivid  picture  of  San  Francisco 
in  the  sixties  and  the  early  seventies. 
A  prologue  Introduces  the  characters, 
while  the  action  of  the  story  is  set 
twenty-five   years    later. 

Treasure    and    trouble   therewith. 


1917 

The  story  opens  with  an  old  fash- 
ioned stage  robbery  in  the  Sierras. 
The  treasure  secured  plays  an  im- 
portant part  in  the  subsequent  narra- 
tive. Sacramento  and  San  Francisco 
are  the  cities  in  which  most  of  the 
action  takes  place.  The  earthquake 
and  fire  give  the  author  an  opportu- 
nity to  clear  up  the  situations  and 
make   a   desirable   ending. 

Boknemann,  Mrs  Mary  ("Oraquill," 
pseud.).  Madame  Jane  Junk  and  Joe. 
1876 

A  long  drawn  out  tale,  introducing 
many  characters.  Scene  shifts  from 
San  Francisco  to  the  eastern  part  of 
the  LTnited  States,  then  to  Scotland, 
but  finally   returns   to   San   Francisco. 

Bower,  B.  M.  See  Sinclair,  3[rs  Bertha 
(Muzzy). 


Boyd,     John     Edward.       The    Berkeley 
heroine  and  other  stories,     n.  d. 

A  collection  of  short  stories  of 
which  "The  Berkeley  heroine"  is  the 
principal  one.  They  contain  a  touch 
of  local  coloring  which  is  of  interest 
in    connection    with    Berkeley. 

BoYN.s,     Richard     Edward.      A     grass 
widow.     1919 

San  Justo,  a  small  California  town 
in  a  shut-in  valley  which  is  accessi- 
ble from  one  point  only,  "a  pass 
which  enables  the  railroad  to  slip  in 
from  the  Santa  Clara  Valley,"  fur- 
nishes the  setting  for  this  story  of 
secluded    community    life. 

Bbennan,   John.     Erin   Mor,   the   story 

of  Irish  i-epublicanism.     1892 

A  story  of  famine  and  misrule  in 
Ireland  and  the  emigration  of  many 
Irish  to  America.  Andy  Dillon  comes 
to  California  and  spends  many  years 
near  San  Diego.  It  is  a  political 
story  in  which  the  writer  denounces 
the  free-trade  of  England,  and  the 
tariff  reform  of  the  Democratic  party. 

Brooks,  Noah.    The  boy  emigrants.    1895 

The   adventures    of   some   boys   who 

crossed      the      plains      to      California 

shortly    after    the    discovery    of    gold. 

Brown,  Cl.ara  Spalding.    Life  at  Shut- 
in  Valley,  and  other  Pacific  coast  tales. 

1895 

San  Diego  furnishes  the  setting  for 
the  story  from  which  the  book 
derives    its   title. 

Brown,  Ruth  Alberta.     Tabitha  at  lyy 
Hall.     1911 

The  scenes  are  laid  first  in  the 
desert,  and  later  in  Los  Angeles, 
where  Tabitha  Catt  is  sent  to  Ivy 
Hall,  a  boarding  school.  The  story 
rather  than  the  environment  is  of 
primary    interest. 


Tabitha's  Glory.     1912 

This  contains  the  experiences  of 
Tabitha.  Her  glory  is  little  Gloriana 
Holliday,  a  poor  orphan  who  had  won 
the    scholarship    place    at    Ivy    Hall. 


Tabitha's  vacation.     1913 

When  and  how  Tabitha  spent  her 
vacation  and  her  return  to  school. 
The  seashore  is  the  vacation  play- 
groimd. 

Bruner,  Jane  W.    Free  prisoners.    1877 
A  melodrama  which   takes  place   in 
1849-1850    in    Grass    Valley,    with    an 
occasional    shift    of    scene    to    Sacra- 
mento. 

Burchell,      Sidney     Herbert.       Jacob 
Peek.     1915 

A  romance  of  southern  California 
orange  groves.  The  book  also  con- 
tains entertaining  descriptions  of 
outlying  points  of  interest  and  of 
desert   charms. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


C.VLIPORNIA    FICTION   LIST. 


105 


BuKGESS,    Frank    Gelett.      The    heart 
line,  a  drama  of  San  Francisco.     1907 
A  good   love  story  ;   also  deals  with 
the    methods    employed    by    clairvoy- 
ants   and    spiritualistic    mediums. 

Lady  Mechante.    1909 


A  clever  take-off  on  the  fads  and 
foibles  of  society  as  they  govern 
people  of  the  "smart  set"  in  London, 
New  Vork,  Boston  and  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

Burgess,     Frank     Gelett,     &     Irwin, 

William  Henry.  The  picaroons.   1904 

A  collection  of  short  stories,  linked 
together  to  make  one  continuous  tale, 
giving  glimpses  of  life  along  the  San 
Francisco  waterfront  in  all  its  vivid- 
ness as  seen  through  the  glass  of 
romance. 

The  reign  of  Queen  Isyl.    1903 

A  fanciful  romance  of  exceptional 
merit.  Queen  Isyl  reigns  over  a 
fiesta  at  San  Jose  and  we  are  given 
a  picture  of  this  most  popular  form 
of   holiday   celebration. 

Burroughs,  Edgar  Rice.    The  girl  from 

Hollywood.     192.3 

"An  uncensored  story  of  the  motion 
picture  colony  that  explains  what  the 
public  has  long  wanted  to  know." 

Burton,  Mrs  Maria  Amparo  (Ruiz). 
The  squatter  and  the  Don ;  a  novel 
descriptive  of  contemporary  occurrences 
in  California.     1885 

A  story  of  California  in  the  early 
'70's.  Scene  changes  from  place  to 
place,  Alameda  County,  San  Diego 
County,  San  Francisco,  Los  Angeles, 
etc.  Leland  Stanford  and  C.  P. 
Huntington  are  mentioned  in  con- 
nection   with    the    railroads. 

California  Crusoe ;  or.  The  lost  treas- 
ure found ;  a  tale  of  Mormonism.  1854 
A  tale  in  which  are  set  forth 
points  against  the  doctrine  of  Mor- 
monism, and  the  comfort,  peace  and 
success  found  by  the  hero  among  the 
rocks  of  California  after  having 
escaped  from  the  "Valley  of  delu- 
sion." 

California  story  hook. 

A  collection  of  short  stories  pub- 
lished by  the  English  Club  of  the 
University  of  California.  "Passing 
of  Cockeye  Blacklock"  is  a  Placer 
County  mining  camp  story  of  the 
early  days. 

California  three  hundred  and  fifty  years 
ago ;  Manuelo's  narrative,  trans,  from 
the  Portuguese  by  a  pioneer.     1888 

Accredited  to  Cornelius  Cole.  The 
story  relates  to  the  native  habits  and 
religion  of  the  inhabitants  at  that 
time. 

Cameron,  Margaret.     Johndover.     1924 
Santa   Barbara  in   the  eighties  fur- 


nishes the  atmosphere  for  this  story 
which  revolves  around  John  Dover, 
a  hermit  beloved  by  everyone.  The 
plot  is  so  cleverly  handled  that  the 
mystery  is  not  solved  until  the  last 
chapter   is   reached. 

Canfield,    Chauncey   Leon.      The    city 

of  six.     1910 

"Well,  boys,  there  are  half  a  dozen 
of  us — why  not  'The  City  of  Six?'" 
and  thus  the  name  was  given  to  the 
camp  in  the  Sierras,  two  thousand 
feet  above  Downieville,  Sierra  County. 
A  '49  mining  story. 

The  diary  of  a  forty-niner.     1906 


A  faithful,  accurate  and  vivid  pic- 
ture, from  the  miner's  point  of  view, 
of  foothill  mining  life.  Purports  to 
be  the  diary  of  Alfred  T.  Jackson. 
Nevada  County  is  the  foothill  coun- 
try in  which  the  stirring  events  took 
place. 

Carlton,    Carrie.      luglenook,    a    story 
for  children.     1868 

A  typical  pioneer  story  for  children, 
which  tells  of  the  experience  and 
traces  the  development  of  a  "down 
East"  family  who  settle  inland  in 
California  in  a  cabin.  The  experi- 
ence of  the  son  when  he  is  sent  to 
school  in  San  Francisco  is  also  given. 

Carpenter,    Edward    Childs.      Captain 

Courtesy.     1906 

Comprises  details  of  the  history 
of  old  California  during  the  Bear 
Flag  V^'ar,  the  attempt  of  the  Mexi-  ' 
can  government  to  expel  American 
citizens.  General  Castro's  murderous 
raids,  the  American  revolution  aided 
and  abetted  by  General  Kearny  and 
General  Fremont,  and  the  admission 
of  California  into  the  Union.  Tlie 
scene  is  centered  in  the  Mission  San 
Gabriel. — Baker. 

Carr,  Mrs   Sarah    (Pratt).     Billy   To- 
morrow.    1909 

— -  Billy  To-morrow  in  camp.     1910 


— ■  Billy  To-morrow  stands  the  test. 

1911 

Series  of  stories  regarding  a  little 
California  boy  whose  courage  and 
manliness  were  brought  into  action 
by  the  stress  of  circumstances  follow- 
ing the   earthquake   and   fire. 

The    iron    way ;    a    tale    of    the 

builders  of  the  west.     1907 

A  thrilling  storv  of  the  building  of 
the  Central  Pacific  P..ailroad.  The 
heroic  deeds  and  undaunted  courage 
of  the  men  who  promoted  this  seem- 
ingly impossible  feat  of  engineering 
are  related  by  the  daughter  of  a  man 
who  held  a  responsible  position  in 
connection  with  the  construction. 
She  was  on  the  ground  and  remem- 
bers each  event  as  a  part  of  her  own 
exper'ence. 


106 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRAEIES.  [April,  1926 


Carter,  Charles  Franklin.  Stories  of 
the  old  missions  of  California.  1917 
The  author  tells  us  in  the  "Fore- 
word" that  all  but  one  of  the  last 
six  stories  have  as  a  basis  some 
modicum,  larger  or  smaller,  of  his- 
torical fact,  the  tale  of  Juana  alone 
being-  wholly  fanciful,  although  with 
an  historical  background.  A  faithful 
picture  of  life  among  the  Indians  and 
Spaniards  in  California  during  the 
early   days   of  the  past  century. 

Chamberlain,  Esther,  &  Chamberlain, 
Lucia.  Mrs  Essington ;  the  romance 
of  a  house  party.     1905 

The  story  centers  around  a  house- 
party  in  a  hospitable  country  home 
on  the   shores  of  Monterey  Bay. 

Chamberlain,  Lucia.    The  other  side  of 

the  door.     1909 

A  murder  is  witnessed  by  the 
heroine ;  the  hero  is  convicted,  but 
by  the  confession  of  a  Spanish  woman 
is  cleared  of  the  crime.  It  is  a  San 
Francisco  story.  The  prologue  con- 
tains an  exhaustive  description  of 
the  city. 

Charles,  Frances  Asa.    Siege  of  youth. 

1903 

A  novel  dealing  with  the  struggle 
of  an  art  editor  who  lived  in  the 
Latin  quarter  in  San  Francisco.  It 
gives  good  descriptions  of  the  various 
sections  of  the  city,  the  climate,  and 
the  characteristics  of  the  people. 

Chase,  Joseph  Smeaton.  The  penance 
of  Magdalena  and  other  tales  of  the 
California  missions.    1915 

These  are  tales  of  the  five  princi- 
pal southern  California  missions : 
San  Juan  Capistrano,  San  Diego,  San 
Gabriel,  San  Fernando  and  Santa 
Barbara. 

Chetwood,  John.  Our  search  for  the 
missing  millions  (of  Cocos  Island).  By 
one  of  the  searchers.  Being  an  account 
of  a  curious  cruise,  and  a  more  than 
curious  character.     1904 

An  account  of  an  expedition  which 
sailed  from  San  Francisco  in  search 
of  the  Cocos  Island  treasure,  and  its 
return  to  the  city  from  which  it 
started  after  encountering  many 
difficulties  because  of  the  conduct  of 
the  leader,  who  evidently  had  no 
intention   of   fulfilling  his   promises. 

Churchill,  iirs  Eugenia  (Kellogg) 
Holmes.  The  awakening  of  Poccalito, 
a  tale  of  Telegraph  Hill,  and  other 
tales.     1903 

Poccalito  is  a  pathetic  story  of  a 
little  Italian  boy  born  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. "The  story  of  a  curse"  deals 
with  the  Pixley  haunted  house,  San 
Francisco. 

Clark,  J.  F.     Society  in  search  of  truth  ; 


or.    Stock  gambling  in   San   Francisco. 

1878 

A  novel  illustrating  the  evil  of 
stock  gambling,  the  exploits  and 
experiences  of  the  various  characters 
which  are  portrayed  being  drawn 
from  the  author's  own  observation  of 
actual  life  in  San  Francisco  in  the 
early  days.  A  description  of  San 
Francisco,  the  Chinese  quarter,  Oak- 
land and  the  Yosemite  Valley  is 
given.  One  chapter  is  given  to  the 
discussion    of    "Woman's    rights." 

CoNNELL,  Hughes.     Born  rich.     1924 

This  is  a  story  of  modern  San 
Francisco.  The  two  princi_pal  char- 
acters were  born  rich,  married  and 
in  following  their  own  pleasure-loving 
desires  were  led  into  tragic  circum- 
stances. 

CooLiDGE,  Dane.     Lost  wagons.     1923 

A  good  yarn  about  gold-mining  in 
the  desert.  It  will  keep  any  reader 
from  thinking  of  his  own  troubles 
while  he  is  following  the  coil  that 
'Death  Valley  Slim'  got  into  when  he 
sold  his  mine  to  a  millionaire  stock 
promoter  and  started  a  boom  in  the 
mining  camps  of  Lost  Valley  and 
the  mushroom  town  of  Gold  Trails. 
— Publisher. 

Wunpost.     1920 

The  mining  region  of  eastern  Cali- 
fornia and  southwestern  Nevada  is 
described.  There  is  much  local  color 
and  the  character,  "Wunpost,"  is 
unusual  and  entertaining.  The  de- 
scriptions  are   especially   good. 

CooLiDGE,    Herbert.      Fancho    McClish. 

1912 

Pancho  McClish  and  his  father  are 
itinerant  horse  dealers.  The  story  is 
told  by  a  waif  who  accompanies  them 
in  their  wanderings  through  Arizona, 
Texas  and  California.  They  traverse 
the  latter  state  from  San  Diego  to 
the  lava  beds  of  the  north. 

CooNEY,  Percival  John.  The  dons  of 
the  old  pueblo.     1914 

An  exciting  account  of  the  occupa- 
tion of  Los  Angeles  by  the  American 
forces  at  the  time  of  the  conquest  of 
California.  The  Dons  are  the  old 
Californians  who  resented  the  treat- 
ment accorded  them  by  the  Ameri- 
cans. The  author  says :  "That  we 
failed  to  understand  them,  and  they 
LIS,  was  neither  their  fault  nor  ours, 
but  due  to  differences  deep  down  in 
the  natures   of  both  races." 

CozzENS,  Samuel  Woodworth.  Cross- 
ing the  quicksands ;  or.  The  veritable 
adventures  of  Hal  and  Ned  upon  the 
Pacific  slope.     1905 

Actual  experiences  of  a  traveler 
through  California  in  early  days,  as 
the  author  states  in  the  preface, 
"through  a  country,  the  greater  por- 
tion of  the  way  inhabited  only  bj' 
hostile  savages  and  infested  by  wild 
beasts,  yet  containing  old  cities  teem- 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   FICTION   LIST. 


107 


ing-  with  a  vast  population,  whose 
.strange  habits,  customs  and  peculiar- 
ities have  for  centuries  furnished  a 
fruitful  theme  for  Spanish  historians, 
poets    and   novelists." 

Crespigny,  Captain  Charles  de.     Where 

the   path  breaks.     1916 

Barbara  Fay,  a  California  girl, 
marries  an  English  otflcer.  •  He  is 
erroneously  reported  killed  in  action. 
They  are  reunited  later.  Santa 
Bai-bara  supplies  the  California  color- 
ing. 

Gbonyn,  George  William;.    '49 ;  a  novel 

of  gold.     1925 

The  coming  through  the  Golden 
Gate  of  the  steamship  "California" 
with  its  crowd  of  adventurers,  a  pic- 
ture of  San  Francisco  in  the  grip  of 
the  Hounds,  Sacramento  and  the 
northern  mines  furnish  the  coloring 
for  this  forty-nine   story. 

CuENTOS  de  California.     1904 

A  collection  of  half  a  dozen  short 
stories  published  by  the  college  set- 
tlement of  Los  Angeles.  They  are  in 
varying  keys  and  have  a  touch  of 
western   spirit  and  coloring. 

Cull,   John  Augustine.     The  bride  of 

Mission   San  Jose.     1920 

A  story  of  the  splendid  forties. 
Mission  San  Jose  is  in  Alameda 
County.  The  entire  Santa  Clara 
Valley,  including  Pueblo  San  Jose, 
lends  color  to  the  vivid  tale  of  the 
time  just  prior  to  the  American 
conquest.  The  action  also  extends 
to    Monterey    and    intervening    points. 

CuMMiNG,  Duncan.  A  change  Avith  the 
seasons.     1897 

A  story  of  Castle  Crags  when  it 
was    a    fashionable    summer    resort. 

CuRRAN,    John    Joseph.     Mr    Foley    of 

Salmon ;  a  story  of  life  in  a  California 

village.     1907 

A  story  of  a  young  woman  who 
goes  from  San  Francisco  to  Sawyer's 
Bar,  Siskiyou  County,  to  teach 
school.  The  brief  descriptions  of 
Yreka,  Fort  Jones,  Etna  Mills  and 
other  places  through  which  she 
travels    on    her    way,    are    accurate. 

Daggett,  Mrs  Mary    (Stewart).     The 

higher  court.     1911 

The  story  of  a  Catholic  priest  who 
breaks  his  vows  and  lives  a  secular 
life.  The  principal  part  of  the  story 
takes  place  in  southern  California  in 
the  vicinity   of   Pasadena. 

Daggett,  Rollin  Mallory.  Braxton's 
Bar ;  a  tale  of  pioneer  years  in  Cali- 
fornia.    1882 

The  scene  of  the  story  shifts  from 
Ohio  to  California,  where  the  true 
characters  of  the  men  are  revealed 
by  the  life  in  the  mining  camps.  The 
story  gives  an  exciting  and  romantic 
picture  of  the  gold  mines,  and  inci- 
dentally touches  upon  life  in  Sacra- 
mento. 


Davis,  George  Wesley.    Aloue.    1922 

A  pleasing  story  that  drifts  along 
in  true  keeping  with  the  languorous 
atmosphere  of  southern  California. 
It  is  redolent  of  the  romance  of  the 
Golden  State  and,  though  the  action 
is  modern,  the  spirit  of  early  da>  s 
has  been  caught  and  is  here  admi- 
rably   reflected. — Los   Angeles    Times. 

Davis,  Leela  B.   Modern  argonaut.   189G 

The  love  stories  of  two  sisters 
living  in  a  small  town  in  the  north- 
ern part  of  the  Sacramento  Valley. 

Dam^son,   Emma  Frances.     A  gracious 

visitation.     1921 

The  scene  of  all  Miss  Dawson's 
stories  is  her  beloved  San  Francisco. 
This  exquisite  tale  is  of  Russian  Hill. 
Ambrose  Bierce  wrote  of  it  some 
years  ago  when  it  first  appeared  in 
a  collection  of  her  stories.  "It  is  a 
marvelous  creation  and  I  know  of 
nothing  in  literature  having  a  suffi- 
cient resemblance  to  it  to  serve  as 
a   basis   of  comparison." 

Itinerant  house  and  other  stories. 


1897 

A  collection  of  stories,  the  scenes 
of  which  are  laid  in  San  Francisco. 
They  deal  for  the  most  part  with  the 
supernatural. 

Dean,  Sara.  Travers,  a  story  of  the  San 
Francisco  earthquake.     190S 

A  British  army  officer  under  suspi- 
cion of  theft  is  in  the  act  of  robbing 
a  Palace  Hotel  guest  of  her  diamonds,' 
when  the  earthquake  shocks  him  to 
his  better  senses  and  reformation 
follows  . 

De  Bra,  Lemuel.    AVays  that  are  wary. 

1925 

Tales  of  San  Francisco's  famous 
Chinatown. 

Delano,  Alonzo.  Old  Block's  sketch- 
book ;  or,  Tales  of  California  life.  1856 
A  collection  of  sketches  portraying 
life  in  the  mines  in  the  early  fifties. 
It  shows  how  the  miners  lived,  what 
manner  of  men  they  were,  and  is 
full  of  local  color.  It  is  illustrated 
by  Nahl. 

De  Ryee,   William.     Truth   unadorned. 

1916 

San  Francisco  furnishes  the  atmos- 
phere for  this  story  of  realism,  in 
which  a  young  sculptor  and  his  model 
defy   the   conventions. 

Dietrich,  Dr.  The  German  emigrants ; 
or,  Frederick  Wohlgemuth's  voyage  to 
California,  by  Dr  Dietrich.  Trans- 
lated by  Leopold  Wray.     n.  d. 

A  German  family  arrives  in  San 
Francisco  after  a  voyage  around  the 
Horn.  The  captain  of  the  vessel, 
Fred,  one  of  the  German  emigrants, 
and  a  negro,  go  to  the  mines,  where 
they    soon    become    wealthy. 


108 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


BoBiE,   Charles   Caldwei.t,.     Blood  red 

dawn.     1920 

A  story  nf  San  Fr:Lnciwc<>,  in  whicii 
a  s'irl  has  to  make  her  own  living 
and  in  going'  from  one  occupation  to 
another  finds  herself  an  entertainer 
in  a  Greek  restaurant.  This  takes 
her  south  of  Market  street  where 
she  meets  the  foreign  born  and  gains 
a  glimpse  of  their  point  of  view. 
Two  men  have  a  part  in  her  story — 
Ned  Stillman,  a  native,  and  Dr  Danilo, 
a    Serbian   doctor. 

Broken  to  the  plow.     1921 

San  Francisco  Is  the  background 
of  this  tale  of  a  man  who  becomes 
the  tool  of  an  anarchist,  through 
being  a  victim  of  a  business  com- 
bine. Later  some  of  his  former 
standards  of  life  come  to  his  rescue 
and  his  inanhood  begins  to  awaken 
again. 

DoissY,    Louise    Augustine    Jane.     A 

business   venture   in   Los   Angeles ;    or, 

A  Christian  optimist,  by  Z.  Z.  (pseud.) 

1899 

The  success  of  three  girls  in  their 
efforts  to  establish  themselves  in 
business  is  the  theme,  with  Los 
Angeles  as  the  scene  of  their  activ- 
ities. 

DoLLiVER,  Clara  G.  No  baby  in  the 
house,    and   other   stories    for   children. 

1868 

Fanciful  stories  and  verses  of  the 
Sunday  school  type,  for  children. 
The  doctor's  frog,  Chee,  The  white 
roses,  and  The  old  man  in  the  ground, 
have   a   California  setting. 

Douglas,  Amanda  Minnie.    A  little  girl 

in  old  San  Francisco.     1905 

The  life  of  the  "little  girl"  from 
childhood  to  womanhood  is  pictured, 
and  in  connection  therewith  the 
growth  and  history  of  San  Francisco 
are   interwoven. 

Doyle,  Charles  William.     The  shadow 

of  Quong  Lung.     1900 

Realistic  stories  of  the  Chinese 
quarter  of  San  Francisco,  connected 
by  the  mysterious  and  threatening 
shadow  of  a  diabolical  monster  who 
lives  by  kidnaping  Chinese  women 
and  employs  the  resources  of  modern 
science  to  carry  out  his  crime. — 
Baker. 

Drago,  Harry  Sinclair.  Suzanna.  1922 
The  romance  of  a  poor  little  peon 
girl  living  within  the  sound  of  the 
bells  of  Mission  San  Carlos  de  Carmel 
at  the  time  when  the  Dons  were 
supreme.  The  old  Spanish  capital, 
Monterey,  with  fascinating  atmos- 
phere and  beautiful  surroundings 
furnishes  the  setting  for  this  vivid 
story. 

Drake,  Samuel  Adams.  Young  Vigil- 
antes, a  story  of  California  life  in  the 
fifties.     1904 

Through    the    working    of    the    San 


Francisco  Vigilance  Committee,  a 
.\oung  man  accused  of  being  a  forger 
is  enabled    to  establish  his   innocence. 

DuYDEN,  Henry  Francis.  Jimmy's  gen- 
tility.    1915 

The  story  travels  from  San  Diego 
to  Sacramento,  San  Francisco  and 
the  bay  regions  holding  the  center 
of  the  stage  for  the  principal  part. 

Du  Bois,  Constance  Goddard.  Soul  in 
bronze,  a  novel  of  southern  California. 
1900 

Pictures  sympathetically  the  char- 
acter of  the  Indian.  The  .scene  is 
placed  at  "Casa  Blanca"  in  southern 
California. 

DuFFUs,  Robert  Luther.     The  coast  of 

Eden.    1923 

The  story  opens  in  Monterey  where 
the  action  of  the  first  part  takes 
place.  Later  the  hero  goes  to  New 
I'ork,  although  he  has  left  his  heart 
in  California.  A  meeting  in  France 
during  the  war  precipitates  a  happy 
ending. 

Dunn,     Joseph    Allan     Elpiiinstone. 

The  water-bearer.     1924 

A  young  eastern  engineer  came  to 
San  Francisco  and  "was  instrumental 
in  promoting  and  engineering  a  valu- 
able water  supply  project  for  the 
city.  The  action  takes  place  in  the 
bay  region  and  at  "El  Nido"  some 
miles  away. 

EicHENBERG,  Eduard.  What  the  birds 
did  at  Hazel's   orchard.     1917 

How  a  California  orchard  with  its 
bird  population  was  instrumental  in 
restoring  a  little  sickly  girl  to  health 
and  happiness.     A  story  for  children. 

Elias,  Solomon  Philip.  Dreams  come 
true.     1923 

A  short  story  of  a  roinance  between 
a  patient  and  his  nurse  in  a  San 
Francisco    hospital. 

Ellerbe,  Rose  Lucile.  Tales  of  Cali- 
fornia yesterdays.    1916 

The  loves,  superstitions  and  simple 
customs  of  the  Spanish-Californians 
are  charmingly  pictured  in  these 
tales  of  California  yesterdays.  San 
Gabriel,  San  Pedro  and  other  south- 
ern California  places  are  used  as 
local  settings.  There  is  one  San 
Francisco    story. 

Ellis,  Edward  Sylvester.  Teddy  and 
Towser,  a  story  of  early  days  in  Cali- 
fornia.    1904 

The  adventures  of  a  man,  a  boy 
and  a  dog,  who  are  shipwrecked 
about  200  miles  south  of  San  Fran- 
cisco and  make  their  way  north 
along  the   coast  searching  for  gold. 

Emerson,  Willis  George.  Vendetta  of 
the  hills.    1917 

The  site  of  old  Fort  Tejon  and  the 
surrounding  country,  including 
Bakersfield,   are   graphically   pictured. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    FICTION    LIST. 


109 


Evans,  Georgk  Samuri,.  Wylackie  Jakp 
of  Covplo.     1904 

"He  (.Mr  KvaiLs)  peiL-cived  that  his 
beyt  literary  worlc  wiis  done  in  the 
portrayal  of  the  scenes  and  people  of 
the  rugged  cattle  country  of  Mendo- 
cino and  Tehama  counties." — Bio- 
Oraj}hical  sketch. 

EwiNG,  Hugh  Boyle.  The  black  list,  a 
tale  of  early   Californie.     1893 

Relates  the  narrow  escapes  from 
death  of  a  rhan  who  had  been  placed 
on  the  death-list  of  the  Mormons. 
The  book  pictures  the  life  of  Cali- 
fornia in  the  early  fifties  and  espe- 
cially San  Francisco  in  the  days  of 
the    Vigilance    Committee. 

Eystek,  Mrs  Nellie  (Blessing).  A 
Chinese  Qtiaker.  an  uufictitious  novel. 
1902 

A  startling  story,  true  in  every 
important  detail,  of  a  Chinese  boy 
who  was  trained  and  educated  by  a 
friend  of  John  Greenleaf  Whittier  in 
California.  The  boy  has  since  Ijecome 
a  high  mandarin  in  China  and  is 
still  what  Mr  Whittier  called  him, 
"A  Chinese  Quaker." — Sunset,  v.  9, 
p.    416. 

Facts,  by  a  woman.     1881 

The  experiences  of  a  book  agent 
who  had  as  her  field  of  operation  a 
portion    of    northern    California. 

Faenham,  Mrs  Eliza  Woodson  (Buk- 
HANs).  The  ideal  attained,  being  the 
story  of  two  steadfast  souls  and  how 
they  won  their  happiness  and  lost  it 
not.     1865 

A  sentimental  story  written  in  a 
style  now  obsolete.  Its  chief  interest 
lies  in  its  description  of  social  life  in 
San  Francisco  in  early  days. 

Ferguson,     Mrs     Esther     (Baldwin). 

The  lump  of  gold.     1910 

The  story  is  told  in  its  title.  A 
California  nugget  worked  in  an  idea.- 
istic  way  into  a  romance  of  morals 
by  a  writer  who  has  seen  the  mines 
and  has  seen  the  world. — Stanislaiis 
Corcoran. 

Fernald,  Chester  Bailey.  The  cat  and 
the  cherub,  and  other  stories.  1896 
The  Chinese  of  San  Francisco  are 
the  amusing  subject  of  these  tales 
which  differ  widely  from  those  of 
C.  W.  Doyle.  The  author  enters  with 
interest  and  real  sympathy  into  the 
curious  workings  of  a  Celestial  mind. 
— Baker. 

Field,     Charles     Kellogg,     cG     Irwin, 

William    Henry.      Stanford    stories. 

1900 

These  are  stories  of  the  university 
as  it  was  before  the  era  of  new  build- 
ings. While  the  attempt  has  been 
made  to  create  in  character,  incident, 
and    atmosphere    a    picture    of    Stan- 


ford life,  the  ."stories,  as  stories,  an^ 
fiction  with  a  fi'W  exceptions. — Prrfa 
ti'ry    note. 

FiLCHEK,  Joseph  Adams.  Untold  stories 
of  California,  short  stories  illtistrating 
phases  of  life  peculiar  to  early  days  in 
the  West.     1903 

A  score  of  good  stories  of  miners, 
stage  drivers,  and  bandits,  told  in  a 
very  effective  manner,  bringing  out 
most  clearly  the  characteristics  of  the 
Argonauts. 

Fisher,  Frederick  Vining.  The  trans- 
formation of  Job.     1900 

Community  life  in  the  high  Sierras 
in  the  early  days,  together  with  ex- 
cursions to  the  big  trees  and  Yosem- 
ite,  furnish  the  inspiring  atmosphere 
in  which  an  orphan  boy  works  out 
his   own   salvation. 

Fisher,  Mary.     The  Treloars.     1917 

A  family  living  in  the  hills  near 
Berkeley.  "The  chief  value  of  the 
book  is  its  concise  comments  on  social 
and  ethical  problems  of  today." — 
Overland,  July,    1917. 

Fitch,  Mrs  Anna  Maeiza.  Bound 
down ;  or,  Life  and  its  possibilities. 
1870 

A  visit  to  the  Cliff  House  where  the 
two  leading  characters  are  impris- 
oned in  a  cave  by  the  rising  tide  is 
the  central  event  around  which  the 
minor  events   cluster. 

Fitch,  Thomas,  d  Fitch,  Anna  Mabiza. 
Better  days ;  or,  A  millionaire  of  to- 
morrow.     1892 

The  local  coloring  is  slight,  as 
Arizona  furnishes  the  principal  set- 
ting. The  object  of  the  story  is  to 
show  that  those  possessed  of  vast 
wealth  can  be  a  great  blessing  to  the 
human   race. 

Florence,  William  Jermyn.  Florence 
fables.     1888 

The  scenes  are  laid  in  various 
counties.  Two  fables,  "Santa  Rosa" 
and  "Sausalito,"  have  a  local  atmos- 
phere. The  latter  is  of  San  Fran- 
cisco Bay  and  Mission  Dolores. 

Foote,  31  rs  Maby  (Hallock).  The 
ground-swell.      1919 

The  shore  along  the  coast  beyond 
Half  Moon  Bay  is  where  a  delightful 
and  eventful  summer  is  spent  by  a 
retired  army  ofRcer  and  his  wife. 
The  story  deals  with  the  fortunes 
and  incidents  in  the  lives  of  their 
children.  The  war  is  in  progress  and 
one  daughter  gives  her  life  while 
caring  for  our  sick  and  wounded 
boys  in  France. 

In  exile,  and  other  stories.     1894 

Two  of  the  six  stories  have  a  decid- 
edly local  coloring.  "In  exile"  is  a 
story  of  the  foothills,  and  Bear  River 
Valley  furnishes  the  atmosphere  for 
"A  cloud  on  the  mountain." 


110 


NEWS    NOTES    OE    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


A  picked  company.     1912 

The  sordid  side  of  life  in  the  golden 
days  of  '41)  and  the  early  fifties  is 
shown  in  all  its  repulsiveness.  The 
greater  part  of  the  book  is  a  picture 
of  early  days   in  Oregon. 


The  prodigal.     1900 

San  Francisco  about  the  year  1880. 
The  story  of  a  shipwrecked  prodigal 
and  of  his  reformation. 


A  touch  of  sun,  and  other  stories. 


1903 

Tales  of  life  on  the  Pacific  side  of 
the  Great  Divide.  They  interpret  the 
variance  in  character  which  gives 
California  and  its  people  so  much  of 
an  individuality  among  the  states  of 
the   Union. — Dial. 

The  initial  story  breathes  of  the 
foothills  around  Grass  Valley,  its 
mines  and  people.    , 

The  valley  road.    1915 

How  a  mining  engineer  under- 
takes to  develop  a  project  involving 
,  great  difficulties  is  the  theme.  The 
events  cover  many  years.  Marys- 
ville,  Colfax  and  the  adjacent  coun- 
try is  the  locality  where  this  project 
is  exploited.  The  San  Francisco 
disaster  is  also  featured. 

Forbes,  Mrs  Haeeie  Rebecca  Piper 
(Smith).  Mission  tales  in  the  days 
of  the  dons.     1909 

Mission  tales  based  on  facts, 
stories,  and  reminiscences  of  Cali- 
fornia pioneers ;  also  legends  and 
traditions  that  have  grown  up 
around   the  various   missions. 

FoRMAN,  Henry  James,  d  Woods,  Wal- 
ter.    The  pony  express.     ]925 

A  thrilling  story  of  the  bravery 
and  patriotism  of  the  pony  express 
riders  who  carried  the  mail  from 
St.  .Toseph,  Missouri,  to  Sacramento 
and  San  Francisco  during  1860  and 
1861.  Like  "The  covered  wagon," 
this  story  has  its  screen  version  and 
is  familiar  to  the  movie-going  public. 

Foster,    Mrs    Caroline    Holcombe 

(Wright).    Little  stories  of  yesterday. 

1906 

Seven  short  stories  of  the  old 
California   mission    days. 

Franklin,  Annie.  Billy  Fairchild, 
widow,  and  other  stories.     1917 

A  collection  of  short,  romantic 
California  stories  in  which  the  loca- 
tions are  vague  and  of  little  impor- 
tance. 

French,  Davida,  cC-  others.  Not  in- 
cluded in  sheepskin ;  Stanford  stories. 
1907 

This  book  does  not  aspire  to  por- 
tray Stanford  life  in  its  entirety,  nor 
does  it  seek  to  justify  many  phases 
of  undergraduate  activity.  It  de- 
fends   itself    only    in    the    light    of    a 


personal  interpretation  of  several 
years  connection  with  things  not 
included    in    a    .sheepskin. — Foreword. 

Friend,  James  Edward.     One  thousand 

liars.     1893 

A  political  tale  of  San  Diego  in  the 
early   nineties. 

Frost,  Mrs  Jenostett  Blakeslee.  Gem  of 
tlie  mines,  a  thrilling  narrative  of  Cali- 
fornia life.     186G 

The  heroine,  a  beautiful  and  virtu- 
ous young  woman,  finally  triumphs 
over  the  many  temptations  in  her 
way,  after  the  manner  of  heroines 
during  the  fifties.  Joaquin  Murieta, 
the  bandit,  figures  to  some  extent  in 
the  book.  Sacramento  plays  an  im- 
portant part  in  the  story. 

Gally.  James  W.  Sand,  and  Big  Jack- 
Small.     1880 

Two  tales  of  the  mines  and  stage 
coach  days.  "Sand"  was  first  pub- 
lished  in  the   Californian   as  a  serial. 

Gerbekding,    Mrs    Elizabeth.       Golden 

chimney  ;  a  boy's  mine.     1902 

A  bright  boy  buys  the  right  to  mine 
the  soot  from  the  chimney  of  an 
abandoned  smelting  plant  located  on 
the  beach  below  Russian  Hill,  San 
Francisco,  and  thereby  secures  funds 
with  which  to  fit  himself  for  his 
profession. 

Gibson,  Mrs  Ellen.  A  fair  Californian, 
by  Olive  Harper,  pseud.     1889 

A  San  Francisco  girl  whose  finan- 
cial reverses  carry  her  to  Sacra- 
mento where  she  teaches  music. 
She  then  goes  to  Mexico  where  she 
acquires  great  wealth  which  enables 
her  to  return  to  San  Francisco  and 
marry  the  man  for  whom  she  has 
made    great    sacrifices. 

Glascock,  Mrs  Mary  Willis  (Wall). 
Dare.     1882 

Scene,  San  Francisco ;  time,  early 
eighties.  There  are  also  glimpses  of 
Mt.  Shasta  and  a  summer's  outing  at 
Monterey. 

Goodrich,  Samuel  Griswold.  The  ad- 
ventures of  Billy  Bump.     n.  d. 

A  book  for  children,  written  in  the 
stilted  style  of  its  day.  Recounts  the 
adventures  of  a  boy  who  came  to 
California  in  1849,  made  a  fortune  m 
the  mines  and  then  lost  it  at  tlie 
gaming  table  in  San  Francisco.  His 
reformation   follows. 

Goodwin,  Charles  Carrol.  Comstock 
club.     1891 

Experiences  of  seven  miners  of 
-  Virginia  City,  Nevada.  These  men 
had  gone  to  California  in  the  first 
days  of  the  gold  rush  and  they  spent 
their  evenings  relating  anecdotes  of 
their  adventures  in  the  various  mni- 
ing  camps  in  both  Callifornia  and 
Nevada. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    FICTION   LIST. 


Ill 


<;raham.     Mis     MzVEGAKET      (Coi.lter). 
Stoi-ies  of  the  foothills.     1895 

The  cliaracter  drawing  is  remarka- 
ably  sti'dng,  the  sense  of  humor  and 
pathos  marked,  and  the  artistic 
reserve  of  the  story  teller  never 
relaxed. — Book    buyer. 

The  scenes  are  laid  in  the  foothills 
of   southern    California. 


The  wizard's  daughter,  and  other 

stories.     1905 


A  few  of  these  stories  have  ,a  Cali- 
fornia setting,  but  the  environment 
is  of  secondary  importance. 

Gkanic'E,    liowENA.      Family    gem ;    mis- 
cellaneous stories.     1856 

Stories  of  a  sensational  type  com- 
mon to  newspapers.  They  appeared 
originally  in  the  Golden  era  and 
other  journals  of  the  early  days,  and 
were  popular  with  the  miners. 

Gkekn,  William  Semple.     Sacrifice  ;  or. 
The  living  dead.     1882 

The  principal  events  take  place  in 
the  region  of  the  Dead  Sea.  The  first 
chapter,  however,  has  to  do  with  a 
family  living  on  the  Alameda  between 
San   Jose  and  Santa  Clara. 

Gregory,     Jackson.       The     everlasting 

whisper.     1922 

The  mighty  ranges  and  vast  for- 
ests of  the  high  Sierras  are  the  back- 
ground of  this  romance  in  which  a 
man  who  is  an  adventurer  and  ex- 
plorer conquers  dangers  and  hard- 
.ships  and  a  spoiled  child  of  wealth  is 
moulded  into  a  courageous  and  use- 
ful  woman. 


Ladyfingers.     1920 

Robert  Ashe,  alias  Ladyfingers,  a 
San  Francisco  boy  left  an  oriDhan. 
became  a  pickpocket,  thief  and  safe- 
cracker, yet  through  it  all  remained 
a  poet  and  an  innocent  boy  at  heart. 

The  maid  of  the  mountain.  1925 


A  tale  of  the  high  Sierras  in  which 
the  romance  and  adventure  revolve 
around  an  untutored  child  of  nature 
and  a  young  gold  seeker. 

Grey,  Zaxe.     Tappan's  burro.     1923 

A  book  of  short  stories.  The  first 
gives  its  title  to  the  book.  The  set- 
ting of  Tappan's  burro  is  Death 
Valley  and  vicinity.  The  other 
stories  are   not   of   California. 

Wanderer  of  the  wasteland.    1923 


A  man  believing  that  he  had  killed 
his  brother  wanders  for  years  in  the 
desert.  He  is  helpful  to  others  who 
have  had  to  seek  the  seclusion  of  the 
wasteland  but  finally  returns  to 
civilization.  The  lure  of  Death  Val- 
ley  gives   the   California   coloring. 

Gtje,  Belle  Willey.  The  fugitives.  1923 
A  young  man  and  a  yoimg  woman 


who  wish  to  escape  from  the  con- 
ventions of  their  eastern  surround- 
ings find  themselves  neighbors  on 
the  coast  of  southern  California 
somewhere  in  the  vicinity  of  Los 
Angeles.  The  descriptions  of  the 
favored  spot  in  which  they  live  are 
vivid    and    entertaining. 

Gt  ezenec,  Alfked.     L'amour  au  uouveau 
monde.     In  French,     n.  d. 

A  romance  of  the  Santa  Cruz  mis- 
sion in  the  days  of  the   Padres. 

Bras  d'acier.     1891 


The  adventurous  days  of  the  gold 
rush  furnish  opportunities  for  a 
French  hero  to  perform  most  remark- 
able feats  of  prowess.  Indians,  gaiii- 
blers  and  adventurers  add  interest  to 
the  exciting  events  here  pictured. 
The  action  takes  place  in  San  Fran- 
cisco  and  the   placer  mines. 

GuA'NisoN.      Charles      Andrew.      The 
beautiful  eyes  of  Ysidria.     1894 

Full  of  the  atmosphere  of  the  old 
Spanish-California  days  and  the 
beauties  of  Marin  County  where  the 
dramatic  action  of  the  story  takes 
place. 

In  the  San  Benito  hills,  etc.    1S91 

Three  short  stories  and  soine 
verses.  The  first  story,  which  gives 
the  name  to  the  collection,  has  San 
Benito  County  as  a  setting  at  the 
time    of   the   outlaw  Vasquez. 

A  Napa  Christchild.    189G 


Two  old-fashioned  Christmas  tale.s. 
The  first  gives  vivid  glimpses  of  the 
Napa  Valley  as  seen  from  the  sur- 
rounding  liiils. 

"Benicia's  letters."  These  letters 
are  written  by  a  Californian  who  is 
far  from  home.  In  them  he  ex- 
presses his  love  for  his  friends  m 
far   away    Santa   Clara  Valley. 

Habberton,  John.  Romance  of  Cali- 
fornia life ;  illustrated  by  Pacific  coast 
stories,  thrilling,  pathetic  and  humor- 
ous.    1879 

,  First   published    in    IS 77    under    the 
title   "Some   folks." 


Some  folks.     1877 

A  collection  of  sketches,  the  major- 
ity of  which  depict  the  picturesque 
life  of  the  mining  camps  after  the 
manner  of  Bret  Harte's  earlier 
stories. 

Haines,  Alice  Calhoun.    Flower  of  the 
world.      1922 

The  story  deals  with  the  develop- 
ment of  a  beautiful  girl  who  lost  the 
"fiower  of  the  world."  The  setting 
for  the  story  is  an  artist  colony  on 
the  coast  of  southern  California.  The 
heroine  also  lives  for  a  time  with  me 
gypsy  tribes   of  Lower  California. 


2— 44S0J 


112 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Haines,    Doxal    Ha^sfiltox.       Sky-Line 

Inn.     1!)2?, 

An  inn  in  tliu  liigli  Sierras  of  cen- 
tr;il  California  is  tlie  scene  of  action 
in  this  intprestins  tale  of  an  ex- 
soldier  of  the  French  army  "who  is 
a  culinary  genius.  The  narrative  of 
an  eventful  summer  forms  the  story 
of   "Sky-Line    Inn." 

H.VLL.  Angelo.  Forty-one  thieves.  1919 
A  Nevada  County  story  giving  an 
account  of  a  stage  robbery,  a  miir- 
der,  the  capture  of  the  murderers 
after  a  chase  of  three  years,  and 
their    final    punishment. 

Han  KINS,    Arthur    Preston.      Cole    of 

Spyglass  Mountain.     1923 

Joshua  Cole  fights  his  way  through 
many  hardships  until  his  wonderful 
and  natural  bent  along  scientific  lines 
makes  him  famous.  He  discovers  a 
California  mountain  eminently  fitted 
for  astronomical  observation,  obtains 
a  homestead,  erects  an  observatorj- 
and  makes  a  wonderful  discovery. 
Romance,  mystery  and  danger  adil 
spice  to  the  narrative. 

Falcon,  of  Squawtootb.     1923 

Squawtooth,  a  ranch  in  the  desert, 
the  construction  of  a  railroad  wit'i 
its  camps,  and  Falcon,  a  product  of 
thp  western  construction  camp,  are 
high  lights  in  this  typical  western 
story. 

Heritage  of  the  hills.     1922 

The  high  Sierras  as  the  setting, 
the  solving  of  an  ethical  question 
involving  keeping  faith  with  the 
Indians,  accompanied  by  a  rather 
unusual  love  story,  make  the  book 
most    entertaining. 

The  valley  of  Arcana.    1923 

An  unexplored  valley  in  the  remote 
mountains  of  California  is  the  setting 
for  a  story  of  love  and  adventure. 

Harraden,   Beatrice.     Hilda   Strafford, 
a  California  story.     1897 

California  life  among  IDnglish  colo- 
nists in  the  foothills  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia  is  here  portrayed. 

Harris,  ^Y.  B.    Pioneer  life  in  California. 

1SS4 

The  story  depicts  the  evils  caused 
by  drinking  and  gambling,  also  the 
quickly  won  and  quickly  lost  for- 
tunes, characteristic  of  early  days  in 
California. 

Hart,    Jerome   Alfred.      The    Golcouda 

bonanza.      1923 

The  far  west  is  the  setting  for 
this  strong  story.  It  sweeps  from 
the  lofty  mountains  of  the  Sierra  to 
the  mighty  Pacific ;  from  the  dark 
depths  of  silver  mines  to  the  bril- 
liant scenes  of  club,  society  and 
studio  life  in  the  Bay  City. — Pub- 
lisher. The  struggle  for  possession 
of  a  mine. 


A  vigilante  gii-1.      1910 

A  stor.v  of  California  which  i.iic- 
tures  the  tran.sition  period  in  the 
state's  history,  between  tlie  glamour 
and  romance  of  adventurous  gold- 
hunting  days  and  the  dawn  of  a 
powerful  reign  of  law  and  order. 
Vigilantes  justice  and  lynch  law  rule 
the   land. — Book  rev.  digest. 

Hart,  William   Surrey.     Told  under  a 
white   oak   tree.     1922 

Bill  Hart's  pinto  pony  tells  of  his 
adventures  in  the  movie  world  as  he 
carries  his  master  through  the  haz- 
ardous incidents  of  his  film  successes. 

Harte,  Francis  Bret. 

No  attempt  is  made  to  give  a  com^- 
plete   list  of  Bret  Harte's  stories. 

Haslett.    Harriet    Holmes.      Impulses. 
1920 

An  interesting  story  of  San  Fran- 
cisco life  in  which  the  hero  followed 
his  impulses  and  was  led  thereby  to 
love   and   happiness. 

Hayes,  J.  W.    Tales  of  the  Sierras.   1900 
The    title    indicates    the    setting    of 
these     tales.      The     illustrations     are 
humorous. 

Heath,    Sarah    Ritchie.      The   Padre's 

little  caretaker.     1913 

A  romance  of  Carmel  Mission.  How 
the  little  caretaker,  through  her 
great  love  for  and  devotion  to  Father 
Serra  and  the  mission,  made  the 
restoration  of  Carmel  possible,  is  the 
theme. 

Hemphill,    Yivia.      Down    the    mother 
lode.     1922 

A  collection  of  ten  stories  of  the 
gold  region  and  the  golden  days  of 
California.  The  author  tells  us  thdt 
"each  one  is  based  upon  truth. 
Somewhere,  sometime,  some  place, 
certain  characters  lived  the  scenes 
and   actions   here   described." 

Herr,    Charlotte    B.      Their    Mariposa 
legend.     1921 

A  charming  legend  of  Catalina 
Island  with  a  modern  romance  which 
is    enacted    there. 

HoLADAY,  May.     On  the  side-lines.     1925 

A  wholesome,  jolly  story  for  boys 
in  their  teens.  The  college  used  as 
a  background  is  undoubtedly  Stan- 
ford University.  The  story  is  writ- 
ten, however,  from  the  viewpoint  of 
the  high  school  boy  rather  than  that 
of  the  university  man. 

Holder,    Charles    Frederick.      Adven- 
tures  of   Torqua.      1902 

The  life  and  remarkable  adventures 
of  three  boys,  refugees  on  the  island 
of  Santa  Catalina  (Pimugna)  in  the 
eighteenth  century. 


vol.  21,  no.  2 


CALIFORNIA    FICTION    LIST. 


113 


The  treawvire  divers.     1S!)S 


The.se  adventurers  in  .search  of  th<^ 
\vondcr.s  of  the  deep  begin  their  cx- 
Ijedition  from  San  I'edro  and  Santa 
Catalina,  where  they  test  their  ship. 
Thence  they  leave  for  the  South  Seas. 

Hopkins,  Mis  Pauline  Bradford 
(  Mackie  ) .  The  story  of  Kate,  a  tale 
of  California  life  for  girls.     1903 

Kate  is  an  ambitious  southern  Cali- 
fornia girl  who  has  to  teach  school  in 
a  small  town  Instead  of  going  to  the 
University  of  California  as  she 
wishes.  She  later  receives  an  art 
scholarship    in    San    Francisco. 

Hough,  Emerson.  Tlie  covered  wagon. 
11)22 

The  pioneer  epic  of  the  west.  The 
struggles,  brave  deeds  anc]  dangers 
faced  by  the  American  pioneers  are 
fascinatingly  portrayed  in  this  story 
which  has  been  transferred  to  the 
screen  and  given  to  the  world  as  a 
magnificent  tribute  to  the  builders 
of   the    west. 

Hudson,  Lillian.  Governor  Thurnioud's 
birdhouse.      1915 

An  up-to-date  story  for  children. 
The  author  says :  "Our  town  sits 
proudly  on  the  uplands  of  the  penin- 
sula that  extends  like  a  sheltering 
arm  around  the  western  rim  of  the 
most  beautiful  bay  in  the  world  and 
which   terminates    in    San   Francisco.'' 

HxTGHES,  Rupert.  Souls  for  sale.  1922 
A  picture  of  studio  life  in  Holly- 
wood. The  story  revolves  around  a 
woman  who  is  caught  by  the  spell 
of  a  screen  career  and  whose  ambi- 
tion for  such  a  life  overshadows  all 
else. 

Irwin,  Wallace.  Seed  of  the  suu.  1921 
Deals  with  the  Japanese  question. 
The  story  of  the  wresting  of  the 
most  fertile  land  in  the  state  from 
the  native-born  Americans  by  the 
Japanese  backed  by  the  imperial 
government.  The  action  in  the  story 
takes  place  in  the  delta  region  on  the 
Sacramento  River  and  in  other  parts 
of   Sacramento   County. 

Irwin,  William  Henry.  The  readjust- 
ment.    1910 

The  hero,  a  vigorous  youth  of 
Tulare,  falls  in  love  with  a  girl 
of  excjuisite  feeling  and  fine  sense  of 
honor.  Before  their  marriage  a 
crisis  brings  them  to  a  realizatioii 
of  their  uncongeniality  of  spirit.  The 
scenes  are  placed  in  the  Santa  Clara 
Valley,  between  Santa  Clara  and  Los 
Gatos,   and   in   San   Francisco. 


ISAMAN,   Mrs   Sara    (White), 
tales   of   California.     1909 


Tonrist 


A  collection  of  monologues  in  dia- 
lect concerning  the  travels  and 
adventures  of  an  elderly  couple  in 
and  near  Los  Angeles,  told  by  them 
on  their  return  to  their  home  in 
Nebraska. 


J.vcKSON.    Chahlks    Tenay.      a    (lay    of 
souls.     1910- 

Life  in  San  Frauciscd's  bohcmia  is 
heie  pictured.  A  young  man.  after 
going-  down  into  the  depths  of  dissi- 
pation, is  cleansed  through  the  help 
of  a  woman. 

Jackson,   Mrs   Helen    Maria    (Fiske) 

Hunt.     Kamona.     1900. 

The  story  was  written  to  expose 
the  injustice  of  United  States  gov- 
ernment policy  towards  the  Indians. 
The  scene  is  southern  California. 
The  author  takes  one  of  the  Mission 
Indians  for  her  hero,  while  picturing 
old-fashioned  life  on  a  Spanish 
rancho,  the  household,  the  pastoral 
occu]iations,  and  the  religious  observ- 
ances.     A   tragic    love    story. — Baker. 

Jajies,  George  Wharton.     The  story  of 

Scraggles.     1900 

Scraggles'  autobiography  is  a 
record  of  sweet  bird  life.  Mr  James 
l^efriended  this  little  weak  scraggly 
sparrow,  made  a  pet  of  it,  and  finally 
interpreted  its  thoughts  as  he  set 
them  down  in  his  story. — Book  rev. 
digest. 

Jarboe,  Mrs  Mary  H.    (Thomas).     Go 
forth  and   find.     1895 

Santa  Cruz,  Monterey  and  vicinity- 
furnish  the  background  for  the 
greater  part  of  the  book.  The  pic- 
turesquenesp  of  the  country  as  it 
was  twenty-five  years  ago  is  well 
described. 

Robert  Atterbury,  a  study  of  life 

and  love.     1896 

The  east  furnishes  the  settings  for 
most  of  the  story.  A  few  chapters, 
however,  picture  Santa  Cruz  as  ii 
was   in   the   early   nineties. 

Jessop,    George    H.      Gerald    Ffrench's 
friends.     1889 

Contents :  "Rise  and  fall  of  the 
Irish  Aigle,"  has  to  do  with  Ffrench's 
editorship  of  a  San  Francisco  news- 
]3aper  in  the  seventies ;  "Carrick 
Meagher,"  a  picturesque  character 
on  the  Irish  Aigle  force ;  "At  the 
town  of  the  Queen  of  the  Angels," 
an  exciting  newspaper  story  laid  in 
Los  Angeles  at  the  time  of  the  com- 
pletion of  the  Southern  Pacific  rail- 
road ;  "An  old  man  from  the  old 
country,"  a  San  Francisco  story  ; 
"Last  of  the  Costellos,''  laid  in  Ire- 
land, San  Fi'ancisco,  and  Marysville  ; 
"Under  the  redwood  tree,"  a  touch- 
ing story  of  a  lumber  camp  in  Hum- 
boldt  County. 

Judge    Lynch.     1889 

A  romance  of  the  California  vine- 
yards. A  small  town  in  the  coast 
range  region  is  the  scene  of  a  lynching 
party.  Fortunately  the  victim  proves 
his  innocence  in  time  to  prevent  the 
final   act. 


n4 


NEWS   NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Johnson,    Mvk    Constanck    Fuller 

(Whekler).        Mary     i-n     California. 

1922 

The  adventures  ol'  a  family  from 
the  east  who  spend  a  vacation  in 
California.  Their  travels  take  them 
over  a  large  portion  of  the  state, 
durinp,-  which  the  three  children  enjoy 
the  thrills  of  many  exciting  expe- 
riences. 

JonNSON,    Elizabeth    Winthrop.      One 
chance  in  a  hundred.     1911 

This  story  has  Idah  Meachani 
Strowbridge's  "Greater  love  hath  no 
man"  as  a  base,  but  gives  the  hero 
a  fate  less  bitter.  It  describes  viv- 
idly the  country  around  Los  Angeles 
Monterey  and  San  Francisco  are 
described  less  fully. 

Orchard  folk.     1898 


Two   California   stories. 

"The  Delician=^  "  The  life  of  the 
Spanish-California  families  living  in 
Santa  Barbara  during  the  fifties  and 
later  is  portrayed. 

"Silvela  of  Dulzura,"  the  second 
story,  is  in  a  measure  both  a  sequel 
and  a  contrast  to  the  former  story. 
Los  Angeles  County  furnishes  the 
setting.  The  easy-going,  pleasure- 
loving  ways  of  Benito  Silvela  are 
typical    of  the    early    Californians. 

Johnson,  Gladys  Etta.    Moon  country. 
1924 

A  mystery  story  laid  in  the  coun- 
try surrounding  Half  Moon  Bay,  San 
Mateo  County.  Terror  lurks  in  the 
lupine  bushes  and  strange  things 
happen  in  the  old  stone  house  above 
the  shore,  in  the  midst  of  which  a 
young  man  and  girl  work  out  their 
destiny. 

Wind  along  the  waste.     1921 


A  weird  tale  full  of  mystery.  The 
setting  is  at  "Dune  House,"  an  ouc- 
of-the-way  place  on  the  San  Mateo 
coast.  Many  terrifying  things  hap- 
pen at  "Dune  House,"  the  solution 
of  which  does  not  come  until  the  last 
and  then  in  a  most  unexpected  man- 
ner. Some  of  the  descriptions  are 
excellent. 

Jones,  Theodore  Elden.     Leaves  from 
an  Argonaut's  note-book.     1905 

Judge  Jones  arrived  in  California 
in  1850,  and  lived  in  the  mines  of 
Trinity  County  for  forty-nine  years. 
He  is  well  qualified  to  give  a  genuini^ 
picture  of  life  in  the  pioneer  days. 

Jordan,    David    St^vhr.      The    book    of 

Knight  and  Barbara.     1899 

•  A  series  of  children's  stories  origi- 
nally told  by  Dr  Jordan  to  his  own 
children,  and  afterwards  written 
down  by  two  Stanford  students,  as 
Dr   Jordan   told   them. 

Keeler,  Ralph.    Gloverson  and  his  silent 
partner.     1869 

The  author  has  made  California, 
mainly    San    Francisco,    the    setting. 


There  is  ver.y  little  local  coloring, 
however,  the  names  only  being  Ca.li- 
forninn. 

Kelly,  Allen.  I'.cars  1  have  met  and 
others.     3003 

Mr  Kelly  was  at  one  time  a  well 
known  newspaper  man  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. He  writes  of  grizzlies  and 
other  bears.  A  full  description  of 
the  capture  of  Monarch,  the  big  griz- 
zly in  Golden  Gate  Park,  is  given. 
The  illustrations  by  various  artists 
are  as  amusing  as  the  text. 

Kenyon,  Camilla.     Bandy's  Flat.    1921 

One  of  the  almost  deserted  mining 
camps  of  the  gold  rush  days  fur- 
nishes the  scenes  of  this  tale  of 
hidden    treasure    and    adventure. 

Knibbs,  Henry  Herbert.  Overland 
Red  :  a  romance  of  the  Moonstone  Can- 
yon trail.     1914 

A  vivid  picture  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia life  during  the  prospecting 
days.  The  hero,  Overland  Red,  is  a 
good  type  of  the  men  bred  by  the 
life  of  the  period.  It  is  especially 
interesting  to  one  who  knows  south- 
ern California.  The  Camino  Real  is 
featured. 

Knox,  Jessie  Juliet.  In  the  house  of 
the  Tiger.     1911 

A  study  of  the  traffic  in  Chinese 
girl  slaves,  describing  fully  many 
Chinese  customs,  and  tracing  the 
traffic  from  its  base  in  China  to  San 
Francisco  Chinatown.  Much  local 
color  is  introduced  in  regard  to  the 
Rescue  Mission   in   San  Francisco. 

Little  Almond  Blossom,  a  book  of 

Chinese  stories  for  children.     1904. 

A  series  of  sympathetic  stories  of 
Chinese  children  in  San  Francisco, 
illustrated  by  photographs  of  these 
most    interesting   little    orientals. 

Kyne,  Peter  Bernard.  Cappy  Ricks. 
1915 

San  Francisco  as  headquarters  for 
the  wholesale  lumber  and  shi^^^iing 
trade  of  the  Pacific  coast  is  feature j. 
Cappy  Ricks,  proclaimed  bv  his  asso- 
ciates "a  character,"  is  described  as 
being  "master  of  many  ships  but 
skipper  of  none." 

The  go-getter.     1921 

Bill  Peck,  private  in  the  late  war, 
will  show  you  how  to  be  one.  The 
beloved  Cappy  Ricks  dominates  as 
usual.  A  San  Francisco  story  with 
good  local  coloring. 

The  long  chance.     1914 

A  tale  of  the  early  days  in  Cali- 
fornia when  corrupt  men  in  the  state 
land  offices  maneuvered  to  get  the 
best  land  and  water  rights  for  them- 
selves. It  gives  a  good  description 
of  California  desert  lands. 

Never  the  twain  shall  meet.    1923 

This  romance  of  east  and  west 
pictures   a   struggle  between   a   South 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   FICTION   LIST. 


115 


Sea  island  queen  and  a  conventional 
girl  of  the  west  for  the  love  of  a 
successful  young  shipping  merchant 
of  San  Francisco.  The  latter  city  is 
where  most  of  the  events  take  place, 
although  the  action  shifts  to  Del 
Monte  and  then  to  the  island  home 
of  the  queen. 

The  pride  of  Palomar.     1921 

The  story  of  the  efforts  of  a  gal- 
lant young  Californian  to  save  his 
ranch  from  falling  into  the  hands  of 
the  Japanese.  By  heroic  schemes 
and  much  ingenuity  he  finally  suc- 
ceeds in  preventing  the  transfer  and 
saves  the  ranch.  The  setting  seems 
to  be  in  the  vicinity  of  San  Luis 
Obispo,  the  local  coloring  adding 
much  to  the  interest  of  the  story. 


The  three  godfathers.     1913 

A  story  of  desert  sufferings,  in 
which  three  bad  men  make  the 
supreme  sacrifice  for  the  love  of  an 
orphan  babe.  "In  him  they  beheld 
the   King." 


Lane,  Mrs  Rose   (Wilder). 
roads.     1919 


Diverging 


Local  color  is  plentiful.  Sacra- 
mento, San  Francisco,  the  fruit- 
raising  country  and  the  oil  districts 
are  all  settings  for  this  tale  of  a 
woman    who    faces    the    world    alone. 

He  was  a  man.     1925 


The  hero  of  this  biographical  novel 
is  known  to  the  public  as  Jack  Lon- 
don, but  in  the  story  is  called  Gordon 
Blake.  The  California  coloring  is 
pronounced.  From  the  San  Fran- 
cisco waterfront  where  London  was 
born  to  the  Valley  of  the  Moon 
where  he  died,  we  follow  this  man 
who  has  added  to  the  fame  of  his 
native  state. 

La    Page,    Gertrude.      Children    of    the 

thorn  wreath.     1902 

Sliort  stories  of  little  chilldren  in 
a  San  Francisco  hospital,  picturing 
their  sweetness  and  their  naughti- 
ness, their  .sorrows  and  their  joys. 

LiCHTENSTEiN,    JoY.      For   the   blue   and 

gold ;   a  tale  of  life   at  the   Uuiversity 

of  California  .  .  .  1901 

The  hero  is  working  his  way 
through  college  and  the  story  is  a 
record  of  his  freshman  experiences. 
Illustrated  by  photographs  of  the 
university. 

Livingston,   Florence   Bingham.     The 

custard  cup.     1921 

The  Custard  Cup  was  the  common 
name  given  to  a  group  of  run-down 
tenement  houses.  The  locality  might 
have  been  any  one  of  our  large  cities. 
"Penzie''  moves  through  the  story  a 
lover   of  her   kind,    an   ultra   optimist. 

Lloyd,   Robert.      The   treasure   of   Shag 
rock,  an  adventure  story.     1902 

Of  interest  to  boys,  contains  much 
good    advice    and   some   very   pleasing 


descriptions  of  San  Francisco.  An 
account  of  the  destruction  of  Shag 
rock  with  an  illustration  of  the  ex- 
plosion is  given. 

London,  Jack.    The  abysmal  brute.   1913 
San    Francisco — its    prize    ring    and 
sporting  life  exposed — the  theme.     The 
redwoods    and    mountains    of    Mendo- 
cino  are   also    described. 

The  call  of  the  wild.    1903 

The  first  few  pages  of  the  story  ax''"! 
placed  in  the  beautiful  Santa  Clara 
Valley  and  San  Francisco,  but  the 
scene  soon  changes  to  Seattle  and 
Alaska. 

The  cruise  of  the  Dazzler.     1902 

The  adventures  of  a  young  boy 
with  bay  pirates  in  and  around  San 
Francisco   Bay. 

The    faith    of    men    and    other 


stories.     1904 

Tales  of  the  North.  The  story  of 
"Jees  Uck"  is  placed  in  San  Fran- 
cisco for  a   short  time. 


The  game.     1905 

The  story  tells  of  a  western  prize 
fighter,  his  sweetheart  and  his  last 
fight.  The  background  is  Oakland 
and    vicinity. 

— -  The  iron  heel.     1908 


A  copy  of  an  imaginative  manu- 
script written  in  the  middle  of  the 
twentieth  century,  telling  of  the 
social  conditions  of  the  time,  but  not 
brought  to  light  until  seven  centuries 
later.  San  Francisco  and  neighbor- 
ing cities  furnish  the  local  setting. 

The  little  lady  of  the  big  house. 


1916 

A  large  ranch  in  the  California 
foothills,  with  its  various  activities, 
furnishes  an  opportunity  for  ex- 
haustive discussions  on  agriculture 
and  stock  raising :  also  charming 
descriptions  of  surrounding  scenerv 
are  given.  The  plot  is  not  of  vital 
interest. 

Martin   Eden.     1909 

Berkeley,  University  of  California 
and  San  Francisco  figure  largely  in 
this  story  of  a  sailor  who,  because  of 
his  love  and  admiration  for  a  girl, 
entered  university  societj'  circles, 
educated  himself  and  gained  literary 
fame. 

Michael — brother  of  Jerry.     1917 

An  expose  of  the  cruelty  prac- 
ticed in  the  training  of  trick  animals. 
Barbary  Coast,  San  Francisco,  is 
given    prominence. 

The  night-born  and  other  stories. 


191/ 


A  collection  of  ten  short  stories, 
some  of  which  contain  California 
coloring.  "The  night-born,"  a  storv 
of  Klondike  days  told  at  the  old  Alta 
Invo    Club  ;     "When    the    world    wau 


116 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


young"  has  Mill  Valley  as  a  setting  ; 
"The  benefit  of  the  doubt"  gives 
glimpses  of  saloon  and  courtroom 
life  in  San  Francisco  ;  "Winged 
blackmail,"  a  carrier  pigeon  and  an 
airship  play  an  important  part  in  a 
blackmailing  scheme.  Alameda, 
Berkeley,  Contra  Costa  hills.  Angel 
Island  and  San  Francisco  furnish 
the   local   background. 


The  scarlet  plague.     1915 

On  the  shores  of  the  Pacific,  near 
the  site  of  the  Cliff  House,  Professor 
James  Howard  Smith,  in  the  year 
2073.  tells  his  great-grandchildren  of 
the  scarlet  plague  that  wiped  out  the 
]3eoples  of  the  earth  in  the  early  part 
of  the  twenty-first  century.  Sur- 
rounded by  a  world  reverted  to  bar- 
barism, he  tells  of  the  former  glories 
of  San  Francisco,  with  its  4,000,000 
population,  and  of  the  devastating 
plague  that  passed  over  it,  leaving 
it   desolate. 

The  sea  wolf.     1004 


The  going  down  of  the  Martinez, 
a  ferryboat  plying  between  Sausalito 
and  San  Francisco,  as  described  in 
the  first  chapter,  is  all  that  claims  a 
local    interest. 


Star  rover.     1915 
The     horrors     of     prison     life     are 


depicted.      San  Quentin  is  used  as  the 
settin 


Tales  of  the  fish  patrol.     1905 

The  enforcing  of  the  fishing  laws 
in  the  bays  and  rivers  near  San 
Francisco  by  the  Fish  Patrol  is  the 
subject   of   these   exciting  adventures. 


Turtles  of  Tasman.     1910 

Eight  short  stories.  The  California 
coloring  is  slight.  "The  prodigal 
father"  has  a  reminder  of  (jakland. 
"In  the  drooling  ward"  a  glirnpse  of 
life  in  the  Glen  Ellen  Home  is  given. 

The   Valley   of   the   Moon.      1913 

The  story  of  a  laundry  girl  and  a 
teamster  who  marry  and  live  in  Oak- 
land. The  labor  troubles  enter 
largely  into  this  story  of  the  working 
people  around  the  bay  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. The  two  principal  characters 
become  dissatisfied  with  city  life. 
They  go  to  Carmel  where  they  remain 
for  a  time  in  the  Bohemian  colony  ; 
then,  after  traveling  through  many 
parts  of  California,  find  their  way 
finally  into  the  "Valley  of  the  Moon." 
Sonoma   Valley. 

"When   God  laughs. 

Two  of  the  stories,  the  title  stor.v 
and  "A  wicked  woman,"  mention 
California  localities,  but  only  inci- 
dentally. 

White   Fang.     190() 


A  story  of  a  wolf  dog.  The  first 
four  parts  are  placed  in  Alaska,  but 
in  part  five  the  scene  is  transferred 
to  a  ranch  in  the  Santa  Clara  Valley. 

London,  Tack,  ti-  Strtjnsky,  Anna.    The 
Kemptou-Wace    letters.      1903 

Imaginary      letters      between      two 


friends,  Kempton  in  London  and 
Wace,  a  graduate  student  in  Eco- 
nomics at  the  University  of  Cali- 
fornia. The  concluding  letters  from 
Kempton  are  from  Stanford  Univer- 
sity. With  the  exception  of  local 
names  there  is  very  little  California 
coloring. 

I>0NGW0RTH,   MiKA  THERESA.     Zanlta.  a 

tale  of  the  Yosemite.     1872 

The  story  contains  descriptions  of 
the  vegetation,  animal  life  and  forma- 
tion   of   the   valley. 

LouGHEAD.     Mrs     Flora      (H  a  i  n  e  .s) 
Apponyi.     Black  curtain.     1S98 

A  young  San  Francisco  artist  who 
has  partially  lost  his  eyesight 
leaves  the  city  and  settles  upon  a 
piece  of  government  land  in  the 
Coast  Range  Mountains  of  California 
near  "Escondido  Creek"  in  the  "Ver- 
nal hills."  That  ]ieople  may  not  find 
him  out  he  changes  his  name  and 
takes  up  farming,  although  he  con- 
tinues his  work  of  painting  behind  a 
black   curtain. 

^ —  Man  from  nowhere.     1891 


Only  one  of  the  three  stories  in- 
cluded has  local  color.  The  scene  of 
"Santos's  brother"  is  laid  near  one  of 
the  missions  of  the  Coast  Range. 
Rafael  Santo-  has  been  rescued 
unhurt  from  a  burning  building,  but 
was  left  with  a  clouded  brain.  In 
his  effort  to  save  Felicia,  his 
betrothed,  from  a  fire  he  regained 
his   reason. 

LOWENUERG.     Mr.S    BETTIE     (LILIBNFELD)  . 

Voices.     1920 

Presents  a  solution  for  modern 
unrest.  Joan  Lynn,  the  heroine,  a 
poor  San  Francisco  girl,  is  guided 
by  voices  that  reveal  to  her  the  cure 
for  the  troubles  of  her  country. 

LuMMis.  Charles  Fletcher.   Enchanted 

burro,  stories  of  New  [Mexico  and  South 

America.     1897 

Two  of  these  tales  have  a  local 
interest.  "A  duel  in  the  desert"  con- 
tains a  description  of  a  struggle  to 
the  death  between  a  wild  cat  and  a\- 
owl  near  Coalinga.  "A  tame  deer" 
relates  an  experience  which  the 
writer  had  in  Los  Angeles.  "Our 
yellow  slave"  contains  a  brief  men- 
tion  of   the    discovery    of   gold. 

My  friend   Will.     1912 

How  a  paralytic  regained  health 
by  pluck  and  perseverance.  He  was 
the  editor  of  a  big  Los  Angeles  daily, 
arduous  work  on  which  caused  his 
disability.  His  heroic  struggle  for 
life  and  health  took  place  in  New 
Mexico. 

Li:ther,  Mark  Lee.  The  boosters.  1924 
Contains  a  distinctive  and  charac- 
teristic picture  of  Los  Angeles 
during  the  oil  boom  and  its  spectacu- 
lar development — the  first  novel  to 
deal  with  modern  conditions  in  this 
southern   California  city. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   FICTION   LIST. 


117 


:McCay.  "William  .AI.  The  valley  of  the 
sun.      1921 

The  Mojave  and  the  Death  Valley 
country  are  vividly  pictured  by  one 
who  knows  them  well.  The  need  of 
water  for  these  desert  places  i.? 
stressed.  Tliere  are  many  hard 
knocks  and  also  romance  and  ex- 
citing  adventures    in    the   story. 

INIcChesxey.  L.  Studdiford.  T'uder 
shadow  of  tlie  mission,  a  memory  of 
Santa   Barbara.     1S97 

A  very  personal  account  of  a  period 
spent  in  Santa  Barbara.  It  is  full  of 
interesting  descriptions  of  the  town 
and  its  environment,  Montecito,  Car- 
pinteria,  Hope  Ranch  and  the  cafions. 
The  time  is  the  early  eighties  before 
railroads  and  crowding'  tourists  had 
stirred  the  sleepy  town  to  life. 

McCrackix.  Mrs  .TosEPHiNE  (Clifford). 

"Another    .Tuanita"    and    other    stories. 

1893 

The  scene  of  "A  miner  from  Ari- 
zona" is  laid  in  San  Francisco.  "That 
ranch  of  his"  is  a  San  Joaquin  Valley 
story.  "The  story  of  a  garden"  finds 
its  main  setting  in  Salinas,  and 
"Modern  Monterey"  is  an  interesting 
description  of  California's  early 
capital. 

Overland  tales.     1877 


San  Francisco,  Los  Angeles,  Sacra- 
mento, San  Jose,  San  Mateo,  Gilroy, 
and  Ventura  are  some  of  the  places 
where  the  scenes  of  these  stories  are 
laid. 

:MacGowax,  Alice.  cG  Newberry,  Perry. 
The  million  dollar  suitcase.     1922 

The  attractive  setting  and  local 
Interest  are  centered  around  San 
Francisco's  social  and  business  life 
and  that  of  its  beautiful  suburbs. 
The  mystery  surrounding  a  million 
dollar  bank  shortage  is  the  basis  for 
a  very  interesting  and  exciting  detec- 
tive story. 


The  mystery  woman.     1924 

San  Francisco  furnishes  the  local 
coloring  for  this  satisfying  mystery 
tale.  In  the  solution  a  tangled  plot 
is  revealed  which  reaches  back  over 
a  period  of  tv.-enty  years.  A  per- 
formance at  the  Greek  Theatre,  Uni- 
versity of  California,  occupies  one 
of    the   closing   chapters. 


The  seventh  passenger.     1926 

The  famous  Jerry  Boyne  is  again 
the  hero  in  this  political  mystery 
story  of  San  Francisco.  The  district 
attorney  who  has  cleared  up  the  city 
disappears  on  the  eve  of  election. 
The  apparent  disappearance  from  an 
automobile  unravels  the  mystery  of 
the    seventh   passenger. 

^IcLntire.    Joiix    Jacksox.      As    I    saw- 
it.     1902 

Of  these  stories  only  one  is  about 
California.      "The  story  of  the  mines" 


is  a  description   of  mining  days  after 
the  '49  rush. 

McNeil.  Everett.     The  cave  of  gold ;  a 
tale  of  California  in  "49.     1911 

In  the  story  an  attempt  has  been 
made,  not  only  to  tell  an  interesting 
story,  but  to  interest  the  younger 
generation  in  this  remarkable  and 
dramatic  phase  of  our  national 
development. — Foreword. 

Fighting  with  Fremont.     1910 


Historic  events  such  as  the  Bear 
Flag  revolution,  the  killing  of  Cowie 
and  Fowler  and  the  final  conquest  of 
California  are  told  in  story  form  for 
boys.  Kit  Carson  plays  a  prominent 
part   in   this   tale   of  adventure. 

Marby'at,  Frederick.  Narrative  of  the 
travels  and  adventures  of  ^Monsieur 
Violet,  in  California.  Sonora.  and  west- 
ern Texas.     1843 

Several  chapters  are  devoted  to 
authentic  accounts  of  Indian  tribes  in 
California,  especially  at  Monterey  and 
San  Francisco.  There  are  good  de- 
scriptions of  the  country  and  short 
stories  are  interspersed  illustrative 
of    Indian    life. 

Masox.  Mrs  Grace  (  .Sartwf.ll  ) .  The 
golden  hope.     1916 

A  tale  of  the  "land  of  little  rain" — 
the  eastern  border  of  California.  A 
struggle  to  reclaim  the  desert  and 
its  outcome. 

Mathew.s,   AiiAXDA.     The   hieroglyphics- 

of  love,  stories  of  Sonoratown  and  old 

Mexico.      1906 

Tales  of  the  Mexican  poor  wiio  live 
in  the  Mexican  quarter  of  Los  An- 
geles, and  of  the  settlement  work 
carried  on  by  college  students  for  the 
betterment    of   conditions. 

Matthews,  David  Sterrett.  America 
Kelsey.     1915 

An  historical  romance  of  the  San 
Joaquin  Valley.  The  author  states 
that  "The  names  in  most  instances 
are  those  of  people  who  actually  lived 
there  during  the  strenuous  days  de- 
picted." The  Indian  tribes,  history 
tells  us,  were  as  described. 

May,     Florence     Laxd.       The     broken 

wheel.     1910 

Political  life  in  San  Francisco  at 
the  time  of  the  great  earthquake  is 
vividly  pictured. 

Meyer,  George  Homeu.  Almirante. 
1890 

A  romance  of  the  old-time  Cali- 
fornia before  the  conquest.  The  coast 
country    furnishes    the    atmosphere. 

The  nine  swords  of  Morales  ;  the 


story    of    an    old-time    California    feud. 
190.-) 

Dedicated  to  "The  beautiful  land  of 
Sonoma  .   .   .  scenes  and  surroundings 


118 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


which  have  ever  seemed  to  me  fit 
home  for  romance."  The  scene  is 
laid  in  Sonoma,  about  the  plains  of 
Santa  Rosa  and  on  tlie  Russian  river  ; 
the  time  is  during  the  old  Spanisli 
days. 

Michaels,   Janie  Chase.     Polly  of  the 

Midwaj'-Sunset.     1917 

The  oilfields  of  the  San  Joaquin 
Valley   furnish   the   local   setting. 

MiCHELSON,     Mieiam.       Antliony     Over- 
man.    1906 

A  band  of  people  known  as  Re- 
nunciants  establish  a  community  at 
"Little  Gap"  in  the  Sierra  foothills, 
near  the  American  river.  The  experi- 
ment proves  a  failure,  and  Jessie 
Incell,  a  newspaper  woman  of  San 
Francisco,  after  visiting  the  "City  of 
peace"  makes  a  sensational  story  of 
it  for  the  San  Francisco  Inquirer. 

MiGHELS.  Mrs  Ella  Steeling  (Claek). 

The  full  glory  of  Diantha.     1909 

The  heroine,  a  New  Tork  book- 
keeper, accepts  a  position  in  a 
northern  California  town,  "Boulder 
Camp." 

MiLLAED,   Feank   Bailey.     The  lure   o' 
gold.     1904 

A  California  boy"s  difficulty  in 
bringing  his  "dust"  from  Nome  to 
San  Francisco  where  the  story  ends. 

A  pretty  bandit.     1897 

Also  published  with  the  title  "She 
of  the  West." 

She  of  the  West.     1899 


A  group  of  stories  of  western  girls 
published  in  1897  under  the  title  of 
"A  pretty  bandit."  The  scenes  shift 
from  San  Francisco  to  the  desert  of 
the  Colorado,  the  mountains  of  Cali- 
fornia and  the  San  Joaquin  Valley. 

MnxEE,  Mrs  Elizabeth  Goee.  Ro- 
mances of  the  California  mission  days. 
1905 

The  delightful  atmosphere  of  the 
mission  period  is  presented  in  these 
charming  mission  tales. 

Millee,  Joaquin,  i.e.,  Cincijstnatus 
Heine.  The  first  families  of  the 
Sierras.     1876 

A  story  of  life  in  "The  Forks,"  a 
Sierra  mining  camp  cut  off  from  the 
outside  world.  Into  the  plot  is  woven 
the  story  of  Nancy  Williams,  the  sole 
survivor  of  the  family  which  was 
responsible  for  the  death  of  Joseph 
Smith,   the   mormon   prophet. 

'49.  the  gold-seeker  of  the  Sierras. 


1884 


A  story  of  the  gold  rush  to  Cali- 
fornia, the  Argonauts,  the  first  tunnel, 
the  Vigilantes,  and  the  final  good 
fortune  of  '49,  the  gold  seeker. 

Shadows  of  Shasta.     ISSl 

A    protest,    in    storjr    form,    against 


the  remoyal  of  the  Indians  from  their 
mountain  homes  to  reservations.  The 
scene  is  laid  principally  in  and  around 
a  mining  camp  at  the  foot  of  Shasta. 

—  True  bear  stories.    1900 


These  stories  have  their  setting  in 
Alaska,  Oregon,  and  different  parts  of 
California.  The  majority  are  in  the 
vicinity  of  Mt.  Shasta,  one  of  these 
giving  an  account  of  a  fire  in  the 
woods  of  the  mountain.  The  scene 
of  one  chapter  is  laid  in  San  Diego. 
A  brief  and  interesting  description  of 
San  Diego  is  given,  and  a  good 
account  of  a  jackrabbit  hunt  which 
took  place  at  the  San  Diego  College  of 
Letters.  Another  chapter  is  devoted 
to  a  description  of  the  capture  of 
Monarch,  the  big  Grizzly  in  Golden 
Gate  Park.  ISvery  detail  of  the  cap- 
ture is  given  from  the  start  at  Santa 
Paula  to  the  finish. 

Milne,  "  Mrs  Feances  M  a  e  g  a  r  e  t 
(Tenor).  Heliotrope,  a  San  Francisco 
idyl  .  .  .  and  other  sketches.     1897 

The  first  of  these  little  sketches, 
which  gives  its  name  to  the  volume, 
belongs  to  San  Francisco,  and  another 
"Home  Sweet  Home"  is  of  experiences 
on  the  steamer  from  San  Francisco 
to   Los  Angeles. 

Mitchell,  Edmund.  The  call  of  the 
bells.     1916 

How  the  bells  of  the  Mission  Inn, 
Riverside,  as  played  by  a  young  girl, 
brought  back  to  manhood  and  useful- 
ness two  men.  The  main  theme  of 
the  story  centers  around  the  labor 
troubles  that  develop  in  a  large  iron 
works  in  San  Francisco.  Local 
atmosphere   is   plentiful. 

In  desert  keeping.     1905 

A  tragic  story  of  a  woman's  life 
which  is  closely  connected  with  the 
southern  California  desert  near  Palm 
Springs,  and  with  ranch  life  in  the 
vicinity  of  Cajon  pass,  San  Bernar- 
dino County.  Los  Angeles  and  San 
Francisco  also  add  to  the  local  color- 
ing. 

Mitchell,    Ruth    Comfort.      Corduroy. 

1923 

The  story  of  a  big  California  cattle 
ranch  owned  by  a  girl,  nicknamed 
"Ginger."  The  ranch  is  located  some- 
where near  San  Luis  Obispo.  The 
story  is  full  of  the  out-of-doors.  The 
man  in  the  case  is  a  young  engineer 
from  Boston,  and  although  his  ideals 
and  those  of  the  girl  are  widely  differ- 
ent, the  romance  has  a  happy  ending. 

Play  the  game.     1921 

The  California  coloring  for  this 
story  of  young  love  and  normal  youth 
is  found  in  Los  Angeles,  other  south- 
ern California  localities  and  Stanford 
L'^niversity. 

A  Avhite  stone.     1924 

San  Francisco  and  a  ranch  in  the 
foothill  country  near  Los  Gatos  fur- 
nish the  background  in  which  a  girl 
works  out  her  salvation  and  finds 
a  romance  in  every  way  worthy  the 
woman   she   has  become. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    FICTION   LIST. 


119 


Montgomery,    Walter.      Boys    of    the 
Sierras,  or  the  young  gold  hunters.  1884 
A   story   for   boys.      The    title   indi- 
cates the  setting-  and  the  period. 

Moore,    Frederick    Ferdinand.      Sailor 

girl.     1920 

The  story  opens  in  San  Francisco 
and  then  shifts  to  the  Cliina  Sea 
where  the  sailor  girl  is  the  center  of 
an    adventure,    comedy    and    romance. 

MoREHorsE,  William  Russell.  Mys- 
tica  Algooat,  an  Indian  legend  and 
story  of  southern  California.     1903 

Pait  I  is  the  legend  of  Tauciuitz, 
the  evil  spirit  of  the  Sabola  Valley 
Indians,  for  whom  Tauquitz  Peak,  or 
Devil's  Peak,  in  the  San  Jacinto 
Mountains  is  named.  Part  II  is  a 
story  of  the  trip  of  a  party  of  six 
tourists  up  Tauquitz  Peak. 

Morgan,  S^^xlie  B.  Tahoe ;  or.  Life  in 
California.      1881 

A  romance  laid  in  Tahoe  City.  The 
travels  of  the  heroine  and  her  father 
take  them  to  Sacramento  and  San 
Francisco.  The  Chinese  question  is 
discussed    incidentally. 

JIoBROw,  William  Chambers.  The  ape, 
the  idiot  and  other  people.     1897 

In  the  "Resurrection  of  little  Wang 
Tai"  brief  mention  is  made  of  Santa 
Clara  Valley,  Mt.  Hamilton  and 
Santa  Clara  Mountains ;  also  of  the 
Chinese  quarter  in  San  Jose.  The 
scenes  of  "Their  permanent  stiletto," 
"An  original  revenge,"  "The  faithful 
amulet"  and  "Over  an  absinthe  bottle" 
are  laid  in  San  Francisco.  "The  story 
told  by  the  sea"  is  a  Monterey  story. 

Blood-money.      1882 

The  scene  of  the  story  is  laid  in  the 
San  Joaquin  Valley.  It  is  a  story  of 
a  lost  treasure  suposed  to  be  buried 
at  the  foot  of  Lone  Tree,  near  Mussel 
Slougli,  in  what  was  at  that  time 
known  as  Tulare  County  (now  Kings). 

A  man  :  his  mark.     1899 


At  the  time  when  the  great  storms 
swept  the  Pacific  coast,  the  hero,  on 
the  slopes  of  Mt.  Shasta  sacrificed 
his  life  to  save  that  of  Laura  Andros, 
who  had  been  instrumental  in  separat- 
ing him  from  the  woman  he  loved. 

]\IuNROE,  Kirk.  Golden  days  of  '49 ;  a 
tale  of  the  California  diggings.  1889 
A  party  of  men  start  from  New 
York  for  California  by  way  of  the 
Isthmus.  Their  journey  leads  them 
through  San  Francisco  and  Sacra- 
mento at  the  time  of  the  gold  dis- 
covery. Descriptions  of  Golden  Valley 
and  Dusty  Gulch  are  given.  Cali- 
fornia politics  and  elections  of  the 
early  days  are  brought  out. 

Mysteries    and    miseries    of    San    Fran- 
cisco,    n.  d. 

Exciting  times  in  San  Francisco  in 
the  early   days.     A  story  of  the  out- 


rages  committed   and   how   the   vaga- 
bonds were  caught. 

Nason,    Frank   Lewis.     The   vision   of 
Elijah   Berl.     1905 

The  story  of  a  young  engineer  who 
lives  in  a  cottage  in  San  Bernardino, 
and  who  is  possessed  with  a  single 
idea,  that  of  reclaiming  the  vast  ex- 
tent of  territory  which  lay  barren 
and  unfruitful  in  that  section. 

NE^VBERRY,  Perry.   Black  Boulder  Claim. 
1921 

The  experiences  of  two  boys  in  the 
mountains  of  Lassen  and  Plumas 
counties.  Their  adventures  take  them 
over  Old  Baldy  to  Eagle  Lake  and 
that  spur  of  the  range  in  which  the 
lake  is  held.  The  description  of  this 
part  of  the  country  is  truthful  and 
readily  recognized.  The  boys  had  a 
most  exciting  time  while  hunting  for 
gold    in   this   rugged   locality. 

Newton,    Emma    Mersereau.      Veil    of 
Solano.     1902 

A  romance  set  in  the  city  of  San 
Luis  Obispo,  when  the  only  way  to 
reach  it  was  by  stage. 

XoRRis,  Charles.     Brass.     1920 

The  story  opens  in  Vacaville,  Solano 
County,  but  the  action  takes  place 
principally  in  San  Francisco  and  the 
bay  region.  Brass  is  a  novel  en- 
tirely of  marriage.  Only  one  of 
the  five  couples  brought  together  in 
the  story  finds  happiness  and  a  lasting 
union. 

NoRRis,   Frank.     Blix.     1899 

The  experiences  of  a  young-  jour- 
nalist and  his  relation  with  a  young 
San  Francisco  girl  are  delightfully 
pictured.  San  Francisco  furnishes  the 
setting. 

A  deal  in  wheat  and  other  stories. 


1903 


"The  wife  of  Chino"  is  the  story  of 
the  Hand-over-flst  gravel  mine  near 
Colfax.  "The  ship  that  saw  a  ghost" 
and  "The  ghost  in  the  cross  trees" 
are  tales  of  the  San  Francisco  water 
front  and  of  the  Pacific,  "The  riding 
of  Felipe"  is  a  Spanish  story  of  early 
California. 


McTeague.     1899 

A  story  of  early  San  Francisco,  in 
and  around  Polk  street,  and  later  of 
the  hero's  experiences  in  the  mines 
near   Colfax   and   on   the   desert. 


Moran  of  the  Lady  Letty.     1903 

An  exciting  tale  of  the  experiences 

of  a  San  Francisco  society  man  who 
was  shang'haied  on  a  vessel  bound  for 
shark  fishing  in  Magdalena  Bay. 

The  octopus.     1901 

The  story  deals  with  the  war  be- 
tween the  wheat  grower  and  the  rail- 
road trust.  Scene,  San  Joaquin 
Valley.  Mussel  Slough  tragedy  takes 
place  between  Hanford  and  Grange- 
ville. 


120 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


The   third  circle.      1909 


Nearly  all  of  these  stories  have 
their  scenes  laid  in  the  San  Francisco 
of  the  last  decade  of  the  19th  cen- 
tury, and  give  brief  glimpses  of  life, 
sudden  snatches  of  light  and  color, 
as  the  author  saw  them  in  his  walks 
about  the  city. — N.  Y.   Times. 

Yaudover  the  brute.     1914 


This  story  was  written  by  Mr  Nor- 
ris  in  1S94  and  '9.5.  but  was  not  pub- 
lished until  a  number  of  years  after 
his  death.  San  Francisco  is  the 
setting. 

XoRRis.    Mrs    Kathleen     (Thompson). 

Certain  people  of  importance.     1922 

A  history  of  the  Crabtree  family 
in  California,  where  they  live,  marry 
and  die.  Their  failings  and  kindli- 
nesses, their  ups  and  downs  in  worldly 
fortune  are  described.  San  Fran- 
cisco and  neighboring  towns  such  as 
San  Rafael,  Napa,  etc.,  are  a  good 
background  for  this  storj'  of  very 
real   people. 


■  Little   ships.     1925 

A  story  of  family  life  in  which  the 
children  appear  to  the  parents  as 
"little  ships"  launched  on  the  sea  of 
life  struggling  against  the  storms,  the 
parents  hoping  that  somehow  they  will 
find  their  way  back  to  the  harbor. 
San  Francisco  is  where  the  action 
takes  place. 


Martie  the  uuconqiiered.     1917 

A  California  town  in  the  bay  region. 
San  Francisco  and  New  York  are  the 
localities  in  which  a  California  girl 
lived,  loved  and  finally  achieved  suc- 
cess as  a  writer. 

Poor  dear  Margaret  Kirby.     1913 

"Bridging  the   years"   is  a   story  of 

San  Francisco.  "Miss  Mix,  kid- 
napper" is  the  story  of  a  Palo  Alto 
girl,  and  "Shandon  Waters"  tells  of 
life  in  a  little  town,  the  center  of  big 
cattle  ranches.  "Dr  Bates  and  Miss 
Sally"  is  the  story  of  a  girl  living 
near  San  Rafael. 


Rose  of  the  world.     1924 

A  small  town  in  central  California 
fui'nishes  the  atmosphere  for  this 
novel  in  which  Mrs  Norris  presents 
the  problem  "Is  there  any  happiness 
in  a  marriage  when  there  is  no  love?" 


Saturday's  child.     1914 

Susan  Brown  is  a  San  Francisco 
gill  around  whom  is  woven  a  story  of 
a  life  of  poverty,  then  "wealth  and 
finally  service.  San  Francisco,  in  the 
days  when  Zinkands,  the  Tivoli  and 
the  Chutes  flourished,  furnishes  the 
local  coloring ;  while  trips  to  Sausa- 
lito,  San  Rafael  and  Oakland  lend 
variety. 


The  story  of  Julia  Page.     191". 

A  young  girl  rises  from  a  home 
life  where  standards  are  low  to  an 
accepted  place  in  the  best  social 
circles  in  San  Francisco.  The  char- 
acters and  setting  are  quite  typically 
Calfornian. 


North,  Grace  May.   Dixie  Martin.   1924 

A  story  for  girls.  Woodford's  Can- 
yon in  the  Sierra  Nevada  Mountains 
is  a  place  Avhere  many  things  can 
happen.  Dixie  Martin,  aged  twelve, 
is  a  "little  mother"  to  her  brothers  and 
sisters.  A  young  lady  from  New 
York  befriends  Dixie  and  adds  in- 
terest to   the  story. 

NoKTOX.   Brayton.     El  Diablo.     1921 

Deals  with  the  great  fishing  in- 
dustry of  southern  California.  A  small 
fishing  village  on  the  coast  is  where 
most  of  the  action  takes  place.  The 
book  receives  its  title  from  an  island. 
El   Diablo,   lying   off  the  shore. 

NoYES.  Alfred.    Beyond  the  desert.    1920 

A  tale  of  Death  Yalley.     "The  story 

is  of   a   soul  losing  itself   in   a    desert 

of  ideas  before  coming   into  the   light 

of  truth." 

Ogden,  George  Washington.    The  road 
to  Monterey.    1925 

A  story  of  the  Dons  just  prior  to 
and  at  the  time  of  the  coming  of  the 
Americans.  The  action  takes  place 
in  southern  California  in  the  vast 
estate  of  Don  Abraham  near  the 
pueblo  of  Los  Angeles.  A  lone  Yankee 
raised  his  flag,  acting  for  the  United 
States,  and  claimed  the  country.  He 
made  good,  for  the  American  troops 
arrived  in  time  to  make  his  conquest 
real. 

Older,  Mrs  Fremont.     The  socialist  and 
the  prince.     1903 

The  story  is  laid  in  San  Francisco 
in  the  '70s,  and  is  a  discussion  of  poli- 
tics. 

Oraquill.     See  Bornemauu.   Mrs  Mary. 

OsBOi'RNE.    Lloyd.      A    person    of    some 
importance.     1911 

A     detective     story     in     which     San 

Francisco  is  brought  in  only  twice  as 

a  place  of  landing  between  the   Mar- 

•     quesas    islands    and    the    east    L^nited 

States. 

Park.  Charles  Caldwell.    A  plaything 
of  the  gods.     1912 

A  stirring  tale  of  the  struggle  in 
California  between  the  Spaniards  and 
the  Americans.  The  story  opens  in 
the  southern  part  of  the  state,  and 
changes  to  other  parts.  The  bandit, 
Joaquin  Murieta,  is  "The  plaything 
of   the   gods." 

Peck.     George     Washington.       Auro- 

fidona ;     or,     Adventures    in    the     gold 

regions.     1849 

This  is  a  fairy  tale  laid  in  a  myth- 
ical city  called  "Aurum"  situated  in 
the   Sierras. 

Pex     { pseud.) .      Nicholas    Nickleton.    a 
California   Christmas  story.     1876 

Tlie  scenes  of  these  stories  are  laid 
in  San  Francisco. 


vol.  21,  uo.  2] 


C.VLIFORNIA    FICTION    LIST. 


121 


Philip  Thaxter.    ia61 

The  adventures  of  a  Xew  England 
boy  who  came  to  California  during  the 
flush  times  of  the  gold  rush.  His  trip 
by  sea,  his  experiences  as  a  gambler 
and  his  pursuit  of  wealth  in  the 
mining  regions  are  set  forth.  The 
book  contains  much  local  color,  such  as 
the  hanging  of  the  Mexican  woman 
at  Downieville.  an  historic  event  that 
caused  great  excitement  in  the  state 
at  the  time  it  occurred. 

Porter.    Mrs    Gene    (  !>5teattox  ) .      Her 

father's  daughter.     1921 

The  mountains,  desert  and  gardens 
around  Los  Angeles  give  the  setting 
for  this  novel.  The  heroine  has  been 
brought  up  to  love  the  beauty  of  her 
surroundings.  Aside  from  the  three 
love  stories  tliere  are  discussions  of 
various   problems   of   the    day. 

The  keeper  of  the  bees.     1925 


A  war  torn  veteran  escapes  from  a 
government  hospital  and  starts  out  in 
searcli  of  health.  He  finds  a  home 
and  becomes  a  bee-keeper  in  a  beau- 
tiful little  California  valley  described 
as  where  the  "Sierra  Madres  meet 
the  Pacific."-  It  is  a  nature  story 
told  in  the  author's  most  charming 
style. 

Porter,    Rebecca   Xewiiax.     The   Rest 
Hollow  mystery.     1922 

A  mystery  story  with  a  refresh- 
ingly original  plot.  It  is  set  in  a 
great  deserted  mansion  of  an  eastern 
millionaire  in  southern  California. 
San  Francisco  also  lends  much  local 
color  to  the  narrative. 

Post,  Charles  Clement.     Driven  from 
sea  to  sea.     18S3 

A  picture  of  the  trials  of  a  pioneer 
settler  in  his  conflict  with  land- 
grabbers  and  railway  corporations  in 
California.  The  .scene  continually 
shifts  from  place  to  place.  The 
Mussel  Slough  trouble  is  given  a  prom- 
inent  place   in    the    narrative. 

Powers.  Frank  H.     I  swear.     1891 

The  effect  of  a  California  education 
on  the  life  of  an  eastern  girl.  She 
describes  her  visit  to  Berkeley.  Tiie 
story  ends  with  her  visiting  Santa 
Monica. 

Raine.    WiLLiAir    ^IacLeod.      Bonanza. 

192(; 

A  j'oung  pony  express  rider  and  his 
brother,  the  great  rush  from  Cali- 
fornia to  Washoe.  Nevada,  in  1S60 
and  many  other  exciting  experiences 
in  the  mining  camps  of  Nevada  make 
tills  a  most  interesting  "story  of  tlie 
Gold   trail." 

Reed.  Constant.     John  Halsey.     1S8-1 

.John  Halsey,  tlie  anti-monopolist, 
makes  a  fight  against  the  bonanza 
kings  and  tax  shirking  corporations. 
A  picture  of  San  Francisco's  political 
life  during  the  seventies  is  portrayed. 
The  Kearney  riots  and  the  new  con- 
stitution are  given  prominence  in  the 
narrative. 


Reeder.  a.  p.     Around  the  Golden  Deep, 
a  romance  of  the  Sierras.     1888 

Story  of  mines  and  mining  in  the 
Sierras.  The  exact  location  is  vague. 
The  Golden  Deep  is  a  quartz  mine. 

Rhodes,  William  Henry.     The  case  of 
Sinnnierfield.      1907 

An  interesting  tale  of  a  murder  and 
a  manuscript.  The  plot  centers 
around  Auburn. 

RiCH.VRDS.   Jerrett  T.     Romance  on   El 

Camino  Real. 

Reminiscences  and  romances  where 
the  footsteps  of  the  padres  fell ;  that 
is,  between  San  Francisco  and  San 
Diego.  Interesting  stories  of  the  cus- 
toms of  the  early  Californians. 

RiGGS,    31  IS    Kate    Douglas     (Smith) 
WiGGiN.     Marm  Lisa.     1896 

A  story  of  a  San  Francisco  kinder- 
garten and  what  was  accomplished  for 
an  unfortunate  girl,  who  won  her 
freedom  and  a  chance  in  life  by  sav- 
ing a   child  from  a  burning  building. 

Polly  Oliver's  problem,  a  story  for 

girls.     1893 

Polly  Oliver  was  a  young  girl  who 
sought  to  find  a  true  expression  of 
lier  nature  in  a  useful  occupation.  She 
was  a  Santa  Barbara  girl  who  went 
to  San  Francisco  and  there  found  her 
vocation. 

The  story  of  Patsy.     1889 

The  Silver  street  kindergarten,  San 
Francisco,  is  the  scene  of  this  tale  of 
a  little  cripple  boy.  It  is  full  of 
humor    and   tender   sympathy. 

A    summer    in    a    caiiou.    a    Cali- 


fornia  story.     1889 

The  story  describes  the  camping- 
experiences  of  a  party  of  young  people 
who  spend  a  summer  vacation  in  a 
southern    California    canon. 

Rising.  Lawrence.  Proud  flesh.  1924 
A  story  of  San  Francisco,  begin- 
ning just  prior  to  the  earthquake  and 
fire,  19  06.  Fernanda  loses  both  par- 
ents and  at  the  age  of  four  is  taken 
to  Spain  by  her  nurse.  There  is  an 
interval  of  twenty  years  after  which 
she  returns  to  San  Francisco  and 
becomes  the  center  of  unusual  events, 
her  amazing  love  affair  with  the 
Irish    plumber    being    the    climax. 

Ritchie,    Robert    Welles.      Drums    of 
doom.     192.3 

A  romance  of  action,  mystery  and 
love.  Tlie  plot  begins  to  unfold  in  San 
Francisco,  then  the  action  is  trans- 
ferred to  Mexico  where  Nancy  Hanni- 
bal goes  to  recover  a  priceless  Mu- 
rillo  which  had  been  given  to  an  old 
Mexican  mission.  The  hero  appears 
and  shares  in  the  many  adventures. 

Roe,    Vingie    Eve.      The    splendid    road. 
1925 

A  story  of  the  pioneers  of  18-50. 
who  crossed  .the  plains,  many  of  them 


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NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


taking  the  splendid  road  tliat  reached 
from  Oregon  to  Sacramento.  Most  of 
the  action  occurs  at  Shasta,  a  min- 
ing town  of  importance  in  the  early 
days.  Sacraniento  also  furnishes 
much  of  the  setting  for  this  tale  of 
love,  courage  and  adventure. 

Val  of  Paradise.     1921 


A  big  stock  ranch  on  the  border, 
Val,  the  daughter  of  the  house, 
rustlers,  wonderful  horses,  etc.,  fur- 
nish the  outstanding  features  of  this 
interesting  novel.  The  location  is  the 
southwest  and  may  be  the  California 
border  or  that  of  one  of  the  other 
border  states. 

RoYCE,    JosiAH.      The    feud   of    Oakfield 

Creek.     1887 

This  is  a  novel  of  California  life  in 
the  last  quarter  of  the  nineteenth  cen- 
tury. It  pictures  home  life  in  San 
Francisco  and  the  bay  regions  at  a 
time  when  the  struggles  of  the  pio- 
neers had  become  a  shadowy  past, 
and  the  great  fortunes  of  California 
were   being  firmly   established. 

Ryan,    Mrs    Marah    Ellis     (Martin). 

For  the  soul  of  Rafael.     1906 

The  heights  of  San  Jacinto  stand 
guard  over  the  valley  which  furnishes 
the  picturesque  setting  for  this  tale. 
The  characters  are  all  the  tine,  aristo- 
cratic Spanish  type,  looking  upon 
Americans  as  "godless  invaders." 
Dramatic  intensity  marks  each  de- 
velopment in  a  story  of  passions  and  a 
splendid   renunciation. 

Sarin,    Edwin   Legrand.     Gold   seekers 

of  '49.     1915 

A  juvenile.  The  adventures  of 
Charley  Adams  and  his  father,  who 
travel  to  California  via  the  Isthmus 
of  Panama ;  one-half  of  the  book  is 
devoted  to  the  voyage.  Conditions 
in  San  Francisco,  Sacramento,  etc., 
during  the  gold  rush  are  well  de- 
scribed. The  book  contains  several 
charts  and  maps,  as  well  as  a  chrono- 
logical outline  of  the  history  of  Cali- 
fornia. 

Sanfobd,  F.  R.     The  bursting  of  a  boom. 
1889 

A  land  boom  story.  The  scene  is 
laid  in  Ventura  County. 

Satterlee,  Anna  E.     The  wonder  girl ; 

a  tourist  tale  of  California.     1915 

A  story  of  California  in  1915.  Tour- 
ists on  their  way  to  the  two  exposi- 
tions stop  off  at  Los  Angeles  and 
enjoy  a  number  of  sight-seeing  trips. 

Savage,   Richard  Henry.     Little  Lady 

of     Lagunitas.     a     Franco-Californian 

romance,     n.  d. 

An  historical  i-omance  of  the  early 
days,  beginning  with  the  rule  of 
Governor  Alvarado.  The  bear  flag, 
Fremont's  Camp,  Monterey.  San 
Francisco,  together  with  Joaquin 
Murieta.  the  bandit,  and  the  Knight.s 
of  the  Golden  Circle  are  brought  into 
the  action  of  the  story. 


Sawtelle,   Mrs  M.   P.   Heroines  of  '49, 

a    story    of    the    Pacific    Coast,      n.  d. 

The  story  describes  the  trip  across 
the  plains,  and  the  entry  into  Wil- 
lamette Valley,  Oregon,  and  later 
into   northern    California. 

Saylor,    Mrs    Emma    Rosai.yn     (Sute- 
meier).     The  last  mile  stone.     1917 
A  love  story  woven  into  twenty-five 
letters.       The    setting    is    a    southern 
California  town  near  the  sea. 

Sheridan,    Solomon    Nehx.      The    ty- 
phoon's secret.     1920 

A  bank  president's  son  finds  himself 
stranded  when  the  bank  fails  and  his 
father  mysteriously  disappears.  Foul 
play  is  suspected  and  the  son  starts 
out  on  the  Pacific  in  an  effort  to 
unravel  the  mystery.  From  this  point 
on  the  story  is  a  sea  yarn  full  of 
thrilling  incidents.  San  Francisco 
is  the  home  city  where  the  local 
coloring  is  pronounced  up  to  the  time 
the  hero  goes  to  sea. 

Short     stories     by     California     authors. 
1885 

These  stories  have  as  their  setting 
Mono  County,  San  Francisco,  Los 
Angeles,  and  Marysville. 

SiEGHOLD,    Mrs    Kate     (Price).       Old 
mission  tales.     1915 

Mission  days  in  Monterey  are  pic- 
tured  with    much    charm. 

Simpson,     William.       The     man     from 

Mars.     1893 

The  story  is  written  by  one  who  for 
thirty-five  years  had  lived  alone  on 
the  plateau  of  a  mountain  in  Cali- 
fornia.    It  has  slight  local  color. 

Sinclair,  Mrs  Bertha 

M.    Bower,"    pseud.). 

1921 

In  this  Casey  Ryan  story,  the  hero 
grows  tired  of  the  luxury  of  living  in 
a  city  and  again  takes  the  desert 
trail.  He  falls  in  with  bootleggers 
and  although  innocent  is  arrested  and 
brought  in  with  the  gang.  His  ex- 
periences with  crooks  and  bootleggers 
induce  him  to  become  a  booze-hunter 
in  earnest  and  as  a  government  agent 
he  brings  many  offenders  to  .justice. 
Los  Angeles  and  vicinity  furnish  the 
background. 

The  gringoes ;  a  story  of  the  old 

California   days   of   1849. 

Although  this  is  a  story  of  Cali- 
fornia of  the  '49  period,  it  is  little  con- 
cerned with  the  craze  for  gold.  Most 
of  the  scenes  are  laid  on  the  ranch  of 
a  Spanish  grandee  who  contests  with 
the  United  States  government  the 
title  of  his  land. — Booh  rev.  digest. 

The  scenes  are  laid  in  Santa  Clara 
Valley  and  San  Francisco.  Mention  is 
made  of  the  Vigilance  Committee. 

SiNCL^\jR,  Bertr.\nd  William.     Burned 
bridges.     1919 

The  background  for  the  larger  part 
of   this  novel   is   the   great  northwest. 


(Muzzy)     ("B. 
Casey    Ryan. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


C^VLIFORNIA    FICTION   LIST. 


123 


The  story  .shifts  to  San  Francisco  and 
several  chapters  liave  a  decidedly 
local  coloringf.  The  hero  burns  his 
bridpres  behind  him  in  the  procession 
of  events  which  make  of  him  a  man 
of  sterling  character. 

Sinclair,    Upton    Beall.      100% ;    the 

story  of  a  patriot.     1920 

In  fiction  form  the  Mooney  case  is 
made  the  theme  of  the  book.  The  ex- 
plosion during  San  Francisco's  Pre- 
paredness Day  parade  furnishes  the 
local   color. 

Smith,   Mrs   Alice  Prescott.     Off   the 

highway.     1904 

The  story  revolves  round  the  life 
of  a  San  Francisco  surgeon.  Scene, 
"Madrono  Crossing,"  a  few  hours 
ride,  to  the  east,  from  San  Francisco. 

Smith,    Nora   Archibald.     Children   of 

the  lighthouse.     1924 

A  story  for  children  written  by  one 
who  has  a  profound  knowledge  of 
child  life.  One  of  the  lonely  Faral- 
lone  Islands  off  San  Francisco  Bay 
is  the  home  of  two  children  whose 
father  is  the  lighthouse  keeper.  An 
unusual   setting  for   a   charming  tale. 

Spadoni,  Adriana.  The  noise  of  the 
world.     1921 

San  Francisco  is  the  home  of  two 
idealists  who  married :  one  an  indi- 
vidualist, the  other  a  socialist.  There 
was  a  separation,  a  clearer  vision  and 
a  realization  that  they  were  not  so 
far    apart    after    all. 

Spalding,    Phebe   Estelle.      The    Tah- 

quitch  maiden.     1911 

An  Indian  legend.  The  scene  is 
placed  in  the  Tahquitch  mountain, 
one  of  the  peaks  of  the  celebrated 
San  Jacinto  range. 

Spinneb,s'  Club.  The  Spinners'  book  of 
fiction,  by  Gertrude  Atherton,  Mary 
Austin,  and  others.     1907 

"Concha  Arguella"  is  a  romantic 
account  of  Concha  Arguella's  funeral 
services  in  the  convent  at  Benicia. 
"The  ford  of  Crevecoeur"  is  the  story 
of  a  French  shepherd  in  the  Sierras. 
"A  Californian"  tells  of  San  Fran- 
cisco society.  "Gideon's  knock"  is 
laid  at  the  headquarters  of  a  mine 
near  Colfax.  "A  yellow  man  and  a 
white"  is  the  story  of  a  Chinaman 
who  lived  in  northern  California. 
"Down  the  flume  with  the  Sneath 
piano"  is  an  episode  of  a  lumber  camp 
in  the  Sierras.  "Miss  Juno"  has  its 
scene   in    San    Francisco. 

Spurr,  George  Graham.  A  fight  with  a 
grizzly   bear.      1886 

A  tale  of  an  encounter  with  a 
grizzly  bear,  which  occurred  in  '49 
while  a  pioneer  was  following  the 
trail  that  led  from  the  Tuba  to  the 
Feather  River,  en  route  for  the  post 
office,   located  at   Bidwell's  Bar. 

The  land  of  gold;  a  tale  of  '49, 


illustrative  of  early  pioneer  life  in 
California  and  founded  upon  fact.  1881 
'J'his  narrative  is  a  vivid  description 
of  experiences  from  the  time  the  ship 
left  her  moorings  at  New  York  en 
route,  via  Cape  Horn,  for  California. 
San  Francisco,  Sacramento,  Sutter's 
Fort  and  many  other  places  are  de- 
scribed. There  is  a  description  of 
the  fire  of  November,  1852,  which 
destroyed  the  city  of  Sacramento. 

Steele,  Mrs  Rowena  (Granice).  Dell 
Dart ;  or  Within  the  meshes.     1874 

Founded  on  facts,  this  story  deals 
witli  the  life  of  a  beautiful  but  un- 
fortunate girl  whose  complete  life 
story  is  not  disclosed  until  the  end  of 
the  book.  The  opening  scenes  are  in 
Sacramento,  later  the  action  changes 
to    the    mountains    in    Sierra    County. 

"The  man  known  to  the  reader  as 
Cheeney  Dart  was  a  member  of  the 
California  Legislature  somewhere  be- 
tween the  years  of  '54  and  '64" — so 
we  are  told  in  the  preface. 

Stoddard,   Charles   Warren.     For  the 

pleasure  of  his  company  ;   an  affair  of 

the  misty  city.     1903 

The  misty  city  is  supposedly  San 
I'^ancisco.  One  story  is  laid  in  a  rose 
garden  in  Santa  Rosa.  Story  is  valu- 
able because  it  embodies  pen  portraits 
of  all  the  celebrities  of  California's 
first    literary    days. 

Island    of    tranquil    delights,     a 


South   Sea  idyl,   and  others.     1904 

Just  one  of  these  stories  has  local 
color.  "Tbe  sawdust  fairy"  is  a  tale 
of  a  small  boy  who  belongs  to  a 
circus.  San  Francisco  and  Sacra- 
mento  are   mentioned. 

Stowell,  WnxiAM  Averill.     The  wake 
of  the  setting  sun.     1923 

A  mystery  and  adventure  story, 
the  scene  of  which  is  laid  on  an 
island  off  the  coast  of  Lower  Cali- 
fornia. There  is  little  real  California 
coloring.  San  Diego  has  a  very  slight 
part  in  the  beginning  of  the  narrative. 

The   Straight  road.     1917 

The  strike  in  the  hopfields  at 
Wheatland  is  cleverly  worked  into 
the  story  and  gives  it  an  historical 
atmosphere.  The  struggles  of  a  wo- 
man to  earn  a  living  and  keep 
straight  both  before  and  after  be- 
coming a  hop  picker  give  the  im- 
pression of  being  real  experiences. 

Strobridge,     Mrs     Idah      (Meacham). 
The  loom  of  the  desert.     1907 

Miscellaneous  stories  of  life  in  the 
west.  The  scenes,  placed  in  Nevada 
and  San  Francisco,  are  of  secondary 
importance. 

Stuart,  Charles  Duff.  '  Casa  Grande. 
1906 

This  is  a  love  story  describing  diffi- 
culties over  land  grants.  Scene,  Napa 
and  Sonoma  counties. 


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NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Swift,  John  Fkaaklin.     Kobort  Groat- 
house,  a  f^tory  of  Nevada  silver  mines. 

187S 

The  story  tells  how  mining  prop- 
erty was  "mismanaged  through  the 
machinery  of  corporation  and  .ioint 
stoclt  companies."  Scenes  are  in  Ne- 
vada (formerly  called  M'"ashoe)  and 
San  Francisco.  Sacramento  is  also 
mentioned.  Many  of  the  characters 
are  taken  from  life  such  as  Sharon, 
Ralston,  Hall  McAllister,  Gen.  Mc- 
Dowell, Lillie  Hitchcock  and  others. 
Fictitious  names  are   given  them. 

SZYMANOWSKI,     STEPHEN    KORWIN.       The 

searchers.     1908 

The  scene  is  laid  in  Los  Angeles. 
Interesting  descriptions  are  given  of 
different  parts  of  the  city,  and  the 
founding  of  the  famous  Ebell  club. 
There  is  also  a  description  of  Tahoe, 
where  the  hero  so.iourns  for  a  time. 

Taber,  Louise  E.     The  flame.     1911 

The  story  of  a  dissolute,  bankrupt 
nobleman  who  attempts  to  win  a  San 
Francisco  heiress.  The  entire  action 
takes   place    in    San    Francisco. 

Taylor,  Mrs  Ada  White.  The  mystic 
spell ;  a  metaphysical  romance.  1923 
"In  a  sunlit  valley  where  snow- 
capped mountains  rise  to  majestic 
heights  above  the  poppy-fields,  the 
vine-clad  hills  and  orange  groves  of 
southern  California  the  scene  is  laid 
and  the  people  live  who  through  their 
strange  e.xperiences  contributed  the 
subject  matter  for  this  book" — Fore- 
word. 

Terhune.  Albert  Payson.     Black  gold. 

1922 

The  scene  of  this  thrilling  novel  is 
northern  California,  "a  beautiful  and 
striking  individualistic  region  which, 
for  the  most  part,  is  ignored  by  tour- 
ists." The  title  is  explained  thus, 
"gold  ingots  painted  black  are  found 
now  and  again  near  Barry  Gale's 
ranch  in  the  luountains  of  northern 
California." 

Thomes,  William  Henry.     On  laud  and 

sea ;  or,  California  in  tlie  years  1843- 

44-i5.     1892 

Deals  with  historic  events  and 
prominent  Californians  of  the  above 
period.  Life  at  Monterey,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Santa  Barbara  and  other  coast 
towns,   is  faithfully  described. 

The  whaleman's  adventures.  1872 

Charles  Allspice's  adventures  aboard 
a  whaler  and  in  the  Sandwich  Islands 
fill  the  first  half  of  the  book.  The 
remainder  recounts  his  adventures 
during  three  visits  to  California ;  on 
the  last  of  these  he  visits  the  interior 
and  t'ne  gold  country.  The  most  con- 
spicuous aspects  of  the  gold  rush  are 
described,  though  the  whaleman's  in- 
dividual experiences  are  usually  in 
the   foreground. 

Thompson,  Ruth.     Comrades  of  the  des- 
ert.    1921 

A  story  for  boys.  Mojave  Desert 
is    the   setting. 


Traoy,  .\rr.s  ]\Iaktua  Desire   (Cvrter). 

AKubah.     u.  d. 

Tlie  story  is  iif  a  stolen  chihl,  who 
after  years  is  found  Ijy  her  father 
and  restored  to  her  family.  Part  of 
the  story  takes  place  in  California. 

A  Christmas  budget,     u.  d. 

Of  these  stories  "Barbara  Clyde" 
and    "Isabel"  have  local   color. 

Jimmie   Beverly's  journal.     1880 


This  is  a  diary  of  a  thirteen-year- 
old  boy  who  described  his  visits  to 
Tahoe,  San  Francisco  and  other 
places   in   the   state. 

Truman,  Benjamin  C.  Occidental 
sketches.     1881 

The  main  facts  and  characters 
in  most  of  the  stories  are  true.  "Hill 
Beachey's  dream"  is  a  story  of  Cali- 
fornia pioneer  days,  and  deals  with 
officials  of  San  Francisco.  "Divorced 
on  the  desert,"  story  of  a  family 
crossing  the  desert.  Sacramento, 
Marysville  and  Santa  Clara  Valley 
are  mentioned.  "An  hour  with  an 
antediluvian"  tells  of  a  traveler  on 
his  way  to  Sacramento  from  Los 
Angeles  who  stops  at  Lathrop,  and 
while  there  is  amused  by  a  story  told 
by  a  runaway  lunatic  from  Stockton. 
"A  midnight  adventure  in  Nevada" 
mentions  the  roliberies  that  have 
taken  iilace  on  stage  routes  from 
Placerville  and  Sacramento  to  Vir- 
ginia City,  and  from  Los  Angeles  to 
San  Francisco.  "Three  extinct  citi- 
zens" is  a  story  of  a  murder  in  Grass 
Valley.  "A  matchless  achievement" 
is  an  historical  sketch  of  the  Central 
and  Southern  Pacific  railroads  of 
California   with   statistics. 

TTlrich,  Charles.     Copper  cross  ;  a  tale 

of  a  treasure  hunt  in  the  Pacific.     1891 

Tlie     plot     turns     on     the     strange 

adventures    which    a     San    Francisco 

physician    and   his   betrothed   have    in 

an  unknown   island  of  the   Pacific. 

Under  the  Berkeley  oaks ;  stories  by 
students  of  the  University  of  Cali- 
fornia.    1901 

These  stories  are  chosen  with  very 
catholic  taste,  some  for  felicity  in 
local  color,  some  for  their  ingenious 
plot,  and  some  for  subtle  analysis. 
We  have  not  chosen  stories  dealing 
exclusively  with  college  life. — 
Preface. 

Upright,    Blanche.      The    losing    gaiu. 

1922 

The  setting  is  San  Francisco  and 
down  the  peninsula  with  a  brief  visit 
to  Los  Angeles  and  Hollywood. 
Economic  independence,  business 
eciuality  witli  man,  or  a  home  and 
children?  This  is  the  problem  which 
had  to  be  worked  out  by  the  girl 
around   whom   the   story   centers. 

Upton,  Charles  Elmer.  Down  Wild 
Goose  Canyon.     1910 

Simple     short    stories  suitable     for 

children.       "Down    Wild  Goose    Can- 


vol.  21,110.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    FICTION    LIST. 


125 


yon,"  "In  darkness,"  and  "A  girl  of 
the  Sierras"  are  incidents  with  a 
sliglit    California    coloring. 

Vachell.    Hokack    Annesley.      Biiueh 

grass ;    a   chronicle   of   life  ou   a   cattle 

ranch.     1912 

Sketches  of  happenings  on  a  large 
cattle  ranch  in  the  foothills  of  south- 
ern California  during  the  eighties. 
The  atmosphere  pervading  these 
character  sketches  is  distinctly  Cali- 
fornian. 

John  Charity.     1901 

John  Charity,  an  Englishman,  lefr 
his  native  land  in  the  year  1837  for 
California.  Life  at  Monterey  and 
many  other  parts  of  the  state  is 
descrihed.  The  hero's  love  for  a 
daughter  of  the  Californias,  the 
intrigues,  jealousies,  and  her  final 
death  by  violence  furnish  the  heai't 
interest.  Alvarado,  Castro,  Vallejo 
and  others  prominent  at  the  time  are 
mentioned. 

Model  of  Christian  Gay  ;  a  study 


of  certain  phases  of  life  in  California. 

1895 

A  story  of  an  artist  and  his  twia 
Ijrother,  who  spend  a  vacation  in  the 
Coast  Range  Mountains  near  the 
great  Pacific.  A  grizzly  bear  hunt  is 
graphically  described.  A  stage  rob- 
bery, murder,  and  lynching  all  enter 
into  this  tale  of  California  life.  The 
scene  of  the  later  chapters  is  laid  in 
San    Francisco. 


The  procession  of  life.     1899 

Southern  California,  especially 
Santa  Barbara,  furnishes  the  setting 
for  this  story  of  love  and  misunder- 
standing. The  time  is  the  early 
nineties  during  the  land  boom.  A 
big  rancho  on  the  coast  figures 
largely  in  the  local  coloring. 


Spragge's   Canyon.     1915 

A  character  study  of  a  San  Fran- 
cisco society  girl,  a  country  girl  and 
a  California  mountaineer,  and  what 
happened  when  they  were  thrown 
together  in  the  high  Sierras.  Many 
California  towns  are  mentioned,  and 
ranch  life  as  it  existed  in  California 
at   that  time   is   vividly   portrayed. 


The  triumph  of  Tim.     1916 

An  English  lad  leaves  his  village 
home  and  comes  to  San  Francisco 
Vv'here  he  spends  ten  years  making 
and  losing  a  fortune.  Local  coloring 
is  of  slight  importance. 


Ya^^ce,  Louis  Joseph.  Linda  Lee  in- 
corporated.     1922 

Hollywood,  the  fam.ous  movie  city, 
is  the  scene  of  this  novel  of  sensa- 
tional  studio  life. 

Van  Denburgh.  Mary  Turrill.  Ye 
On's  ten  hundred  sorrows  and  other 
stories.     1907 

Tales  of  Chinese  children  in  the 
Chinese   quarter,   San   Francisco. 


Ya.\  Dyke,  Theodore  Strong.  Ritlc. 
rod  and  gtiu  in  California  ;  a  sporting 
romance.  1889  (  First  published  under 
title  "Flirtation  camp.;  or,  The  rifle, 
rod  and  gun  in  California.") 

The  hunting  and  fishing  adven- 
tures chronicled  herein  took  place  in 
southern  California.  An  interesting 
picture  of  sporting  methods   is   given. 

\'ax  Loben  Sels.  Mrs  Helen  (Ells- 
worth ) .  The  blue  jays  in  the  Sierras. 
1918 

Adventures  of  four  happy  children, 
who  live  on  a  ranch  near  the  Sacra- 
mento River,  during  a  camping  trip 
to  the  high  Sierras,  are  entertainingly 
told. 

Yerne,  Jl"lio.  Escuela  de  los  Robin- 
•soues.     1898     Spanish. 

San  Francisco,  which  is  featured 
as  the  capital  of  California,  furnishes 
the  background  for  the  first  part  of 
the  story.  The  scene  then  shifts  to 
an   island   in  the  Pacific. 

YiCTOR,  Mrs  Frances  Auretta  (Ful- 
ler) Barrett.  The  new  Penelope  and 
other  stories.     1877 

Charming  western  sketches  for  the 
most  part  of  the  northwest.  Several, 
however,  have  a  slight  California 
coloring. 

Wait,  Frona  Eunice.  Yermah  the 
Dorado.     1897 

A  story  of  an  astrological  nature 
rehiting  to  a  highly  civilized  nation, 
whose  largest  city,  so  the  story  says, 
was  on  the  present  site  of  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

Walcott,  Earle  Ashley.  The  apple  of 
discord.     1907 

Labor  troubles  and  anti-Chinese 
riots.  The  days  of  Denis  Kearnej- 
and  the  sand  lot  meetings  combine  to 
give  a  strong  local  coloring  to  this 
historic  tale  of  San  Francisco  in  the 
late  seventies.  The  activities  of  the 
Committee  of  Safety  are  also  faith- 
fully   portrayed. 

Blindfolded.     1900 


A  mystery  story,  radiating  the 
atmosphere  of  San  Francisco's  China  - 
town,  waterfront,  stock  exchange  and 
other  centers  where  the  adventurous 
life  of  the  city  finds  expression. 

Tlie    open    door ;    a    romance    of 

mystery.     Time  1905.     1910 

With  its  setting  in  San  Francisco 
the  plot  of  the  novel  hinges  on  the 
attempt  to  discover  the  true  murderer 
of  Arthur  Griscom,  a  wealthy  young 
inan  and  member  of  the  social  set  in 
that  city. 

Waters,  Russell  Judson.  El  estran- 
jero  (The  stranger)  ;  a  story  of 
southern  California.     1910 

A     fascinating     story     of     southern 


126 


NEWS   NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


California  in  the  early  days.  The 
Pueljlf),  forming  the  principal  setting?, 
lies  at  the  foot  of  the  San  Bernar- 
dino lange  in  Imperial  County.  A 
picture  of  the  rodeo,  Indian  raids,  and 
many  exciting  adventures  is  given. 

Webster,  Jonathan  Vinton.    Two  true 
Califoruia  stories.     1SS3 

The  scene  of  the  first  story  is  laid 
])rincipally  in  the  state  of  Nevada. 
A  village  on  the  bay  of  San  Fran- 
cisco figures  in  a  small  way  in  several 
of  the  chapters.  The  second  tale  is 
of  a  family  living  on  a  farm  near  the 
Marysville  Buttes.  The  daughter 
attends  a  private  school  at  Sacra- 
mento, where  she  receives  a  fashion- 
able education. 

Wentwobth,     May     (pseud.).       Fairy 

tales  for  gold-land. 

Children's  stories.  "Santa  Claus 
and  the  Christ  child"  is  a  San  Fran- 
cisco Christmas  story.  "The  Moorish 
pearl"  and  "The  strong  man  of  Santa 
Barbara"  picture  Spanish  days  in 
Santa  Barbara.  "Juanetta,  or  The 
treasure  of  the  lake  of  the  tuli§s" 
relates  to  Spanish  days  in  the  Los 
Angeles  country.  "Emperor  Norton,"' 
the  story  of  an  eccentric  character 
who  lived  in  San  Francisco  for  many 
years.  "Death's  valley,  the  golden 
boulder,"  a  tale  of  Fort  Tejon  and 
Death   Valley. 


The     golden     dawn     and     other 

stories.      1870 

Stories  for  children.  "Doiia  Made- 
lina,"  a  story  of  Santa  Cruz,  and 
"The  shrine  of  San  Luis  Obispo" 
have  a  decided  local  coloring. 

Whaley,  Airs  Makia  Louise  (Theiss). 

By    earthquake    and    fire ;    or,    The 

checkered  romance  of  two  generations. 

1914 

The  San  Francisco  disaster  is  the 
historical  event  that  furnishes  the 
author  with  an  opportunity  to  un- 
tangle the  threads  of  the  story  and 
bring  about  a  happy  ending. 

Whitaker,   Herman,   ed.     West   winds. 

1914 

Short  stories  by  California  authors, 
illustrated  by  California  artists. 
"Bufoe  the  mascot,"  "Pals,"  "The 
corner  table,''  and  "The  temptation 
of  Ann  O'Brien"  have  an  incidental 
California  setting ;  the  last  two  have 
San  Francisco  as  a  background. 

White.  Stewart  Edward.     Gold.     1913 

A  vivid  picture  of  early  gold 
seekers.  Their  voyage,  perils  of  tlie 
Isthmus,  San  Francisco,  Sacramento, 
the  mines,  the  Vigilantes  all  play  a 
part  In   this   exciting  story. 

The  gray  dawn.     1915 

This  is  the  second  story  of  Stewart 
Edward  White's  California  trilogy. 
It  pictures  the  gray  days  of  San 
Francisco's  history  during  the  period 
1852-1856     when    its     citizens    deter- 


niined  through  their  well  organized 
vigilance  committees  to  win  back  the 
lity  to  a  state  of  law  and  order.  The 
volunteer  fire  companies  are  also 
given   prominence. 

On  tiptoe.     1922 

A  romance  of  the  great  redwood 
forests  of  the  northern  part  of  Cali- 
fornia. A  party  traveling  in  a  high- 
powered  car  is  overtaken  by  a  moun- 
tain storm.  A  young  man  who 
knows  the  woods  saves  the  party 
from  a  grim  fate  and  the  romance 
follows. 

The  rose  dawn.     1920 

The  land  boom  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia in  the  eighties,  when  the  great 
cattle  ranches  had  to  give  way  to 
irrigation  and  small  fruit  farms, 
furnishes  the  theme  of  this  last  of 
the  California  trilogy  written  by  Mr 
White.  The  local  setting  is  undoubt- 
edly Santa  Barbara  and  vicinity, 
although  the  name  Arguello  is  used 
in  the  book. 

Rules  of  the  game.     1911 


The  California  Sierras,  with  the 
great  forests  and  wonderful  natural 
resources,  form  the  setting  for  the 
greater  part  of  this  excellent  story 
of  conservation  and  the  lumber  inter- 
ests.— Book   rev.   digest. 

Whitney,     At  well.       Almond-eyed,     a 
story  of  the  day.     1878 

A  story  of  the  seventies  in  which 
the  evils  arising  from  the  invasion 
of  the  Chinese  are  set  forth.  The 
town  in  which  the  incidents  took 
place  could  be  one  of  many  in  Calli- 
fornia. 

WiLLARD.    Madeline    Deaderick.     The 

King's   Highway.     1914 

The  interest  of  the  story  centers 
around  San  Juan  Capistrano  Mission 
and  along  El  Camino  Real. 

Williamson,     Charles     Norris,     cG 

Williamson,    Mrs    Alice    Muriel 

(Livingston).    The  port  of  adventure. 

1913 

The  motor  trips  of  the  principal 
characters  take  them  to  all  the  points 
of  interest  in  the  state.  Los  Angeles. 
Yosemite  Valley  and  Lake  Tahoe 
receive  a  .goodly  share  of  attention. 
The  hero  of  the  story  owns  a  ranch 
and  has  oil  interests  in  the  Kern  oil 
district.  The  heroine  builds  a  beau- 
tiful home  in  Monterey,  where  they 
both  find  happiness. 

Wilson,    Mrs    Elizabeth     (Sargent), 

<€  Sargent,  J.  L.    Sugar-pine  murmur- 

ings.    1899 

Short  sketches  of  miners,  Mexican-?, 
Indians  and  mountaineeis  of  the 
early  days.  Mokelumne  Hill,  Sama 
Clara,  San  Francisco,  and  many 
other  places  are  briefly  mentioned. 


vol.  21,  no.  2 


CxVLIPORNIA    I-MCTION   LIST. 


127 


Wilson,    Harry    Lp;ox.      Cousiu    Jano. 

1925. 

A  story  of  one  of  those  large  Cali- 
fornia fortunes  made  from  mining 
and  dissipated  by  stocl-c  gambling  and 
liigli  living.  Jane,  fresh  from  a 
fasliionable  boarding  school,  works 
out  her  destiny  in  the  shell  of  the 
great  old  house  which  is  located  in 
the  mining  region.  She  has  inherited 
the  pioneer  spirit  and  is  thereby  able 
to  gain  for  herself  a  place  in  the 
new   order   of   things. 

Merton  of  the  movies.     1922 

Hollywood  and  the  movie  world  are 
here  delightfully  portrayed.  It  is 
different.  Both  Merton  and  the  girl 
are  lovable  characters  and  are 
deservingly    successful. 

Wilson,  John  Fleming.     Scouts  of  the 
desert.     1920 

A  story  of  the  fascinating  desert 
region  of  southern  California.  A 
book   of   adventure   for  boys. 


Somewhere   at  sea.     1923 

Twelve  stories  of  the  sea.  All  but 
two  or  three  of  the  stories  have  San 
Francisco  as  the  home  port  and  its 
picturesque  waterfront  lends  color 
and  a  fascinating  atmosphere.  Most 
of  the  action  takes  place  on  the  high 
seas. 

Wolf,  Alice  S.     House  of  cards.     1896 
A  story  of  society  life  in  San  Fran- 
cisco.    Mention  is  made  of  Del  Monte, 
Ross    Valley,    and    other    resorts    fre- 
quented by   San  Franciscans. 

Wolf,  Emma.     Fulfillment ;  a  California 
novel.     1916 

A  novel  dealing  with  the  married 
life  of  two  modern  San  Franciscans — 
he  a  wealthy  oil  man,  she  a  member 
of  the  intellectual  set  of  the  Bay 
City.  The  subtitle,  a  California 
novel,  is  rather  misleading,  inasmuch 
as  tlie  book  throws  very  little  light 
on  California  conditions. 


Heirs  of  yesterday.     1900 

The  social  life  and  culture  of  the 
Jews  of  San  Francisco  are  portrayed. 
The  last  two  pages  contain  a  descrip- 
tion of  the  sailing  of  the  first  Cali- 
fornia   regiment    for    the    Philippines. 

Other   things   being  equal.     1894 

The  love  of  a  Jewish  girl  and  r 
Christian  is  sanctioned,  "Other  things 
being  equal.''  San  Francisco  and  a 
summer  resort  on  the  Russian  River 
enter  largely  into  the  story  and  fur- 
nish the  local  atmosphere. 


Prodigal  in  love.     1894 

Love,  misunderstanding,  and  remn- 
ciliation  are  the  ijrincipal  features 
of  this  bcol-c.  San  Francisco  an  1 
vicinity  furnish  the  stage  for  the 
local   action   and   intere.st. 

Woods.  Yirna.     An  elusive  lover.     1898 

A   story   of   the   Dr   Jekyll    and   Mr 

Hyde    type.       Los    Angeles,    Catalinzi 

Island    and    Mt.    Lowe    fuurnish    the 

background. 


-  A  modern  ^lagdaleue.     18i)4 
The      title     tells     the      story. 


Francisco  is  the  scene  of 
The  Chinese  highbinders  are 
part   in  the  story. 


San 
action, 
iven   a 


Worth,  Pauline  Wilson.    Death  Valley 

Slim  and  other  stories.     1909 

"Western    sketches    with    very    little 
local   coloring. 

WOBTHINGTON.       ELIZABETH       S  T  K  0  N  G. 

Little  brown   dog.     1898 

A  tale   of   the   Presidio,    San   Fran- 
cisco. 

Twentv-eight    seconds   and   after. 


1900 

A  tale  of  the  San  Francisco  dis- 
aster. The  experiences  of  a  single 
family  serve  as  a  background  for 
pictures  of  this  time  gathered  from 
contemporary  accounts.  The  first 
chapter  gives  some  detail  of  the  old 
Latin  Quarter. 

Wright,  Harold  Bell.     The  eyes  of  the 
world.    1914 

A  protest  against  the  conventional 
ways  of  the  world.  The  action  is 
staged   in   southern   California. 

The  winning  of  Barbara  Worth. 


1911 

The  reclamation  of  the  great  Im- 
perial Valley  is  the  theme  of  this 
novel.  The  battle  of  the  Colorado 
River  and  the  operations  of  unscrupu- 
lous promoters,  enter  into  the  scheme 
of  the  story. 

Wyneken.    L.    Ernest.      Chronicles    of 
Manuel  Alanus.      1908 

A  tale  of  old  San  Francisco. 

Young,  Gordon.     Days  of  '49.     1925 

A  well  rounded  story  of  the  adven- 
turous days  of  the  gold  rush.  The 
title  furnishes  the  clue  to  the  setting 
and    vivid   coloring. 


3— 44S05 


128 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


JUDICIAL  COUNCILS. 


Comiiilcd  by  Law  and  Lesislativc  Reference  Department,  California  State  Libkkarv. 


/.  Laws. 


California — A  resolution  to  propose  to 
the  people  of  the  state  .  .  .  that  the 
constitntion  ...  be  amended  ...  by 
providing  for  a  iudicial  council.  (1925 
Calif.  Stats.,  res.  ch.  48,  p.  1369-70.) 

Massachusetts — An  act  providing  for  the 
establishment  of  a  judicial  council  to 
make  a  continuous  study  of  the  organi- 
zation, procedure  and  practice  of  the 
courts.  (1924  Mass.  Acts  and  Re- 
solves, c.  244.  p.  228.) 

North  Carolina — An  act  to  create  a  judi- 
cial conference.  (1925  N.  C.  Public 
Laws.  c.  244,  p.  "489-90.) 

Ohio — An  act  .  .  .  relative  to  the  duties 
of  the  chief  justice  of  the  supreme 
court.  (1925  Ohio  Laws,  v.  Ill,  p. 
90.) 

Ohio — An  act  to  provide  for  a  judicial 
council  in  the  state  of  Ohio.  (1923 
Ohio  Laws,  v.  110,  p.  364-5.) 

Oregon — ^An  act  .  .  .  Providing  for  the 
administration    of    the    courts    through 


council  of  judges.  (1925  Oregon  Gen- 
eral Laws,  c.  164,  p.  244—6.  A  revi- 
sion of  their  1923  act.) 

United  States — An  act  .  .  .  providing  for 
an  annual  conference  of  certain  judges, 
and  for  other  purposes.  (67  Cong.. 
Public  no.  298.  September  14.  1922; 
42-1  U.  S.  Stats,  at  Large,  c.  306,  p. 
837-840.) 

Washington  (state) — An  act  establish- 
ing a  judicial  council  and  prescribing 
its  powers  and  the  duties  of  other 
officers  in  respect  thereof.  ^  (1925  ex. 
Wash.  Laws,  c.  45,  p.  38-41.) 

Wisconsin — (Board  of  circuit  judges  pro- 
vided for)  (1923  Wisconsin  Statutes, 
sec.  252.08.) 

X016.  Wisconsin     Legislative     reference 
library. 
Misc.   Judicial  Councils. 

Brief  digest  of  legislation  (proposed 
and  enacted)  of  the  states  of  the 
United  States  providing  for  judicial 
councils.  [Madison]  Jl.  1924.  3  p. 
typewritten. 


//.  Articles  in  Periodicals. 


Arnold.  G.  B.  [Missouri's  proposed  con- 
stilntioual]  Amendment  paves  the  way 
to  great  progress.  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc. 
J.     7:157-8.     Feb.  1924.) 

[California  Bar  Association]  Adoption 
in  California  of  the  svstem  of  a  unified 
court.  (In  Calif.  B.  A.  1917  and  1918. 
Various  speeches  and  discussions.) 

Carr,  G.  W.  The  federal  judicial  council 
and  the  movement  for  better  bank- 
ruptcv  administration.  (In  Am.  Jud. 
Soc.   J.     7:180-3.     April,   1924.) 

Chief  .Justice  Taft  on  need  for  judicial 
council.  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  7:163- 
4.      Feb..   1924. 

City  Club  of  New  York.  Unified  court 
proposed  to  New  York  [state]  consti- 
tutional convention.  (In  Am.  Jud. 
Soc.  J.     5:121-7.     Dec,  1921.) 

Conference  of  senior  circuit  judges.  (In 
Docket.     3:2859-61.     Jan.,    1925.) 


Fowler.  C.  A.  Wisconsin's  board  of 
circuit  judges.  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
4:101-3.    Dec,  1920.) 

A  good  beginning.  (Oregon  Judicial 
Council.)  [Editorial]  (In  A.  B.  A. 
Jour.  11:585.     Sept..  1925.) 

Harley.  Herbert.  A  unified  state  court 
svstem.  (In  Neb.  S.  B.  A.  7:108-27. 
Dec.  29,  1924.) 

Higgins.  W.  E.  English  courts  and  pro- 
cedure. (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  7:185- 
234.     Apr.,  1924.) 

How  courts  may  be  coordinated.  (In 
Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  5:105-14.  Dec, 
1921.) 

How  to  unify  state  courts.  (Including 
model  act.)  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
6:101-4.     Dec.  1922.) 

Hunke,  W.  A.  Courts  of  tomorrow.  (In 
Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  6  :22-31.  June.  1922  ; 
and  Wash.  S.  B.  1921:  126-38.) 


*As  this  is  a  subject  to  be  voted  on  at  the  election  in  November,  1926,  this  list 
ol  references  is  published  to  assist  libraries  that  will  be  asked  for  material  con- 
cerning  it. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


JUDICIAL   COUNCILS. 


129 


The  judicial  council.  (In  A.  B.  A.  Jour. 
11  :.508-n.    Aug.,  1925. 

Judicial  couucil  foi-  North  Carolina. 
[Editorial  covering  also  the  California 
proposition.]  In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
9:15-17.    June,  1925.) 

Judicial  council  idea  ably  presented.  [Re- 
port read  at  meeting  of  North  Dakota 
Bar  Association  by  Judge  A.  G.  Burr.] 
(In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  9 :103-G.  De- 
cember, 1925.) 

Judicial  council  in  Massachusetts.  [Edi- 
torial including  text  of  act.]  (In  Am. 
Jud.  Soc.  J.     8:245-6.     June,  1924.) 

Judicial  council  in  Missouri  constitution. 
(In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  6:87-90.  Octo- 
ber, 1922.) 

Judicial  council  should  regulate  practice 
and  procedure.  [Editorial  in  re  pro- 
posed amendment  to  California  con- 
stitution.] (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
8:173-5.    April,  1925.) 

Judicial  efficiency  experts.  [Editorial 
comment  upon  1st  report  of  Massachus- 
setts  Judicial  Council.]  (In  A.  B.  A. 
Jour.     12:32-3.     Jan.  1926.) 

Judicial  superintendence  for  Oregon. 
[Editorial  including  text  of  act.]  (In 
Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.    7:85-6.    Oct.,  1923.) 

Kelsey,  Carl,  and  Jessup,  H.  W.  Justice 
through  simplified  legal  procedure.  (In 
Amer.  Acad,  of  Pol.  and  Soc.  Sci. 
Annals.  73 :1-251.    Sept.,  1917.) 

McMurray,  O.  K.  Unified  courts.  (In 
Calif.  B.  A.  1917:25-37.) 

Massachusetts  bar  ass'n.  Resolve  re- 
questing certain  studies  by  the  judicial 
council.  (In  Mass.  L.  Q.  10:34. 
May,  1925. 

Massachusetts  judicial  council  appointed. 
[Editorial]  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
8:84.     Oct.,  1924.) 

Massachusetts  judicial  council  makes  its 
first  report.  (In  A.  B.  A.  Jour.  12: 
15-19.     Jan.,  1926.) 

A  ministry  of  justice.  (In  Harv.  L.  Rev. 
35:313-26.  Dec,  1921;  and  Lectures 
on  Legal  Topics.     1921-22:  69-86.) 

Missouri  fight  for  judicial  council,  etc. 
[Editorial]  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
7:147-50.     Feb.,  1924.) 

Missouri  judicial  system  unified  in  revised 
constitution.     [Editorial  including  pro- 


posed   amendments.]        (In    Am. 
Soc.  J.,  7  :117-119.    Dec,  1923.) 


.Tud. 


iNIissouri  rejects  judicial  reform.  [Edi- 
torial] (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  7:183- 
184.    Apr.,  1924.) 

Model  judiciary  article.  (In  Am.  Jud. 
Soc.  J.  3:132^1.  Feb.,  1920;  Am. 
Jud.   Soc.   J.     6:48-58.     Aug.,   1922.) 

The  new  judicial  council.  (In  Ohio  L.  B. 
&  R.     21:241-3.     Sept.  10,  1923.) 

New  law  unifies  federal  judiciary.  (In 
Am.  Jud.  Soc  J.  6:69-72.  Oct. 
1922.) 

Ohio  adopts  judicial  council.  [Editorial 
including  text  of  act.]  (In  Am.  Jud. 
Soc.  J.     7:5-6.     June,  1923.) 

Oklahoma  state  bar  ass'n.  Committee  on 
judicial  reform.  Report  ...  (In  Ok- 
lahoma S.  B.  A.     1924:120-9.) 

Olson,  Harry.  New  (proposed  Illinois) 
constitution  and  the  administration  of 
justice.  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  6:108- 
14.      Dec,    1922.) 

O'Neal,  E.  Reorganization  of  the  judicial 
administration  of  justice.  (In  Cent. 
L.    J.     86:406-18.      June   7,    1918.) 

On  having  arrived  in  the  judicial  council 
era.  [Editorial]  In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
9:99-101.     Dec  1925.) 

Oregon  judicial  council  cooperates  with 
bar  association.  [Editorial]  (In  Am. 
Jud.  Soc.  J.    9:14-15.     June,  1925.) 

Paul,  C.  H.  Growth  of  the  judicial  coun- 
cil movement.  (In  Minn.  L.  Rev. 
10:85-99.     Jan.,  1926.) 

Paul,  C.  H.  Judicial  council  movement. 
(In  Wash.  L.  Rev.  1:101-12.  Oct., 
1925.) 

Pennsylvania  bar  association  approves 
judicial  council  plan.  [Report  of 
special  committee.]  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc 
J.     9:47-9.     Aug.,  1925.) 

Potter,  W.  W.  Give  judiciai-y  greater 
power.  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  6:164^8. 
April,  1923.) 

Potts,  C.  S.  Unification  of  the  judiciary : 
a  record  of  progress.  (In  Tex.  L.  Rev. 
2:445-57.  June,  1924;  and  Am.  Jud. 
Soc  J.     8:  85-91.     Oct.,  1924.) 


Pound,     Roscoe     M. 
courts..      (In   Minn. 
169-89.) 


Organization     of 
S.   B.  A.     1914: 


130 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Powell,  H.  G.  Success  of  business  prin- 
ciples in  a  city  [Cleveland,  Ohio]  court. 
(In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  7:166-75.  Feb., 
1924.) 

Principles  of  court  reform  are  based  upon 
notorious  facts.  [Editorial]  (In  Am. 
Jud.  Soc.  J.    8:263-6.    June,  1924.) 

.  [Rule-making  power  eliminated  from  pro- 
posed California  constitutional  amend- 
ment.] [Editorial]  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc. 
J.     9:35.     Aug.,   1925.) 

Smith,  Sj^dney.  Plea  for  establishment  in 
Mississippi  of  a  modern  unified  court. 
(In  A.  B.  A.  Jour.  2:27-45.  Jan., 
1916;  and  Miss.  S.  B.  A.  10:4.5-71. 
May  4,  1915.) 

State-wide  judicature  act.  (In  Am.  Jud. 
Soc.  J.     1:101-18.    Dec,  1917.) 

Taft,  W.  H.  Possible  and  needed  re- 
forms in  the  administration  of  civil 
justice  in  the  federal  courts.  (In  Am. 
Jud.  Soc.  J.     6:36-47.     Aug..  1922.) 

Taft,  W.  H.  To  unify  federal  judges. 
[Bill  explained  by  Chief  Justice  Taft.] 
(In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  5:36-^0.  Aug., 
1921.) 

A  unified  court  in  Mississippi.  [Edi- 
torial] (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  1:15- 
17.     June,  1917.) 


'J'he  unified  state  court. 
Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.     1  :l 


[Editorial]      (In 
-7.    June,  1917.) 


To  unify  Oklahoma  courts.  [Editorial] 
In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J.  3  :179-90.  April, 
1920.) 

[United  States.  Conference  of  senior 
circuit  judges.]  The  federal  judicial 
council.  [Official  memorandum  of  first 
two  meetings.]  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
8:92-5.  Oct.,  1924;  and  Tex.  L  Rev. 
2:458-63.     June,  1924.) 

United  States.  Conference  of  senior  cir- 
cuit judges.  Resolutions  [adopted] 
...  (In  A.  B.  A.  Jour.  11:453^. 
July,  1925.) 

Washington      creates  judicial      council. 

[Editorial  including  text  of  act.]    (In 

Am.    Jud.    Soc.    J.  9:102-3.      Dec, 
1925.) 

What  a  judicial  council  can  do.  [Edi- 
torial] (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc  J.  7:159- 
60.     Feb.,  1924. 

What's  the  matter  with  the  courts? 
[Editorial]  (In  Am.  Jud.  Soc.  J. 
7:151-4.     Feb.,  1924.) 

Wigmore,  J.  H.  Wanted — A  chief  judi- 
cial superintendent.  (In  111.  L.  Rev. 
11:45-8.  May,  1916;  and  Am.  Jud. 
Soc.   J.     1:7-9.     June,   1917.) 

Note  :  Numerous  articles  relative  to  ju- 
dicial councils,  and  other  phases  of 
the  administration  of  justice,  will  be 
found  in  the  American  Judicature 
Society  Journal,  of  which  vol.  9,  no.  6, 
was  issued  in  April,  1926. 


///.  Miscellaneous  Publications. 


American  judicature  society.  Second 
draft  of  a  state-wide  judicature  act. 
Chic,  1917.  198  p.  O.  (Bulletin 
YII-A.) 

Massachusetts.  Judicature  commission. 
Second  and  final  report  .  .  .  Jan., 
1921.  Bos.,  1921.  168  p.  O.  (House 
report  no.  1205.) 

Massachusetts.  Judicial  council.  First 
report  .  .  .  Nov..  1925.  Bos.,  1925. 
162   p.     O. 

New    York    State    Association    of    Magis- 


trates. Proceedings  of  twelfth  (to 
sixteenth)  annual  conference  .  .  . 
Albany,  1921    (-1925). 

United  States.  Congress.  Congressional 
record,  v.  62.  (See  H.  R.  9103.  pro- 
viding in  part  for  conferences  of  cer- 
tain judges,  and  which  upon  adoption 
became  Public  no.  298  of  67th  Con- 
gress.) 

Wisconsin.  Board  of  circuit  judges. 
Proceedings  of  the  .  .  .  annual  session 
.  .  .  1921-1922.     Madison,   1921-1922. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


MAP   OF    CALIFORNIA. 


131 


MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA  SHOWING  COUNTIES. 


^1   /»r/S««»^  /&.    5*N  FRMCISCO 


lUlt-  (flarlttnn.  S<. 


132 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES,  [April,  1926 


LIST   OF   COUNTIES    HAVING   COUNTY   FREE   LIBRARIES 
Statistics  of  July  1,  1925. 


County 

Librarian 

Established 

Income 
1924-251 

Books, 
etc. 

Branches 

Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county  2 

Active 
school 
dists. 
that 
have 
joined 

Sept.  26  101  n 

$47,389  00 
6,144  14 
18,173  69 
10,955  55 
50,761  88 

149,874  95 
16,104  92 
27,564  44 
12,748  01 
9,300  45 
94,142  32 

30.266  87 
13,926  31 

290,000  78 

21.267  77 
41,725  76 

4,096  99 
20,505  06 
11,421  99 
25,987  00 
10,548  59 
14,299  83 
35,028  02 

9,370  13 
33,314  71 
30,948  63 

116,570 

14,628 

62,539 

a43,257 

142,657 

357,097 

43,549 

82,105 

75,799 

26,361 

239,226 

103,315 

37,457 

497,450 

80,447 

103,850 

12,538 

76,482 

22,823 

53,762 

33,672 

0 

61,104 

30,025 

91,100 

90,833 

87 
43 
91 
48 
99 

256 
64 

163 
81 
43 

187 
58 
74 

338 
72 
81 
32 

157 
77 
57 
75 
86 

109 
76 

133 

136 

51 
35 
66 
33 
65 

179 
45 

111 
59 
32 

106 
40 
42 

161 
51 
73 
44 
98 
51 
58 
30 
73 
80 
37 
71 

115 

37 

Bertha  S.  Taylor.. 

Blanche  Chalfant— 

Ella  Packer 

Mrs  Alice  G.Whitbeck... 

Sarah  E.  McCardle 

Mrs  Faye  K.  Russell 

June    2 
Sept.   3 
June    8 
July  21 
Mar.  12 
April   8 
May  12 
Feb.    6 
Sept.  15 
Nov.  16 
June    4 
Sept.    7 
Sept.   5 
May    3 
June    6 
July    8 
Aug.    6 
Feb.     9 
Dec.    9 
Sept.    7 
Nov.    8 
Oct.     1 
Feb.    4 
July  14 
April   5 

1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 

31 

Butt« 

59 

29 

Contra  Costa 

56 
153 

41 

102 

Imperial . 

Evalyn  Boman  .     .. 

55 

30 

Kern 

Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock ...  1 

Julia  Steffa 

Lenala  A.  Martin 

Helen  E.  Vogleson 

Blanche  Galloway 

Minette  L.  Stoddard 

Anna  L.  Williams 

104 

38 

Lassen . 

37 

Los  Angeles 

Madera 

125 
49 

64 

Modoc . 

'   28 

89 

Napa 

Estella  DeFord 

46 

Margaret  Livingston 

Edith  Gantt... 

33 

Plumas.. .. 

30 

Chas.  F.Woods 

45 

Sacramento 

San  Benito— 

San  Bernardino... 
San  Diego 

Cornelia  D.  Provines 

Florence  J.  Wheaton 

Caroline  S.  Waters 

Eleanor  Hitt.. 

63 
37 

60 
104 

IdaE.  Condit        ...   . 

Mar.   7 
July     6 
Sept.   5 
Feb.  16 
July  20 
Oct.   13 
June    7 
April   6 
Aug.  14 
May    9 
Aug.    8 
Sept.   8 
June  10 
July     3 
April   9 
July  12 

1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1915 
1914 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 

30,260  00 
15,259  26 
15,999  03 
22,066  00 
28,635  23 

8,500  32 
18,249  01 
23,019  72 
28,898  03 
14,881  05 
10,875  50 

4,426  62 
42,209  29 

8,373  24 
27,713  60 
17,860  44 

0 

42,175 
a32,045 

0 
96,653 

0 
72,964 
61,430 
79,859 
31,694 
36,694 
17,152 
109,367 
23,655 
65,916 
80,725 

122 
98 
64 

110 
98 
92 

152 
66 
71 
42 
73 
57 

122 
61 
94 
76 

92 
93 
42 
69 
84 
55 
92 
50 
68 
36 
55 
25 
133 
32 
57 
47 

68 

Flo  A.  Gantz. 

80 

27 

Santa  Barbara 

Santa  Clara 

Santa  Cruz 

Siskiyou 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Mrs  Elizabeth  Singletary 
Minerva  H.  Waterman... 
Ellen  B.  Frink 

62 
76 
5{ 
89 

Clara  B.  Dills 

47 

Stanislaus- 

Sutter  .... 

Bessie  B.  Silverthom 

Frances  M.  Burket 

Anne  Bell  Bailey 

MrsLila  D.  Adams 

Gretchen  Flower 

44 
34 

52 

Trinity 

25 

Tulare 

74 

29 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping 

Nancy  C.  Laugenour 

54 

Yolo 

45 

43 

Ol,'08-D9. '19 

$1,353,094  13 

a3,248,975 

4,121 

2,836 

2,404 

■The  income  as  given  does  not  include  balance  in  fund  July  1,  1924. 
^Includes  elementary  and  high. 

^San  Francisco  city  and  county  are  coterminous.    The  city  library  therefcrc  covers  the  entire  coimty. 
tics  see  under  "Public  Libraries,  Etc.,"  next  page. 


For  statis- 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


LIST    OF    LARGER    PUBLIC    LIBRARIES. 


133 


PUBLIC  LIBRARIES  OF  20,000  BOOKS,  ETC.,  AND  OVER. 


City 


Librarian 


Established 


Income  1924-25 


Books,  etc. 


Card- 
holders 


Alameda 

.41hambra 

Berkeley 

ElCentro 

Glendale 

Long  Beach 

Los  Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakla,nd 

Oxnard 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San  Bernardino. 

San  Diego 

San  Francisco.. 

San  Jose 

Santa  Ana 

Santa  Barbara.. 

Santa  Cruz 

Santa  Monica.. 

Santa  Rosa 

South  Pasadena 

Stockton 

Vallejo 


Mrs  Marcella  H.  Krauth 

Marian  P.  Greene 

Carleton  B.  Joeckel 

Agnes  F.  Ferris 

Mrs  Alma  J.  Danford  _ 

Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt 

Everett  R.  Perry 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn 

Chas.  S.  Greene 

Ethel  Carroll 

Jeannette  M.  Drake 

Sarah  M.  Jacobus 

Mabel  Inness 

Norah  McNeill 

Chas.  F.Woods 

Susan  T.  Smith 

May  Coddington 

Althea  H.  Warren 

Robert  Rea 

Mrs  Edith  Daley 

Jeannette  E.  McFadden 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Minerva  H.  Waterman 

Elfie  A.  Mosse.-- 

Margaret  A.  Barnett 

Mrs  Nellie  E.  Keith 

Ida  E.  Condit 

L.  Gertrude  Doyle 


1877 

1893 
1907 
1906 
1895 
1872 
1905 
1868 

1882 
1887 
1893 
1907 
1879 
1857 


1868 
1886 
1869 


1883 


as  F  P  1879 

1906 

as  F  P  1895 
as  F  P  1909 
as  F  P  1907 
as  F  P  1901 
as  F  P  1891 
as  F  P  1907 
as  F  P  1878 

1906 

as  FP  1890 
as  F  P  1902 
as  F  P  1894 
as  F  P  1909 
as  F  P  1907 
as  F  P  1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as  F  P  1880 

1891 

1882 

as  F  P  1881 
as  F  P  1890 
as  F  P  1884 
as  F  P  1895 

1880 
as  F  P  1884 


833,487  53 
28,329  67 

110,077  64 
11,732  24 
40.159  99 

190,282  46 

776,275  00 
14,582  49 

171,784  91 
8,170  37 

125,247  29 
26.344  95 
23,212  28 
27,262  13 
44.569  27 
43,335  67 
19.565  11 
85,584  37 

264,406  33 
19,767  13 
22,343  72 
48,485  21 
17,804  21 


11.127  66 

13,848  20 

53,571  31 

12,911  65 


70,433 
26,901 

137,631 
22,007 
36,708 
91,615 

717,765 
26,675 

305,395 
27.558 

104,395 
74,826 
67,697 
70,884 

110.205 

113,325 
28,784 

152.952 

340.020 
28,837 
33,455 
90,131 
59,719 
46,161 
30,763 
25,450 

187.098 
22,861 


23,227 
11,892 
26,906 

4,965 
21,910 
43,574 
215.697 

8,225 
60,227 

3,539 
42,673 
10,426, 

6,961 

8,953 

7,973 
19,705 
10,635 
61,858 
96,634 
12.575 

7,691 


5,596 
"y,i47 


12,312 
a  5,700 


Note :   For  public   libraries   of   less   than    20,000   books,    etc.,    sec   Annual    Statistics 
number  of  News  Notes  of  California  Libraries,  October,  1925. 


134 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY   NEWS    ITEMS. 


Only  those  California  libraries  are  listed  for  which  there  were  news  items.     For 
complete  list  of  libraries,  see  Annual  Statistics  Number,  October,  1925. 


CALIFORNIA. 

Area,  158.297  sq.  mi. 

Second  in  size  among  the  states. 

Population,  3,426,536. 

Assessed  valuation,  $7,035,742,630. 

Number  of  counties,  58. 

ALAMEDA   COUNTY. 

(Third  class.) 
County    seat,    Oakland. 
Area,   840  sq.  mi.     Pop.  344,127. 
Assessed    valuation   $398,907,567    (tax- 
able for  county  $353,955,912). 

Alameda  Co.  Free  Library,  Oakland. 
Miss  Mary  Barmby,  Lib'n. 

The  Library  School  Class  from  the 
University  of  California  was  taken  on 
the  annual  trip  through  Alameda  County 
in  March.  Types  of  branches  were  visited, 
such  as  the  Farmer's  Branch,  a  town 
branch,  a  liorae  branch,  the  brooder 
branch,  a  large  school,  and  the  institu- 
tional branches.  The  entire  class  took 
the  trip  and,  because  of  this,  it  was  con- 
sidered a  bit  more  seriously.  There  were 
thirty-six  in  all,  including  the  drivers. 
There  was  an  experienced  librarian  in 
each  car  to  ask  and  answer  questions. 
I'icnic  lunch  was  enjoyed  at  the  water 
temple  ar  Sunol. 

Mary  Barmby,  Lib'n. 

Alameda. 

|l§Ar.AJrKi)A  Free  Public  Library. 
Mrs  Marcella  H.  Krauth,  Lib'n. 

The  city  of  Alameda  has  purchased  the 
land  adjoining  the  library  to  the  south. 
The  lot  is  50  by  1.10  feet.  There  is  a 
house,  which  after  being  put  into  shape 
is  to  be  used  as  a  juvenile  library.  The 
price  was  $8000. 

Marcella  H.  Krauth,  Lib'n. 

Berkeley. 

Garfield  .Junior  High  School  Li- 
brary. D.  L.  Hennessey,  Prin.  Eliza- 
beth I.  Patton,  Lib'n. 

The  fifth  annual  Library  Day  at  Gar- 
field   .Tunior   High    School.    Feb.    11,    was 


ALAMEDA   CO. — Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued, 
the    most    successful    ever    held,    notwith- 
standing   the    unpleasant   weather   of   the 
afternoon. 

The  observance  of  the  day  fills  two 
purposes,  taking  the  place  of  the  mean- 
ingless "Old  Clothes  Day,"  and  raising 
funds  for  books  and  magazines  for  the 
library.  For  weeks  preceding  this  im- 
portant event,  much  interest  and  enthu- 
siasm are  aroused  among  the  pupils 
through  the  discussion  of  favorite  books 
and  characters,  making  posters  and 
planning  costumes.  On  this  day  all 
pupils  and  teachers  dress  to  represent 
books  or  well  known  characters  from 
history,   fiction,   etc. 

An  audience  that  packed  the  audi- 
torium   enjo.ved    the    following    program : 

Part  1 
An  original  play,  "The  Book  Shop,"" 
arranged  and  written  by  two  members 
of  the  English  department  and  the  libra- 
rian. A  large  "Magic  Book"  was  opened 
and  many  well  known  characters  steppe-l 
forth  to  entertain.  These  included 
Oberon,  Titania  and  their  court ;  Hans 
Brinker' ;  Dr  Doolittle  ;  Rebecca  of  Sunny- 
brook  Farm  ;  Mother  Goose  characters  ; 
Evangeline ;  Bob  Cratchett  with  Tiny 
Tim,  and  many  others. 

Part  2 

The  Boys'  Glee  Club,  75  in  number, 
resplendent  in  their  white  uniforms  with 
orange  sashes,  sang  several  selections  in 
a  most  pleasing  manner,  the  new  school- 
song  making  a  decided  hit. 

Part  3 
"Miss  Columbia"  with  her  48  fair 
maidens,  each  representing  a  state,  pre- 
sented a  beautiful  patriotic  number, 
including  tableaux,  vocal  solos  and 
choruses.  The  parade,  in  which  over 
1000  children  with  their  teachers  took 
part,  was  held  indoors,  the  groups 
marching    down    one    side    of    the    audi- 


vol.  21,  DO.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


135 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued, 
torium,    across    the    stage   and    down    tlie 
otlit'i-  aisle. 

The  judges  found  great  difficulty  in 
(L'ciding  among  the  many  cla.sses,  groups 
and  in(li\'iduals.     The  final  decision  was : 

1— Best  Class 

First  prize — Low  eighth  grade,  repre- 
senting A  kiss  for  Cinderella. 

Second  prize — High  ninth,  Ali  Baba 
and  the  forty  thieves. 

Plonorable       mention — High      seventh, 
Toby  Tyler. 
2 — Best  Group   (smaller  than  class-unit) 

First  prize — Hans  Brinker. 

Second  prize — Robin  Hood  and  his 
merry  men. 

Third  prize — Sara  Crewe. 

Honorable    mention — The    Pilgrims. 

3 — Individuals 
1 — Most  beautiful 

First  prize — AYhen  knighthood  was  in 
flower. 

Second  prize — Lavender  and  old  lace. 

Honorable   mention — Carmen. 
2 — Most  original 

First  prize — Radio 

Second  prize — World  Book. 

Honorable    mention — Phantom    of    the 
opera. 
3 — Best  sustained 

First  prize — Nydia. 

Second  prize — Dr  Doolittle. 

Honorable   mention — Sailor   Ben. 
4 — Best  teachers 

First  prize — Ichabod   Crane. 

Second   prize — Joaquin   Miller. 

Third   prize — Dora   Copperfield. 

From  the  luncheon  and  entertainment 
s?veral  hundred  dollars  were  added  to  our 
library   fund. 

At  the  request  of  Misses  Barmby  and 
Baird  of  the  Alameda  County  Free 
Library,  our  play,  "The  Book  Shop,"  was 
repeated  in  Oakland  before  a  very  appre- 
ciative audience. 

I{;lizabeth  Pattox,   Lib'n. 

I'ACiFic  School  of  Religion  Libeaby. 
Dr  Herman  F.  Su'ortz,  Pres.  Geo.  T. 
Tolson.  Lib'n. 

The  Holbrook  Library  building,  a  gift 
of  the  late  Charles  Holbrook  of  San 
Francisco,    was    dedicated    Feb,    3,    1920. 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

The    library    of    the    Pacific    School    ^-t 
Religion  has  been  moved  into  it. 

Livermore. 

Li\^EMOKE  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary.    Herbert  Lee.  Prin. 

Our  students  act  as  assistant  librarians 
and  receive  activity  credit  for  their  serv- 
ices. This  system  gives  the  students  an 
opportunity  to  earn  activity  credit  w^hicii 
assists  them  to  meet  the  honor  sociecy 
requirements.  It  also  gives  them  trail- 
ing in  librai"5'  procedure  and  acts  as  a 
vocational  aid,  for  many  students  find 
out  in  this  way  if  they  would  like  to  enter 
the  library  profession. 

Ethel  L.  Reith,  Lib'n. 

Oakland. 

:;:§||Oakland  Free  [Public]  Library. 
Chas.  S.  Greene,  Lib'n. 

The  Librarian  has  appointed  the  fol- 
lowing members  of  the  staff  lo  serve  on 
Committees  for  the  six  months  beginning 
January  1,  1926.  Program :  Mrs  C.  K. 
Louderback,  chairman  ;  Misses  Edith  Hib- 
berd  and  Grace  Ransome.  Staff  Bulletin  : 
Miss  Leona  M.  Alexander,  chairman ; 
Misses  Irene  Farrell  and  Elsie  Schauflei'. 

On  January  ISth  Mr  C.  W.  Gibson 
presented  to  the  Library  a  check  for  .S.^OQ 
for  the  purchase  of  books  for  the  Rock- 
ridge  Branch.  This  makes  a  total  amount 
of  .$2,500  since  March,  192.5,  that  Mr  Gib- 
son has  given  for  books  for  Rockridge 
Branch,  and  the  circulation  of  the  branch 
has  increased  greatly  since  the  books 
purchased  with  the  money  have  been 
added  to  the  shelves. 

Smaller  gifts  of  money  have  been  re- 
ceived from  the  Fruitvale  and  Sequoia 
Parent-Teacher  Associations  and  Mrs 
Olive  Lathrop  for  the  Dimond  Branch, 
and  from  the  Golden  Gate  Parent-Teachev 
Association  for  the  Golden  Gate  Branch. 

Mr  Henry  Root,  who,  with  Mr  J.  R. 
Talcott,  gave  the  site  of  the  Melrosa 
Branch,  has  presented  to  the  Melrose 
Branch  ten  additional  volumes  to  the  set 
of  the  United  States  Supreme  Court  deci- 
sions, making  260  in  all.  The  Claremont 
Parlor,  N.  S.  G.  W.,  has  presented  to 
the  Golden  Gate  Branch  the  old  fire  bell 
from  that  district.  Dedication  services 
were  held  on  Washington's  Birthday. 

The     Oakland     Library     Council     hag 


136 


NEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
changed  its  name  to  the  Eastbay  Library 
Council,  and  now  includes  tlie  libraries 
of  Berkeley  and  Alameda  as  well  as  Oak- 
laud.  In  January,  Miss  Eloise  B.  Gush- 
ing of  the  Alameda  County  Law  Library 
addressed  the  Council  on  "How  to  find 
the  law."  In  February,  Miss  Helena  M. 
Critzer  of  the  Berkeley  Public  Library  re- 
viewed the  "Winnetka  Graded  Book-list,"" 
and  at  the  ]March  meeting  Mrs  Helen 
Swett  Artieda  of  the  Public  Welfare 
'Lea,gue  of  Alameda  County  was  the 
.speaker. 

Civil  Service  examinations  for  library 
substitute  and  library  assistant  were  lieli 
March  2-5  and  26,  respectively. 

Columbian  Park  »Station  held  a  birth- 
day celebration  February  18,  its  first 
anniversary.  Miss  Nye  and  the  Librarian 
spoke  for  the  Main  Librai'y.  The  prin- 
cipal address  was  given  by  Commissioner 
Moorehead,  who  later  visited  the  sta- 
tion and  expressed  himself  as  astonished 
at  the  amount  that  Iiad  been  done  in  the 
district. 

CiiAS.  S.  Geeexe,  Lib'u. 

San   Leandro. 

§San  Leaa^deo  Feee  Public  Libbaey 
AND  Beaxch,  Alameda  Co.  Feee  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Mary  Brown,  Lib'n. 

"Be  Kind  to  Animals  Week"  was  ob- 
served at  the  library  by  story-telling  and 
a  display  of  animal  pictures  and  books  on 
the  subject.  Mr  Walter  H.  Osborn  i>f 
the  Society  for  the  Prevention  of  Cruelty 
to  Animals  gave  an  address  en  humane 
work  in  the  auditorium.  This  was  we'.l 
received. 

^L\EY  Brown,  Lib'n. 

ALPINE  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth  class.) 
County  seat,  Markleeville. 
Area,  575  sq.  mi.    Pop.  243. 
Assessed    valuation    $890,557     (taxable 
for  county  -$714,521). 

AMADOR  COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  Jackson. 
Area,  .508  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7793. 
Assessed  valuation  $7,803,717    (taxable 
for  county  $0,758,127). 


BUTTE  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second  class.) 
County  seat,   Oroville. 
Area,  1764  sq.  mi.    Pop.  30,030. 
Assessed    valuation    .$44,966,513     (tax- 
able for  county  $.36,480,949). 

Biggs. 

Biggs  [Feee]  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  Butte  Co.  Feee  Library. 
Mrs  C.  P.  Gibson,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  C.  P.  Gibson  has  been  appointed 
Librarian  by  the  Trustees  of  the  Biggs 
Public  Library,  the  appointment  to  be 
effective  April  1.  She  succeeds  Miss 
Marchia  Webb,  who  has  held  the  position 
for  some  time,  but  whose  resignation  has 
been  tendered. — Biggs  Weekly  Neics, 
Mr  28 

Chico. 

Chico  High  School  Library.  James 
Ferguson,  Prin. 

340  books  were  added  to  the  library 
during  1925-26.  Lessons  on  the  use  of 
the  library  have  been  given  to  our  stu- 
dents. 

LiLi.iE   Earll,    Lib'n. 

CALAVERAS  COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth   class.) 
County  seat,  San  Andreas. 
Area,  990  sq.  mi.     Pop.  6183. 
Assessed  valuation  $8,471,515    (taxable 
for  county  $7,032,275). 

COLUSA  COUNTY. 

(Forty-second  class.) 
County  seat,  Coiusa. 
Area,  1080  sq.  mi.     Pop.  9290. 
Assessed    valuation    $20,815,147     (tax- 
able for  county  .$22,071,355). 

Colusa  Co.  Free  Library,  Colusa. 
Miss   Ella   Packer,   Lib'u. 

During  the  quarter  our  bi'anch  at 
Williams  has  been  improved.  An  out- 
side entrance  has'  been  cut.  Formerly 
patrons  had  to  pass  through  the  telephone 
office  to  get  into  the  library.  Now  the 
entrance  is  directly  on  the  sidewalk,  so  it 
is  much  more  convenient.  ^Fore  shelv- 
ing was  also  added. 

yivs  Dorothy  L.  Worden,  former 
County  Librarian  of  Colusa  County, 
visited  us  one  day  during  the  last  week 
in  jNIarch.  INIrs  Worden  is  now  on  the 
staff  of  the  Solano  County  Free  Library. 

We  are  now  the  possessors  of  an  adding 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


137 


COLUSA  CO.— Continued, 
machine,  a  gift  from  the  County  Auditor's 
office.  He  recently  installed  an  electric 
machine,  and  very  kindly  gave  the  old  one, 
for  which  he  no  longer  had  use,  to  the 
County  Library. 

Eli.a  Packee,  Lib'n. 

CONTRA  COSTA  COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth  class.) 
County  seat,  Martinez. 
Area,  750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  53,SS9. 
Assessed    valuation    $99,631,572     (tax- 
able for  county  $88,605,475). 

CoNTBA  Costa  Co.  Fkee  L  i  b  e  a  b  y, 
Maetixez.  Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

Early  in  .January  the  County  Librarian 
met  with  the  different  clubs  in  Rodeo 
to  talk  over  improved  library  accommoda- 
tions. 

The  tablet  with  inscription  Pinole  Pub- 
lic Library  was  installed  with  ceremony 
in  the  new  building  Jan.  23  and  on  March 
G  the  building  was  dedicated  with  open 
air  ceremonies.  Mrs  Whitbeck  spoke  on 
both  occasions.  The  library  is  a  combina- 
tion library,  fire-house,  jail  and  com- 
munity hall.  The  plans  were  well  worked 
out,  the  library  room  large  and  well- 
appointed,  the  jail  inconspicuou.s  in  the 
rear,  the  fire-house  having  room  for  one 
large  truck,  and  the  community  hall  over 
the  whole  lower  floor.  The  cost  of  the 
building  was  in  the  neighborhood  of 
$8(X)0.  Similar  plans  may  be  adopted  by 
Rodeo. 

A  large  entertainment  given  in  Danville 
toward  the  end  of  February  netted  suffi- 
cient funds  to  pay  entirely  for  the  fitting 
up  of  the  new  library  room  in  the  Legion 
Building.  The  room  is  a  joy  to  the  whole 
community.  On  March  15  and  16,  a 
force  from  the  county  library  moved  the 
books  from  the  room  in  the  City  Hail 
to  the  new  building.  The  library  was 
opened  the  next  day  without  ceremony. 
The  part  of  the  building  devoted  to  th':^ 
library  is  very  delightful,  light,  sunny 
and  large  enough  for  a  few  years.  The 
plans  have  allowed  for  expansion. 

Mrs.  Whitbeck  spoke  at  the  Third  Dis- 
trict Library  Meeting  in  Mill  Valley, 
March  27,  on  Children's  Rooms  and  Li- 
brary Work. 

Kensington   Park   is   ijlanning   incorpo- 


CONTRA   COSTA   CO.— Continued. 

ration  and  hopes  to  arrange  for  new  and 
more  convenient  librai-y  quarters. 

Mes  Alice  G.  Whitbeck,  Lib'n. 

DEL   NORTE  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth  class.) 
County  seat,  Crescent  City. 
Area,  1.546  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2759. 
Assessed    valuation    $10,339,847     (tax- 
able for  county  $10,283,747) . 

EL   DORADO   COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth  class.) 
County  seat,  Placerville. 
Area,  1891  sq.  mi.     Pop.  6426. 
Assessed    valuation    $12,835,140     (tax- 
able for  county  $10,337,340) . 

FRESNO   COUNTY. 

(Fourth  class.) 

County  seat,  Fresno. 
Area,  5G90  sq.  mi.     Pop.  128,779. 
Assessed   valuation   $198,413,940    (tax- 
able for  county  $105,714,637). 

sFeesno  Co.  Feee  Libeary,  Feesno. 
Miss   Sarah  E.   McCardle,  Jjib'n. 

We  have  had  a  number  of  changes  in 
the  staff  during  the  last  three  months. 
Mrs  Muriel  Merman  resigned  the  first  of 
.January,  having  left  library  work  fo'' 
that  of  the  home.  Miss  Mary  Elizabeth 
Fox  who  had  been  with  us  only  a  short 
time,  working  both  at  the  Loan  Desk  and 
in  the  Branch  Department,  resigned  to 
accept  a  position  a.s  assistant  in  the  li- 
brary at  the  State  College.  Miss  Clara 
J^arson  has  accepted  a  position  in  the 
Catalog  Department  at  the  JTniversity 
of  Arizona.  Miss  Irene  Whitford  has  had 
to  give  up  her  work  as  I^aw  I^ibrarian  on 
account  of  the  ill  health  of  her  mothei". 
We  have  been  able  however,  to  fill  all 
these  vacancies  and  the  work  is  moving 
along  smoothly.  ^Miss  ^larie  and  Miss 
Paulene  Vaughn  of  Oklahoma  City  have 
been  given  positions  at  the  Loan  Desk 
and  in  the  Branch  Department,  respec- 
tively. Mrs  Ethel  Heidenrich  has  again 
joined  the  staff  and  is  in  the  Catalog 
Department,  as  is  Mrs  John  Piddock. 
Mrs  Melissa  J\iller  has  been  appointed 
head  of  the  School  Department  and  Miss 
Bernice  Price  is  taking  up  her  work  with 
the    High    Schools,      Mr    Torence    Magee 


138 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


FRESNO  CO.— Continued, 
has  been  appointed  Law  Librarian.  Mrs 
Lepliia  Fudge  who  has  been  custodian 
at  both  the  Conejo  and  Monmouth 
Branches  has  resigned  and  Miss  Clara 
Rasmussen  has  taken  charge  of  the  Mon- 
mouth Branch.  Mrs  D.  E.  Fuller  will 
take  up  her  duties'  as  custodian  at  the 
Conejo  Branch  on  April  first. 

We  have  been  trying  out  a  new  plan 
this  quarter,  namely,  sending  the  Repair 
Department  out  to  the  branches  instead 
of  having  so  many  books  sent  into  the 
main  librai^j'.  A  number  of  the  larger 
branches  have  been  visited,  several  days 
being  spent  at  each,  and  we  believe  the 
plan  will  work  out  satisfactorily. 

Helm  Branch  has  been  moved  from  the 
home  of  Mrs  Engasser  to  the  school  house 
in  Helm.  Mrs  O.  R.  Taylor  has  been 
appointed  custodian  and  so  great  is  her 
enthusiasm  that  she  keeps  her  brancli 
even  though  she  has  moved  eleven  miles 
away  from  it.  The  membership  and  cir- 
culation have  grown  wonderfully  and  we 
feel  justly  proud  of  her  work.  College 
Branch  which  was  located  in  an  upijer 
room  at  the  State  College  has  moved  into 
a  first  floor  room  with  an  outside  en- 
trance, w'hich  President  McLane  gener- 
ously had  fixed  for  vis.  The  circulation 
has  increased  until  it  has  been  necessary 
to  have  the  branch  open  another  after- 
noon each  week,  thus  proving  again  that 
a  branch  always  thrives  best  on  the 
ground  floor  I 

We  were  very  glad  indeed  to  receive  a 
visit  from  our  State  Librarian  and  his 
wife  recently.  Mr  Ferguson  spoke  to  the 
staff  on  some  of  the  more  interesting 
things  which  are  being  done  in  the  library 
Avorld  and  told  us  among  other  things 
about  the  new  buildings  at  Pasadena  and 
at  Los  Angeles.  We  were  glad  to  have 
the  members  of  the  staff  meet  Mr  and 
Mrs  Ferguson  and  hope  that  they  will 
come  our  way  again  soon. 

Miss  McCardle,  attended  the  meeting 
of  the  First  and  Second  Districts  of  the 
California  Library  Association  at  the 
Fairmont  Hotel  March  6.  She  reiwrts 
a  very  intere-sting  meeting  witli  a  good 
attendance. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Lib'n. 

The  Board  of  Supervisors,  on  .Jan.  22. 
approved  the  recommendation  of  Miss 
^IcCardle    for    slight    advances   in    salary 


FRESNO  CO. — Continued, 
to  several  assistants. — Fresno  Repuilicay, 
Ja  24 

Fbesno  Co.  Law  Library,  Fresno. 
T.  S.  Magee,  Lib'n. 

We  now  have  received  most  of  our 
state  statutes.  Also  we  have  acquired 
most  of  the  English  and  Canadian  reports. 
Work  is  pi'ogressing  toward  preparing 
the  unbound  Supreme  Court  Records  for 
binding.  These  when  bound  will  approxi- 
mate two  hundred  fifty  or  three  hundred 
more  volumes. 

Miss  Irene  Whitford  tendered  her  resig- 
nation as  law  librarian  March  1,  and 
Mr  T.  S.  Magee  was  chosen  by  the  Board 
of  Law  Library  Trustees  to  fill  the 
vacancy. 

T.  S.  Magee,  Lib'n. 

Clovis. 

Clovis  Union  High  School  Library 
AND  Branch,  Fresno  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary. Paul  E.  Andrew,  Prin.  Ottilia 
C.  Anderson,  Lib'n. 

Circulation  has  increased  five  hundred 
per  cent  since  last  year.  Complete  cir- 
culation, including  use  of  periodicals  and 
reference  books  outside  of  library  room, 
averages  1000  per  month. 

Ottilia  C.  Anderson,  Lib'n. 

Kingsburg. 

K  IN  G  s  B  u  R  G  Joint  Union  High 
School  Library.  I.  Y.  Funderburgh, 
Prin.     Miss  Ruth  Hinson,  Lib'n. 

We  have  20.31  books  on  our  shelves 
at  present.  19  books  are  out  of  circula- 
tion for  rebinding.  We  have  bought  S4 
new  books  so  far  this  year. 

Our  libi-ary  has  been  gone  over  and 
thoroughly  organized.  Heretofore,  there 
has  not  been  any  system. 

Ruth  Hinson,  Lib'n. 

GLENN  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth  class.) 

County  seat.  Willows. 

Area,  1460  sq.  mi.    Pop.  11,853. 

Assessed  valuation  $27,952,818  (tax- 
able for  county  $22,894,726). 

HUMBOLDT  COUNTY. 

(Twentieth  class.) 
County  .seat,  Eureka. 
Area,  3507  sq.  mi.     Pop.  37,413. 
Assessed    valuation    .$57,257,456     (tax- 
able for  county  $.52,406,168). 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


139 


IMPERIAL  COUNTY. 

(FHex'pnteenth  class.) 
('oiioty  scat,  El  Ceutro. 
Area,  4316  sq.  mi.    Pop.  43,383. 
Assessed    valuation    .$52,223,716     (tax- 
able for  county  $42,567,499). 

Imperial  Co.  Fbee  Library,  El  Cen- 
TKO.     Miss  Evalyn  Boman,  Lib'n. 

The  Rrawley  Branch  is  now  very 
pleasantly  located  in  new  quarters  in  the 
City  Hall.  It  is  a  fine  large  room  with 
plenty  of  room  for  growth.  "With  the 
cooperation  of  the  city  of  Brawley  we 
feel  that  we  will  soon  have  a  library 
such  as  the  people  have  been  wanting'. 
The  formal  opening-  was  held  on  Fri- 
day, April  2.  Mrs  Ritza  Freeman  Rear- 
don,  a  professional  story  teller  from  San 
Diego,  charmed  the  audience  for  over  an 
hour  with  her  folk-lore  and  fairy  tales. 
Punch  was  served,  very  much  to  the 
delight  of  the  children. 

The  next  day  at  a  round  table,  which 
was  open  to  all  persons  interested  in 
story  telling,  Mrs  Reardon  gave  us  very 
full  instructions  in  the  art  of  story  telling. 
Her  talk  so  inspired  every  one  we  all 
feel  as  if  we  should  like  to  return  to  that 
oldest  of  arts  and  become  masters,  such 
as  she. 

In  March  Mr  and  Mrs  Ferguson  paid 
us  a  short  visit  which  we  enjoyed  and 
hope  they  will  come  again  when  they  have 
more  time.  Among  our  other  visitors 
were  Mr  Chas.  F.  Woods,  Miss  Sara 
Hitchcock,  and  Miss  Frances  Strang,  all 
from  Riverside.  We  enjoyed  our  visitors 
and  hope  others  will  come,  even  though 
we  are  rather  far  away. 

The  County  Librarian  has  given  several 
talks  at  various  meetings  in  the  interest 
of  "Sailors  Book  Week."  We  are  busy 
with  this  right  now  and  hope  to  have  a 
good  showing. 

EvAL-vN  BoMAN,  Lib'n. 

El   Centre, 

El  Centro  [Free]  Public  Library 
AND  Branch,  Imperial  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.     Miss    Agnes    F.    Ferris,    Lib'n. 

Ritza  Freeman  Reardon,  story  teller, 
presented  a  program  composed  of  fair>' 
talks,  folk  lore,  stories  from  ancient  Ire- 
land, Russian  stories,  English  tales  and  a 
Tolstoi  selection  at  the  Ten  Thousand 
Club  the  evening  of  April  3.  This  was 
under  the  auspices  of  the  city  library. 


IMPERIAL  CO.— Continued. 
El    Centro — Continued. 

We  presented  this  program  to  the  com- 
munity in  order  that  the  public  might 
have  a  better  understanding  of  the  Uise 
of  the  story  hour  in  the  library  and  its 
value. 

Mrs  Reardon  gave  a  special  round  table 
for  the  members  of  the  staffs  of  the  city 
and  county  libraries  on  Saturday  after- 
noon. Her  talk  was  very  practical  and 
helpful  to  those  who  are  telling  stories, 
and  so  thrilling  and  inspiring  that  we 
all  wanted  to  become  story  tellers. 

Agnes  Ferris,  Lib"n. 

INYO  COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh  class.) 

County  seat.  Independence. 
Area,  10,224  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7031. 
Assessed    valuation    $18,730,553     (tax- 
able for  county  $11,390,515). 

KERN   COUNTY. 

(Twelfth  class.) 
County  seat,  Bakersfield. 
Area,  8159  sq.  mi.     Pop.  54,843. 
Assessed   valuation   $211,995,472    (tax- 
able for  county  $180,120,547). 

Kern  Co.  Union  High  School 
Library  and  Branch,  Kern  Co.  Free 
Library,  Bakersfield.  H.  A.  Spindt, 
Prin.     Mrs  H.  S.  Craig,  Lib'n. 

In  October,  1925,  our  library  reopene<l 
in  new  and  commodious  quarters,  fur- 
nished completely  with  Library  Bureau 
furniture,  with  shelf  room  for  4000  vol- 
umes. Since  then  it  has  received  about 
375  new  books,  including  works  of  history, 
science  and  general  reference  and  .50 
volumes  of  bound  magazines.  Books  re- 
bound have  numbered  75.  The  library 
regularly  receives  8  magazines,  4  month- 
lies and  4  weeklies. 

Mrs  H.  S.  Craig,  Lib'n. 

Delano. 

Delano  Joint  Union  High  School 
Library  and  Branch,  Kern  Co.  Frek 
Library.  L.  A.  Baker,  Prin.  Hazel 
Lindh,   Lib'n. 

This  news  item  of  our  library  was 
written  by  one  of  the  students. 

Hazel   Lindh,    Lib'n. 

Delano  High  School  library  had  many 
handicaps  the  first  two  or  three  weeks  of 


140 


NEWS    NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


KERN  CO.— Continued. 
Delano — Cdutinupd. 
lliL-  SL'liool  year.  Tlicri'  was  no  n'gul.u' 
librarian,  and  books  were  kept  overtime 
and  often  lost.  All  of  the  missing  books 
have  not  yet  been  recovered,  but  since  the 
arrival  of  Miss  Hazel  Lindh,  as  librarian, 
order  has  been  established,  and  the  sys- 
tem has  improved  greatly. 

A  new  rule  has  been  made  that  all 
students  who  have  kept  books  overtime, 
and  neglect  to  pay  fines,  must  be  subject 
to  the  punishment  of  having  their  parents 
notified. 

Freshmen  students  have  been  receiving 
instruction  on  the  correct  way  to  shelve 
books.  The  students  find  this  interesting 
instruction,  and  it  helps  to  gain  their 
cooperation  in  keeping  the  library  1:1 
order. 

The  library  is'  being  used  as  a  study 
hall  this  j'ear,  and  is  well  suited  for  the 
purpose,  though  it  is  small. 

Through  the  efforts  of  ]Miss  Lindh,  and 
the  cooperation  of  the  students,  Delano 
High  School  library  is  rapidly  improv- 
ing in  system,  and  has  established  order. 

KINGS  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth   class.) 
County  seat,  Hanford. 
Area,  1373  sq.  mi.     Pop.  22,031. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,932,326     (tax- 
able for  county  $25,088,599). 

Kings  Co.  Free  Library,  Hanford. 
Miss  Julia  Steffa,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Sarah  ,T.  Esrey,  custodian  of  San 
Jose  Branch,  resigned  her  position  as  she- 
was  moving  from  the  county.  Mrs  Lena 
Campbell  was  appointed  her  successoi-. 
the  appointment  to  take  effect  April  1. 

Through  the  courtesy  of  the  Sierra 
Club,  the  library  received  an  exhibit  of 
60  large  mountain  photographs.  Tlie  col- 
lection is  the  finest  of  its  kind  and  each 
picture  is  a  wonderful  example  of  photo- 
graphic art.  The  views  are  of  the  Hima- 
layas, Caucasus,  Alps,  Sierras  and  a 
few  m-ountains  in  othei  parts  of  the  world. 
The  collection  has  been  shown  in  the 
Hanford  Public  Libraiy  and  will  be 
exhibited  in  the  various  branches  of  the 
county  library. 

Julia  Steffa,  Lib'n. 


LAKE  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first  class.) 
County  seat,  Lakeport. 
Area,  1332  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5402. 
Assessed  valuation  $7,382,585   (taxable 
for  county  $7,336,8-40). 

LASSEN    COUNTY. 

(Forty- fourth  class.) 
County  seat,   Susanville. 
Area,  4750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  8507. 
Assessed    valuation    $17,805,368     (tax- 
able for  county  $13,400,500). 

Lassen  Co.  Free  Library,  Susan- 
ville.    Miss  Lenala  A.  ^lartin.  Lib'n. 

The  Monticola  Club  held  its  March 
meeting  in  ihe  Supervisors'  room  and. 
after  a  talk  on  "Is  art  interpretation  or 
imitation"  by  the  librarian,  adjourned 
to  the  librarj'  stock  room  to  view  the 
exhibits  of  prints  and  copies  of  old 
masters  borrowed  from  the  State  Library. 
Two  High  School  classes  consisting  of 
about  30  pupils  visited  the  art  exhibits 
at  the  County  Library  during  March. 

Mrs  AA^iitlock  resigned  from  her  posi- 
tion of  branch  custodian  for  Susanville 
February  1.  Mrs  Jessie  Agee  was  ap- 
pointed to  take  her  place. 

In  .January  a  visit  was  made  by  th^ 
librarian  to  Karlo  Branch  to  help  the 
new  custodian,  Mr  Middleton,  in  fch? 
branch  work. 

Lenala  A.  Martin,  Lib'n. 

LOS  ANGELES  COUNTY. 

(First  class.) 
County  seat,  Los  Angeles. 
Area  3880  sq.  mi.    Pop.  936,438. 
Assessed  valuation  $2,940,078,815  (tax- 
able for  county  $2,525,067,035). 

Los  Angeles  Co.  Free  Library.  Los 
Angeles.  Miss  Helen  E.  Vogleson, 
Lib'n. 

Two  important  appointments  were 
made  to  the  staff  in  January.  Miss 
Eleanor  Stephens,  formerly  library  organ- 
izer for  "Washington,  has  been  appointed 
Acting  Assistant  Librarian  and  in  charge 
of  branches,  pending  a  civil  service 
examination.  Mrs  Ethel  K.  Hughes,  was 
appointed  Secretary  to  the  Librarian. 
Mrs  Hughes  has  been  the  bookkeeper  at 


vol.  21,  no.  21 


CALIFORNIA    r>IBRARIES. 


141 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 

('.  (".  rarkrr's  Book  i^tore  for  fourteen 
YciU's  and  stood  No.  1  .ninong  SS  appli- 
cants. 

The  staff  celebrated  two  ^Yedding■  events 
with  a  dinner  party.  Elizabeth  Perry, 
Head  of  Branches,  resigned  to  marry  Ml* 
Raymond  Crow,  and  P^velyn  Bnssell  has 
changed  her  name  to  Mrs  Alton  Bean. 
It  was  a  great  pleasure  to  have  Mr 
Ferguson  present  on  this  occasion  and  to 
again  welcome  him  and  Mrs  Ferguson  on 
their  return  trip  to  the  annual  Super- 
visors meeting  in  San  Diego. 

Many-hued  smocks  flit  like  bright 
lights  among  the  stacks  these  days,  serv- 
ing as  a  most  attractive  style  of  apron. 

Miss  Gei'tude  Darlow  has  given  three 
delightful  talks  on  books  worth  while, 
and  the  staff  is  eager  to  subscribe  to  a 
course  on  book  selection  to  be  given  by 
Miss  Helen  Haines. 

Four  branches  were  moved  during  the 
quarter — Woodcrest  and  Oliveto ;  also 
Xorwalk  and  Burb.'^^nk.  Norwalk  was 
moved  into  a  bungalow  built  to  serve  as  a 
library,  and  Burbank  was  moved  into  a 
fine  room  on  the  first  floor  of  a  new  build- 
ing, secured  through  cooperation  of  the 
Burbank  City  Trustees  and  the  Chamber 
of  Commerce. 

Lilian  Sabin  and  .Jeanne  Johnson, 
Heads  of  the  School  and  Catalog  Depart- 
ments, re&'pectively,  have  visited  neigh- 
boring county  libraries,  gleaning  many 
helpful  suggestions  regarding  service  to 
schools  and  catalogs  suitable  for  branch 
libraries. 

Helen  E.  Vogleson,  Lib'n. 

Long   Beach. 

lilLoiNG  Beach  [Free!  Public  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt,  Lib'n. 

An  Oriental  vase  of  great  value  and 
beauty  has  been  presented  to  the  Long 
Beach  Public  Library  by  Mr  and  Mrs 
Frank  B.  Sturge  of  San  Pedro.— San 
Pedro  Pilot,  Ja  1 

Los  Angeles. 

:i:§Los  Angeles  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.    Everett  R.  Perry,  Lib'n. 

With  the  new  Central  Library  Building 
scheduled  to  open  July  first  there  is  much 
to  be  done  to  forward  the  great  change  to 
a  permanent  home.  The  removal  from 
the  last  of  the  rented  quarters  of  the  Los 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
Los  Angeles — Continued. 
Angeles  Public  Library  will  begin  .Iu.k' 
fifteenth.  With  the  exception  of  the 
.iunior  members  of  the  Registration  and 
Loan  Department  it  is  expected  that  ^ln' 
efforts  of  the  entire  staff  will  be  required 
to  "settle"  in  the  beautiful  new  building, 
to  shift  records,  catalogs,  files,  etc.,  to 
the  new  furniture.  The  opening  will  be 
celebrated  with  appropriate  dedicatory 
exercises  and  visitors  will  be  shown 
through  the  building  during  the  first  week. 

The  landscape  contract  has  been 
awarded  to  the  Beverly  Hills  Nursery 
Com])any  ;  the  lighting  contract  given  to 
Thomas  Day  Company ;  the  sculpturing 
and  interior  decorating  are  progressing. 
The  figures  of  Herodotus,  Vi-rgil,  St  John 
and  David  are  coming  to  life  under  the 
hands  of  the  carvers  and  the  Lee  Lawrie 
sculptures  promise  great  beauty.  M^' 
•Julian  Garnsey's  colorful  designs  for  the 
ceilings  are  taking  i'hape,  and  have  been 
approved  by  the  Art  Commission  and  the 
Library  Board.  His  plan  for  the  chil- 
dren's room  includc-b  a  pictorial  repre- 
sentation of  scenes  from  Ivanhoe  for  the 
murals.  It  is  hoped  to  have  murals  or 
tapestries  later  for  the  walls  of  the 
rotunda. 

The  staff  was  well  represented  at  the 
Sixth  District  meeting  of  the  California 
Library  Association  at  Fullerton  April  C. 
The  I^ibrarian  presented  the  need  of  li- 
brary school  training  in  Southern  Cali- 
fornia and  offered  the  suggestion  that 
the  UniA'crsity  of  California,  Southern 
Branch,  incorporate  a  one-year  library 
course  in  its  curriculum. 

The  T-^ibrarian  attended  the  meeting 
at  Oakland  on  Adult  Education  January 
IG.  An  endeavor  was  made  to  ascertain 
just  how  the  schools  and  libraries  might 
work  together  on  this  vital  question. 

On  April  6th,  the  Public  Affairs  Com- 
mittee of  the  Friday  Morning  Club  will 
hold  "Library  Day"  when  the  Librarian 
will  speak  on  library  administration.  Mv 
Arthur  B.  Benton  of  the  Art  Commissioi:, 
Mr  Winslow,  architect,  and  Mr  Garnsey, 
mural  painter,  will  talk  on  the  new  li- 
brary. 

From  the  branches  comes  news  of 
growth,  expansion  and  in  many  cases 
need   of   larger   quarters.      Seven   branch 


142 


NEWS    NOTES    (JF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  1920 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 

Los  Angeles — Continued, 
luiildi'is'.s  are  now  under  consideration, 
sites  and  architects  s'^lected.  Tlie  Dayton 
Avenue  Branch  in  its  new  building-  wil; 
be  known  as  the  Richard  Henry  Dana 
liranch.  Since  Venice  has  come  into  the 
city  through  annexation,  it  necessitates 
tlie  taking  over  of  tlie  county  library 
service  in  July.  Purchase  of  fiOOO  books 
for  the  Venice  Branch  has  been  made. 
Tlu'  ])atio  garden  of  the  Hollywood  Li- 
))rary  was  formally  presented  to  the 
I^iibrary  Board  by  the  Hollywood  Chapter 
of  the  Daughters  of  the  American  Revolu- 
tion on  INIarch  10th. 

Everett  R.  Perry,  Lib'n. 

CALiFGR^fiA  Society,  Sons  of  the 
Revolution  (Repository of  the  South- 
west I .  California  Society  of  Colonial 
Wars,  and  California  Society  of  this 
Order  of  E'oundees  and  Patriots  of 
America  Library.  Arthur  B.  Bentou, 
Pres.     Willis  Milnor  Dixon.  Lib'n. 

The  attendance  of  the  public  is  in- 
creasing all  the  time. 

We  have  added  3  volumes  of  Texas 
historical  matter,  1  of  Minnesota,  1  of 
Connecticut.  1  of  Vermont,  2  of  Southern 
families  and  the  latest  volumes  of  the 
D.  A.  R.  Lineage  Books,  4  in  all. 

We  have  had  a  great  many  books  re- 
bound and  repaired,  and  are  using 
"Barco"  to  varnish  all  books  as  they 
come  from  the  bindery  and  many  already 
on  our  shelves. 

We  are  indexing  our  manuscript  tiles 
as  fast  as  possible,  making  the  matter 
there  more  available. 

W.  M.  Dixon,  Lib'n. 

California  State  Fisheries  Labo- 
ratory Library.  Ruth  Rogers  Miller, 
Lib'n. 

Although  the  library  at  the  Californi.i 
State  Fisheries  Laboratory  contains  only 
about  the  equivalent  of  two  thousand 
volumes,  it  is  so  selected  and  arranged 
that  it  has  been  pronounced  a  very  satin- 
factory  working  collection  for  use  in 
fisheries  research.  Aside  from  the  neces- 
sary texts,  dictionaries,  and  general  refer- 
ence books,  the  library  is  rich  in  sets,  or 
parts  of  sets  of,  and  reprints  from,  serial 
publications  dealing  chiefly  with  fisherie.^, 
statistical  methods,  hydrography,  ocean- 
ography, and  marine  biology  in  general. 
While  several  of  the  large  university  li- 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
Los  Angeles — Continued. 

iirai'ies  on  llie  west  coast  contain  many 
of  these  .same  volumes,  they  are  nowhere 
so  eas'ily  available  as  at  the  Laboratory. 
Whereas  at  the  universities  a  fisheries 
investigator  must  often  seek  the  material 
he  wants  in  several  departments  anil 
even  in  several  different  buildings,  it  i^ 
here  assembled  for  his  convenience  in  n 
single  room.  Furthermore,  the  individual 
articles'  in  the  serial  publications  can 
be  referred  to  directly  by  subject  and 
author.  A  degree  of  specialization  in 
bibliographic  work  is  possible  at  the 
Laboratory  which  can  seldom  be  attained 
in   a   large   library. 

AVhile  the  ani^ual  appropriation  for 
purchase  of  new  volumes  is  usually  con- 
siderably under  $1000,  the  librai-y  acquires 
many  valuable  subscriptions  and  back 
files  by  exchanging  its  "Fish  Bulletins," 
with  other  scientific  institutions.  Among 
other  important  series,  the  library  owns 
all  but  two  volumes  of  the  "Zoological 
Record,"  and  all  the  publications  of  the 
'"International  Council  for  the  Study  of 
the   Sea." 

A  librarian  who  has  had  college  train- 
ing in  Zoology  has  been  employed  ever 
since  the  Laboratory  was  built  except 
in  1923-1924,  when  a  temporary  lack 
of  funds  prevented.  Another  assistanr 
gives  part  time  to  library  work. 

Ruth  Miller,  Lib'n. 

General  Petroleum  Corporation 
Engineering  Library.  Miss  Nelle  Mc- 
Kenzie,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Ruth  Delaney  of  the  Gener.:il 
Petroleum  Corporation  resigned  her  posi- 
tion as  Librarian  and  left  December,  1 
for  Spain  where  she  and  her  husband 
plan  to  make  their  home.  Miss  Nelle 
McKenzie,  formerly  of  the  San  Diego 
County  Library,  has  been  appointed  to 
succeed  Mrs  Delaney. 

Nathaniel  A.  N  a  k  b  o  n  n  e  High 
School  Library.    Mary  G.  Wylie,  Lib'n. 

The  Lomjta  Hig'li  School  has  become 
the  Nathaniel  A.  Narbonne  High  School 
with  a  fine  new  building  in  which  the 
school  library  is  very  comfortably  and 
beautifully  housed. 

We  have  seating  space  for  sixty  pupils 
with     the     very     best     library     furnituie 


vol.  21,  no.  21 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


143 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
Los   Angeles^Con tiniH'd. 
llirou.uiK  ul.       Oui'    lilivary    iimv    iiuiiiln'i's 
;il)OLit  three  tlioii.sand  volumes. 

We  are  trying  the  experiment  of  keep- 
ing the   library   open  two   nights  a  week 
until   nine  o'clock  and   hope   that   it  will 
meet  a  real  need  as  a  community  library. 
Maey  G.  Wylie,  Lib'n. 

Skcuritt  Trust  and  Savings  Bank 
Keference  Library.  Dept.  of  Research 
and  kSermce.  Miss  Eleanora  O'Toole, 
Lib'n. 

^Irs  Paul  G.  Lovinggood.  formei-ly  Mi.>j 
Helen  Huleu,  assistant  librarian  of  th-i 
Security  Trust  aud  Savings  Bank,  left 
the  profession  Afarch  1.  Miss  Agnes 
Lokken  who  has  been  in  the  library  ac 
the  University  of  California,  Southern 
Branch,  is  the  new  assistant. 

Southwest  Museum,  Munk  Library 
OF  A  R  I  z  o  n  I  a  N  A.  Milbank  Johnson, 
Director.     Miss  Cora  Hatch.  Lib'n. 

The  Munk  Library  of  Arizoniana  added 
G20   items  during   the  year  1925. 

The  Southwest  Museum  Library,  early 
in  January,  192-5,  by  the  death  of  Judge 
Grant  Jackson  of  Los  Angeles,  received 
his  library  on  Californiana  of  about  LjOO 
volumes  and  valued  at  approximately 
.'};20.(XM). 

Cora  Hatch,  Lib'n. 

Pasadena. 

AIouNT  Wilson  Solar  Observatory 
Library.  George  E.  Hale,  Director  of 
Observatory.     Elizabeth  Connor,  Lib'n. 

"In  accordance  with  the  bequest  of  the 
late  President  "NA'oodward,  Piesident  of 
Ihe  Carnegie  Institution  of  Washington, 
191  ».")-1920,  six  hundred  volumes  of  pro- 
fessional books,  dealing  with  technical 
asijects  of  astronomy,  engineering,  geodesy ,j 
mathematics,  mathematical  physics,  mete- 
orology, mechanics,  and  physics  have  been 
received  by  the  Institution  for  deposit  in 
the  library  of  the  Mount  Wilson  Observa- 
tory. This  bequest  forms  a  mo.st  valuable 
addition  to  the  ObsL.ervatory  library." — 
Keport  of  the  President  of  the  Carnegie 
Institution  of  Washington  for  1925. 

This  collection  reached  the  Mount  Wil- 
son Observatory  early  in  the  fall :  the 
volumes  have  been  marked  with  a  spe- 
cially designed  and  appropriate  book- 
plate and  incorporated  in  the  library. 
Elizabeth  Connor,  Lib'n. 

4— 44S05 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continuerl. 
Pomona. 

§||PoMONA  I  Free]  I'ublk;  Lihrary. 
Miss    Sarah   M.   Jacobus.   Lib'n. 

With  the  first  of  the  year  the  library 
has  been  trying  out  a  sliglitly  differer.r 
publicity  plan.  Persons  eligible  to  library 
membership  but  not  now  member.s  are 
sent  postcards  which  inform  them  that 
such-and-such  .t,  book  has  been  x'eceived  at 
the  library,  and  thar  in  the  hope  that  ii 
would  interest  the  addressee  the  book 
is  held  for  him  till  -i  given  date.  Of  the 
persons  so  notified,  ten  per  cent  have 
taken  out  memberships  and  drawn  the 
books  offered. 

The  books  selected  for  experiment  have 
been  fairly  evenly  divided  among  popu- 
lar fiction,  travel,  and  miscellaneous. 
Only  one  response  has  been  received  to 
an  offer  of  fiction. 

The  chief  labor  is  in  getting  the  names 
of  prospects.  The  terephone  director.\- 
has  been  used  as  a  working  list,  as  b.y  tlie 
library  rules,  an.y  telephone  subscrilxn- 
is  entitled  to  library  membership.  Therp 
would  thus  be  no  chance  that  the  pros- 
pect would  be  refused  a  card,  when  he 
came  for  the  book.  We  realize  that  tlris 
trial  is  too  short  to  be  conclusive  e.i 
dence  for  this  form  of  publicity,  but 
from  the  proportion  responding  to  cir- 
culars in  other  fields,  we  know  that  a 
ten  per  cent  response  warrants  at  least 
a  further  trial  of  the  plan. 

The  Reference  Department  is  making 
a  sketchy  index  of  book  notices  in  current 
unindexed  periodicals,  in  the  hope  of 
saving  time  in  serving  patrons.  Work  is 
well  advanced  on  an  index  to  Racinel's 
"Le   costume   historique." 

Mrs  George  Phillips,  of  this  city,  has 
given  the  local  historical  society  a  vertical 
filing  cabinet.  The  library  has  charge  of 
the  collections  of  the  Historical  Socie'y. 
and  will  welcome  this  generous  gift. 

Added  shelving  and  bulletin-board  space 
have  helped  relieve  congestion  and  make 
publicity  more  easily  carried  on. 

The  Circulation  Department  has  been 
featairing  the  Winnetka  list,  by  grouping: 
books  according  to  the  Winnetka  grading, 
keeping  the  list  itself  close  by.  and 
advertising  in  the  newspapers. 

S.  M.  .Jacobus,  Lib'n. 


144 


KEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


LOS   ANGELES   CO.— Continued. 
Pomona — Continued. 

PoMOXA  High  Sciiooi.  and  .Junior 
College  Libeaey.  H.  P.  Reynolds,  Prin. 
Edna  Adell  Hester.  Lib'n. 

Last  year  the  books  were  moved  out  oi! 
the  study  hall  in  the  old  school  plant  into 
the  new  library  in  the  new  building. 
This  year  over  .$2009  is  being  spent  i'l 
starting  to  build  up  a  real  working  collee 
tion  which  is  especially  needed  by  the 
junior  college. 

Edna  A.  Hestee,  Lib'n. 

Redondo   Beach. 

Redondo  Union  High  School  Li- 
beaey. Mrs  Aileen  Hammond,  Prln. 
^liss  Rosalie  A.  Wilson,  Lib'n. 

Recently  the  library  has  received  sev- 
eral years  files  of  Literary  Digests,  nearly 
complete,  and  a  large  number  of  maga- 
zines with  pictures  valuable  for  clipping-. 
These  were  the  gift  of  a  lady  who  saw 
a  writeup  in  the  local  paper  of  the  use 
that  the  library  has  been  making  of 
magazine  pictures  in  enlarging  the  picture 
file.  The  Literary  Digests  are  invaluable 
in  completing  and  duplicating  our  un- 
liound  circulating  files  of  that  magazine. 
Rosalie  A.  Wilson,  Lib'n. 

Santa   Monica. 

§  Santa  Monica  [Feee]  Public  Li- 
beaey.    Miss  Elfie  A.  Mosse,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Elfie  A.  Mosse  was  Jan.  .5  re- 
appointed librarian  of  Santa  Monica  Pub- 
lic Library  by  unanimous  vote  of  the 
city  commissioners,  for  a  term  of  four 
years.  She  took  charge  of  the  library 
Dec.  G,  1890,  when  it  was  just  out  of 
tlie  reading  room  class. — Santa  Monic;i 
Oiitloolc,  .Ja  5 

One  of  the  items  at  the  special  election 
of  April  14  is  the  library  bond  issue  for 
Sr)O,G'0O  for  expanding  the  Santa  Monica 
I'ublic  Library  building.  Harry  X.  Goelz, 
who  designed  the  library  as  it  now  stands, 
prepared  the  plans  for  the  additions  which 
are  of  such  a  nature  that  it  will  have  the 
appearance  of  a  new  structure.  The 
library  is  very  badlj'  cramped  for  space. 
— Santa  Monica  Outlook,  Mr  26 

South    Pasadena. 

*SouTiT  Pasadena  High  School  Li- 
brary. .John  E.  Alman,  Prin.  Hope  L. 
I'otter.   Lib'n. 

South  Pasadena  High  School  Library 
moved  into  its  new  quartere  in  the  new 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued. 
South  Pasadena — Continued, 
academic  building  on  the  first  of  Febru- 
ary. The  main  room  has  a  seating  capac- 
ity of  95  pupils.  Opening  off  from  this 
is  the  work  room  and  a  magazine  room. 
For  the  first  time  a  coarse  in  librai-y 
science  Avas  offered  this  year  and  there 
are  five  Seniors  taking  it.  The  course  is 
open  only  to  Seniors. 

Hope  L.  Potter,  Lib'n. 

MADERA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Madera. 
Area.  2140  sq.  mi.     Pop.  12,203. 
Assessed    valuation    $28,248,229     (tax- 
able for  county  $22,909,600). 

Madera  Co.  Feee  Libraey,  Madeea. 
Miss  Blanche  Galloway,  Lib'n. 

In  line  with  the  Adult  Education  move- 
ment a  club  for  I'eading  and  study  of 
Modem  Drama  has  been  foi'med  with  the 
County  Library  as  its  meeting  place.  The 
club  meets  bi-weekly  under  the  direction 
of  the  Supervisor  of  DramaticArt  of  the 
local  High  School.  Books  for  study  woi'k 
have  been  supplied  by  the  library  through 
the  courtesj'  of  our  neighboring  counties 
and  the   State  Librarj'. 

The  County  Librarian  has  talked  before 
the  AVoman's  Improvement  Clubs  of 
Madera  and  Chowchilla  on  the  subject 
of  "Laces  and  lace  makers  of  Europe," 
to  the  Rotary  Club,  and  to  a  group  of 
County  Chairmen  of  the  Home  Depart- 
ments of  Merced  and  Madera  counties  on 
"Countj'  Library  Service." 

Instruction  in  the  use  of  reference 
books  was  given  by  the  head  of  the  School 
Department  to  the  student  assistants  in 
the  Chowchilla  High  School  Library. 

An  exhibit  of  Boy  Scout  camp  equip- 
ment, emblems,  and  pictures  was  maiii- 
taiued  in  the  library  during  Scout  week 
with  a  boy  in  charge  each  afternoon  to 
explain  the  knots,  etc. 

Blanche  Galloway,  Lib'n. 

MARIN   COUNTY. 

(Twentj'-fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  San  Rafael. 
Area,  516  sq.  mi.     Pop.  27,342. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,132,953     (tax- 
able for  county  $25,497,930). 


vol.  21,  no.  2  I 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


145 


MARIN   CO.— Continued. 
San  Quentin. 

San  Quentin  Prison  Library.  Frank 
J.  Smith,  Warden.  Earle  M.  Stigers, 
Director. 

T'lais  library  is  sustained  by  donations. 
850  volumes  have  recently  been  receiveil. 
The  library  is  now  in  process  of  recatalo.n- 
ing,  the  Dewey  Decimal  system  of  classifi- 
cation being-  used.  In  circulation  the 
last  three  months  were  10..349  books  and 
14,985  magazines. 

E.   M.    Stigers,   Director. 

San   Rafael. 

^Dominican  College  Library. 
Sister  M.  Raymond,  Prin.  Sister  M. 
Edward,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Margaret  Conners,  one  of  our  Col 
lege  graduates  last  year,  has  been  added 
to  our  library  staff. 

Mrs  Richard  Queen  donated  sixteen 
volumes,  printed  by  The  Grolier  Society. 
They  are  the  Life  of  Napoleon  Bonaparte 
by  Hazlitt,  and  Memoirs  of  Madame 
Junot.  Another  friend  donated  her  whole 
library  of  over  three  hundred  volumes  of 
miscellaneous  literature.  Sets  of  the 
works  of  Thackeray,  Scott,  Hawthorne, 
Kipling,  Dickens  and  others  are  included. 

Our  French  professor,  while  traveling 
in  France  last  summer,  procured  for  us 
complete  sets  of  Taine,  Corneille,  Racin(>, 
Rousseau,  Moliere  and  works  of  other 
French  writers. 

Mr  Robert  Rea  recently  paid  us  an 
official  visit. 

Sister  M.  Edward,  Lib'n. 

MARIPOSA  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third  class.) 
County  seat,  Mariposa. 
Area,  3580  sq.  mi.    Pop.  2775. 
Assessed  valuation  $5,582,997   (taxable 
for  county  $4,713,177). 

MENDOCINO  COUNTY. 

(Twenty -eighth  class.) 
County  seat,  Ukiah. 
Area,  3400  sq.  mi.     Pop.  24,116. 
Assessed    valuation    $31,059,690     (tax- 
able for  county  $25,898,504). 

y/  Ukiah. 

TJkiaii  Free  Public  Library.  Mrs 
Mary  L.  Bur'rey,  Lib'n. 

This    year    our    library    held    another 


MENDOCINO  CO.— Continued. 
Ukiah — Continued. 
Wild  Flower  Show  from  the  29th  to  31st 
of  March.  During  the  three  days  of  the 
exhibit,  over  a  thousand  people  attended 
and  it  was  generally  stated  that  th^^ 
flowers  were  in  greater  abundance  and 
of  more  beauty  than  in  past  years.  Tu 
all,  there  were  about  two  hundred  vari- 
eties of  flowers  and  plants  shown.  Each 
school  or  organization  that  made  an 
exhibit  arranged  its  flowers  to  its  own 
liking  and  this  plan  brought  out  many 
novel  and  beautiful   arrangements. 

One  of  the  largest  exhibits  was  that  cf 
the  Ukiah  High  School,  arranged  by  the 
teacher  of  Botany.  The  entire  table  was 
covered  with  sand,  and,  planted  in  this 
were  the  flowers  with  a  cottage  and 
garden  in  the  foreground,  the  orchard, 
the  fields  of  grain,  and  in  the  background 
were  the  hills.  In  this  display  there 
were  ninety-nine  varieties  of  flowers  and 
shrubs. 

The  Boy  Scout  table  was  a  collectio;i 
of  miniature  camps  in  a  Redwood  grove. 
This,  together  with  a  large  variety  of 
pressed  leaves  of  every  kind  of  tree 
obtainable  in  this  section  of  the  country, 
made  a  very  impressive  showing. 

The  Ukiah  Chamber  of  Commerce 
arranged  a  table  of  wild  flowers  from  the 
"Terraces,"  the  famous  gardens  of  Cirl 
Purdy.  His  flowers  are  always  of  great 
interest  to  botanists  as  they  are  known 
all  over  the  world. 

The  flowers  on  the  library  table  were 
all  donated  by  patrons  and  this  collection 
was  probably  larger  than  any  other  shown. 
The  other  tables  exhibited  were  arranged 
by  the  teachers  of  district  schools  on  the 
outskirts  of  the  city. 

Mrs  Mary  L.  Burrey,  Lib'n. 

Willits. 

Wiliits  Free  Public  Library.  Mrs 
Sai'ah  R.  Livermore,  Lib'n. 

Our  library  is  slowly  but  surely  grow- 
ing. It  has  been  necessary  to  add  two 
new  stacks  of  shelves  to  the  equipment  of 
the  library.  They  add  greatly  to  the 
attractiveness  as  well  as  to  the  conven- 
ience of  the  library. 

Many  good  and  attractive  volumes  have 
been  added  during  the  winter  months  a>' 
people  have  more  time  for  reading  in 
winter. 


146 


NEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


MENDOCINO  CO.— Continued. 
Willits — Continued. 

Now  Mint  wpriug  is  liere  men  iuul 
families  are  leaving  for  the  wood  camps 
and  come  to  the  library  for  our  discarded 
liooks  and  magazines  for  their  summer 
reading  while  in  camp.  We  are  always 
glad  to  help  those  that  are  out  of  reach 
of  the  libraries. 

]\Irs  Sarah  R.  Liveemobe,  Lib'n. 

MERCED  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Merced. 
Area,  1750  sq.  mi.    Pop.  24,579. 
Assessed    valuation    $39,830,913     (tax- 
able for  county  $32,612,022). 

Merced  Co.  Free  Library,  Merced. 
Miss  Minette  L.  Stoddard,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Viola  Fred'rickson  is  on  leave  of 
absence.  Miss  Corabel  Tyndall,  late  od 
the  Tacoma  Public  Library,  Tacoma, 
Washington,  will  take  her  place  during 
her  absence. 

Minette  L.  Stoddard,  Lib'n. 

MODOC  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second  class.) 
County  seat,  Alturas. 
Area,  "4097  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5425. 
Assessed  valuation  $8,140,949   (taxable 
for  county  $7,670,374). 

JModoc  Co.  Free  Library,  Alturas. 
Miss  Anna  L.  Williams,  Lib'n. 

A  branch  of  the  Modoc  County  Library 
was  established  at  Eagleville  by  the  Board 
of  Supervisors  at  their  regular  January 
meeting.  The  books  will  be  kept  in  the 
community  club  house  and  in  the  care  of 
the  ladies  of  the  club,  Mrs  Irene  Groves, 
President. 

Anna  L.  Williams,  Lib'n. 

MONO  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Bridgeport. 
Area,  2796  sq.  mi.     Pop.  960. 
Assessed  valuation  $6,049,540   (taxable 
for  county  $3,084,630). 

MONTEREY  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth  class.) 
County  seat,  Salinas. 
Area,  3450  sq.  mi.    Pop.  27,980. 


MONTEREY    CO.— Continued. 

Assessed  valuation  $48,880,947  (tax- 
able for  county  .$40,182,545). 

Monterey  Co.  Free  Library,  Salinas. 
Miss  Anne  Hadden,  Lib'n. 

At  their  meeting  of  .January  4,  192<j, 
the  Supervisors  reappointed  Anne  IJaddon 
County  Librarian  for  a  term  of  four  years 
beginning  .January  4,  appointed  Marjorie 
M.  Frink  to  take  Miss  Gawne's  place,  and 
took  over  the  Spreckels  Library  from 
the  Spreckels  Library  Association  as  part 
of  the  Monterey  County  Free  Librai'y. 

Beatrice  Y.  Gawne,  California  Stale 
Library  Scliool  '17,  cataloger  in  the 
Monterey  County  Free  Library,  left  Jan- 
uary 16,  1926.  She  plans  to  take  a  real 
vacation.  Marjorie  M.  Frink  began  work 
January  11,  1926. 

The  branch  at  the  Point  Sur  Light  Sta- 
tion was  suspended  March  30,  as  Mr 
McEwan,  keeper  of  the  light  and  custo- 
dian of  the  county  library  books  was 
transferred  to  Point  Loma  on  that  date. 

Interesting  visitors  during  the  quarter.' 
were  Mr  and  Mrs  M.  J.  Ferguson  of  thi> 
California  State  Library  and  Miss  Heleii 
Kennedy  of  the  Los  Angeles  Public  Li- 
brary and  her  brother. 

Anne  Hadden,  Lib'n. 

NAPA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first  class.) 
County  seat,  Napa. 
Area,  800  sq.  mi.    Pop.  20,678. 
Assessed    valuation    .$26,163,972     (tax- 
able for  county  $22,079,  343). 

St.  Helena. 

Elmhurst  Uksuline  Academy  Li- 
brary.    Mother  Agatha,  Prin. 

Thirty  books  have  been  added  to  the 
library  within  the  year. 

NEVADA  COUNTY. 

( Thirty-ninth  class. ) 
County  seat,  Nevada  City. 
Area,  982  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,850. 
Assessed  valuation  $9,658,005   (taxable 
for  county  $7,065,905). 

ORANGE  COUNTY. 

(Tenth  class.) 
County  seat,  Santa  Ana. 
Area,  780  sq.  mi.     Pop.  61,375. 
Assessed   valuation   $166,799,719    (tax- 
able for  county  $146,732,680). 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    IvIBRARIES. 


147 


PLACER  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second  class.) 
County  seat,  Auburn. 
Area,  14S4  sq.  mi.     Pop.  18,.5S4. 
Assessed    valuation    $22,378,027     (tax- 
able for  county  $15,678,205) . 

Auburn. 

Placer  Union  High  School  Library. 
.John  F.  Engle,  Prin.  Roberta  Ingrum, 
Lib'u. 

Our  school  bond  election  to  raise  money 
for  new  high  school  buildings  carried  by 
an  overwhelming  majority  in  February. 
Work  will  begin  soon  on  the  new  wings 
which  will  be  built  before  the  present 
building  will  be  remodeled. 

Our  present  small  library  quarters  will 
be  enlarged  by  taking  in  a  large  room 
connected  with  the  library  which  is  now 
being  used  for  a  study  hall.  We  will 
then  have  a  seating  capacity  for  four 
times  as  many  students  as  we  are  now 
able  to  accommodate. 

Roberta  Ingrum,  Lib'n. 

PLUMAS  COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth  class.) 
County  seat,  Quincy. 
Area,  2.361  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5681. 
Assessed    valuation    .$20,774,601     (tax- 
able for  county  $12,624,992). 

Plumas  Co.  Free  Library,  Quincy. 
Miss  Edith  Gantt.  Lib'n. 

Trio  Branch  was  established  March  17 
Edith  Gantt,  Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE  COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth  class.) 

County  seat.  Riverside. 
Area,  7008  sq.  mi.     Pop.  50,297. 
Assessed    valuation    $63,155,539     (tax- 
able for  county  .$46,121,230). 

Riverside. 

§i|RivERSiDE  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Chas.   F.   Woods,   Lib'n. 

Librarian  Woods  gave  interesting- 
demonstrations  of  the  value  of  the  Public 
Library  to  the  Rotary  Club  Feb.  3  and 
to  the  Kiwanis  Club  Feb.  11.  He  dis- 
tributed books  on  the  crafts  of  the 
different  members  to  all  the  members. 
The  lists  of  these  books  are  representative 
of  the  library's  usefulness  to  business 
men. 


RIVERSIDE  CO.— Continue-^ 
Riverside — Continued. 

Flowers  from  the  foothills  about  River- 
side are  the  third  in  the  series  of  charm- 
ing floral  exhibits  being  donated  this 
season  by  Edmund  C.  Jaeger  of  the 
Junior  College.  The  first  of  the  series, 
Feb.  25,  consisted  of  seventeen  specimens 
of  desert  flowers.  Twenty-two  specimens 
were  on  exhibit  March  2,  all  very  interest- 
ing and  many  quite  rare. — ^Riverside 
Enterprise,  Mr  17 

Senior  High  School  and  Junior 
College  Library  and  Branch,  River- 
side Co.  Free  Library.  A.  G.  Paul, 
Prin.     Miss  Rosa  B.  Cage,  Lib'n. 

The  Senior  High  School  and  Junior 
College  Library  has  an  additional  read- 
ing room  this  year,  thus  our  seating 
capacity  is  greatly  increased. 

Arrangements  have  been  made  with  the 
Riverside  Library  Service  School  whereby 
each  student  of  the  school  comes  to  our 
library  for  a  week  to  observe  high  school 
library  methods,  etc.  It  is  of  benefit  to 
us  also,  as  we  receive  help  from  the 
students,  and  can  place  them  where  most 
needed.  Before  coming  to  us  they  receive 
a  minimum  of  eight  weeks'  work  in  the 
Library  School. 

Some  new  equipment  and  many  books 
have  been  added  during  the  past  few 
months,  some  as  gifts,  but  the  majority 
by  purchase.  Over  forty  prints,  which 
they  collected  in  Europe  last  summer, 
were  presented  by  the  Dean  of  Women  of 
the  Junior  College  and  the  Librarian. 
These  are  all  copies  of  famous  paintings 
and  statuary. 

Rosa  B.  Cage,  Lib'n. 

SACRAMENTO  COUNTY. 

(Seventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Sacramento. 
Area,  988  sq.  mi.     Pop.  90,978. 
Assessed   valuation   $155,360,518    (tax- 
able for  county  $128,-361,002) . 

Sacramento. 

J  §  Sacramento  Free  Public  Library. 
Miss  Susan  T.  Smith,  Lib'n. 

In  order  to  promote  an  appreciation  of 
local  art  and  give  encouragement  to  latent 
talent,  the  library  has  held  a  number  of 
exhibitions  during  the  winter  showing  the 
work  of  native  artists.  Beginning  in 
November  with  sketches  in  oil  by  H.  M. 


148 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


SACRAMENTO  CO.— Continued. 
Sacramento — Continued. 
Ward,     instructor    in     painting    in     the 
Sacramento  Junior  College,  every  month 
has  seen  an  added  interest  among  visitors 
as  well  as  artists. 

Among  those  whose  work  has  been 
shown  are  Mr  Wm.  Jackson,  Curator  of 
the  Crocker  Art  Gallery ;  Mr  Joseph 
Tempest,  who  paints  vivid  pictures  of 
the  engineering  projects  he  visits ;  Miss 
Mary  Crouch,  who  displayed  some 
exquisite  water  colors  ;  Mr  Rusk,  interest- 
ing impressionistic  studies ;  and  Mrs 
Charles  Stockton  Pope,  a  former  pupil 
of  Whistler,  who  has  six  canvases  of 
interesting  and  unusual  portraits. 

The  library  is  building  up  a  picture 
collection  with  a  fund  given  by  Mrs 
Fratt  and  has  also  purchased  a  number 
of  books  of  colored  plates  of  design,  cos- 
tume and  ornament  and  architecture. 
The  exhibits  have  helped  to  advertise  this 
collection.  Thus  the  exhibits  have  served 
a  double  purpose.  They  have  brought  a 
number  of  people  to  the  library  to  learn 
of  its  varied  service  who  had  never  before 
visited  it,  as  well  as  recognition  to  artists 
hitherto  unknown. 

SuvSAN  T.  Smith,  Lib'u. 

Sacramento  High  School  and 
JuNioK  College  Libraet.  John  F. 
Dale,    Frin. 

The  resignation  of  Miss  Jean  Ross,  for 
several  years  librarian  at  Sacramento 
High  School,  was  accepted  Feb.  1  by  the 
Board  of  Education.  She  is  to  take  a 
similar  position  at  Santa  Monica. — 
Sacramento  Union,  F  2 

SAN    BENITO  COUNTY. 

(Forty-third  class.) 
County  seat,  Hollister. 
Area,  1476  sq.  mi.    Pop.  S995. 
Assessed    valuation    $14,985,021     (tax- 
able for  county  .$13,308,600). 

San  Benito  Co.  Free  lyjBRARY,  Hol- 
lister. Miss  Florence  J.  Wheaton, 
Lib'n. 

Miss  Marjorie  Homer  who  accepted  a 
position  on  the  staff  January  first,  has 
been  very  ill  and  not  able  to  report  for 
vrork.  Miss  Edith  Overstreet  and  Miss 
Elizabeth  Breen,  two  .Junior  College 
students,  are  working  temporarily  in  the 
library.      Both    girls    expect    to    take    up 


SAN   BENITO  CO.— Continued. 

library  work  as  a  profession. 

At  the  meeting  of  the  Board  of  Super- 
visors in  February  the  librarian  was  re- 
appointed for  a  term  of  four  years. 

Florence  J.  Wiieaton,  Lib'n. 

SAN    BERNARDINO  COUNTY. 

(Ninth  class.) 
County  seat,   San  Bernardino. 
Area,  20,0.55  sq.  mi.     Pop.  73,401. 
Assessed   valuation   $114,022,926    (tax- 
able for  county  $69,033,74.5). 

San  Bernardino  Co.  Free  Library, 
San  Bernardino.  Miss  Caroline  S. 
Waters,  Lib'n. 

The  Fontana  Branch  was  moved  on 
•January  1  from  the  grammar  school 
building,  where  it  has  been  located  since 
it  was  established,  into  the  building 
vacated  by  the  l<^ontana  Lands  Company, 
which  has  been  donated  by  Mr  A.  B. 
Miller,  and  the  Fontana  Company,  to 
house  the  library.  The  building  consists 
of  a  main  room  134  by  194  feet,  a  small 
office  room  about  9  by  9,  and  a  lavatory. 
The  interior  walls  are  sealed  in  Oregon 
pine,  light  oak  finish.  The  building  sits 
back  from  the  street  with  an  attractive 
lawn,  trees  and  flower  garden,  thus  mak- 
ing a  very  inviting  community  center. 
The  County  Library  has  equipped  the 
reading  room  with  light  antique  oak 
Library  Bureau  shelving  and  furniture, 
increased  the  book  capacity  and  the  num- 
ber of  books,  and  also  the  number  of  days 
the  library  is  open.  The  new  hours 
are :  Monday,  Tuesday,  Wednesday  and 
Friday.  1..S0  to  5  p.m.  and  Monday  and 
Thursday,  7  to  8.30  p.m. 

On  Januai'y  2.5,  Mrs  Chas.  Burden  was 
appointed  custodian  of  the  Helendale 
Branch,  to  take  the  place  of  Mr  Walter 
T.  Trickey,  resigned.  The  branch  was 
suspended  Jan.  31,  on  account  of  the 
store  in  which  the  library  was  located 
being  burned.  The  library  will  reopen  as 
soon  as  the  new  store  and  Post  Office  is 
completed.  The  branch  library  at  Hink- 
ley  was  moved  from  the  Santa  Fe  Station 
to  the  school  house  February  4.  Mrs 
Alice  G.  Sproule  is  the  new  custodian, 
having  taken  the  place  of  Mr  C.  D. 
Raftery.  resigned.  Miss  Muriel  I^ynde 
was  appointed  custodian  March  12,  of 
the    Adelanto    Branch   to   take    the   place 


vol.21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


149 


SAN  BERNARDINO  CO.— Continued. 

of  Mrs  E.  S.  Lynde.  Yermo  Branch  also 
has  a  new  custodian,  Joseph  Fries,  ap- 
pointed March  1,  Roy  Gipson  having  re- 
signed. 

The  emergency  school  at  Twenty-nine 
Palms  near  Banning,  which  was  sus- 
pended on  November  23,  1923,  was  re- 
opened on  March  31,  19'26,  with  Mrs 
Maud  Sperry  as  teacher.  The  County 
Free  Library  is  serving  them  free.  The 
Cima  Emergency  School  was  closed  in 
September,  192.5.  The  County  Free 
Library  started  giving  separate  service 
to  Cram  Mexican  School  Jan.  7.  This 
school  is  included  in  Cram  School  Dis- 
trict, but  is  in  a  separate  building  about 
one  and  a  half  miles  away.  Mrs  Lena 
Fisher  is  the  principal  of  the  school. 
Caroline  S.  Waters,  Lib'n. 

Highland. 

Highland  Library  District  Library. 

W.  T.  Grow,  President  of  the  Board  of 
Trustees  of  Highland  Library  District, 
sent  in  his  resignation  and  the  San  Ber- 
nardino County  Supervisors  appointed 
Mr  Gratz  Barnes  to  fill  the  vacancy.  The 
Board  of  Trustees  has  called  an  election 
for  April  3,  1926,  to  submit  to  the  voters 
the  question  of  whether  or  not  the  li- 
brary district  shall  be  bonded  for  $10,000 
for  a  new  library  building. 

Ella  M.  Parmalee,  Lib'n. 

Redlands. 

A.  K.  Smiley  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Mabel  Inness,  Lib'n. 

Two  hundred  and  fifty  children  enjoyed 
the  annual  Easter  egg  hunt  in  the  Li- 
brary Park  on  April  3. 

Smiley  Daj- — March  17 — was  observed 
by  the  Library  in  memory  of  the  Smiley 
brothers  who  gave  so  generously  to  Red- 
lands.  Mr  Albert  K.  Smiley,  the  donor 
of  the  library  building,  was  one  of  the 
brothers. 

Mr  and  Mrs  Arthur  Nelson,  former 
members  of  the  library  staff,  announce 
the  birth  of  a  son,  Francis  Eugene, 
March  31. 

Mabel  Innes,   Lib'n. 

University  of  Redlands  Library 
AND  Deposit  Station,  A.  K.  Smiley 
Public  Library.  Victor  L.  Duke,  Pres. 
Eleanor  A.   Symmes.   Lib'n. 

The  new  library  building  of  the  Uni- 
versity   of    Redlands    was    dedicated    the 


SAN  BERNARDINO  CO.— Continued. 
Redlands — Continued. 

afternoon  of  Feb.  1..  Rev  O.  P.  Gifford 
of  Pasadena  delivered  the  dedicatory  ad- 
dress. The  building  has  just  been  com- 
pleted at  a  cost  of  .$6-5,000.  The 
furiiishiugs  represent  an  additional  ex- 
penditure of  .$1.3,000.  There  is  avail- 
able space  for  60,000  books. — Highland 
Messenger,   F   5 

Upland. 

Upland  [Free]  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  San  Bernardino  Co.  Free 
Library.     Mrs  F.  H.  Manker,  Lib'n. 

Over  the  Christmas  holidays,  the  dif- 
ferent departments  had  a  moving  day — 
moving  fiction  from  the  west  end  to  the 
east  and  non-fiction  from  the  east  end  to 
the  west,  moving  the  unbound  magazines 
into  the  magazine  room  in  the  basement 
and  at  last  placing  the  reference  room 
where  it  was  intended  to  be  in  the 
original  plans  of  the  library. 

A  large  room  was  built  on  the  east  side 
of  the  basement,  taking  that  space  out  of 
the  larger  room  where  we  will  have  the 
juvenile  department,  finances  permitting, 
in  another  year,  for  our  cases  of  filed 
magazines.  It  is  a  little  inconvenient  at 
present  to  get  to  them  but  the  children's 
librarian  will  be  able  to  look  after  maga- 
zine references  when  the  room  is  trans- 
ferred to  the  basement. 

On  the  west  side  of  the  main  room,  the 
floor  has  been  covered  with  battleship 
linoleum  making  in  all  about  two-thirds 
of  the  floor  covered.  This  will  deaden 
the  sound  for  the  children's  department 
below. 

A  very  important  e\-ent  was  the  birth 
of  Frances  Meredith  Austerman,  Febru- 
ary 12,  a  daughter  of  the  assistant  li- 
brarian, Mrs  A.  E.  Austerman.  The  little 
tot  was  welcomed  by  her  two  older 
brothers.  Mrs  Mary  Haddow,  former 
assistant,  substituted  for  Mrs  Austerman 
during  her   absence. 

A  very  nice  book-mark  was  found  in  a 
book  recently,  a  check  in  favor  of  the 
Upland  Public  Library  for  $50  and  duly 
signed  by  R.  R.  Harrington.  Mr  Har 
rington  remembers  the  library  each  year 
and  this  money  may  be  used  for  books  or 
anything  special  the  library  may  need. 
This  year  the  amount  is  dedicated  to 
books. 

Mrs  F.  H.  Manker,  Lib'n. 


150 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


SAN   DIEGO  COUNTY. 

(Fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  San  Diego. 
Area,  4377  sq.  mi.     Pop.  112,24,8. 
Assessed    valuation   $121,179,472    (tax- 
able for  county  .$100,963,301). 

San  Diego  Co.  Free  Library,  San 
Diego.     Miss  Eleanor  Hitt,  Lib'n. 

Oakdale  Branch  was  established  March 
4,  1926.  with  Mrs  Emma  Stockdale  as 
custodian. 

Eleanor  Hitt,  Lib'n. 

San   Diego. 

:;:§San  Diego  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Mrs  II.  P.  Davison.  Lib'n  Emeritus. 
Miss  Althea  H.  Warren.  Lib'n  (on  leave 
of  absence).  Miss  .Tosephinc  R.  Har- 
grave.  Acting  Lib'n. 

Our  branch  libraries  are  to  the  fove 
this  quarter.  The  new  building  at  Uni- 
ver.sity  Heights  is  completed  and  was 
formally  opened  to  the  public  March  29. 
It  is  a  Spanish  building  at  Park  Boule- 
vard and  Howard  Street.  The  dull  green 
finish  of  furniture  and  woodwork  is  very 
pleasing.  The  old  quarters  were  quite 
outgrown  and  the  community  and  city 
take  great  pride  in  this  first  branch  li- 
brary to  be  built  by  the  city.  The  hours 
of  opening  have  been  extended  and  are 
now  from  2  to  S  p.m.  week  days  and  2 
to  a  p.m.  Sundays. 

The  building  formerly  occupied  by  the 
University  Heights  Branch  Library  is 
to  be  moved  to  the  library  lot  at  NoriUii] 
Heights  to  house  our  thriving  brancli 
there. 

The  Altadena  Branch  in  the  McKiuley 
School  has  been  opened.  It  is  open  thrje 
afternoons  and  evenings  a  week.  Mi.^s 
Mabel  Menifee,  as  branch  librarian,  is 
serving  the  enthusiastic  public  there. 

'I'he  circulation  for  the  system  passed 
|]ie  million  mark  in  192.5,  being  1,145,308 
volumes. 

.TOSEPIIINE    R.    IIargrave. 

Acting  Lib'n. 


SAN    FRANCISCO. 

(Second   class.) 
City  and   county  coterminous. 
Area,  43  sq.  mi.    Pop.  .506.676. 
Assessed  valuation  $1",0.50,485,716  (ta.s:- 
able  for  county  $733,693,760). 

Com iroN wealth  Club  of  California 
L:brai:y.     ^Nlax  Thelen,  Pres.     Dr  MortoLi 


SAN    FRANCISCO— Continued. 

R.  Gibbons,  Sec.  R.  S.  Gray,  Chairman 
Library  Committee.  Mrs  Lois  H.  Mc- 
Veigh, Lib'n. 

There  is  a  new  librarian  for  the  Com- 
monwealth   Club    Library. 

The  librar'j-  has  hardly  been  attended  to 
for  the  last  three  years,  and  therefore, 
my  first  work  is  to  recatalog  the  library 
and  take  care  of  the  new  material. 

L.  H.  McVeigh,  Lib'n. 

SAN   JOAQUIN   COUNTY. 

(Eighth   class.) 
County  seat,  Stockton. 
Area,  1370  sq.  mi.     Pop.  79,905. 
Assessed   valuation   $122,330,481    (tax- 
able for  county  $104,620,310). 

Lodi. 

LoDi  [Free]  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  San  .Toaquin  Co.  Free  Lt- 
BRARY.     Miss  Amy  L.  Boynton,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Edna  B.  Thompson,  library 
assistant  for  the  past  three  years,  has 
recently  announced  her  marriage  to  Wm. 
Corell  Smith  on  September  10,  1925. 
She  resigned  her  position  March  31  to 
join  her  husband  in  Palo  Alto  where  ho 
is  doing  graduate  work  at  Stanford  Uni- 
versity. She  has  been  replaced  on  the 
library  staff  by  her  sister.  Miss  Dorothy 
Thompson. 

Amy  L.  Boynton,  Lib'n. 

Stockton. 

:i:§ Stockton  Free  Public  Library. 
Miss  Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 

The  members  of  the  library  staff  re- 
ceived a  slight  increase  in  salary  imder 
Councilmanic  Order  No.  7646,  passed 
March  29.  The  following  standards  of 
pay  were  established  for  positions  in 
the  city  library :  Head  of  School  Dept., 
$135  per  mo.;  Children's  librarian,  $130; 
Cataloger.  $130;  Head  of  Circulation 
Dept.,  $125;  First  assistant  librarian, 
$125 ;  one  assistant  librarian,  $120 ; 
three  assistant  librarians,  $110 ;  two 
assistant  librarians.  $105.  Three  ne'.v 
assistants  were  added  to  the  staff  during 
the  month  of  February,  one  to  receive 
ninety  dollars  a  month  and  two  to  receive 
eighty-five  dollars. 

The  resignation  of  ]Miss  Melba  C.  Bur- 
den, head  of  the  Circulation  Department 
occurred  Feb.  8.  Miss  Burden  and  'Slv 
Louis  B.  Price  were  united  in     man-ing-? 


J 


vol.  21,  uo.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES 


151 


SAN  JOAQUIN  CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued. 
?.Iai-ch  20.  ^Nliss  Hedwig  Weiss,  formerly 
lieafl  of  the  Order  Department.  Avas' 
appointed  to  fill  the  vacancy  created  i)y 
the  resignation  of  Miss  Burden.  Miss 
Tillie  Prasher,  who  has  been  an  assistant 
iu  the  County  Department  for  several 
years,  was  appointed  head  of  the  depar:- 
ment. 

The  following  school '  districts  have 
been  added  since  September,  192.5  :  Doug- 
las, Liberty,  Madison,  Montezuma,  Wild- 
wood,  Boulden  Is-laud,  Holt  and  Tele- 
graph. The  library  now  serves  74  school 
districts. 

The  expenditure  of  several  hundred 
dollars  from  the  J.  D.  Peters  trust  fund 
for  theological  books  was  authorized. 
According  to  the  terms  of  the  trust  aa 
equal  proportion  is  annually  expended  for 
the  purchase  of  Protestant  and  Catholic 
1  ocks.  The  Ministerial  Union  and  the 
Pastor  of  the  Catholic  paris'h  were  i-e- 
quested  to  make  suggestions  and  recom- 
mendations for  the  purchase  of  books 
pertinent  to  their  need-s. 

Tte  meeting  of  the  Fifth  District  of 
the  California  Library  Association  at 
Hotel  Sacramento,  March  fourth  was 
atiended  by  the  following  members  of  the 
liln-ary  staff :  Miss  Condit,  Miss  Orr, 
yihfi  Ryland,  Miss  Prasher,  Miss  .Joui.'s 
and  Mr  Harry  Devereaux. 

The  annual  report  for  the  calendar  year 
showed  a  gain  of  81.5.3  volumes  circulated 
to  county  borrowers  from  the  Main  Li- 
brary and  community  branches.  In  the 
school  district  branches  there  v.as  an 
increase  of  2ST2  volumes. 

Daring  Good  Book  Week  -500  copies  of 
the  list  of  books  en  display  in  the  .Juvenile 
room  were  distributed.  An  essaj'  contest 
on  what  constitutes  a  child's  good  book 
was  conducted  among  the  children  of  the 
seventh   grades. 

A  new  furnace  has  been  installed  and 
new  floor  covering  put  in  the  circulating 
department  of  the  library. 

During  the  Yuletide  season  a  beauti- 
fully decorated  and  illuminated  Christ- 
mas tree  delighted  the  patrons.  A  fine 
selection  of  the  latest  books  of  travel  and 
fiction  was  placed  about  the  tree  in  the 
manner  of  gifts  for  the  choice  of  the 
l)(>rrower. 

Ida  E,  Cojs^dit,  Lib'u. 


SAN   LUIS  OBISPO  COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth  class.) 
County  seat,  San  Luis  Obispo. 
Area,  3500  sq.  mi.     Pop.  21.893. 
Assessed    valuation    .$39,a33,T21     (tax- 
able for  county  .?.34,4&4,9'o3). 

SAN    MATEO  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first  class.) 
County  seat,  -Redwood  City. 
Area,  470  sq.  mi.     Pop.  36,781. 
Assessed    valuation    .$40,183,707     (tax- 
able for  county  $42,062,670). 

Sai^  Mateo  Co.  Free  LiBiiARY,  Red- 
wood City.     Miss  Edna  Holroyd,  Lib"n. 

A  bequest  of  $5000  was  left  to  the 
San  Carlos  Librai-y  Association  by  the 
will  of  the  late  Mrs  Virginia  A.  Lord, 
peninsula  society  matron,  filed  for  pro- 
bate Feb.  23  in  the  county  clerk's  office. — - 
Burlingame  Advance,  F  23 

SANTA  BARBARA  COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth  class.") 
County  seat,  Santa  Barbara. 
Area,  2450  sq.  mi.     Pop.  41,097. 
Assessed    valuation    $70,788,831     (tax- 
able for  county  $60,567,709). 

Santa   Barbara. 

Santa  Barbara  Free  Public  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  Frances  Burns  Linn,  Lib'n. 

The  little  library  known  as  the  Ship 
Library,  established  several  years  ago  by 
Mrs  Frank  Abbott  on  her  home  grounds 
in  Mission  Canyon,  has  been  turned  over 
to  the  Public  Library  as  a  branch,  a  free 
gift  to  the  people  of  Santa  Barbara.  Its 
shelves  are  stocked  with  editions  of 
children's  books.  A  small  collection  of 
adult  books  also  is  provided  for  those 
who  may  find  it  convenient. — Santa 
Barbara  Press,  Mr  21 

Reconstruction  of  the  public  library 
building  is  to  start  March  8.  The  con- 
tract price  is  $50,800,  of  which  .$.51,000 
already  is  on  hand  ;  the  remaining  $5800 
will  be  appropriated  out  of  the  1926-27 
budget,  available  -July  1.  Graham  and 
Smith  are  the  contractors  having  the 
work  in  hand.  Carleton  M.  Winslow,  the 
architect,  designed  the  structure  to  be 
rebuilt  as  nearly  as  pcssilile  along  the 
original  lines. — Santa  Barbara  Prcsis, 
.Mr  6 


152 


NEWS   NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


SANTA  CLARA  COUNTY. 

(Sixth  class.) 

County  seat,  San  Jose. 
Area,  13.50  sq.  mi.  Pop.  100,588. 
Assessed   valuation   .$121,103,301    (tax- 
able for  county  $107,985,290). 

Santa  Clara  Co.  Free  Library,  San 
JOSE.      Mrs    Elizabeth    Singletary,    Lib'n. 

The  marriage  of  Miss  Elizabeth 
Ste\ens  to  Harry  Hunter  Singletary 
took  place  Feb.  12  at  Trinity  Episcopal 
Church. — San  Jose  Mercury-Herald,  F  14 

At  a  shower  at  the  home  of  Miss  Crump 
on  Tuesday  evening,  Feb.  9,  Miss  Stevens 
was  the  recipient  of  a  basket  full  of  linen 
to  he  used  in  her  new  home.  Yellow,  the 
bride's  chosen  color,  predominated  in 
table  decorations  and  in  the  bowls  of 
flowers  about  the  house. 

Besides  staff  members,  the  party  w-as 
attended  by  Miss  Stella  Huntington, 
who  came  down  from  Oakland ;  Miss 
Grace  Smith,  a  former  member  of  the 
staff,  and  Miss  Norma  Singleton. 

On  Feb.  1,  Miss  Joy  Jackson,  who  has 
been  in  charge  of  the  school  department, 
left  to  accept  a  position  in  the  library  of 
the  San  Jose  State  Teachere  College. 
Her  place  has  been  filled  by  Mrs  B.  C. 
Frisby.  Mrs  Frisby  is  a  graduate  of  the 
Los  Angeles  Library  School  and  was 
formerly  on  the  staff  of  Tehama  County 
Library. 

Miss  Grace  Smith,  Avho  has  been  doing 
part-time  work,  was  appointed  librarian 
of  the  Los  Gatos  Public  Library  at  the 
beginning  of  the  year. 

Seven  members  of  the  staff  Avent  to 
San  Francisco,  March  6,  to  attend  the 
joint  meeting  of  the  First  and  Second 
Districts  of  the  California  Library  Asso- 
ciation at  the  Fairmont  Hotel.  In  the 
evening  we  visited  Chinatown  and  dined 
on  chow-mein  at  the  New  Shanghai  Low. 

On  the  evening  of  April  8  a  staff  dinner 
party  was  enjoyed  at  the  new  home  of 
the  librarian. 

Los  Gatos. 

ilLos  Gatos  High  School  Libraey. 
,L  W.  Ayer,  Prin.     Pauline  Clark,  Lib'n. 

This  year  the  high  school  added  a 
librarian,  Mi.ss  Pauline  Clark,  to  the 
staff  to  take  charge  of  the  study  halls 
and  to  develop  the  library.  The  slogan 
is   "Building" — both   the   library   and   the 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued. 
Los  Gatos — Continued, 
use    and    importance   of    it.      Progress    is 
slow,  but  it  is  present. 

Six  girls  help  with  the  work  and  receive 
elementary  library  training.  High  school 
credit  is  given  for  the  work. 

Pauline  Clark,  Lib'n. 

San  Jose. 

§|iSAN  .Jose  Free  Public  Library. 
Mrs  Edith  Daley,  Lib'n. 

Since  the  last  issue  of  Neivs  Notes  of 
California  Lihrarids  the  San  Jose  Free 
Public  Library  has  had  added  to  its 
patronage,  by  the  city's  annexation  of 
territory,  about  10,000  persons.  To  date, 
in  this  addition,  more  than  400  library 
applications  have  been  made — the  iirst 
one  that  of  a  12-year-old  boy,  who  said 
he  was  "glad  to   helong   to  the  librar'y  !" 

Also,  the  library  has  instituted  a 
"service  with  a  heart."  This  service,  to 
"Shut-ins."  has  the  fine  cooperation  of 
the  Board  of  Trustees,  and  is  a  direct 
from-library-to-home  service  of  books  and 
magazines  for  those  who,  by  reason  of 
age  or  infirmity,  are  unable  to  visit  the 
librar'y,  and  who  have  no  one  to  send. 
There  are  now  being  served  each  Thurs- 
day more  than  fifty  persons,  and  new 
names  are  on  the  list  for  investigation. 
The  board  has  also  started  hospital 
service  to  the  San  Jose  hospital,  the  only 
one  within  the  city  limits.  This  has  been 
started  with  delivering  to  the  hospital 
100  volumes  of  books,  including  some 
juvenile,  the  hospital  made  responsible. 
These  books  are  to  be  used  as  long  as 
they  will  serve,  then  to  be  exchanged  for 
others.  It  is  hoped  that  this  service  will 
eventually  develop  into  one-day-a-week 
service  with  a  library  assistant  in  charge 
of  a  book  wagon.  The  main  thing  was 
to  make  a  beginning — and  that  has  been 
done  to  the  joy  of  the  patients  within 
the  big  hospital. 

•January,  1926,  has  the  record  for  the 
largest  circulation  in  the  history  of  the 
library — 17,804,  an  increase  over  Janu- 
ary,  1925,  of  2086. 

The  Library  Board  as  now  constituted 
consists  of :  Henri  G.  Hill,  president ; 
Mrs  Philip  L.  Wise,  vice  president ;  Mrs 
Selma  B.  Olinder',  Dr  Jay  C.  Elder, 
Oscar  T.   Martin. 

Edith  Daley,  Lib'n, 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


153 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued. 
San  Jose — Continued. 

San  .Jose  High  School  Library. 
liaymoud  B.  Leland,  Prin.  Mi.ss  Henri- 
ette  Thomas,  Lib'n. 

The  Library  Club  of  the  San  Jose 
High  School,  composed  of  student  mem- 
bers of  the  library  force,  has  adopted  a 
constitution.  The  girls  have  decided  to 
give  book  reviews  at  the  club  meetings. — 
San  .Jose  High  School  Herald,  .Ja  24 

State  Teachers  College  Library. 
H.  C.  Minssen,  Acting  Pres.  Miss  Joyce 
Backus.  J^ib'n. 

Miss  Joy  Jackson,  formerly  with  the 
Santa  Clara  County  Library,  joined  the 
staff  Feb.  1  as  assistant  in  charge  of 
circulation   and   reference   work. 

Joyce  Backus,  Lib'n. 

Sunnyvale. 

Sunnyvale  Free  Public  Library. 
Miss  Ellen  Ballard,  Lib'n. 

We  have  purchased  a  set  of  the  revised 
edition  of  the  Encyclopaedia  Britannica. 
Ellen  Ballard,  Lib'n. 

SANTA  CRUZ  COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth   class.) 
County  seat,  Santa  Cruz. 
Area,  42.5  sq.  mi.    Pop.  26,269. 
Assessed    valuation    $26,314,41.5     (tax- 
able for  county  $122,442,480). 

Santa  Cruz. 

Santa  Cruz  High  School  Library. 
W.  E.  Elmer,  Prin.  Mrs  M.  C.  Hale, 
Lib'n. 

The  Santa  Cruz  High  School  Ubrary 
has  been  moved  from  the  first  floor  to 
the  basement,  which  gives  much  added 
room  and  more  light.  Each  semester  the 
number  of  students  using  the  library 
increases,  also  those  who  take  library 
science.  In  the  last  year  over  500  book;; 
have  been  added  for  the  use  of  the 
dramatic  classes  and  a  new  course  in 
sociology.  From  a  daily  attendance  of 
about  1.50  five  years  ago  the  libr'ary 
attendance  has  increased  to  over  .500 
with  a  like  increase  in  our  enrollment  in 
school. 

Maeelle  Chace  Hale,  IJb'n. 

Watsonville. 

Watsonville  High  School  JuIBKary. 
T.  S.  McQuiddy,  Prin.  Miss  H.  Esther 
Crawford,  Lib'n. 


SANTA  CLARA  CO. — Continued. 

Watso  nvi  I  le — Continued. 
I  wish  to  report  that  since  the  second 
semester  of  the  present  school  year  I 
have  undertaken  the  duties  of  school 
librarian.  The  position  is  not  full  time 
at  present.  In  the  morning  I  have  classes 
in  Latin  and  Spanish,  but  my  afternoons 
are  given   to  the  library. 

H.  Esther  Cram^ford,  Lib'n. 

SHASTA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth  class.) 
County  seat.  Redding. 
Area,  4050  sq.  mi.     Pop.  1,3,811. 
Assessed    valuation    $2;:{,921,23S     (lax- 
able  for  county  $16,940,710). 

SIERRA   COUNTY, 

(Fifty-sixth  class.) 
County  seat,  Downieville. 
Area,  957  sq.  mi.     Pop.  178.3. 
Assessed  valuation  $3,2.56,377    ( taxable 
for  county    .$2,.S92,010) . 

SISKIYOU   COUNTY. 

(Thirty- third  class.) 
County  .-veat,  Yreka. 
Area,  0079  sq.  mi.    Pop.  18,545. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,092,483     (ta.v- 
able  for  county  $21,072,870). 

Etna    Mills    (No   exp.   office). 

Etna  Free  [Public]  Library  and 
Branch,  Siskiyou  Co.  Free  Library. 
Mrs  Mary  A.   Parker,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Mary  A.  Parker  is  now  librarian 
of  Etna  Free  Library. 

SOLANO  COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth   class.) 
County  seat,  Fairfield. 
Area,  911  sq.  mi.     Pop.  40,602.  ■ 
Assessed    valuation    $37,602,015     (tax- 
able for  county  .$30,787,420). 

Solano  Ck).  Free  Library,  Fairfield. 
Miss  Clara  B.  Dills,  Lib'n. 

The  new  branch  county  library  at  Bay 
Terrace,  on  the  northern  outskirts  of 
Vallejo,  was  opened  Feb.  3,  with  Mrs 
Frances  Keaton  in  charge. — San  Fran- 
cisco   Vhronivlc,  F   .5 

Mrs  Nell  Wright,  assistant  in  Solano 
Co.   Free   Library,   has   resigned   to   take 


154 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


SOLANO    CO.— Continued. 

up  hei-  residence  in  San  Francisco.  IMiss 
Beruice  Hayes  of  the  library  staff  of  the 
T^niversity  of  Washing-ton  has  been 
a])pointed  to  fill  the  vacancy. — Vallejo 
Chronicle.   Mr  S 


SONOMA  COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth  class.) 
County  seat,  Santa  Rosa. 
Area,  1540  sq.  mi.    Pop.  51,990. 
Assessed    valuation    $51,110,190     (tax- 
able for  county  $13,514,070). 


STANISLAUS  COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth   class.) 

County   seat,    Modesto. 
Area,  1486  sq.  mi.     Pop.  43,557. 
Assessed    valuation    $62,169,779     (tax- 
able for  county  $53,830,075). 

Stanislaus  Co.  Free  Libeaky,  Mo- 
desto.    Miss  Bessie  B.  Silverthorn,  Lib'n. 

During  the  month  of  January  five 
members  of  the  staff  were  down  with  the 
fin  simultaneously,  and  Mrs  H.  S.  Crowe, 
Oakdale  custodian,  and  Mrs  Charlotte 
Taylor,  assistant  at  Turlock  Public 
Library,  came  to  the  main  library  and 
gave  emergency  help  which  was  much 
appreciated. 

The  county  librarian  gave  a  number 
of  new  book  reviews  at  the  annual  spring 
luncheon  of  the  Ceres  Study  Club, 
March  2.  She  talked  before  the  P.  T.  A. 
of  the  Washington  School,  Modesto,  at 
the  regular  meeting,  March  8. 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn,  Lib'n. 

Modesto. 

^IcHenry  [Free]  Public  Library 
Axn  P*>RANcn,  Stanislaus  Co.  Free 
Library.  Miss  Bessie  B.  Silverthorn, 
Lib'n. 

Miss  IMildred  De  Ferrari,  cataloger 
in  the  library  for  the  past  four  years, 
resigned  March  1  and  will  retire  from 
library  work  for  a  period,  which  will  be 
spent  at  her  home  iu  Oakland.  Mrs 
Kuth  Beard  McDowell,  California  State 
Library  School,  1914,  has  been  appointed 
to  fill  her  place  temporarily. 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn,  Lib'n. 


SUTTER  COUNTY. 

(Forty-first  class.) 
County  seat,  Yuba  City. 
Area,  611  sq.  ml.     Pop.  10,115. 
Assessed    valuation    $22,141,102    (tax- 
able for  county  $17,853,325). 

Sutter  Co.  Free  Library,  Yuba  City. 
Miss  Frances  M.  Burket,  Lib'n. 

The  Tudor  Branch  of  the  County 
Free  Library  was  re-established  Jan.  14. 
Frances  M.  Burket,  Lib'n. 

TEHAMA  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth  class.) 
County  seat,  Red  Bluff. 
Area,  3200  sq.  mi.    Pop.  12,882. 
Assessed    valuation    $20,807,359     (tax- 
able for  county  $17,165,960). 

Tehama  Co.  Free  Library,  Red 
Bluff.      Miss   Anne   Bell    Bailey,    Lib'u. 

In  looking  back  over  the  activities  of 
the  county  library  for  this  quarter,  they 
seem  mostly  "visits." 

Our  new  year  began  most  auspiciously 
with  one  of  those  rare  visits  from  Mrs 
Henshall,  that  through  her  encourage- 
ment and  sympathetic  understanding  in- 
spire us   to   renewed   effort. 

Miss  Neva  Reno,  first  assistant,  went 
to  Kern  County  Free  Library  on  the 
fifteenth  of  January,  to  be  gone  for  six 
months.  On  March  1  Miss  Idella  Men- 
denhall  came  to  us  as  junior  assistant  for 
the  time  Miss  Reno  is  to  be  away. 

Paskeuta  Branch  was  closed  March  23. 
The  books  for  that  section  will  be  taken 
care  of  by  the  Elkins  School. 

Gerber  Branch  was  moved  from  the 
real  estate  office,  where  it  has  been  for 
several  months,  to  a  filling  station.  In 
the  new  location  the  branch  will  be  open 
all  day  every  day. 

The  librarian  spoke  to  the  Red  Bluff 
High  School  Girls'  League  Feb.  20,  using 
the  legends  of  Paul  Bunyan  as  the  basis 
for  the  talk,  for  the  alleged  activity  of 
Mt.  Lassen  a  few  days  before  recalled 
the  story  of  Paul  Bunyan's  visit  west  to 
the  Red  River  Lumber  Co.  at  Westwood 
in  1914  (the  time  of  the  big  eruption  of 
Mt.  Lassen) — "Every  time  Paul  took  a 
puff  at  his  pipe  (so  the  story  goes)  the 
people  declared  the  old  volcano  was  erupt- 
ing again  I'' 

The    next   day    the    librarian    talked    to 


vol.  21,  no.  21 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES. 


155 


TEHAMA  CO. — Continued. 

I  lie   ti-nsteos  at   their  annual    nieotins    on 
the  serVico  to  the  scliool.s. 

^'isits  were  made  to  the  Farm  Center 
meeting  at  Red  Bank  in  March,  and  to 
the  Home  Department  meetings  at  Flour- 
noy,  Henleyville,  Richfield  and  Vina  for 
the  purpose  of  spealiing  about  the  "Sea- 
men's Book  Week."  At  the  County 
Federation  of  Women's  Clubs'  meeting 
Marcli  19  the  opportunitj-  to  speak  there 
on  the  same  subject  was  given. 

A  most  entertaining  afternoon  was 
spent  with  the  children  of  the  Flournoy 
School  in  March.  The  teacher  of  this 
school  allows  each  child  free  choice  of 
the  books  he  reads,  be.sides  keeping  a 
book  "going"'  in  school. 

All  reading  is  correlated  with  geogra- 
phy or  history,  as  the  case  might  be,  and 
at  the  time  of  the  librarian's  visit  the 
book  of  the  hour  was  "David  goes  voyag- 
ing." The  map  lesson  for  the  day  had 
been  on  the  course  of  the  Arcturus.  Each 
child  has  a  note  book,  in  which  the  notes 
of  each  book  read  during  the  term  are 
kept,  the  important  or  interesting  charac- 
ters and  an  estimate  of  the  book  given. 
This  teacher,  ignorant  of  the  vacation 
note  books,  certificate  system  for  vaca- 
tion reading,  etc.,  evolved  by  libraries, 
has  worked  out  this  scheme  by  herself. 
The  school  is  situated  in  a  remote  section 
of  the  county  and  the  children  have  ex- 
perienced little  outside  of  the  school 
life.  The  taste  in  reading  and  the  lively 
interest  of  these  children  in  world  affairs 
was  nothing  short  of  remarkable. 

Anne  Bell  Bailey,  Lib'n. 

TRINITY  COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth  class.) 
County  seat,  Weaverville. 
Area,  .3276  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2551. 
Assessed  valuation  .$3,827,  208  (taxable 
for  county  .$3,395,927). 

TULARE  COUNTY. 

(Eleventh  class.) 
County  seat,  Visalia. 
Area,  4863  sq.mi.     Pop.  59031. 
Assessed    valuation    $88,988,736     (tax- 
able for  county  $67,763,250) . 

Tulare  Co.  Free  Library,  Visalia. 
Miss  Gretchen  Flower,  Lib'n. 


TULARE   CO.— Continued. 

'i'lic  'i\ile  River  Indian  Reservation 
P.i-ancli  was  establislicd  March  2,  with 
Euiil  B.  Fisher  as  custodian.  The 
addiess  is  Porterville..  ^Irs  Z.  M.  Hinds- 
man  succeeded  Mrs  Birdie  Phillips  .  as 
custodian  of  Allensworth  Branch,  Feb.  8. 
The  library  will  be  open  Tuesday  and 
Thurc^day  afternoons.  The  Grand  View 
Heights  School  joined  the  County  Library 
March  1 ;  Mrs  Alta  C.  Clarke  is  teacher. 
Gretchen  Flower,  Lib'n. 

TUOLUMNE  COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth  class.) 

County  seat,   Sonora. 
Area,  2292  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7768. 
Assessed    valuation    $12,.356,640     (tax- 
able for  county  $8,850,745). 

VENTURA  COUNTY. 

(Twentj'-third  class,  i 
County  seat,  Ventura. 
Area,  18-50  sq.  mi.     Pop.  28,724. 
Assessed    valuation    $63,246,876    (tax- 
able for  county  $.54,-556,749). 

Ventura  Co.  Free  Library,  Vkx- 
TUBA.     Miss  Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 

Four  members  of  the  County  Library 
staff  and  one  of  the  city  had  the  pleasure 
of  attending  the  Sixth  District  Meeting 
of  the  California  Library  A.ssociation  at 
Fullerton. 

A  talk  and  display  of  children's  books 
were  given  by  the  librarian  before  the 
Fillmore  P.  T.  A. 

The  staff  has  enjoyed  several  visits 
made  the  library  this  quarter.  Mr 
Ferguson  stopped  off  on  his  way  sovith, 
the  Library  School  of  the  Los  Angeles 
Public  Library  included  Ventui'a  in  its 
itinerary  and  Miss  Sabin  of  the  Los 
Angeles   Countj-  Library  visited  us. 

Miss  Clara  Smith,  the  county  rural 
supervisor,  and  the  County  Librarian 
made  a  trip  into  Verba  Buena.  One  of 
the  horses  sent  to  meet  them  slipped  off 
the  trail  and  was  killed.  Coming  out  a 
rainstorm  caught  them.  The  school  had 
read  every  book  on  the  shelves  and  was 
delighted  to  get  new  material.  The  two 
boys  who  play  violins  were  supplied  with 
easy  music.  One  has  taught  the  other 
how  to  play. 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 


156 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


VENTURA    CO.— Continued. 
Ventura. 

IIYentuka  [Fkee]  Public  Libkaey 
AXD  Branch.  V  e  n  t  u  b  a  Co.  Fkee 
Library.  Miss  Elizabeth  R.  Topping, 
Lib'n. 

A  picture  exhibit  was  given  by  the 
Shakespeare  Club  in  the  Children's  Room. 
This  was  supplemented  by  books  from  the 
State  Library  that  contained  famous 
illustrations  of  the  plays. 

Various  clubs  in  the  city  have  made 
good  use  of  the  State  Library  pictures 
this  quarter. 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 

YOLO  COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth    class.) 
County  seat.   Woodland. 
Area,  1017  sq.  mi.     Pop.  17,10.5. 
Assessed    valuation    $33,466,439     (tax- 
able for  county  $26,966,854). 

Davis. 

Davis  Free  Library  and  Branch, 
Yolo  Co.  Free  Library.  Miss  Hattie 
Weber,  Lib'n. 

The  officers  of  the  Library  Club  gave 
a  silver  tea  at  the  library,  2  to  5  p.m., 
February  28.  Light  refreshments  were 
served  by  members  of  the  club.  During 
the  afternoon  coin  to  the  amount  of  thirty 
dollars   was  placed   in   the  basket. 

Following  are  the  books  borrowed  for 
the  last  three  months :  fiction  2522  ;  non- 
fiction  385 ;  juvenile  4SS  :  magazines  168. 
Hattie  Weber,  Lib'n. 

INIrs   O.   B.  AYilber.   one  of  the   charter 


YOLO  CO.— Continued. 
Davis — Continued, 
members  of  the  Davis  Library  club,  made 
a  presentation  of  a  handsome  bronze 
tablet  to  the  or'ganization  at  a  recent 
meeting,  in  memory  of  Mrs  W.  H.  Marden 
and  Mrs  F.  W.  Crawford,  pioneer  women 
who  in  ]872  founded  the  first  library  in 
Davis.  The  tablet  bearing  the  names  of 
the  t\vo  founders  was  procured  at  a  cost 
of  $200,  the  joint  gift  of  Mrs  Wilber  and 
her  sister,  Mrs  Minnie  Collins. — Sacra- 
mento Bee,  F  1 

YUBA  COUNTY. 

(Fortieth  class.) 
County  seat,  Marysville. 
Area,  625  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,375. 
Assessed    valuation    $20,257,344     (tax- 
able for  county  $16,578,575). 

Marysville. 

§Marysville  City  [Free  Public] 
Library.     Miss  Clara  Tietjen,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Jennie  C.  Engell,  City  Librarian, 
tendered  her  resignation,  ,Tan.  22,  to 
Walter  A.  Kynoch,  chainnan  of  the 
library  board,  and  to  the  city  council,  to 
take  effect  Feb.  1.  She  is  leaving  to 
accept  a  position  with  the  Kern  County 
Free  Library  in  Bakersfield. — Marysville 
Appeal,  Ja  23 

Miss  Clara  Tietjen,  for  the  past  three 
years  in  charge  of  the  Y.  W.  C.  A. 
Library  in  San  Francisco,  has  accepted 
the  position  of  Marysville  City  Librarian, 
beginning  work  Feb.  19. — Marysville 
Appeal,  F  20 


vol.  21,  no.  2  I  DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,   ETC. 


157 


DIRECTORY  FOR  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES  AND  OTHER  ITEMS 
OF  GENERAL  INTEREST. 


The  following  directory  is  based  on 
recommendations  received  from  the  libra- 
ries of  California.  New  recommendations 
and  corrections  will  be  welcomed  at  any 
lime. 

SUPPLIES. 
Amateur   Plays. 
Acting  Dramas  foe  Amateurs. 

The  Book  Den,  464  Eighth  st,  Oak- 
land.  Calif. 

A.   L-   A. 

Headquabtees. 

S6  E.  Randolph  st.,  Chicago,  111. 

All  A.  L.  A.  publications  sold  from 
headquarters  except  1904  Catalog  which 
can  be  purchased  for  $1  from  Superin- 
tendent of  Documents,  Washington,  D.  C. 

Binding  and    Mending. 

Rinding. 
Cooperative  Bindery  Co.,  330  Jackson 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Foster  &  Futernick  Co.,  444  Bryant  st., 

San   Francisco,   Calif. 
Herring  &  Robinson,  1927  Howard  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Hicks-Judd    Co.,    460   Fourth   st.,    San 

Francisco,  Calif. 
Pacific    Library    Binding    Co.,    770    E. 

Washington   st.,  Los   Angeles,   Calif. 
Sacramento    Bookbindery,    309    J    st., 

Sacramento,   Calif. 
Silvius   and    Schoenbackler,   423   J  st., 

Sacramento,   Calif. 

Mending. 

Stix   Co..    San  .Jose. 

Stix-Parchment  mending  tissue. 

Blind. 

Embossed  books,  etc.  Addresses  will 
be  furni.shed  by  the  State  Library. 

Book   Cases  and   Shelving. 

MoKee  &  Went  worth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 


Book   Packing    Bags. 

Hoegee  Co.,  138-142  S.  Main  st.,  Los 
Angeles,   Calif. 

Book    Packing    Boxes. 

Pacific  Box  Factory,  2600  Taylor  St., 
San   Francisco,   Calif. 

COEKUGATED    PAPER    CAETONS. 

Illinois-Pacific  Glass  Co.,  15th  and 
Folsom  sts.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Richardson-Case  Paper  Co.,  1021 
Front   St.,   Sacramento,   Calif. 

Book   Plates. 
Manhattan      Photogravure      Co.,      142 

West  27th  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Sequoyah  Studio,  319  42d  St.,  Oakland, 

Calif. 
Times-Mirror     Printing     and     Binding 

House,      118      S.      Kroadway,      Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Western    Lithograph    Co.,    600-610   E. 

Second  st.,  Los  Angeles',  Calif. 

Book   Pockets. 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus    st., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Hicks-Judd   Co.,   460   Fourth    st.,    San 

Francisco,   Calif. 
McKee  &  Wentworth    (Library   Bureau 

Distributors),    39    Second    st.,    San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los   Angeles 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
The  Zellerbach  Paper  Co.,  534  Battery 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Book  Stacks,  Metal  Furniture,  Etc. 

Art  Metal  Construction  Co.,  James- 
town, N.  Y. 

McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

J.  Niederer  Co.,  3409  S.  Main  st,  Los 
Angeles,  Calif. 

Van  Horn  Iron  Works  Co.,  Cleveland, 
Ohio. 


158 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Book   Supports,   Bracket  and   Pedal   for 
Perforating    Stamp    and    Other    Me- 
chanical   Appliances. 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 
<4a.vlorcl    Bros..    44    N.    Stanislaus    St., 

Stoclvton.  Calif. 
McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner  Co.,  365-369  Market 
St..    San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Book   Varnish. 

Pacific  Library  Binding  Co.,  770  E. 
Washington  St.,   Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Books. 

Baker  &  Taylor  Co.,  354  4th  ave..  New 

York  City. 
Chivers  Book  Binding  Co.,  126  Nassau 

St.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

For   books  in   CUivers   binding. 

Emporium,  835-865  Market  st.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Himebaugh  &  Browne,  471  Fifth  ave.. 
New  York,  N.  Y. 

Holmes  Book  Co.,  342  14th  st.,  Oakland, 
and  152  Kearny  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

H.  R.  Huntting  Co.,  Springfield,  Mass. 

Levinson's  The  Book  Store,  1012  K  St., 
Sacramento,  Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Library  Depart- 
ment, 330  E.  Ohio  st,   Chicago,   111. 

McDevitt- Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  st., 
New   York  City. 

Newbegir's,  358  Post  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco. Calif. 

Parker's  Hook  Store  (C.  C.  Parker), 
520   W.   6th  St.,  Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 
St.,   Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Pumell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

SaLher  Gate  Bookshop,  2235  Telegraph 
ave.,  Berkeley.  Calif. 

Chas.  Scribner's  Sons,  5th  ave.  and 
4Sth  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

G.  E.  Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33  B.  10th 
St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Technical  Book  Co..  525  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Technical  Publishing  Co.,  274  I.  W. 
Hellman  bldg.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Handles  only  technical  books. 


Books — Continued. 

Union   Library   Association,   225  Fifth 

ave..  New  York  City. 
\'ioinan",s  Book  Store.  329  E.  Colorado 

St.,   Pasadena. 
Harr    Wagner,    149    New    Montgomery 

St.,  San  Francisco,   Calif. 
Especially    western   books    by   western    authors. 

White    House,    Sutter   st.,    bet    Grant- 
ave.  and  Kearny  st.,   San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

English  Books  and  Publications. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33  E.   10th 

St.,   New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   F.   Stevens  &  Brown,   4   Trafalgar 
Square,  London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 

Foreign    Books   and    Publications   in 

Various  Languages. 
Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.   Spring 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33  E.   10th 

St..  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   Westermann  Co.,   Inc.,   30-32  East 

Twentieth  st.  New  York,  N.  Y. 

French. 

French  Book  Store,  Alfred  Blanc  &  J. 

Delabriandais,  324  Stockton  st.,  San 

Francisco,  Calif. 
J.    Terquem,    19    Rue    Scribe,     Paris 

France. 

ftalian. 

A.  Cavalli  &  Co.,  255  Columbus  ave., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

SiMnish. 

Victoriano   Suarez,  Madrid,  Spain. 

Law  Books. 
Bancroft-Whitney   Co.,   200  McAllister 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Matthew-Bender  &  Co.,  109   State  st., 

Albany,  N.  Y. 

School  Books. 

Milton  Bradley  Co.,  20  Second  st.,  San 
Francis'co,   Calif. 

California  School  Book  Depository, 
149  New  Montgomery  st,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Ginn  &  Co.,  45  Second  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco,  Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Library  Depart- 
ment, 330  E.  Ohio  st.,   Chicago,   111. 


V0].21,  no.  2]  DIRECTORY   FOR   LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,    ETC. 


159 


Books — Continued. 
Owou   Publishing   Co.,  GSl   iNIarket  st., 

San   Francisco,   Calif. 
White    House,    Sutter    st.,    bet.    Grant 

ave.  and  Kearny  st.,  San  Francisco, 

Calif. 

Second-Hand  Books. 
McDevitt-Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  st.. 

New   York   City. 
J\iudie's     Select    Library,    30-34    New 

Oxford  St.,  London,  Eng. 
Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Henry     Sothern    &    Co.,    140    Strand, 

London,   W.   C.  2,   Eng. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33  E.   10th 

St.,  New  York.  N.  Y. 
P..    F.    Stevens   &  B'rown,    4  Trafalgar 

Square.  London,  W.  0.  2,  Eng. 
A.   R.   Womrath,  15  E.  28th   st.,   New 

York,  N.  Y. 

For  used  Action. 

Especially  Californiana. 

Dawson's    Book    Shop,    627    S.    Grand 

ave.,  Los  Angeles,  California. 
F.  M.  De  Witt,  620  14th  st.,  Oakland, 

Calif. 
Holmes  Book  Co.,  S42  14th  st.,  Oakland, 

and   152  Kearny  st.,   San  Francisco, 

Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See  Furniture  and  Supplies. 

Catalog  Cards. 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

(:Jaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman  &  Erbe  Manufacturing  Co., 
132-140  Suttet  St.,  San  Francisco, 
and  727  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 

H.  S.  Crocker  Co.,  565-571  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's  Press  Clipping  Bureau,  255 
Commercial  st.,  San  Francisco,  and 
626  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

5—44805 


County    Free    Library    Signs. 
For    information,    write    Mrs    Frances 
Burns  Linn,   Santa  Barbara  County 

Frco   Lilirary,   Snntu  Bnrhara,   Calif. 

County     Free    Library    Stickers. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Cutter  Tables,    Size    Rulers,    Etc. 
McKee  &  Wentworth   (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),     39     Second    st.,     San 
Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los   Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Duplicating    Appliances. 
Dandij  Duplicator. 

Dodge  &   Dent,   New  York,   N.  Y. 

Edison  Rotary  Mimeograph. 

H.  S.  Crocker  Co.  (Agents),  565-571 
Market  St.,   San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Filing   Cases. 

See  Furniture  and  Supplies, 

Films. 
For  Rent. 

American  Red  Cross  Films,  distributed 
by  University  of  California  Library, 
Berkeley,  Calif. 

Fox  Film  Corporation,  New  York, 
N.  Y. 

National  Producci's  Film  Service,  111 
Golden  Gate  ave.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

Pathe  Exchange,  Inc.,  Non-Theatrical 
Dept.,  985  Market  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

United  States  Forest  Service,  Ferry 
bldg.,  San   Francisco,  Calif. 

University  of  California,  Extension 
Division,    Berkeley,    Calif. 

Furniture   and    Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth  Stationery  Co.,  737- 
7.39  S.  Spriilg  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  St.,  San 
Francisco,  and  759  S.  Los  Angeles 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  ^t.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller  Desk  Co.,  677  Mission 
St.,    San    Francisco,    Calif. 

Yawman  &  Erbe  INIanufacturing  Co., 
132-140  Sutter  st.,  San  Francisco, 
and  727  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 


160 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Furniture    and    Supplies — C'ontinued. 
Filiiif/  Cases  for  Music. 

Los  Angeles  Desk  Co.,  S4S  S.  Hill  st., 
r^os  Angeles,  Calif. 

Globes. 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  5235-7  Ravens- 
wood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
agent :  A.  F>.  Maine,  Box  (j3."i,  Arcade 
Station,   Los  Angeles,   Calif.) 

Pnrnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac 
ramento,   Calif. 

Rand-McNally  Co.,  125  E.  Sixth  St.. 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  St., 
San   Francisco,   Calif. 

C.  F.  Weber  &  Co..  985  Market  st.. 
San    Francisco,    Calif. 

Magazine   Binders. 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,   Madison,  Wis. 
Elbe    File    and    Binder    Co.,    215-217 

Greene  s't.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus    st., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Gem    Binder    Co.,    Go    W.    Broadway, 

New  York. 
Wm,  G.  Johnston  &  Co.,  Pittsburgh.  Pa. 
McKee  &  Wentworth    (Library  Bureau 

Distributors),     30    Second    st.,     San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los   Angeles 

St.,   Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Magazines. 

See  Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  5235-7  Ravens- 
wood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
auent :  A.  B.  Maine,  Box  635,  Arcade 
Station,    Los   Angeles,   Calif.) 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Raud-McNally  Co.,  125  E.  Sixth  St., 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  st., 
San   Francisco,   Calif. 

C.  F.  Weber  &  Co.,  985  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman.  Clay  &  Co.,  Kearny  and  Sut- 
ter  sts..    San    Francisco,   Calif. 

(5.  Schlrmer,  3  E.  43d  st.,  New  York, 
N.  V. 


.  Pamphlet    and    Multi-Binders,    and 
Pamphlet   Boxes. 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44    X.    Stanislaus    st.. 

Stockton.   Calif. 
McKee  &  Wentworth   (Library  Bureau 

Distributors),    .39     Second    st.,     San 

Francisco,   and   759   S.   Los  Angeles 

St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Paste. 

Pacific  Library  Binding  Co.,  770  E. 
Washington   st.,   Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Pasting   Machines. 

A.  G.  Prior.  136  Liberty  st..  New 
York,  N.  Y. 

Perforating    Stamps. 

B.  F.  Cummins  Co.,   Chicago,    111. 
iMoise-Klinkner    Co.,    36.5-369    Market 

St.,  San   Francisco,  Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back  Volumes  and  Numbers. 

F.  W.  Faxon  Co.,  83-91  Francis  st., 
Back   Bay,    Boston,    Mass. 

F.  M.  De  Witt,  620  14th  st.,  Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific  Library  Binding  Co.,  770  E. 
Washington    st.,    Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Universal  Library  Service.  2189  Wool- 
worth   bklg..   New   York   City. 

II.  W.  Wilson  Co.,  958-64  University 
ave..   New   York   City. 

SuDSCRiPTiON  Agencies. 

.lohn  A.  Clow,  2925  N.  Lake  ave., 
Pasadena,  Calif. 

F.  W.  Faxon  Co..  83-91  Francis  st.. 
Back  Bay,  Boston.  ]Mass. 

Franklin  Square  Agency,  Franklin 
Square,    New   York   City. 

Moore-Cottrell  Subscription  Agencies, 
North  Cohocton,   N.   Y. 

^Mutual  Subscription  Agency,  602  Cro- 
zer  B'ldg.,  Philadelphia.   Pa. 

I'acific  News  Bureau.  643  S.  Olive  st.. 
Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento.  Calif. 

San  Francisco  News  Co.,  657  Howard 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

G.  E.  Stechert  .&  Co..  31-33  E.  10th 
St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

For  foreign  peilodicals  only. 


vol.  21,  no.  2]  DIRECTORY    FOR   LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,    ETC. 


161 


Periodicals — Continued. 
Sunset     Subscription     Agency,     631 
South  W(\Kt  Bids..  1-3U  S.  Broadway. 
Los  Angeles.   Calif. 

Pictures. 

Braun  &  Co.,  Dornach,  Alsace,  France. 
Curtis     &     Cameron,     Copley     Square, 
Boston,  Mass. 

Especially  for  reproduction  of  American  art. 

Toni  Landau  Photo  Co.,  1  E.  45th  St., 

New  York,  N.  J. 
(Formerly  Berlin  Photographic  Co.) 
Perry  Pictures  Co.,  Maiden,  Mass. 
Vickery,  Atkins  &  Torrey,  550  Sutter 

St.,    San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Rubber  Stamps  and  Type. 

Chipron  Stamp  Co.,  224  West  First 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Los  Angeles  Rubber  Stamp  Co.,  131  S. 
Spring   St.,    Los    Angeles,    Calif. 

^foise-Klinkner  Co.,  3f>o-869  Market 
St.,    San   Francisco,   Calif. 

Sleeper  Stamp  Co.,  528  J  st,  Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse  &  Co.,  Spear  and 
ILirrison   sts..    San   Francisco.   Calif. 

Shelf    Label-Holders. 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

McKee  &  Wentworth  (Library  Bureau 
Distributors),  39  Second  St.,  San 
Francisco,  and  750  S.  Los  Angeles 
St..  Lo.s  Angeles,   Calif. 

Signs. 

Sam  H.  Harris,  631  S.  Spring  st.,  Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,   San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Tablet  &  Ticket  Co.,  604   Mission  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Slides. 
Ceo.  Kanzee,  12  Geary  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp    Affixers. 
Multipost  Co.,  Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Steel  Stacks. 

See  Book  Stacks. 


Stereoscopic    Views. 

Keystone  View  Co.,   Meadville,   Pa. 

Willis  E.  Case  (Agent  Keystone  View 
Co.  and  Underwood  &  Underwood), 
1610  Grove  st.,  Berkeley,  Calif. 

Typewriter   Ribbons. 

L.  &  M.  Alexander,  444  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,   Calif. 

Remington  Typewriter  Co.,  240  Bush 
St.,  San  Francisco,  420  S.  Spring  St., 
Los  Angeles,  and  913  8th  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter  Inspection  Co.,  426  S. 
Spring  St.,  Los'  Angeles,  Calif. 

Underwood  Typewriter  Co.,  531  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  430  S.  Broad- 
way, Los  Angeles,  and  611  J  st., 
Sacramento,   Calif. 

CALIFORNIA     LIBRARY    SCHOOLS. 

Los  Angeles  Library  School.  For  full 
information,  write  to  Librarian,  Public 
Library,  Los  Angeles,  California. 

Riverside  Library  Service  School. 
For  full  information  write  to  Librarian, 
Public    Library,    Riverside.    California. 

University  of  California  Department 
of  Library  Science.  For  full  informa- 
tion write  to  Chairman,  Department  of 
Library  Science,  University  of  California, 
Berkeley,  Calif. 

UNIVERSITY  OF  CHICAGO. 

Institute     for     Instructors     in     Library 

Science. 

Problems  in  teaching,  educational  psy- 
chology and  curriculum  construction  are 
to  be'  featured  in  this  summer  institute. 
.July  29  to  Sept.  3.  The  courses  are 
being  planned  as  a  whole  so  no  over- 
lapping may  be  expected.  Some  of  the 
instructors  propose  to  ask  students  to  do 
preparatory  reading  in  their  subjects,  to 
save  the  time  of  the  Institute  for  appli- 
cation of  principles.  It  is  highly  desir- 
able that  those  planning  to  attend  should 
make  early  application  for  admission. 
Write  to  the  University  Examiner,  Uni- 
versity of  Chicago,  for'  admission  to  the 
University  and  to 

Sydney  B.  Mitchell, 
Department  of   Library   Science, 

L'niversity    of    California. 

Berkeley,  Calif., 
for   admission    to    the   particular   courses. 


162 


NEWS   NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


AMERICAN     LIBRARY    ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The  officers  of  the  American  Library 
Association  for  1925—26  are  as  follows  : 

Charles  F.  D.  Belden,  Director,  Boston 
Public  Librarj',  President. 

;Mrs  Elizabeth  Claypool  Earl,  President, 
Indiana  Library  and  Historical  Depart- 
ment, 1st  Vice-President. 

Theodore  W.  Koch,  Librarian,  North- 
western University  Library,  Evanston, 
111.,  2d  Vice-President. 

Carl  H.  Milam,  Chicago,  Secretary. 

Edward  D.  Tweedell,  Assistant  Li- 
brarian, The  John  Crerar  Library,  Chi- 
cago, Treasurer. 

NATIONAL   ASSOCIATION    OF 
STATE   LIBRARIES. 

The  officers  of  the  National  Associa- 
tion of  State  Libraries  for  192.5-26  are 
as  follows : 

Con  P.  Cronin,  Librarian,  Arizona 
State  Library,  Phoenix,  Ariz.,  President. 

H.  J.  Conant,  Assistant  Librarian, 
Vermont  State  Library,  Montpelier,  Vt., 
1st  Vice-President. 

AV.  J.  Millard,  Librarian,  Washington 
State  Law  Library,  Olympia,  Wash.,  2d 
Vice-Pi"esident. 

Herbert  S.  Hirshberg,  Librarian,  Ohio 
State  Library,  Columbus,  Ohio,  Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

AMERICAN   ASSOCIATION   OF   LAW 
LIBRARIES. 

Officers  for  1925-26  are  : 

Sumner  T.  Wheeler,  Essex  County  Law 
Library,  Salem,  Mass.,  President. 

Ralph  H.  Wilkins,  Supreme  Court  Li- 
brary, Springfield,  111.,  1st  Vice-President. 

W.  J.  Millard,  State  Library,  Olympia, 
Wash.,  2d  Vice-President. 

Lucile  Vernon,  New  York  City  Bar 
Association,  Secretary-Treasurer. 

LEAGUE     OF      LIBRARY     COMMIS- 
SIONS. 

The  officers  of  the  League  of  Library 
Commissions  for  1926  are  as  follows : 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian,  Cali- 
fornia State  Library,  Sacramento,  Calif., 
President. 


Clarence  B.  Lester,  Sec.  Wisconsin 
Library  Commission,  Madison,  Wis.,  1st 
Vice-President. 

Miss  Fannie  C.  Rawson,  Sec.  Kentucky 
Library  Commission,  Frankfort,  Ky.,  2d 
Vice-President. 

Miss  Clara  F.  Baldwin,  Director  of  Li- 
brary Division,  Minnesota  State  Depart- 
ment of  Education,  St.  Paul,  Minn.,  Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. 

PACIFIC    NORTHWEST    LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The  officers  of  the  Pacific  Northwest 
Library  Association  for  1925-26  are  as 
follows' : 

M.  H.  Douglass,  University  of  Oregon 
Library,  President. 

Ellen  G.  Smith,  Walla  Walla,  and 
Edgar  S.  Robinson,  Vancouver,  Vice- 
Presidents. 

Constance  R.  S.  Ewing,  Portland,  Sec- 
retary. 

Effie  L.  Chapman,  Seattle,  Treasurer. 

SPECIAL  LIBRARIES  ASSOCIATION 
OF     SOUTHERN     CALIFORNIA. 

The  officers  of  the  Special  Libraries 
Association  of  Southern  California  for 
192.5-26  are  : 

B.  E.  Edwards,  Standard  Oil  Co.,  EI 
Segundo,    President. 

Mrs  R.  E.  Creveling,  San  Diego  Cou. 
Gas  and  Electric  Co.,  San  Diego,  Vict'- 
President. 

Mildred  E.  Schaer,  Southern  Californi-i 
Telephone  Co.,  Los  Angeles,  Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CHAPTER,  NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL  LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION. 

Officers  for  192.5-26  are  : 

W.  A.  Worthington,  Pacific  Gas  and 
Electric  Co.,  San  Francisco,  President. 

Hilda  W.  Palache,  Federal  Reserve 
Bank,  San  Francisco,  Vice-President. 

Miss  H.  Britton,  State  Mining  Bureau, 
San   Francisco,    Secretary-Treasurer. 

Bonnie  E.  Strong,  Standard  Oil  Co., 
and  K.  Dorothy  Ferguson,  Bank  of  Italy, 
San  Francisco,  Executive  Committee. 


vol.  21,  110.  2]  DIRECTORY   FOR   LIBRARY    SUPPLIES,    ETC. 


163 


ALUMNAE  ASSOCIATION  OF  THE 
UNIVERSITY  OF  CALIFORNIA 
AND   STATE   LIBRARY  SCHOOLS. 

Officers. 

President Anita  Crelliu 

Vice  President Margaret  Girdner 

Secretary   Ivander   Mclver 

Treasurer Margaret   Dennison 

Executive  board  of  five  consisting  of 
the  above  and  ex-president  of  the  preced- 
ing executive  board   (Edna  Holroyd). 


EMPLOYMENT   BUREAU. 

The  State  Library  registers  all 
library  workers  in  California  who  are 
looking  for  positions  and  all  from  outside 
the  state  who  wish  to  come  here.  Also 
it  will  be  glad  to  know  of  libraries'  that 
want  head  librarians  or  assistants  in  any 
branch  of  their  work.  In  writing  for 
recommendations,  libraries  are  urged  to 
be  as  specific  as  possible,  especially  in 
regard  to  time  position  must  be  filled  and 
salary  offered.  A  librarian  who  wishes 
to  be  dropped  from  the  Employment 
Bureau  list  and  a  library  that  fills  a  posi- 
tion for  which  it  has  asked  a  recom- 
mendation will  help  the  work  greatly  by 
notifying  the  State  Library  at  once.  For 
further  information,  write  to  the  State 
Library,   Sacramento,   California. 


FOR  SALE  OR   EXCHANGE. 

Harper's  Weekly,  1885-1890,  inclusive 
Frank     Leslie's     illustrated     newspaper, 

1886-1890,  inclusive 
Harper's  Magazine,  Vol.  12   (Dec.  1855- 
May   1856) 

These  magazines   are  bound. 

Would  any  library  care  for  the  gift  of 
Our  first  century,  by  R.  M.  Devens, 
published  at  Springfield,  Mass.,  by 
Nichols  &  Co.,  in  1882,  with  1004  pages? 

Anyone  interested  write  to  Caroline  S. 
Waters,  County  Librarian,  San  Bernar- 
dino Co.  Free  Library,  San  Bernardino, 
Calif. 

FOR  SALE. 
Harper's   Magazine,   June  1864—1884 
Art  Journal   (D.  Appleton  &  Co.),  1875- 
1880 

First  72  nos.,  3  steel  plates  in  each. 

No.  3  missing. 
Ai-t   Journal,    New    Series    (Patterson   & 
Neillson),  1881-1882 

First  24  nos.,  3  steel  plates  in  each. 

Nos.  8,  9,  20,  21  missing. 

These  magazines  are  unbound. 

For  information,  address  Miss  Sarah 
L.  Prentiss,  Mendocino  City,  Calif. 

FOR  SALE. 

Harper's    New    Monthly    Magazine,    v.    1 

(1850) -v.  75 
Harper's  Weekly,  1857-1890 

Write  to  Mr  George  Dunlap,  lone, 
Calif. 


SCHOOL   LIBRARY   STATISTICS. 
(From  reports  of  County  Superintendents  of  Schools,  1924-25) 

Total  school   districts 3563 

Elementary    3265 

High  (428  schools) 298 

Total  expended  for  books  for  elementary  schools $657,397.93 

Total  expended  for  books  for  high  schools $808,896.79 

Total  volumes  in  elementary  schools 2,850,561 

Total  volumes  in  high  schools 2,791,820 


164 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION. 


OFFICERS. 

President,  Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt, 
Public  Library,  Long  Beach. 

Vice-President,  Mabel  R.  Gillis,  State 
Library,  Sacramento. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Hazel  G.  Gibson, 
Sacramento  County  Free  Library,  Sacra- 
mento. 

Trustees  Section. 

President,  F.  H.  Pettingell,  Trustee 
Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Secretary,  Mrs  J.  Wells  Smith,  Trustee 
Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Municipal  Libraries  Section. 
President,   Mary   B  o  y  n  t  o  n,   D.   H. 
Blanchard      Memorial      Library,      Santa 
Paula. 

Special  Libraries  Section. 

Chairman,  Margaret  Hatch,  Standard 
Oil  Company  Library,  San  Francisco. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive  Committee  —  The  President, 
Vice  -  President,  Secretary  -  Treasurer  and 
Mary  Barmby,  Jeannette  M.  Drake,  Anne 
Hadden,  Marion  L.  Horton,  Harold  L. 
Leupp,  H.  O.  Parkinson. 

Auditing — Sarah  M.  Jacobus,  Public 
Library,  Pomona,  chairman;  Ethel 
Carroll. 

Nominating — The  Constitution  provides 
for  a  "Nominating  Committee  consisting 
of  representatives  selected  by  the  respec- 
tive districts  at  their  district  meetings." 
First  District.  Alice  Charlton ;  Second 
District.  Edna  Holroyd :  Third  District, 
Sybil  Nye ;  Fourth  District,  Mrs  .Julia 
G.  Babcock ;  Fifth  District,  Mrs  Olive  K. 
Tremble:  Sixth  District,  Margaret  E. 
Livingston :  Seventh  District,  Ida  M. 
Reagan ;  Eighth  District,  Lenala  A. 
Martin ;  Ninth  District,  Frances  M. 
Burket. 

PuTjlications — Norah  McNeill,  Public 
Library,  Richmond,  chairman ;  Irene 
Smith,  Josephine  L.  Whitbeck. 

Resolutions — Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck, 
Conti-a     Costa     County     Free     Library, 


Martinez,   chairman ;    Charles    S.    Greene, 
Faith  E.  Smith. 

Certification — Mabel  R.  Gillis,  State 
Library,  Sacramento,  chairman  (1930)  ; 
Susan  T.  Smith  (1926),  Eleanor  Hitt 
(1927) ,  Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt  (1928), 
Mary  Barmby   (1929). 

J.  L.  Gillis  Memorial — Milton  J. 
Ferguson,  State  Library,  Sacramento, 
chairman ;   Mary  Barmby,   Eleanor  Hitt. 

Legislative — Herbert  V.  Clayton,  State 
Library,  Sacramento,  chairman ;  Marian 
P.  Greene,  H.  O.  Parkinson,  Cornelia  D. 
Provines,  Charles  F.  Woods. 

Salaries — Everett  R.  Per  r  y,  Public 
Library,  Los  Angeles,  chairman  ;  Carleton 
B.  Joeckel,  Sarah  E.  McCardle. 

Seamen's  Lihrary — Caroline  Wenzel, 
State  Library,  Sacramento,  chairman ; 
Mary  Barmby,  Gladys  English,  Chaplain 
F.  K.  How&vA,  Stella  Huntington,  Mrs 
Harrison  Moore,   Mrs  Albert  W.   Stokes. 

Memhershirt — Gretchen  Flower,  Tulare 
County  Free  Library,  Visalia,  chairman ; 
1st  District,  Alice  Charlton ;  2d  District, 
Mrs  Mary  T.  Gervais ;  3d  District, 
Estella  De  Ford;  4th  District,  Julia 
Steffa ;  5th  District,  Nancy  Laugenour ; 
6th  District,  Gladys  Caldwell;  7th  Dis- 
trict, Henry  A.  Kendal ;  Sth  District, 
Edith  Gantt;  9th  District,  Mrs  Lila 
Adams. 

Jinks — Leslie  Hood,  Vroman's  Book 
Store,  Pasadena,  chairman  ;  Jasmine  Brit- 
ton,  Clara  B.  Dills,  Gladys  English. 

P.  iV.  L.  A.  and  C.  L.  A.  Cooperation — 
Helen  T.  Kennedy,  Public  Library,  Los 
Angeles,  chairman ;  Sydney  B.  Mitchell. 
Helen  E.  Vogleson. 

DISTRICT  OFFICERS  AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First  District. 

President,  Helena  Critzer,  Public  Li- 
brary, Berkeley. 

Secretary,  Ivander  Mclver,  University 
of  California  Library,  Berkeley. 

The  first  district  coiislsts  of  the  follow- 
ing  cities:    San   Francisco,    Alameda, 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARY    ASSOCIATION. 


165 


Berkeley,  Oakland ;  and  the  following 
libraries:  Leland  Stanford  Junior  Uni- 
versity Library  and  Margaret  Carnegie 
Library,   Mills  College. 

Second  District. 

President,  Jean  D.  Baird,  Alameda 
County  Free  Library,  Oakland. 

Secretary,  Edna  Holroyd,  San  Mateo 
County  Free  Library,  Redwood  City. 

The  second  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties:  Alameda  (excepting  Ala 
meda,  Berkeley,  and  Oakland),  Contra 
Costa,  Monterey,  San  Benito,  San  Mateo, 
Santa  Clara  (excepting  Stanford  Univer- 
sity), Santa  Cruz. 

Third    District. 

President,  Sybil  Nye,  Public  Library, 
Mill  Valley. 

Secretary,  Margaret  MacDonald,  Public 
Library,  San  Rafael. 

The  third  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Lake,  Marin,  Mendo- 
cino, Napa,  Solano,  Sonoma. 

Fourth   District. 

I'resident,  Mrs  .Julia  G.  Babcock,  Kern 
County  Free  Library,  Bakersfield. 

Secretary,  Muriel  Wright,  Tuolumne 
County  Free  Library,   Sonora. 

The  foui'th  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Fresno,  Inyo,  Kern, 
Kings,  Madera,  Mariposa,  Merced,  Stanis- 
hius,  Tulare,  Tuolumne. 

Fifth    District 

President,  Mrs  Olive  B.  Tremble,  City 
Library,  Sacramento. 

Secretary,  Marie  Lamb,  Yolo  County 
Free  Library,  Woodland. 

The  fifth  district  consists  of  the  follow- 
ing counties  :  Alpine,  Amador,  Calaveras, 
El  Dorado,  Mono,  Nevada,  Placer,  Sacra- 
mento, San  Joaquin,  Yolo. 

Sixth    District. 

President,  Margaret  E.  Livingston, 
Orange  County  Free  Library,  Santa  Ana 

Secretary,  Mrs  Ethelene  M.  Kitching, 
High   School  Library,  Fullerton. 

The  sixth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Imperial,  Los  Angeles, 
Orange.  Riverside,  San  Bernardino,  San 
Diego,  San  Luis  Obispo,  Santa  Barbara, 
Ventura. 


Seventh   District. 

President,  C.  E.  Gi-aves,  Humboldt 
State  Teachers  College,  Areata. 

SecrPtai-y,  Mrs  Helen  Bartlett,  Public 
Library,  Eureka. 

The  seventh  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties  :  Del  Norte,  Humboldt. 

Eighth  District, 

President,  Elisabeth  C.  Haines,  Lassen 
County  Free  Library,   Susanville. 

Secretary,  Anna  L.  Williams,  Modoc 
County  Free  Library,  Alturas. 

The  eighth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties  :  Lassen,  JNIodoc,  Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth    District. 

President,  Blanche  Chalfant,  Butte 
County  Free  Library,  Oroville. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Edith  Shaw  Simons, 
Public  Library,  Oroville. 

The  ninth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Butte,  Colusa,  Glenn, 
Shasta,  Siskiyou,  Sutter,  Tehama,  Trin- 
ity, Yu1)n. 

ANNUAL    MEETING. 

The  31st  annual  meeting  will  be  held 
at  the  Virginia  Hotel,  Long  Beach. 
June  2  to  ."),  1020. 

The  County  Librarians  will  meet  at 
the  same  time  and  place,  with  the  special 
county  library  program  on  June  2. 

DISTRICT   MEETINGS. 
First   and   Second   Districts    Meeting. 

On  March  6,  ]92;f).  in  the  Terrace 
Room  of  the  Fairmont  Hotel,  about  one 
hundred  and  eighty  members  of  the  First 
and  Second  Districts  of  the  California 
Libra)-y  Association,  with  their  guests, 
met  in  a  joint  session.  As  192G  marks 
the  fiftieth  anniversary  of  the  American 
Library  Association,  the  morning  session 
was  devoted  to  the  history  of  the  library 
mo\ement    in   the   United   States. 

After  the  President,  Helena  Critzer, 
had  called  the  meeting  to  order  at  10.15 
o'clock,  she  introduced  the  first  speaker. 
Faith  E.  Smith,  Librarian  of  Lange 
Ijibrary,  L'niversity  of  California.  In 
presenting  "Notable  phases  in  the  devel- 
opment of  American  libraries,"  Miss 
Smith  ga\  e  a  splendid  survey  of  the 
progress   that   has   been   made   along   vari- 


166 


NEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


ous  lines.  She  prefaced  her  remarks  by 
saying  she  was  reminded  of  a  preceptress 
of  her  college  days  who  offered  a  lecture 
iu  one  hour  on  the  history  of  language, 
literature  and  art  from  the  beginning  of 
tiim-  to  the  present !  Taking  the  first 
meeting  of  the  A.  L.  A.  as  the  starting 
])()int  of  modern  librarj'  movement,  she 
drew  attention  to  the  distinguished 
si)eakers  at  that  conference,  Justin  Win- 
sor,  Charles  Cutter,  Melvil  Dewey  and 
others ;  and  to  the  many  problems  they 
found  awaiting  them.  Her  paper  also 
traced  the  growth  of  branch  and  travel- 
ing libraries,  the  county  library  system 
and  special  libraries.  Particular  em- 
phasis was  laid  upon  the  progress  that 
has  been  made  in  connection  with  the 
work  with  the  young  people,  both  in  the 
.public  libraries  and  in  the  schools.  A 
recent  development  is  the  departmental- 
ization of  libraries  which  necessitates  a 
large  and  adequately  trained  staff.  In 
connection  with  the  topic  of  library 
cooperaticii  with  other  countries,  our' 
activities  in  Paris  and  China  were 
stressed.  Miss  Smith  closed  with  the 
warning  note  that  there  is  still  much  to 
be  done.  "If  anyone  wonders,  'why  is 
an  A.  L.  A.,'  I  commend  to  you  the 
enlightening  reports  of  committees  pub- 
lished in  the  A.  L.  A.  Proceedings  since 
the  war." 

George  T.  Clark,  Director  of  Libraries, 
Stanford  University,  gave  a  delightful  talk 
on  "I'rogress  of  library  work  in  Cali- 
fornia ^vith  reminiscences  of  early  A.  L. 
A.  meetings."  His  discussion  centered 
around  the  period  of  twenty  years  prior 
to  lOOG  and  covered  three  important 
to])ics  :  two  of  the  early  meetings  of  the 
A.  L.  A.,  the  beginning-  of  the  C.  L.  A., 
and  the  development  of  the  California 
State  Libr'ary,  including  the  county  sys- 
tem. He  was  able  to  give  many  inter- 
esting sidelights  on  the  Thousand  Isles 
meeting  of  the  A.  L.  ^ .  in  1S87,  at  which 
he  was  present,  and  the  San  Francisco 
Conference  in  1891.  The  latter  drew 
about  fifty  from  the  East  who  came  out 
on  a  missionary  expedition,  according  to 
their  viewpoint.  Of  particular  interest 
was  the  account  of  the  inception  and 
growth  of  the  C.  L.  A.  in  which  a  tribute 
to  the  work  of  Mr  Gillis  was  made. 
Ml-   Clark   concluded   his   talk  by  quoting 


a  few  lines  from  one  of  Longfellow's 
poems  which,  by  analogy,  ttr'ged  those 
who  are  carrying  the  burden  of  the 
library  work  today  to  maintain  the  high 
professional  standards  and  ideals  of 
service  which  have  been  the  watchwords 
of  librarians  in   the  past. 

As  he  has  'recently  returned  from 
Chicago,  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State 
Librarian,  was  well  qualified  to  discuss 
some  of  the  plans  for'  the  Fiftieth  Anni- 
versary of  the  A.  L.  A.  He  emphasized 
the  necessity  of  backing  the  association 
so  that  the  exhibition  at  Philadelphia 
may  be  a  success,  and  explained  the  plan 
evolved  by  the  committee  to  secure  the 
necessary  money.  Various  publications 
are  to  be  issued  which  will  be  furnished 
to  institutions  in  return  for  subscriptions. 
Provision  is  made  for  a  sliding  scale  -of 
charges  according  to  the  size  of  the 
library. 

Chaplain  F.  K.  Howard  of  the  Sea- 
men's Institute  requested  books  and 
magazines  for  his  men,  and  asked  the 
librarians  present  to  try  to  secure  books 
from  people  in  the  community  during 
Book  Week,  April  19-26. 

Alice  Charlton  was  chosen  as  nomina- 
tor for  the  First  District,  with  Mabel  W. 
Thomas  as  alternate. 

The  meeting  then  adjourned  for  lunch, 
which  was  served  in  the  South  Court, 
where  baskets  of  spring  flowers  on  the 
tables  made  a  bright  splash  of  color. 
One  hundred  and  forty-three  attended. 

The  afternoon  session  began  at  2.10 
o'clock.  Miss  Charlton  gave  the  report 
of  the  C.  L.  A.  membership  committee. 
She  emphasized  the  importance  of  .ioining 
the  state  library  organization.  C.  B. 
Joeckel  followed  with  the  plea  for  more 
members  for  the  A.  L.  A. 

Miss  Critzer  next  introduced  Mrs 
Theodora  R.  Br'ewitt,  President  of  the 
C.  L.  A.,  who  brought  up  some  general 
matters  before  discussing  her  particular 
topic,  "The  promotion  of  library  work 
with  children  in  California."  Everything 
has  been  done  to  make  books  available  to 
readers  and  we  have  succeeded  in  inter- 
esting the  public.  Now  we  must  con- 
sider the  problem  of  maintaining  a  high 
per'sonnel,  the  matter  of  certification  and 
our  relation  tO'  adult  education.  More- 
over,   we    must    adopt    a    more    scientific 


vol.  21.  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY    ASSOCIATION. 


167 


attitude  towards  our  profession.  Coming 
to  the  work  with  children,  Mrs  Brewitt 
poiuted  out  the  development  of  elementary 
school  libraries  and  asked  such  pertinent 
questions  as :  Does  this  mean  that  all 
cliildreu's  work  is  to  be  left  to  the 
schools?  What  is  the  public  library  going 
to  do  to  compete  with  the  salaries  offered 
l)y  the  schools  to  their  librarians?  Vari- 
ous other  mooted  points  were  touched 
upon,  vacation  reading,  value  of  story- 
telling, matter  of  reading  lists,  selection 
of  books. 

The  last  speaker  of  the  day  was  Dr 
I\Iaud  A.  Merrill  of  Stanford  University, 
who  gave  an  illuminating  explanation  of 
"Professor  Terman's  contribution  to  the 
genetic  study  of  genius."  She  pointed 
out  that  the  scientific  study  of  genius 
has  only  been  possible  in  r'ecent  years, 
although  its  origin  has  engaged  interest 
and  attention  ever  since  man's  first  study 
of  man.  For  over  twenty  years,  Pro- 
fessor Terman  has  studied  the  problem. 
Dr  ^Merrill  described  the  methods  em- 
ployed in  selecting  the  gifted  children 
aud  the  various  tests  given  to  prove 
their  abilitj'.  She  also  enumerated  the 
results  obtained.  To  show  what  these 
young  people  are  doing,  she  read  extracts 
of  poems  and  stories  written  by  them. 
A  brief  outline  of  the  history  of  a  young 
musician  was  also  given.  At  the  end  of 
her  talk  Dr  Merrill  Avarned  her  audience 
that  prediction  as  to  the  probable  future 
of  these  children  is  profitless.  "To  expect 
all.  or  even  a  majority,  to  attain  any 
cousider'able  degree  of  eminence  would 
be  unwarranted  optimism.  It  remains 
to  compare  the  promise  of  youth  with 
adult  performance." 

IvAis^DEE  McIvER,  Secretary. 

Third  District  Meeting. 

On  Saturday,  March  27,  1926,  the 
members  of  the  Third  District  of  the  Cali- 
fornia Library  Association  met  for  lun- 
cheon at  Tamalvista  Lodge  in  Mill 
Valley,  a  charming  spot  in  the  hills  at 
the  foot  of  Mt.  Tamalpais.  The  meet- 
ing proper  was  held  at  the  Outdoor  Art 
Club,  Miss  Sybil  Nye,  President  of  the 
district,  presiding.  Several  selections  by 
the  High  School  String  Quartette  were 
followed  by  addresses  of  welcome  on  be- 
half of  the  Trustees  of  the  Mill   Valley 


Public   Library   and  of  the   Outdoor  Art 
Club. 

Chaplain  F.  K.  Howard,  of  the  Sea- 
men's Church  Institute,  announced  the 
annual  book  week  to  be  held  April  10  to 
26,  asking  cooperation  in  securing  books 
for  the  men  on  the  merchant  vessels. 

"What  the  email  library  should  do  in 
the  musical  line"  was  the  subject  of  an 
inspiring  talk  by  Miss  Jessie  M.  Fred- 
ricks,  head  of  the  music  department  of 
the  San  Francisco  Public  Library. 
"What  the  small  library  should  do  for 
children"  was  discussed  by  Mrs  Alice  G. 
Whitbeck,  Librarian  of  the  Contra  Costa 
County  Free  Library. 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Librarian, 
told  of  his  recent  trip  through  the  south- 
ern part  of  the  state,  as  weU  as  of  the 
plans  for  the  celebration  of  the  fiftieth 
anniversaiT  of  the  American  Library 
Association. 

Miss  Sybil  Nye  was  elected  nominator 
for  the  district,  with  Miss  Estella  De 
Ford  as  alternate. 

After  a  visit  to  the  Mill  Valley  Public 
Library,  the  visitors  were  taken  for  a 
drive  and  then  to  the  Outdoor  Art  Club 
for   tea. 

Margaret  MacDonald,  Secretary. 

Fifth    District   Meeting. 

A  meeting  of  the  Fifth  District  of  the 
California  Library  Association  was  held 
in  Sacramento,  Thursday,  March  4,  1926. 
A  luncheon  served  in  the  Empire  Room 
of  the  Hotel  Sacramento  preceded  the 
meeting. 

The  business  session  and  program 
opened  at  2.30  o'clock  in  the  Gold  Room 
of  the  Hotel,  Mrs  Olive  B.  Tremble  pre- 
siding. Fi'ed  W.  Links  of  Sacramento 
sang  two  numbers  which  were  much  en- 
joyed. 

The  business  of  electing  a  nominator 
and  an  alternate  for  the  district  followed. 
The  president  of  the  district,  Mrs  Tremble, 
was  chosen  as  nominator  and  Miss  Cor- 
nelia D.  Provines  was  elected  alternate. 
Mrs  Tremble  made  an  announcement  re- 
garding membership  in  the  American  Li- 
brai-y  Association  and  Miss  Caroline 
Wenzel.  chairman  of  the  C.  L.  A.  Sea- 
men's Library  Committee  announced  the 
annual  book  drive  to  be  held  in  April. 
She  said  that  the  committee  were  again 


168 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


using  as  their  slogan  for  the  drive  "Give 
one  book  that  you  have  read  and  liked." 

We  were  very  fortunate  in  having  in 
attendance,  the  president  of  our  state 
association.  Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt, 
who  spoke  on  "Problems  of  children's 
work  in  the  public  library."  She  prefaced 
her  talk  with  words  of  greeting  and 
touched  briefly  on  the  adult  educational 
program  of  the  American  Library  Asso- 
ciation and  of  the  work  of  the  certifica- 
tion committee  of  the  California  Library 
Association.  She  also  urged  membership 
in  the  American  Library  Association. 

E.  C.  Porter.  Secretary -Manager  of  the 
Sacramento  Chamber  of  Commerce,  was 
the  next  speaker,  his  subject  being  '"Fac- 
tors in  community  development."  He 
recommended  library  publicity  along  busi- 
ness lines  in  order  to  bring  the  library 
before  the  people  and  make  it  a  factor  in 
the   development   of   the   community. 

A  talk  on  "Books  and  people"  was 
given  by  Samuel  Levinson  of  Levinson's 
Book  Store,  which  evei'j'one  enjoyed. 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Librarian, 
talked  on  "1920  in  the  library  world." 
He  spoke  of  the  Fiftieth  Anniversary  of 
the  American  Library  Association  which 
will  be  celebrated  in  October  in  Phila- 
delphia and  of  other  activities  of  the 
association. 

The  program  was  concluded  by  a  talk 
on  "Library  supplies,"  by  H.  O.  Parkin- 
son, manager  of  Gaylord  Brothers, 
Stockton  Branch.  He  told  something  of 
the  history  of  the  firm  and  of  the  work 
being  done  at  the  Stockton  Branch. 

Marie   Lamb,   Secretary. 

Sixth   District   Meeting. 

The  Sixth  District  of  the  California 
Library  Association  held  its  annual  meet- 
ing in  the  Masonic  Temple,  Fullerton, 
February  G,  1920.  The  meeting  was 
called  to  order  by  the  District  President, 
Miss  Margaret  PI  Livingston,  Librarian 
of  Orange  County  Free  Library,  who 
introduced  H.  H.  Crooke,  the  Mayor  of 
Fullerton.  Mr  Crooke  addressed  the 
assembly  in  a  most  gracious  welcome, 
assuring  all  present,  that  the  gates  of 
the  city  were  open  for  them  and  the 
keys  thrown  away.  A  letter  of  welcome 
from  T.  B.  Talbert,  chairman  of  the 
Board  of  Supervisors  of  Orange  County, 
was   read   by   tlie   Secretarv. 


Minutes  of  the  last  meeting  at  River- 
side were  r'ead  and  approved.  Miss 
Marion  Horton.  Principal  of  Los  Angeles 
Public  Library  School,  made  a  short  but 
telling  appeal  for  one  hundred  per  cent 
membership  in  the  California  Library 
Association.  Livitation  was  extended  by 
the  President  to  those  present  to  visit  the 
Public  Library,  the  Grammar  Grades 
Library  and  the  Library  of  the  Fullerton 
Union  High  School  and  Junior  College 
at  the  close  of  the  day's  program.  A 
resolutions  committee  was  named  by  the 
President. 

Tlieodora  R.  Brewitt,  Librarian  of 
Long  Beach  Public  Library  and  Presi- 
dent of  the  California  Library  Associa- 
tion, made  an  announcement  of  the 
annual  meeting  of  the  association  to  be 
held  in  Long  Beach  the  first  week  of 
June.  She  asked  for  the  assurance  of  a 
full  attendance  and  suggestions  and  coop- 
eration from  everyone  on  plans  for  the 
program,  saying,  "My  idea  is  to  repre- 
sent the  more  intensive  things  librarians 
are  doing  and  the  forward  looking  schol- 
arly use  of  libraries." 

Miss  Althea  Warren,  Librarian  of  San 
Diego  Public  Library,  gave  a  book  talk 
on  "Style  in  present-day  children's  books." 
(See  this  publication,  page  97.) 

Richard  Warner  Borst,  Head  of  the 
P^nglish  Department  of  Fullerton  Union 
High  School  and  Junior  College,  gave  an 
address  entitled  "The  dynamic  librarian," 
in  which  he  made  an  appeal  to  the  mem- 
bers of  the  library  profession  to  i-ealize 
the  opportunities  of  their  calling,  to  place 
in  the  hands  of  the  people  the  vital  books 
that  make  for  advancement  in  civilization 
and  an  appeal  for  the  fostering  of  indi- 
vidual service  by  librarians  to  the  public. 

At  luncheon  Mrs  Mabel  E.  Faulkner, 
President  of  the  Oi*ange  County  Library 
Club.  Librarian  of  Orange  Public  Li- 
brary, very  graciously  acted  as  toast 
mistress,  introducing  Willis  H.  Kerr  of 
Pomona  College  Library,  Mrs  Frances 
B.  Liun  of  Santa  Barbara  Public  Library, 
Miss  Eleanor  Hitt  of  San  Diego  County 
Fi'ee  Library,  and  H,  O.  Parkinson  of 
Stockton,   who   responded  to  toasts. 

The  afternoon  session  was  called  to 
order  by  the  President,  introducing  Miss 
Jasmine  Britton  of  the  Los  Angeles  City 
Schools,  who  made  an  earnest  plea  for 
menil)ership     in     the     American     Library 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY    ASSOCIATION. 


169 


Association,  siving-  tlae  need  of  coopera- 
tion and  membei'sliip  to  furtlier  the  pi-es- 
ent  splendid  work  of  tlie  organization. 

Miss  Jeannette  Drake.  Librarian  of 
Pasadena  Public  Library,  led  the  discus- 
sion concerning  the  serious  need  of  ade- 
quate schools  for  library  training.  Everett 
K.  Perry.  Librarian  of  Los  Angeles  Pub- 
lic Library,  read  a  summary  of  the 
present  situation  as  seen  by  those  in 
charge  of  the  Los  Angeles  Public 
Library  School.  He  said,  in  imrt :  "The 
two  schools  in  southern  California  are 
both  at  public  libraries.  Now  the  modern 
public  library  has  a.?sumed  a  thousand 
and  one  activities  on  behalf  of  the 
pations  that  throng  its  doors  and  its 
resources  are  pretty  well  exhausted  in 
this  type  of  service.  Possibly  certain 
city  libraries  can  with  advantage  under- 
take limited  training,  but  a  moment's 
reflection  will  convince  us  that  they  can 
not  afford  to  conduct  librarj'  schools  of 
the  widest  scope,  whose  graduates  shall 
be  able  to  fill  any  type  of  position  any- 
where. Again,  why  should  one  city 
library  incur  expense  and  possibly  criti- 
cism in  training  librarians  for  another 
city  library?  They  are  both  primarily 
service,  not  training,  institutions,  and  the 
teaching  should  be  done  for  them  both  by 
the  governmental  unit  that  includes  them 
both,  which  is  the  state,  and  through  the 
agencj'  of  the  state  supported  universi- 
ties .  .  .  Los  Angeles  Public  Library 
looks  forward  to  the  time  when  general 
training  will  be  undertaken  by  the 
university,  leaving  it  free  to  consider 
courses  fitting  for  certain  grades  in  its 
own  staff  of  300  assistants.  It  would 
appear  then  that  the  tendency  in  southern 
California,  if  not  toward  contraction, 
certainly  does  not  promise  such  general 
expansion  as  would  enable  us  to  keep 
pace  with  our  needs." 

Charles  F.  Woods,  Librarian  of  River- 
side Public  Library,  spoke  of  his  accept- 
ance of  Mr'  Perry's  conclusions,  but 
stated  that  at  present  he  anticipated  no 
change  in  his  own  school.  Mrs  Elizabeth 
Riddell  White,  Librarian  of  the  Long 
Beach  city  schools,  made  a  further  plea 
from  the  standpoint  of  the  need  of  trained 
workers  as  school  librarians.  Miss 
liritton  presented  the  following  resolu- 
tion, which  was  adopted  by  the  con- 
vention ; 


We,  the  librarians  of  the  Sixth  District 
of  the  California  Library  Association,  in 
convention  a.ssembled.  realizing  the  great 
need  of  facilities  for  library  training  in 
rlie  state,  do  hereby  request  the  Presi- 
dent of  the  Sixth  District  to  appoint  a 
committee  of  five  on  library  training  and 
that  this  committee  bring  the  matter  to 
the  attention  of  the  President  of  the 
California  Library  Association  at  the 
forthcoming  convention  to  be  held  in 
Long  P.eacli.  tirging  immediate  consider- 
ation, followed  by  action  at  the  proper 
time. 

A  letter  was  read  by  the  Secretary 
inviting  all  interested  to  attend  the  meet- 
ings of  the  regional  group   of  catalogers. 

All  present  were  urged  to  cooperate 
with  the  A.  L.  A.  Committee  on  Federal 
and  State  Relations  in  working  for  legis- 
lation  for  a  library  book  post. 

INIiss  ^Margaret  E.  Livingston  was 
elected  nominator  from  the  district,  with 
Miss  Marian  P.  Greene  of  Alhambra  as 
alternate. 

Robert  L.  Brown  of  the  Santa  Ana 
Book  Store  sang  three  songs :  "Manda- 
lay,"  "Thora"  and  "Danny  Deever," 
which  were  very  much  applauuded. 

"Recent  library  activities"  was  the 
topic  of  a  talk  by  ^Milton  .J.  Ferguson, 
State  Librarian. 

Lady  Agnes  A.  Adams  chatted  for 
thirty  minutes  in  a  delightful  manner  of 
literary  clubs  and  persons  abroad,  giving 
what  she  called  "Literary  Gossip."  Her 
friendly  animated  talk  was  most  pleasing 
to  both  librarians  and  guests. 

The  Resolutions  Committee  presented 
the  following  resolutions,  which  were 
Linanimously  adopted : 

The  Sixth  District  of  the  California 
Library  Association  in  convention  assem- 
bled, feeling  the  hospitality  and  the 
Iiomelike  welcome  extended  to  us  by  the 
people  of  Fullerton,  do  hereby  resolve  : 

That  we  extend  our  thanks  to  the 
Ma.sonic  Trustees,  the  Fullerton  Lodge 
of  Masons  No.  339  and  the  Azure  Lodge 
Xo.  .533  for  the  use  of  their  commodious 
ind  attractive  building  and  for  the  prep- 
iratiou  and  service  of  the  bountiful 
luncheon. 

Tliat  our  gratitude  be  extended  to  th" 
Fullerton  Women's  Club,  the  Fullerton 
Ebell  Club,  the  Fullerton  Kiwanis  Club 
tnd  the  various  Masonic  organizations 
who  greeted  us  with  flowers,  and  to  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce  for  arranging 
■rausportatiou  and  sight-seeing  conven- 
iences for  us. 

That  we  appreciate  the  efforts  of  the 
Orange  County  Library  Club,  the  officers 
ot  the   Sixth  District,  who  prepared   the 


170 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


progi-am  for  us  and  those  of  our  number 
and  guests  who  contributed  to  our  protit 
and   enjoyment. 

That  we  further  resolve  to  use  our 
efforts  to  bring  up  the  membership  of  the 
Sixth  District  in  the  California  Library 
Association     to     one     hundred     per'    cent 


before  the  annual  meeting  at  Long  Beach. 
Jeankette    Drake,    Chairman. 
ELiZABETn  Topping. 

H.    A.    LiNSCOTT. 

The  meeting  was  declared  adjourned. 
Ethelene  M.   Kitching,   Secretary. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    COUNTY   LIBRARIES. 


171 


CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS. 


Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Ex-officio  Chair- 
man. 

Advisory    Committee. 

Stella  ITnntington,  1707  Fremont  Way, 
Oakland,  Chairman. 

Clara  B.  Dills,  Solano  County. 

Margaret  E.  Livingston,  Orange  County. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County. 

Cornelia  D.  Provines,  Sacramento 
County,   Treasurer. 

SCHOOL  COLLECTION  REPORTS. 

The  blanks  for  school  reports  to  the 
Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction  have 
been  changed  somewhat  this  year  in 
regard  ta  the  book  collections.  Because 
these  changes  are  of  vital  interest  to 
county  librarians,  the  following  full  ex- 
planation is  given  for'  their  information 
and  guidance : 

The  thirty-first  biennial  report  of  the 
Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction 
for  the  school  years  ending  June  30, 
192.3,  and  June  30,  1924,  is  filled  with 
information  of  general  interest  to  all. 
Section  III,  page  111,  Statistics  of  Ele- 
mentary Schools,  Tables  No.  10,  No.  13A 
and  13B  contain  data  of  direct  interest 
to  county  librarians. 

As  the  biennial  reports  prior  to  1916—17 
do  not  conform  to  the  plan  for  the  report 
of  1923-24,  the  biennial  reports  for  the 
years  mentioned  were  used  as  a  basis  of 
comparison.  In  1916-17  the  total 
amount  of  money  expended  for  elementary 
school  libraries  was  $213,542  and  the 
total  number  of  volumes  reported  for  the 
schools  was  2,763,909.  In  1923-24  the 
total  amount  spent  for  elementary  school 
libraries  was  $577,293  and  the  total 
number  of  volumes  reported  for  the  ele- 
mentary schools  was  2,980,126. 

In  the  years  intervening  between 
1016-17  and  1923-24  over  two  million 
dollars  had  been  expended  by  the  ele- 
mentary schools  of  California  for  library 
books  and  apparatus.  In  sharp  contrast 
to  this  vast  sum  of  money  expended  for 
elementary  school  libraries  was  the  small 
increase  of  216,217  volumes  reported  in 
1923-24  over  those  on  hand  in  1916-17. 

The    biennial    report    of    the    Superin- 


tendent of  Public  Instruction  is  compiled 
from  the  annual  reports  of  the  county 
school  superintendents.  A  comparison  of 
the  data  given  for  each  county  as  shown 
in  Table  No.  10  shows  either  no  school 
library  books  reported  or  in  many  cases 
an  annual  decrease  in  their  number'. 

An  inspection  of  the  original  reports 
of  the  county  school  superintendents  on 
file  in  the  oflSce  of  the  Superintendent  of 
Public  Instruction  shows  that  in  the 
forty-two  counties  having  county  libraries 
practically  the  only  school  library  books 
reported  are  those  in  the  large  city 
schools  and  the  town  and  rural  schools 
that  have  not  joined  county  libr'aries. 
Added  to  these  are  the  school  volumes  in 
the  counties  (most  of  them  small  ones) 
that  have  not  established  county  libraries. 
This  stands  as  the  total  for  California. 

There  are  2404  school  districts  (some 
large  ones  like  the  city  of  Bakersfield) 
that  have  joined  county  libraries.  Prac- 
tically all  of  these  districts  have  the  old 
school  district  libraries  that  they  retained 
in  the  school  buildings  after  joining  their 
respective  county  libraries.  Yet  few  of 
these  books  have  been  reported  in  the 
school  superintendents'  annual  reports 
under  the  column  headed,  "Number  of 
volumes  remaining  in  school  library  at 
the  close  of  school  year."  In  place  of 
giving  the  number  of  volumes,  there  is 
the  cryptic  abbreviation,  "Co.  Lib.,"  indi- 
cating that  the  school  district  has  joined 
the  county  library,  but  giving  no  indica- 
tion of  the  information  desired'.  A  town 
school  and  a  few  rural  schools  that  have 
not  joined  the  county  library  will  have 
the  volumes  in  their  school  libraries 
reported.  The  sum  of  the  volumes  in 
these  few  school  districts  is  given  as  the 
total  volumes  in  the  school  libraries  for 
the  entire  county.  The  result  is  that 
hundreds  of  thousands  of  volumes  in  the 
school  collection  of  the  county  libraries 
plus  additional  hundreds  of  thousands  in 
the  old  school  libraries  are  not  taken  into 
account.  Califor'nia,  which  ranks  first 
in  the  United  States  in  its  rural  school 
library  service,  has  no  evidence  to  show 
from    the    standpoint    of    statistics    that 


172 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


siicli  is  the  oasp.  To  correct  tliis  particu- 
lar lack  of  informatiou  in  the  school 
statistics,  Mr  Will  ('.  Wood,  Hnpcrin- 
tencTent  of  Pnl)lic  Instruction,  has  made 
changes  in  the  annual  report  blanks  of 
teachers,  principals  and  county  school 
superintendents.  The  teachers'  and  the 
principals'  annual  reports  require  them 
to  state  how  many  volumes  (excluding 
county  library  books)  are  in  the  school 
district  library.  The  teachers'  reports  to 
the  county  school  superintendent  from 
all  the  school  districts  in  a  county  will 
give  the  total  volumes  (excluding  county 
library  books)   in  the  old  school  libraries. 

When  the  school  superintendent  com- 
piles his  report  at  the  end  of  the  school 
year  he  will  obtain  from  the  county 
librarian  the  total  number  of  books  in 
the  school  collection  of  the  county  free 
library  and  an  approximate  estimate  of 
their  value.  The  total  number  of  volumes 
in  the  old  school  libraries  reported  by  the 
teacher  plus  the  total  number  of  books 
in  the  school  collection  of  the  county 
library  will  give  as  nearly  a  correct 
number  of  school  libra r.y  books  as  it  is 
possible  to  obtain. 

Thirty-four  teachers'  libraries  have 
joined  county  libraries  and  professional 
books  are  being  added  constantly  to 
them.  Regardless  of  this  fact,  the  bien- 
nial report  of  the  Supeilntendent  of 
Public  Instruction  for  the  years  1916-17 
gives  77,010  as  the  total  number  of 
A'olumes  in  the  teachers'  libraries  of  the 
state.  In  1921-22  the  biennial  report 
gives  a  total  of  46.952,  or  a  loss  of 
30,058. 

Under  "Miscellaneous  Statistics — Gen- 
eral Questions"  of  the  school  superin- 
tendent's  annual    report    is    the   question, 


"Number  of  liooks  in  the  county  teachers' 
lilu-ary  V"  Ilepeatedly  the  question  is 
;uiswei'('(l.  "Kolong  to  county  library," 
and  the  number  of  books  is  not  given. 
To  correct  this  the  new  annual  reports 
have  added  "(If  turned  over  to  county 
library,  so  state  and  give  number  of  books 
and  amount  paid)."  In  such  event  the 
county  school  superintendent  will  ask 
the  county  librarian  for  the  information. 

Questions  149-150  and  151.  on  page  4;-> 
of  the  school  superintendent's  annual 
report  for  this  school  year  are  the  ones 
countj^  librarians  serving  the  schools  will 
be  asked  to  answer.  They  are  as  follows  : 
Question  149 — Amount  of  money  paid  for 
books  for  County  Teachers'  Library'? 
Question      1.50 — Number      of     books      in 

County    Teachers'    Library"? 
Question  151 — Books  in  school  collection 
of   County    Free   Library? 

The  county  librarian  can  see  these 
annual  report  forms  at  the  county  super- 
intendent's office. 

This  information  from  the  county 
librarians  to  the  school  superintendents 
•will  not  only  give  them  correct  statistics 
to  forward  to  the  Superintendent  of 
Public  Instruction  but  will  also  give 
everyone  who  is  interested  a  far  better 
idea  of  the  resources  of  the  school 
department  of  the  county  libraries  of 
California. 

COUNTY   LIBRARIANS 
CONVENTION. 

The  County  Librarians  Convention  will 
be  held  in  Long  Beach,  June  2  to  5,  1926. 
June  2  will  be  the  special  county  library 
day.  The  rest  of  the  meeting  will  be  held 
in  conjunction  with  the  California  Library 
Association. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


LIBRARY    CLUBS,    ETC. 


173 


LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC. 


Undei-  this  heading  will  be  given 
accounts  of  meetings  of  the  various 
library  clubs  and  similar  organizations 
throughout  the  state.  Previously  such 
accounts  liave  been  printed  under  the 
library  wliere  they  have  been  held  or  the 
library  where  the  president  or  secretary 
was  located.  This  new  arrangement 
should  make  these  articles  more  available. 
News  items  of  the  various  clubs  are 
solicited. 

ORANGE  COUNTY  LIBRARY  CLUB. 

The  Orange  Couut-y  Library  Club  met 
Saturday.  March  (i,  at  the  Anaheim 
Public  Library,  with  ^Nliss  Elizabeth 
Calnou  as  hostess.  She  was  assisted  by 
her  library  co-workers  and  several  mem- 
bers of  the  Library  Boai-d.  About  fifty 
members  and  friends  were  present. 

Roll  call  proceeded  from  left  to  right, 
each  person  introducing  her  right-hand 
neighbor. 

After  the  minutes  of  the  previous 
meeting  and  the  treasurer's  report  were 
read  and  approved,  a  letter  from  Lady 
Adams,  wife  of  Sir  John  Adams  of  the 
University  of  California,  Southern 
Branch,  was  read,  in  which  she  expressed 
lier  thanks  to  the  club  for  flowers  sent 
her.  She  spoke  at  Fullerton  to  the  Sixth 
District  of  the  California  Library  Asso- 
ciation, early  in  February.  Thanks  were 
also  expressed  to  the  club  by  Mrs  Kitching 
in  behalf  of  the  Sixth  District  for  the 
hospitality  of  the  club  at  that  time. 

In  that  the  club  convenes  only  quar- 
terly, the  personnel,  both  of  members  and 
visitors,  varies  at  each  meeting.  So  a 
motion  was  made  and  carried  that  the 
members  and  friends  wear  labels  bearing 
the  wearers'  names. 

New  officers  were  elected  for  the  ensu- 
ing year  as  follows :  President.  Mrs 
Kitching  of  the  Fullerton  High  School 
Library  :  Vice  President.  Miss  Kate  Rea 
of  the  Anaheim  Library  Board  :  Secretary- 
Treasurer.  Miss  Carrie  Sheppard  of  the 
Fullerton  Public  Library. 

The  place  of  the  next  meeting  was  not 
definitely  decided,  owing  to  the  illness 
and    nonattendance    of    Mrs    Reynolds    of 


the  Huntington  Beach  Public  Library. 
She  had  requested  that  the  next  meeting 
be  held  there,  but  word  had  not  been 
received. 

The  business  of  the  club  having  been 
completed,  the  speakers  of  the  program 
were  introduced. 

Miss  Caroline  Scales  of  the  Long  Beach 
schools  discus.sed  "Children's  Books." 
She  said  the  first  requisite  of  a  children's 
librarian  is  a  love  of  children  ;  second,  a 
knowledge  of  the  books  passed  over  the 
counter  to  the  children,  so  that  the  right 
book  should  go  to  the  particular  child  ; 
third,  a  policy  of  buying  only  the  best 
books,  regardless  of  price — best  in  their 
illustrations,  type,  paper,  make-up,  and 
content.  Miss  Scales  did  not  recommend 
many  series  of  children's  books,  but  gave 
the  Iwoks  of  Grinnell  as  typical  of  good 
ones.  She  emphasized  the  fact  that  the 
children's  hour  should  be  not  merely  for 
entertainment,  but  should  present  some 
good  book  or  give  history  or  biography  or 
some  other  valuable  knowledge.  Exhibits 
of  books,  butterflies,  coins,  pictures,  etc., 
should  be  used  to  attract  children.  Miss 
Scales  concluded  her  talk  by  telling  the 
Japanese  story  of  ''Tongue-cut  Sparrow." 
a  story  to  be  told  by  the  teacher  to  fir.st 
grade  children  and  to  be  retold  by  the 
children.  The  audience  were  as  children 
during  the  telling  of  the  story. 

Two  poems  were  quaintly  and  skillfully 
given  by  little  Marcella  Dutton. 

One  of  our  rising  poets.  Miss  Frazee 
of  Fullerton.  then  rendered  several  of 
her  poems :  "The  Poplars,"  "A  Day,"  "A 
Love  Lyric,"  '"A  Lyric,"  *'To  a  Broken 
Tile"  (part  of  a  longer  poem  to  "'La 
Purissima  Mission"),  "Love's  a  Little 
RoAvdy,"  and  "'To  Books."  The  poems 
were  charming  and  charmingly  given. 

Fortunately  the  club  had  one  unex- 
pected visitor  that  day  and  one  who  had 
sat  patiently  listening  to  the  program  so 
far — our  only  gentleman  guest,  Mr'  Lesler. 
New  York  representative  of  the  Hough- 
ton Mifilin  Publishing  Company.  The 
announced  Question-Box,  after'  one  out- 
break on  cataloging,  was  pushed  aside 
and  Mr   Lesler   requested  to   speak.     He 


174 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


introduced  himself  by  telling-  a  story  on 
Amy  Lowell,  who  once  requested  from  a 
fi'iend  in  a  company  to  know  who  is 
"that  clam-faced  suy""V  Mr  Lesler  re- 
vealetl  to  ns  the  mysteries  of  the  making 
of  a  book  from  the  author  to  the  con- 
sumer. 

At  the  close  of  Mr  Lesler's  talk  the 
company  went  to  the  American  Legion 
diniug-hall,  where  an  excellent  luncheon 
was  served.  Purple  and  cream  pansies 
formed  the  floral  decorations  of  the  tables. 
'J'he  favors  for  each  guest  were  purple 
book  covers,  on  which  was  the  title,  "Our 
Mutual  Friend,"  Charles  Dickens,  and 
booklets  containing  nuts,  with  the  same 
sort  of  covers.  A  beautiful  edition  of 
"David  Copperfield,"  lying  open,  graced 
the  table  immediately  in  front  of  the 
President  and  Secretary  in  their  "throne" 
chairs.  From  between  the  pages  of  the 
book  sti-etched  out  some  twenty  ribbon 
streamers,  each  leading  to  a  little  manni- 
kin  representing  a  Dickensesque  charac- 
ter', each  accompanied  by  a  saying. 

Thanks  are  due  the  Anaheim  Public 
Library  for  its  hospitality  and  the 
appropriately   appointed   luncheon. 

Lulu  I.  Rumsey,  Secretary. 

PASADENA   LIBRARY  CLUB. 

At  the  February  meeting  of  the  Pasa- 
dena Library  Club,  Dr  Maurice  L. 
Fttinghausen,  Bibliographer  to  Messrs 
Maggs  Bros,  (the  Booksellers  of  London 
and  I'aris)    was  the  speaker. 

Dr  Ettinghausen  in  his  charming  man- 
ner told  of  book  hunting  in  Spain  and 
Portugal,  chiefly  the  latter,  as  it  is  one 
of  the  few  remaining  fields  offering  valu- 
able rarities  among  old  books.  He  gave 
an  interesting  description  of  life  in  some 
of  the  cities,  and  an  amusing  account  of 
an  old  library  and  its  impractical  custo- 
dian. He  presented  an  exhibit  of  rare 
illuminated  miniatures  from  European, 
Indian  and  Persian  manuscripts  of  the 
14tli   to  18th  centuries. 

Anne  Teittipoe, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 


SAN   ANTONIO   LIBRARY  CLUB. 

The  San  Antonio  Library  Chih  held 
ils  ri'suhtr  meeting  at  Chaffey  Union 
High  School  Library,  ]Mr  Fisk  and  Mrs 
Xeals  being  our  hosts.  The  business 
meeting  was  presided  over  by  our  Presi- 
dent, Miss  Bees.  Miss  Maynard  gave  a 
resume  of  the  morning  session  of  the 
Sixth  District  of  the  California  Library 
Association.  Miss  Bees  and  Mrs  Neals 
took   the  afternoon   session. 

Professor  Joseph  Pijoan  was  the  guest 
speaker,  his  subject  being  "Manuscripts 
that  I  was  permitted  to  handle  at  the 
Vatican."  His  talk  was  delightful.  Pro- 
fessor Pijoan  spent  thr'ee  years  at  the 
Vatican  doing  research  work  for  the 
Spanish  Government.  He  is  a  professor 
at  Pomona   College. 

The  next  meeting  of  the  club  will  be 
held  at  Pomona  Public  Library. 

Ermine   R.   Gkoves,    Secretary. 

SPECIAL     LIBRARY     ASSOCIATION 
OF  SOUTHERN   CALIFORNIA. 

The  regular  meeting  of  the  Special 
Libraries  Association  of  Southern  Cali- 
fornia was  held  Wednesday  evening, 
February  8,  1926,  at  the  Barlow  Medical 
Library.  Following  the  business  of  the 
evening,  Dr  Elizabeth  Saphro,  Chief  of 
the  Division  of  Child  Hygiene  of  the  Los 
Angeles  County  Health  Department, 
talked  to  us  on  "How  the  library  can  be 
useful  to  a  large  public  health  program." 
Dr  Saphro  has  just  returned  to  Los 
Angeles  after  having  been  at  Johns 
Hopkins  University,  where  she  enjoyed 
the  attributes  of  an  Inter'national  Health 
Board  fellowship  in  public  health,  fol- 
lowed by  a  traveling  scholarship  which 
enabled  her  to  investigate  child  hygiene 
work  in  all  countries  of  continental 
Europe.  In  her  work  both  here  and 
abroad,  she  has  come  to  realize  the  value 
of  the  library  and  gave  us  many  sugges- 
tions asl  to  how  libraries  can  do  the  most 
good  in  this  particular'  line  of  work. 

Mildred   E.   Sciiaer,   Secretary. 


vol.  21, 110.2  I 


BOARD    OP    LIBRARY    EXAMINERS. 


175 


BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS,  CALIFORNIA. 


MEMBERS   OF  THE   BOARD. 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert  Rea,  Librarian,  San  Francisco 
Public  Library,   Secretarj-. 

Everett  R.  Perry,  Librarian,  Los  An- 
geles Public  Library. 

Sections  0  and  7  of  the  County  free 
library  law  (Chap.  68,  Cal.  Statutes 
1911)    read  as  follows: 

Sec.  G.  a  commission  is  hereby  cre- 
ated to  be  known  as  ihe  board  of  library 
examinei-s,  consisting  of  the  state  libra- 
rian, who  shall  be  ex  officio  chairman  of 
said  board,  the  librarian  of  the  public 
library  of  the  city  and  couniy  of  San 
Francisco,  and  the  librarian  of  the  Los 
Angeles  public  library. 

Sec.  7.  Upon  the  establishment  of  a 
county  free  library,  ihe  board  of  super- 
visors shall  appoint  a  county  librarian, 
who  shall  hold  office  for  the  term  of  four 
years,  subject  to  prior  removal  for  cause, 
after  a  hearing  by  said  board.  No  per- 
son shall  be  eligible  to  the  office  of 
county  librarian  unless,  prior  to  his 
appointment,  he  ha.s  received  from  tlii 
board  of  library  examiners  a  certificate 
of  qualification  for  the  office.  At  the 
time  of  his  appointment,  the  coimty 
librarian  need  not  be  a  resident  of  th? 
county  nor  a  citizen  of  the  State  of 
California. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHAIRMAN. 

There  has  been  no  meeting  of  the  board 
this  quarter. 

CERTIFICATE   HOLDERS. 

Note. — First-grade  certificates  were 
valid  for  use  throughout  the  state  ;  second- 
grade,  in  counties  of  the  twenty-first  to  the 
fifty-eighth  (except  twenty-fiftli,  thirty- 
third,  thirty-fifth  and  forty-second)  class, 
inclusive ;  tliird-grade  in  counties  of  the 
forty-nintli  to  the  fifty-eightli  class,  in- 
clusive. 

The  new  certificate,  issued  for  the  first 
time,  December  22,  1920,  is  valid  for  use 
througliout  the  state. 

New  Certificates. 

Adams,  Mrs  Lila  (Dobell),  Ln.  Trinity 
County  Free  Library,  Weaverville. 

Anderson,  Mrs  Rachel  (Rhoads),  Asst. 
San  Bernardino  County  Free  Library, 
San  Bernardino. 

Babcock,  Mrs  Julia  G.,  Ln.  Kern  County 
Free   Library,   Bakersfleld. 

Bailey,  Anne  Bell,  Ln.  Tehama  Countj' 
Free  Library,   Red  Bluff. 

Barmby,  Mary,  Ln.  Alameda  County  Free 
Library,    Oakland. 

Beardsley,  Mrs  Arline  Davis,  Asst.  Orange 
County  Free  Library,    Santa  Ana. 

B  e  e  m  a  n,  Mrs  Anne  (Madison),  Mrs 
Thomas  Beeman,  Ln.  Warren  G.  Hard- 
ing High  School  Library,  Sawtelle. 

6—44805 


Boman,  Evalyn,  Ln.  Imperial  County  Free 

Libi-ary,  El  Centre. 
Brackett,    Thelma,    Ln.    Newark    Museum, 

Newark,  N.  J. 
Brewitt,  Mrs  Theodora  R.,  Ln.  Public  Li- 
brary, Long  Beach. 
Burket,    Frances    M.,    Ln.    Sutter    County 

Free  Library,  Yuba  City. 
Chalfant,  Blanche,  Ln.  Butte  County  Free 

Library,   Oroville. 
Chatfield,     Marguerite,     Asst.     Public    Li- 
brary, Ventura. 
Coulter,  Mabel,  Asst.  Contra  Costa  County 

Free  Library,   Martinez.      (On  leave  of 

absence.) 
Culver,    Essae    M.,    Exec.    Sec.    Louisiana 

Library  Commission,  Baton  Rouge,  La. 
Dalton,   Mrs   Blanche    (Harris),   Mrs  John 

E.   Dalton,   Asst.   State  Library,   Sacra- 
mento. 
Davis,    Edna    D.,    Asst.    Humboldt    County 

Free    Library,    Eureka. 
De  Ford,   Estella,   Ln.   Napa  County  Free 

Library,   Napa. 
Dills,    Clara   B.,    Ln.    Solano   County   Free 

Library,   Fairfield. 
Duff,   Marcella   Carmelita,   Asst.   State  Li- 

Ijrary,   Sacramento.      (On  leave  of 

absence. ) 
English,    Gladys,    Ln.    Piedmont   High 

School   Library,    Piedmont. 
Ferguson,   K.   Dorothy,  Ln.  Bank  of  Italy 

Library,  San  Francisco. 
Ferguson,    Milton    J.,    Ln.    State    Library, 

Sacrainento. 
Flower,    Gretchen    L,    Ln.    Tulare    County 

Free  Library,  Visalia. 
Frazier,   Hubert  B.,  Asst.  Public  Library, 

Los  Angeles. 
Frink,  Ellen  B.,  Ln.  Siskiyou  County  Free 

Library,    Yreka. 
Fuller,  Mrs  Melissa,  Asst.  Fresno  County 

Free  Library,  Fresno. 
Galloway,    Blanche,    Ln.    Madera    County 

Free  Library,  Madera. 
Gantt,    Edith,    Ln.    Plumas    County    Free 

Library,    Quincy. 
Gantz,  Flo  A..  Ln.  San  Luis  Obispo  County 

Free  Library,   San  Luis  Obispo. 
Gibson,    Hazel    G.,   Asst.    Sacramento 

County  Free  Library,   Sacramento. 
Greene,  Charles  S.,  Ln.  Free  Library,  Oak- 
land. 
Gregory,  Marion  L.,  Asst.  San  Bernardino 
County  Free  Library,  San  Bernardino. 
Hadden,  Anne,  Ln.  Monterey  County  Free 

Library,    Salinas. 
Haines,   Alice   J.,   Head   Documents   Dept., 

State  Library,   Sacramento. 
Harris,  Mary  W.,  Asst.  Louisiana  Library 

Commission.  Baton  Rouge,  La. 
Hitt,  Eleanor,  Ln.  San  Diego  County  Free 

Library,  San  Diego. 
Holroyd,  Edna  S.,   Ln.   San  Mateo  County 

Free  Librarv,   Redv/ood  City. 
Kennedy,    Helen    T.,    2d    Asst.    Ln.    Public 

Library,   Los  Angeles. 
Kitching,   Mrs   Ethelene  M.,  Ln.  Fullerton 

High  School  Library,  Fullerton. 
Kobler,     Marjorie     H.,     Asst.     San     Diego 

County  Free   Library,    San   Diego. 
Kyle,      Eleanore,      Ln.      San      Bernardino 
Polytechnic  High   School   Library,    San 

Bernardino. 
Laugenour,    Nancy    C,    Ln.    Yolo    County 

Free   Library,   Woodland. 


176 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Linn,  Mrs  Frances  Burns,  Ln.  Santa  Bar- 
bara Free  Public  Library  and  Santa 
Barbara  County  Free  Library,  Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston,  Margaret  E.,  Ln.  Orange 
County  Free  Library,  Santa  Ana. 

McCardle,  Sarali  E..  Ln.  Fresno  County 
Free   Library,   Fresno. 

Margrave,  Anne,  Ln.  Inj'o  County  Free 
Library,   Independence. 

Martin,  Lenala  A.,  Ln.  Lassen  County 
Free  Library,  Susanville. 

Meredith,  Roberta,  Asst.  Fresno  County 
Free  Library,  Fresno. 

Middleton,  Maude,  Asst.  Kings  County 
Free   Library,  Hanford. 

Miller,  Mabel  V.,  School  Library,  Los 
Angeles. 

Morse,  Marion,  Ln.  Maui  County  Free 
Library,   Wailuku,   T.   H. 

Mumm,  Beulah,  Reference  Ln.  State  Li- 
brary,   Sacramento. 

Packer.  Ella.  Ln.  Colusa  County  Free 
Library,   Colusa. 

Perry,  Everett  R.,  Ln.  Public  Library,  Los 
Angeles. 

Provines,  Cornelia  C,  Ln.  Sacramento 
County  Free  Library,  Sacramento. 

Rea,  Robert,  Ln.  Public  Library,  San 
Francisco. 

Reagan,  Ida  M.,  Ln.  Humboldt  County 
Free  Library,  Eureka. 

Russell,  Mrs  Faye  (Kneeshaw) ,  Mrs  Ralph 
H.  Russell,  Ln.  Glenn  County  Free 
Library,    Willows. 

Silverthorn,  Bessie  B.,  Ln.  McHenry  Pub- 
lic Library  and  Stanislaus  County  Free 
Library,    Modesto. 

Singletarj^,  Mrs  Elizabeth  (Stevens),  Mrs 
Harry  H.  Singletary,  Ln.  Santa  Clara 
Count}^  Free  Library,  San  Jose. 

Smith,  Susan  T.,  Ln.  City  Library,  Sac- 
ramento. 

Steffa,  Julia,  Ln.  Hanford  Public  Library 
and  Kings  County  Free  Library,  Han- 
ford. 

Stoddard,  Minette  L.,  Ln:  Merced  County 
Free  Library,  Merced. 

Taylor,  Bertha  S.,  Ln.  Amador  Coimty 
Free   Library,    Jackson. 

Thomas,  Mabel  W.,  Asst.  Ln.  Free  Li- 
brary. Oakland. 

Topping,  Elizabeth  R.,  Ln.  Ventura  Public 
Library  and  Ventura  Coimty  Free 
Library,    Ventura. 

Vogleson,  Helen  E.,  Ln.  Los  Angeles 
County  Free  Library,   Los  Angeles. 

Warren,  Altliea  H.,  Ln.  Public  Library, 
San  Diego.      (On  leave  of  absence.) 

Waterman,  Minerva  H.,  Ln.  Santa  Cruz 
Public  Library  and  Santa  Cruz  County 
Free  Library,  Santa  Cruz. 

Waters,  Caroline  S.,  Ln.  San  Bernardino 
County  Free  Library,  San  Bernardino. 

Wheaton,  Florence  J.,  Ln.  San  Benito 
County   Free   Library,   Hollister. 

Whitbeck,  Mrs  Alice  G.,  Ln.  Contra  Costa 
County  Free  Library,  Martinez. 

Worden,  Mrs  Dorothy  (Clarke),  Asst. 
.Solano  County  Free  Library,  Fairfield. 

Wright,  Muriel,  Ln.  Tuolumne  County 
Free  Library,  Sonora. 

Yates,  Mrs  Bess  (Ranton),  Mrs  John  D 
Yates,  Asst.  Public  Library,  Long 
Beach. 


Third  Grade. 

Williams,  Anna  L.,  Ln.  Modoc  County 
Free   Library,    Alturas. 

At  Present  Out  of  Library  Work. 

Alexander,  Mrs  Lela  (Clapperton)  (New 
certificate). 

Burrell,  Mrs  Marjorie  (Chilberg),  Mrs 
Elmer  Edward  Burrell  (New  certifi- 
cate). 

Ferris,  Katharine  Post    (New  certificate). 

Gleason,  Celia    (New  certificate). 

Hatfield,  Mrs  Margaret  (Smith),  Mrs  John 
Glover  Hatfield    (New  certificate). 

Heffner,  Mrs  Martha  June  (Coleman), 
Mrs  Harold  V.  Heffner  (New  certifi- 
cate). 

Herrman,  Mrs  Jennie  (Herrman),  Mrs 
James  White  Herrman  (New  certifi- 
cate). 

Huntington,    Stella    (New  certificate). 

Lewis,  Mrs  Anna  Jean  (Thomson),  Mrs 
R.   B.  Lewis    (New  certificate). 

McDonald,  Mrs  Ora  Regnart,  Mrs  Charles 
E.   McDonald    (New  certificate). 

Parkinson,  H.  O.    (New  certificate). 

Price,  Mrs  Melba  (Burden),  Mrs  Louis  B. 
Price    (New  certificate). 

COUNTY   FREE   LIBRARY  LAW. 

The  "California  county  free  library 
law  and  circular  of  information  for 
applicant.s  for  certificates  of  qualification 
to  hold  office  of  county  librarian  in  Cali- 
fornia" was  published  in  Neics  Notes  of 
Vfi.Uforiiia  Libraries,  April,  1911,  and 
later  reprinted  in  pamphlet  form.  The 
edition  being  exhausted,  a  revised  edition 
of  the  circular  was  printed  in  News  Notes 
of  California  'Lihrarics,  January,  1914. 
This  has  been  reprinted  as  a  pamphlet. 
The  fifth  edition  was  issued  December, 
1921.  (Circular  of  information  only.) 
The  fifth  edition  of  the  County  free 
library  law  was  issued  in  September, 
192.").  Copies  of  both  of  above  pamphlets 
will  lie  furnished  on  request. 

NEXT   EXAMINATION. 

The  next  examination  will  be  held  at 
the  Public  Library,  Los  Angeles,  on  June 
7,  and  at  the  State  Library,  Sacramento, 
on  June  12,  1926. 

APPLICATION   BLANKS. 

All  who  wish  to  take  the  examination 
should  file  applications  with  the  Chairman 
of  the  Board.  For  application  blanks  or 
further  information  address  the  Chairman 
of  the  Board,  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State 
Librarian,  Sacramento,  California. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


177 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY. 


The  bill  establishing  the  California 
State  Library  was  signed  by  Governor 
Peter  H.  Burnett,  January  24-,  1850. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
established  by  resolution  adopted  Sep- 
tember 4,  1913. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
discontinued  by  motion  adopted  May  22, 
1920. 

Biennial  income  for  1925-27,  $253,490. 

Total  accessions  262,383  (less  3391 
lost  and  discarded =258,992)  exclusive  of 
18,561  accessions  in  Books  for  Blind 
Department  and  of  the  Sutro  Branch  in 
San  Francisco. 

LAUREN   WILLIAM    RIPLEY 

1864-1926 

Lauren  W.  Ripley  died  at  his  home  in 
Oakland  in  the  early  morning  of  March 
S,  1926.  He  was  a  Sacramentan  by 
birth,  grew  to  man's  estate  here,  and 
here  lived  all  the  years  of  his  life,  except 
the  last  three,  serving  his  fellow  towns- 
people in  a  capacity  by  which  his  con- 
tribution to  mankind  will  be  weighed. 

While  he  was  a  high  school  student  in 
1881  Ml-  Ripley  began  service  in  the 
the  Sacramento  Public  Library,  which 
then  had  a  collection  of  about  8000 
volumes.  His  unusual  mentality  might 
naturally  have  led  him  to  the  univer- 
sity ;  but  circumstances  willed  otherwise, 
and  he  continued  true  to  that  boyhood's 
allegiance.  On  the  retirement  of  Miss 
Hancock,  the  librarian,  he  was  named  to 
take  up  the  directing  duties ;  and  con- 
tinued at  the  head  of  the  library  until 
July  1,  1921.  The  institution  grew  and 
Mr  Ripley  had  the  satisfaction  of  seeing 
his  beloved  charge  transferred  from  the 
old  building  into  the  present  well  planned 
structure.  The  architect  of  the  new 
building  no  doubt  gave  it  architectural 
form,  but  the  ideas  incorporated  therein 
are  very  largely  those  of  the  librarian. 

Mr  Ripley  was  president  in  1910-11 
of  the  California  Library  Association. 
When  his  old  schoolmate,  Hiram  W. 
Johnson,  came  into  power  as  Governor 
of  California,  Mr'  Ripley,  at  the  first 
opportunity,  was  named  to  a  place  on  the 
Board  of  Trustees  of  the  California 
State  Library,  which  post  he  held  for  a 


period  of  five  years.     He  was  president  of 
the  board  from  1917  to  1921. 

Lauren  W.  Ripley  had  a  great  love  for 
books  and  learning ;  but  those  who  knew 
him  well  felt  that  his  genius  showed  to 
best  advantage  in  his  home,  where  in 
friendly  discussion  his  wide  reading  and 
his  kindly  wit  made  him  a  companion  of 
alluring  qualitj'.  He  loved  flowers  and 
expended  much  of  his  leisure  time  coax- 
ing his  garden  to  more  beautiful  bounti- 
fulness. 

Milton   J.   Ferguson. 

STAFF. 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian. 

Mabel  R.  Gillis.  Assistant  Librarian 
and  Head  of  Books  for  the  Blind  Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert  V.  Clayton,  Law  and  Legisla- 
tive Reference  Librarian. 

Eudora  Garoutte,  Head  of  California 
Department. 

Alice  .J.  Haines.  Head  of  Documents 
Department. 

Mrs  May  Dexter  Henshall,  County 
Library  Organizer, 

Annie  Lowry,  in  charge  of  Periodicals 
and  Binding. 

Wm.  H.  Lugg,  Head  of  Shipping,  Re- 
pairs, etc..  Department. 

Beulah  Mumm,  Reference  Librarian. 

Ida  G.  Munson,  Head  of  Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle  Ruhl,  in  charge  of  Order 
Department. 

Beryl  Andrews,  Assistant. 

Helen  M.  Bruner,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch,  San  Francisco. 

Sarah  Carder,  Assistant. 

Ella  A.  Clark,  Indexer. 

Mrs  Blanche  Harris  Dalton,  Assistant. 

Margaret  Dennison,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch.  San  Francisco. 

Mrs  Marguerite  Walker  Duggins,  Ste- 
nographer. 

Kate  M.  Fole.y,  Home  Teacher  of  the 
Blind,  146  McAllister  St..  San  Francisco. 

Zilla  Grant,  Assistant. 

Lyndall  Harmon,  Assistant. 

Mrs  Dorothy   Puffer  Isaacs,   A.ssistant. 

Florence  Lamb.  Bookkeeper. 

Rachel  Look,  Assistant. 

Mavis  A.  McCampbell,  Typist. 

Mrs  Bessie   Heath   McCrea,  Assistant. 

Anna  G.  McNamee,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch,   San  Francisco. 

Alicia  W.  Manning.  Assistant. 

D.  Florence  Montfort.  Assistant. 

Catharine  J.  Morrison.  Home  Teacher 
of  the  Blind,  951  El  Molino  st..  Los 
Angeles. 

Irene  E.  Ryan.  Assistant. 

Blanche  L.  Shadle.  Assistant. 

Lily  M.  Tilden,  Assistant. 


178 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Mrs  Corinue  E.  Tracy,  Assistant. 

.Time  Vladvka,  Assistanl. 

Mrs  Julia   M.   Waldron.  Assistant. 

Caroline  Wenzel.  Assistant. 

^Mrs   Ina  Brosseaii.  Book  Iieimirer. 

Emma    F.    de   Merritt,   Book   Repairer. 

Adeline  Martin.  Book  Repairer. 

Arden  Hall,  Assistant  Shipping  Clerk. 

Wm.  G.  Lyons,  Assistant  Shipping 
Clerk. 

Add'albert  Morris,  Assistant  Sbippini;' 
Clerk. 

Lois  Little.  Messenger. 

Vera  Palermo,  Messenger. 

Margaret  Schilling,  Messenger. 

J.  L.  Foss,  Janitor. 

G.  A.  Klees,  Janitor. 

Harry   A.    Simons,   Elevator   Operator. 


STAFF   NEWS   ITEMS. 

Mae  Davies,  a  member  of  our  staff 
since  March  3,  1920,  passed  away  March 

30  after  a  serious  illness  of  more  than  a 
month's  duration.  Miss  Davies  had  been 
an  assistant  in  the  Blind  Department  for 
the  pa^st  three  years.  Her  cheerful  dispo- 
sition, her  willingness  to  do  to  the  utmost 
of  her  ability  any  task  assigned  her  and 
her  lively  interest  in  her  work  endeared 
her  to  the  whole  State  Library  staff. 

Mrs  Helen   G.  Nelson  resigned   March 

31  in  order'  to  be  at  home  for  a  time. 
Kenneth  Curtright  resigned  March  31; 
Addalbert  Morris,  who  has  been  one  of 
the  messengers,  is  taking  his  place. 

We  had  two  staff  meetings  during  the 
quarter.  At  the  one  of  January  27,  Mr 
Ferguson  told  us  of  his  trip  back  to  the 
A.  L.  A.  midwinter  meeting  in  Chicago 
and  the  Louisiana  Library  Association  at 
Lafayette,  La.  The  other  staff  meeting 
was  held  March  25  and  was  largely  taken 
up  with  State  Library  matters  with  news 
items  from  some  of  the  southern  Cali- 
fornia libraries  recently  visited  by  Mr 
Ferguson. 

Wm.  R.  Watson,  Assistant  State  Li- 
brarian from  January  1,  1904',  to  Octo- 
ber 15,  1907,  died  in  Albany,  New  York, 
January  8.  He  was  Director  of  the 
Library  Extension  Division  in  the  New 
York   State   Library. 

Mr  Ferguson  attended  the  Regional 
Adult  Education  Conference  in  San 
Francisco,  February  8  and  9;  the  meet- 
ing of  the  Sixth  District  of  the  Cali- 
fornia Library  Association  at  Fullerton, 
February  6 ;  the  meeting  of  the  First  and 
Second  Disti'icts  at  San  Francisco  March 
Ct:    that    of   the   Third    District    at    Mill 


Valley  ^larch  27.  He  also  attended  the 
stale  meeting  of  the  County  Supervisors 
held  at  San  Diego  eai'ly  in  March;  and 
sjioke.  at  the  pioneer  luncheon  and  after- 
noon meeting  of  the  Tri  County  Federa- 
tion of  Women's  Clubs  at  Placerville, 
February  20 ;  at  the  Conference  of  Cali- 
fornia Economic  Research  and  Statistical 
Agencies  in  Los  Angeles,  February  23 ; 
at  the .  San  .Juan  Union  High  School  the 
afternoon  of  February  26. 

Most  of  the  State  Library  staff 
attended  the  meeting  of  the  Fifth  District 
of  the  Califorliia  Library  Association  at 
Hotel   Sacramento,  March  4. 

Judson  Jennings,  head  of  the  Seattle 
I'ublic  Library,  visited  the  California 
State  Library,  February  10,  on  his  way 
home  from  attending  the  Regional  Adult 
Education   Conference  in   San   Francisco. 

]Miss  Wenzel,  a.ssistant  in  the  Cali- 
fornia Department,  gave  a  talk  on  Cali- 
fornia history  at  the  Bogue  Wednesdaj' 
Club.  Januarj'^  13. 

LIBRARY   HOURS. 

Week  days   0  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

Legislative  session  : 

Week  days 9  a.m.  to  9  p.m. 

Sundays 10  a.m.  to  3  p.m. 

LAW    AND     LEGISLATIVE     REFER- 
ENCE  DEPARTMENT. 

Herbert  V.  Clayton,  in  charge. 

The  Law  and  Legislative  Reference 
Department  is  fully  equipped  with  the 
latest  reports,  digests,  encyclopedias  and 
textbooks,  the  statutes  of  other  states, 
the  Ignited  States.  Great  Britain,  Can- 
ada, Australia  and  certain  other  foreign 
countries,  and  briefs  of  counsel  in  ca.ses 
decided  in  the  California  Supreme  and 
Appellate  courts.  State  oIBcers  are  en- 
titled to  borrow  books,  and  private  indi- 
viduals are  accorded  the  same  privilege 
upon  presentation  of  a  request  signed  by 
a  Supreme.  Appellate  or  Superior  .Judge, 
or  other  state  officer.  Books  may  be  kept 
three  weeks,  and  will  be  once  renewed 
for  two  weeks.  All  books  are  .subject  to 
recall,  if  required  by  a  state  officer,  or  if, 
in  the  opinion  of  the  Librarian,  a  recall 
is  fair  and  expedient. 

In  addition  to  special  service  to  mem- 
bers of  the  Legislature,  information  on 
the  laws  of  California  and  other  states 
and  countries  is  given  on  inquiry  from 
libraries  or  individuals. 

Recent  accessions  to  the  department 
will  be  found  listed  under  the  heading 
'"Law"  in  the  section  on  "Recent  Acces- 
sions." 

>S'c,c  also  Judicial  Councils,  p.  128. 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


179 


DOCUMENTS    DEPARTMENT. 

Alice  J.  Haines,  in  charge. 

The  Documents  Department  aims  to 
collect,  arrange  and  make  available  gov- 
ernment publications,  federal,  state,  city 
and  foreign. 

Recent  accessions  of  California  State 
and  City  publications  will  be  found  on 
pp.  209  and  21^5. 

Copies  of  10  California  State  publica- 
tions have  been  received  for  distribution 
to  libraries  during  January,  February 
and  March,  1926. 

Agriculture  Department.     Monthly  bulle- 
tin, vol.  15,  nos.  1—6   (in  1). 

Special  publication,  no.  81. 

Adjutant    General.       Special    regulations 

no.  1. 
Athletic  Commission..     Report.     1925. 

Rules   and  regulations.     1925. 

Attorney  General.     Report.     1922-24. 
Chiropractic    Examiners    Bd.      Directory. 

1926. 
Fish  &  Game  Comm.     Cal.  fish  &  gam'% 

vol.  11,  no.  4. 
Forestry  Bd.     Forest  fire  laws,  1925—27. 
Hi^hwav   Comm.      Cal.   highways,   vol.   3. 

nos.  1-2.      . 
Industrial  Accident  Comm.    Report,  1925. 

Cal.  safety  news,  vol.  10,  no.  1. 

Insurance     Comm.       Insurance     brokers. 

1926. 
Labor  Bur.     Labor  laws.     1925. 
Les'islative  Counsel  Bur.     Constitution  of 

California.     1925. 
Medical   Examiners    Bd.      Report.      1925. 
Real  Estate  Bd.     Directory  bulletin,  vol. 
6,  no.  2. 
^        Secretarv     of     State.      General     election 
I  laws.     1926. 

i  REFERENCE    DEPARTMENT. 

*       Beulaii  MuMJsr,  in  charge. 

The  Reference  Department  furnishes 
information  to  any  inquirer.  It  furnishes 
books  to  public  libraries  on  request  of 
the  librarian,  and  to  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  on  request  of  its  ofBcial 
head  or  its  librarian ;  to  individuals 
through  the  signature  of  a  state  officer, 
of  the  Librarian  of  the  local  library  or 
of  the  official  head  of  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  or  on  receipt  of  a  $5.00 
deposit :  to  a  club  or  grange  on  request 
of  its  president,  secretary  or  librarian. 
In  counties  having  county  free  libraries. 
all  requests  must  be  made  through  the 
county   free    library. 

A  marked  activity  in  the  r'efereuce 
dei)artment  during  the  past  few  mouths 
has  been  found  in  the  circulation  of  pic- 
tures, iloro  conmiunities  are  using  the 
collection  of  reproductions  and  for  more 
varied  purposes  than  ever  before.  The 
art  clubs,  as  has  always  been  the  case, 
are  the  chief  users,  but  manv  schools  are 


sending  in  requests  for  pictures  to  be 
used  in  art  classes.  One  public  librarv 
sends  for  collections  of  three  at  a  time  to 
be  used  as  exhibits  in  the  library,  a  plan 
in  which  the  State  Library  is  happy  to 
cooperate.  A  complete  list  of  the  pic- 
tures available  for  circulation  was  issued 
in  News  Notes  of  California  Libraries 
for  .January,   1923. 

ORDER  AND  ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

INIyetle  Ruhl,  in  charge. 

During  .January,  February  and  March, 
1S19   books,   26   prints   and   1   map   were 

accessioned. 

CATALOG   DEPARTMENT. 

Ida  G.  Munson,  in  charge. 

During  January,  February  and  March, 
894  books  were  cataloged  and  6.391  cards 
were  added  to  the  file. 

CALIFORNIA    DEPARTMENT. 

EuDORA  Gaeoxjtte,  in  charge. 

The  California  Department  aims  to 
have  a  thoroughly  good  collection  of 
books  on  the  history  and  description, 
resources  and  industries  of  the  State,  as 
well  as  the  works  of  California  authors 
in  all  departments  of  literature.  These 
are  made  accessible  by  means  of  a  card 
catalog.  Full  names  and  biographical 
sketches  of  California  authors,  artists, 
musicians,  pioneers  and  early  settlers  are 
being  secured,  together  with  their  photo- 
graphs. The  collection  of  bound  peri- 
odicals is  quite  large.  The  Department 
also  contains  about  10,000  bound  volumes 
of  newspapers,  a  file  of  which  is  being 
indexed  with  reference  to  the  history  of 
the  State.  Students  will  be  assisted  in 
Iheir  work. 

Pioneers  and   Early  Settlers. 

Charles  Vine  Uttley  Br'ockway  was  a 
Sacramento  pioneer  who  arrived  in  1849. 
Mr  Brockway  built  one  of  the  first  houses, 
and  owned  and  operated  an  early  hotel, 
the  Preemption  House.  His  death 
occurred  in    Sacramento,   1877. 

William  Phillips  was  another  '49er. 
who  came  with  an  overland  party  and 
mined  in  Nevada  County.  Mr'  Phillips 
died  in  Grass  Valley,  1852,  at  the  age  of 
24  years. 

George  Lorenzo  Brown  came  to  Cali- 
fornia with  his  parents  in  1849.  Mr 
Brown  has  lived  at  Colusa  almost  con- 
tinuously since  that  time.  He  knew  most 
of  the  prominent  people  and  early  settlers 


180 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


of  the  Sacramento  Valley,  in  which  he 
is  deeply  interested. 

Robert  B.  Woodward  reached  Cali- 
fornia in  1854.  As  owner'  of  the  famous 
AVhat  Cheer  House,  Woodward's  Gardens 
and  builder  of  the  City  railroad,  San 
Francisco,  he  was  known  from  one  end 
of  the  state  to  the  other.  Woodward's 
Gardens  was  a  source  of  pride  and  joy 
to  young  and  old  alike.  Mr  Woodward 
died  at  his  country  home.  Oak  Knoll, 
Napa  County,  1879. 

Other  cards  received  are  as  follows : 
Martha  Ann  Bergler,  Turner  Cowing 
Purington,  George  Ross  Shepherd,  Martha 
Hamlin  Shepherd. 

California    Authors. 

The  following  author  car'ds  have  been 
received  since  the  last  issue  of  News 
Notes  of  California  Liiraries  : 

Bush,  Mrs  Grace  Elizabeth  (Pickell) 
(Mrs  Guy  Frederick  Bush) 
*Crocker,  Templeton 
Siple,    Mrs    Jessie    Beatrice     (Allen) 

(Mrs  George  H.  Siple) 
Wheat,   Carl  Irving 

California  Artists. 

The  following  artist  cards  have  been 
received  since  the  last  issue  of  Netcs 
Notes  of  California  Liiraries  : 

Otis,  George  Demont 

Rea,  Louis  Edward 

Wood,   Stanlej^  Huber 

California   Musicians. 

The  following  musician  cards  have 
been  received  since  the  last  issue  of 
Neics  Notes  of  California  Libraries: 

Bush,  Mrs  Grace  Elizabeth   (Pickell) 

(Mrs    Guy    Frederick    Bush) 
*Schardin,    Roy   Kennard 

Newspaper    Index. 

The  index  co\'ers  the  period  from 
August  1.1,  I84G,  to  date. 

Catalog. 

43.")  cards  have  been  added  to  tlie  Cali- 
fornia catalog  during  the  last  quarter. 

Exhibit. 
A  very  interesting  exhibit  of  early  Cali- 
fornia   material    in    the    rotunda    of    the 
Capitol  continues   to  attract  much  atten- 
tion. 

♦Native  Californians. 


BOOKS   FOR  THE   BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 

Mabel  R.  Gillis,  in  charge. 

Embossed  books  in  the  various  types 
are  sent  to  any  blind  resident  in  Cali- 
fornia upon  application.  Circular'  and 
finding  list,  with  Call  slip  postal,  will  be 
sent  on  request.  Writing  appliances  and 
games  for  the  blind  are  loaned  as  samples 
to  those  wishing  to  buy  such  articles,  so 
that  the  different  kinds  can  be  tried  be- 
fore they  are  ordered.  Addresses  of  firms 
supplying  all  articles  loaned  will  be  fur- 
nished on  request. 

Books  sent  to  individuals  from  an  in- 
stitution distributing  embossed  literature 
are  carried  free  through  the  mails. 

Embossed  catalogs  of  the  earlier  mate- 
rial in  American  Braille.  Moon,  and  New 
York  point  are  available.  'They  will  be 
loaned  to  borrowers  wishing  them  for  use 
in  book  selection. 

The  State  Library  will  be  glad  to  have 
borrowers  who  care  to  do  so  write  any 
letters  or  requests  for  books  to  the  Li- 
brary in  Braille  or  New  Yoi'k  point. 

The  first  book  was  loaned  June  13, 
1!}05.  There  are  now  2376  blind  borr'ow- 
ers,  56  borrowers  having  been  added  dur- 
ing .January,  February  and  March.  Total 
accessions  are  18,561  as  follows :  New 
York  point  books  2599 ;  New  York  point 
music  1S7  ;  American  Braille  books  3029 ; 
xVmerican  Braille  music  1283  ;  European 
Braille  books  3033 ;  European  Braille 
music  213 ;  Esperanto  Braille  books  3 ; 
Moon  books  4321 ;  Moon  music  5 ;  Re- 
vised Braille  books  2936  ;  Revised  Braille 
music  128;  Standard  dot  books  14;  Line 
books  193 ;  Line  music  21 ;  Ink  print 
books  430 ;  '"Appliances  84  ;  *Games  49 ; 
Maps  33. 

During  January,  February  and  March 
ST21  books,  etc.,  were  loaned  as  follows : 
New   York   point   559 ;   American   Br'aille 
277;  European  Braille  1162;  Moon  3435; 
Revised     Braille     Grade     1*     3276;     Ink 
print  1 ;   Appliances  9 ;   Games  2 ;   Maps 
0.      The   loans   were   divided   by   class   as 
follows :     Philosophy    and    rel'gion    577 
sociology   57 ;    language   79 ;   primers   89 
science  135  ;  useful  arts  28 ;   fine  arts  4 
amusements    2 ;    'music    101 ;     literature 
2US  ;  fiction  ,5565  ;  travel  and  history  484  ; 
biography   223 ;   periodicals  1169. 

( "opies  of  magazines  have  been  donated 
during  the  last  three  months  by  Mrs 
F.  A.  Bacher,  F.  B.  Beans,  Mrs  A.  H. 
Cllse,  Susie  J.  Davis,  Franklin  Dean  Jr, 


*Appliances    and    games    are   loaned 
samples  to  anyone  wishing  to  try  them. 


i 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE    LIBRARY. 


181 


II.  .1.  Donnelly,  Kate  M.  Foley,  Mabel 
(jribsou,  W.  A.  Gose,  William  Harper, 
J.  W.  Hoggard,  Ruby  Holtz,  Miss  Rosa 
Laxsou,  Bessie  Long,  Mrs  Rose  JNIcComb, 
W.  A.  Miller.  Hattie  B.  Newman,  Mrs 
M.  E.  Phillips,  Mrs  L.  Sargent,  George 
W.  Shoemaker.  Mrs  R.  M.  Smith,  Wil- 
liam Thomas,  American  Braille  Press 
for  War  and  Civilian  B'lind,  Inc.  (for- 
merly The  Permanent  Blind  Relief  War 
Fund,  Inc.),  Canadian  National  Institute 
for  the  Blind,  Christian  Record  Publish- 
ing Company,  Free  Gospel  Library  for 
the  Blind,  Gospel  Trumpet  Company, 
National  Institute  for'  tlie  Blind,  New 
York  Association  for  the  Blind,  Society 
for  Aid  to  the  Sightless.  Western  Penn- 
sylvania Institute  for  the  Blind,  Xavier 
Braille  Publishing  Company,  Ziegier 
Publishing  Company. 

Other  gifts  are  indicated  in  the  list  of 
books,  etc..  which  have  been  added  to  tue 
library  during  the  last  three  months. 
.S'ee  p.  214. 

Home  Teaching. 

Kate  M.  Foley,  home  teacher  of  the 
blind,  is  at  the  Argyle  Apartments,  146 
McAllister  street,  San  Francisco,  every 
Thursday  from  9  a.m.  to  5  p.m.  Her 
telephone  number  is  Market  090.  She 
gives  lessons  regularly  in  the  bay  region 
and  the  Santa  Clara  Valley,  with  occa- 
sional trips  to  other  parts  of  the  state. 
Catharine  J.  Morrison,  home  teacher  of 
the  blind,  is  at  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Free  Library,  Broadway  Annex,  Hall  of 
Records,  every  Wednesday.  Her  home 
address  is  951  El  Moliuo,  Los  Angeles. 
Her  telephone  number  is  Drexel  5339. 
She  gives  lessons  regularly  in  Los  Angeles 
and  vicinity  and  makes  occasional  trips  to 
San  Diego. 

From  January  1  to  March  31,  the 
home  teachers  gave  627  lessons  in  the 
homes  of  the  blind  and  58  lessons  at  libr'a- 
ries.  They  made  80  visits  and  calls  in 
connection  with  the  work  for  purposes 
other  than  giving  lessons,  and  have 
received  28  visits  in  connection  with  the 
work. 

During  the  quarter  Miss  Foley  and 
Miss  ^Morrison  spent  225  hours  on  corre- 
spondence and  preparing  lessons.  They 
wrote  354  letters  and  198  postals  and 
received  267  letters  and  43  postals.  They 
also    answered    and    made    522    telephone 


calls.  They  made  3  addresses.  JNIiss 
Foley  teaches  regularly  in  Oakland,  in 
Alameda  and  in  San  Francisco  classes  of 
seeing  people  to  write  Braille.  She  spent 
lOS  hours  in  proofreading  hand-copied 
books.  The  various  other  activities  in 
connection  with  the  work  of  the  home 
tear'liers  can  not  be  easily  tabulated. 

SUTRO   BRANCH. 

The  Sutro  Branch  occupies  space  in  the 
Public  Library,  Civic  Center,  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  is  open  every  day,  except  Sun- 
day, from  9  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

CALIFORNIA     STATE     LIBRARY 
SCHOOL   GRADUATES. 

Esther  M.  Bomgardner,  '15 

Asst.  Public  School  L,.,  Los  Angeles 
Thelma  Brackett,  '20 

Ln.  Newark  Museum.  Newark,  N.  J. 
Helen  V.   Briggs,  '14 

46  Fairview  ave.,  Los  Gatos 
Agnes  E.  Brown.  '15 

Asst.    San    Diego    High    School    L.,    San 

Diego 
Helen  M.  Bruner,   '14 

Asst.  in  charge,  Sutro  Branch,   State  L., 

San  Francisco 
Mrs    Lucile    Huff    Buchan    (Mrs    Dean   W. 
Buchan),  '20 

1631   Cowper  St.,  Palo  Alto 
Mrs    Virginia    Clowe    Bullis     (Mrs    James 

1314   Alameda  Padre   Serra,    Santa  Bar- 
S.  Bullis),  '17 

Ruth  E.  Bullock,  '15 

Ln.    Belvedere    Junior    High    School    L., 

Los  Angeles 
Elta  L.  Camper,  '17 

Asst.  Univ.  of  Cal.  L.,  Berkeley 
Blanche  Chalfant,  '14 

Ln.  Butte  Co.  F.  L.,  Oroville 
Marguerite  Chatfleld,  '20 

Asst.  Ventura  P.  L.,  Ventura 
Nellie   E.   Christensen,  '19 

Ln.  Selma  High  School  L.,  Selnia 
Mabel  Coulter,  '14 

Asst.  Contra  Costa  Co.  F.  L.,  Martinez. 

(On  leave  of  absence.)      Temporarily  in 

Lange  Library  of  Education,  Berkeley 
Helen  Esther  Crawford,  '20 

Ln.    "Watsonville    High    School   L.,    Wat- 

sonville. 
Dorotha  Davis,  '17 

Ln.   Fresno  High   School  L.,  Fresno 
Tillie  de  Bernard!,  '18 

Smith   College,   Northampton,   Mass. 
Estella  De  Ford,   '15 

Ln.  Napa  Co.  F.  L.,  Napa 
Margaret  Dennison,  '17 

Asst.  Sutro  Branch,  State  L.,  San  Fran- 

Abtaie  Doughty,  '20 

Ln.  Garfield  High  School  L.,  Los  Angeles 
Mrs  Vivian  Gregory  Douglas    (Mrs  James 
R.  Douglas),  '14 

Barbara  Hotel.  Los  Angeles 
Ellen  B.  Frink,  '19 

Ln.  Siskiyou  Co.  F.  L.,  Treka 
Flo  A.  Gantz,  '20 

Ln.    San    Luis    Obispo    Co.    F.    L.,    San 

Luis  Obispo 
Beatrice  Y.  Gawne.  '17 

1224   Hyde   St.,   San   Francisco 


1^2 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Hazel  G.  Gibson,  '19 

A.sst.  Sacramento  Co.  F.  L.,  Sacramento 
Margaret  V.   Girdner,  '17 

Asst.  Pasadena  Jr.  College  L.,  Pasadena 
Marv  E.  Glock,  '15 

Died,  March   6,   1922 
Bernice  L.  Goff,  '14 

Asst.  P.  L.,  New  York  City 
Mrs    Jennie    Rumsey    Gould     (Mrs    J.    A. 
Gould),    '14 
746  Elm  St.,  ^Voodland 
Mrs  Mildred  Kellogg  Hargis  (Mrs  'William 
H.  Hargis),  'IS 
725  Coe  ave.,  San  Jose 
Mrs   Louise    Jamme    Harriss    (Mrs    Frank 
U.    Harriss),    '15 
2  9   S.  State  St.,  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah 
Margaret  Hatch,  '15 

Ln.   Standard  Oil  Co.  L.,  San  Francisco 
Mrs   Hazel   Meddaugh   Heffner    (Mrs   Roy 
J.   Heffner).    'IS 
1528  Channing  way,  Berkeley 
Cecilia  Henderson,  '14 

Santa   Paula 
Edna  S.  Holroyd,  '15 

Ln.  San  ilateo  Co.  F.  L.,  Redwood  City 
Mrs    Helen    Hopwood    Judd    (Mrs    Wilber 
Judd).   '20 
Out   of  library  work 
Mrs    Winona    ^McConnell     Kennedy     (Mrs 
John  Elmer  Kennedv),  '15 
1320   39th  St.,   Sacramento 
Mrs    Marguerite    Ryan    Kirschman     (Mrs 
Orton  A.  Kirschman ) .   '19 
2839  Forest  ave.,  Berkeley 
;Mrs   Algeline    Marlow    Lawson    (Mrs    Iver 
N.    Lawson,   Jr.),   '18 
Asst.    P.    L.,    San    Diego     (On    leave    of 
absence)      3231  Front  St.,  San  Diego 
Marjorie  C.  Learned,  '2  0 

Asst.  P.  L.,  New  York  City 
Mrs  M.  Ruth  McLaughlin  Lockwood   (Mrs 
Ralph    L.    Lockwood).   '17 
93  8  Geary  st..  San  Francisco 
Amy  G.  Luke,  '15 

Beaumont 
Mrs    Bessie    Heath    McCrea     (IMrs    Robert 
W.   McCrea),   '19 
Asst.    State   L..    Sacramento 
N.  Ruth  McCullough,  '17 

24   N.    Sheridan   Road,    Lake   Forest,    111. 
Mrs  Ruth  Beard  McDowell    (Mrs  Roy  F. 
McDowell).   '14 
Asst.   McHenry  P.   L..   Modesto    (tempo- 
rary ) 
Mrc    Everett    McCullough    McMillin     (Mrs 
James  M.   McMillin),   '19 
Potomac    Park    Apts.,     21st    &    C    sts., 
T^^ashington,  D.   C. 
Anne  Margrave,  '14 

Ln.  Inyo  Co.  F.  L.,  Independence 
Lenala  Martin,  '14 

Ln.  Lassen  Co.  P.  L.,  Susanville 
Mrs    Georgia   Pearl    Seeker    Meyers    (Mrs 
Robert  K.  Meyers).  '19 
Ln.  Tulare  Joint  Union  High  School  L., 
Tulare 
Vera  V.  Mitchell,  '19 

Ln.  Biggs  High  School  L.,  Biggs 
Marion  Morse,  '17 

Ln.  Maui  Co.  F.  L.,  Wailuku,  T.  H. 
Mrs    Alice    Moore   Patton    (Mrs   James    L. 
Patton),  'IS 
Out  of  library  work 
Mrs    Helen     Katherine     Kellogg    Peabodv 
(Mrs  Rpger  Peabody),  '19 
48  W'inthrop  st..  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Mrs    Marion    Schumacher    Pereival     (Mrs 
H.  Frederic  Pereival),  '15 
1633   3Sth  St..   Sacramento 
Mrs  Miriam  Colcord  Post,  '14 

157  East  Seventh  st.,   Claremont 
Margaret  L.  Potter,  '16 

Asst.  Lane  Medical  L.,   San  F'rancisco 


Mrs    Eunice    Steele    Price     (Mrs    Jav    H. 
Price).  '16 

1054  Cragmont  ave.,  Berkeley 
Mrs   Beatrice   Brasefield   Rakestraw    (Mrs 
Norris  W.  Rakestraw),  'IS 

Asst.  Oberlin  College  L.,  Oberlin,  Ohio 
Esther  L.  Ramont,  '20 

Ln.  Modesto  High  School  L.,   Modesto 
Mrs  Frances  Haub  Ravmond   (Mrs  George 
J.   Raymond).    '20 

2005   22d  St.,   Sacramento 
Anna  Belle  Robinson,  '18 

Died,  June   22.1920 
Myrtle  Ruhl,  '14 

Head   of   Order  Dept.,    State   L.,    Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth  Seymour,  'IS 

Ln.    Tamalpais    Union    High    School    L., 

Mill  Vallev 
Blanche  L.   Shadle,   '17 

Asst.   State  L.,  Sacramento 
Mrs    Edith    Edenborg    Smallev    (Mrs    Carl 
J.  Smalley),  'IS 

Ln.  Art  Institute  L.,  Kansas  Citv.  Mo. 
Mrs    Edna    Bell    Smith    (Mrs    William   A. 
Smith).  '17 

1225   42d  St.,   Sacramento 
Mrs  Elizabeth  Snvder  Smith    (Mrs  Joseph 
K.   Smith).  '20 

3100  19th  St.,  Bakersfleld 
Mrs  Rosamond  Bradbury  Waithman   (IMrs 
Joseph  de  L.  Waithman),  'IS 

Out  of  library  work 
Caroline  Wenzel,  '14 

-Asst.  State  L..  Sacramento 
Josephine  L.   WTiitbeck,    '16 

Asst.  P.  L..  Richmond 
Essie  T.  White.  '19 

Asst.  Sacramento  High  School  and  Jun- 
ior College  L..   Sacramento 
Mrs  Katharine  Cahoon  Wilson  CMrs  Lloyd 
R.  Wilson),  '17 

112  5   Grand  ave.,   Seattle.  Wash. 
Aldine  Winham,  '20 

Ln.    State    Teachers    College    L.,    Santa 

Barbara 
Mrs  Dorothy  Clarke  Worden,  '15 

Asst.  Solano  Co.  F.  L..  Fairfield 
Mrs  Bess  Ranton  Yates  (Mrs  John  DeWitt 
Yates),  "18 

Asst.  P.  L.  Long  Beach 

News   Items. 

Miss  Beatrice  Gawue,  '17,  cataloger'  in 
^lonterey  County  Free  Library,  resigned 
.Tan.  in.  She  plans  to  take  a  real  vaca- 
tion. 

Mrs  Paith  Beard  :»IcDowell,  "14,  has 
taken  a  three  mouths'  position  as  cata- 
loger at  INIcHeury  Public  Library, 
Modesto. 

Mrs  Miriam  Colcord  Post.  '14.  writes 
from  Claremont :  "Although  I  am  still 
out  of  library  work,  I  am  always  inter- 
ested in  the  California  libraries.  I  am 
homekeeper  for  my  mother  and  son 
Richard,  wlio  is  now  over  seven  years 
old  and  half  way  through  the  second 
grade." 

And  Mrs  Katharine  Cahoon  WilsoH, 
"17,  sends  word  from  Seattle  that  she  has 
been  there  for  almost  two  years,  and 
speaks  of  a  baby  daughter  who  keeps 
her  very  busy. 


vol.  21,110.2; 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


188 


Evpi-ett  McCullousli  IMcMillin,  '19, 
whom  we  last  heard  of  at  El  Paso,  Texas, 
lives  now  in  Washington,  D.  C. 

RECENT    ACCESSIONS. 

Additions  to  the  Library  During  Janu- 
ary, February  and  March,  1926. 

The  last  number  of  the  Quarterly 
Bulletin  of  the  California  State  Library 
which  was  issued  was  no.  4  of  vol.  4, 
covering  the  accessions  for  September- 
December,  1905.  The  Bulletin  has  been 
discontinued  and  the  matter  contained  in 
it  is  now  appearing  in  News  Notes  of 
California  Libraries. 

The  last  list  of  recent  accessions 
appeared  in  the  January,  192G,  issue  of 
this  publication. 

GENERAL    WORKS. 

American   library   association. 

Popular    books    in    science :    a    reading 
list.     Rev.  ed.     1925.        016.5  W31a 

The  Ameeican  mercury,     v.  1-4,  Janu- 
ary, 1924-April,  1925.  051   A51me 

Abnett,  L.  D. 

Elements  of  library  methods.     1925. 

x021  A74 
Bennett,  Jesse  Lee. 

Frontiers  of  knowledge.    1925.     (Read- 
ing with  a  purpose)  028  B47f 

Bonner,  Mary  Graham. 

A  parent's  guide  to  children's  reading. 
1926.  028  B71 

Indianapolis  public  library  staff.     /Spe- 
cial committee. 
Books  for  the  modern  home.     1925. 

028   139 
Kleiser,    Grenville. 

Training  for  authorship.     1925. 

029   K64 

The  LiiiR^VBiANs'  guide,  1925-26. 

x027  L63 
Long,  Harriet  Catherine. 

Why  Not?     1926.  qx021    LS 

Mason,   Daniel   Gregory. 

Ears  to  hear,  a  guide  to  music  lovers. 
1925.       (Reading    with    a    purpose) 
028  M39 
Moore,  Annie  Carroll. 

The  three  owls.     1925.  028  IVl821t 


MuBPHY,  Gwendolen. 

A  bibliography  of  English  character- 
books  1608-1700.  1925.  (Supple- 
ment to  the  Bibliographical  society's 
transactions)  016.09   B582 

Pope,  Mildred  H..  conip. 

Buying  list  of  books  for  small  libraries. 
1925.  x028  P82 

Special  libraries  association  of  southern  . 
California. 
Union  list  of  periodicals  in  libraries  of 
southern  California.     1925. 

r016.05  S74 

Stonehill,  C.  a.,  c€  Stonehill,  H.  W. 
Bibliographies      of      modern      authors. 
(Second   series)    [1925]     016.82  S88 

Terman,  Lewis  Madison,  c£  Lima,  Mar- 
garet. 
Children's  reading.     1926.  028  T31 

Waldman,  Milton. 

Americana ;  the  literature  of  American 
history.     1925.  016.73  WIS 

Washbuene,   Carleton  Wolsey,  d  Vogel, 
Mabel. 
Winnetka  graded  book  list.     1926. 

028  W31 

PHILOSOPHY  AND    ETHICS. 

Beecher,   Henry   Ward. 

Twelve  lectures  to  young  men.     [1925] 

174  B41 
BuETT,  Edwin  Arthur. 

The  metaphysical  foundations  of  mod- 
ern physical  science.  1925.  (Inter- 
national library  of  psychology,  phi- 
losophy   and    scientific    method) 

110  B97 

CosGEAVE,  Mrs  Jessica    (Garretson). 
Mothers  and  daughters.    cl925. 

173  C83 
Dark,   Sidney. 

How  to  enjoy  life.  [1925]  (Hodder 
and  Stoughton's  people's  library) 

170   D21 
Eaton,    Ralph   Monroe. 

Symbolism  and  truth.     1925.     121    El 4 

B^iTE,  Warner. 

Moral  philosophy.     cl925.         170  F546 

Hamilton,  Arthur  Edward. 

The  real  boy  and  the  new  school.   1925. 

173   H21 


184 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


James,   William. 

The  philosophy  of  William  James. 
cl925.  (The  modern  library  of  the 
world's    best    books)  191   J29p 

JoAi),   Cyril   Edwin   Mitchinson. 

Mind  and  matter.     [1925]       104  J62m 

Mason,  Joseph  Warren  Teets. 

Creative  freedom.     1926.  191   M39 

'Maxwell,   William   Babington. 
Life;   a  study  of  self.     1925. 

170  M46 

Montague,  William  Pepperrell. 

The  Avays  of  knowing ;  or.  The  methods 
of  philosophy.  [1925]  (Library  of 
philosophy)  121   M75 

Pythagoras,  Greek  philosopher,  initiate 
teacher,  founder  of  a  brotherhood  at 
Crotona,  by  a  group  of  students.  2d 
ed.,   1925.  182  P99 

Rashdall,   Hastings. 

The  theory  of  good  and  evil ;  a  treatise 
on  moral  philosophy.  2d  ed.  1924. 
2  V.  171    R22t 

WiLLOUGHBY,  Westel  Woodbury. 

Opium  as  an  international  problem. 
1925.  178  8  W73 

INTERNATIONAL  ETHICS. 

(From  the  library  of  Dr  E.  B.  Krehbiel) 

AiNSLiE,  Peter. 

Christ  or   Napoleon — which?     cl915. 

172.4  A29 
Atkins,   Gains  Glenn. 

The  maze  of  the  nations  and  the  way 
out.     cl915.  172.4  A87 

BOTJBNE,  Randolph  Silliman,   comp. 
Towards  an  enduring  peace.     [1916] 

172.4  B77 
CRAJfE,  Frank. 

War  and  world  government.     1915. 

172.4  C89 
Dodge,  David  Low. 

War  inconsistent  with  the  religion  of 
Jesus   Christ.     1905.  172.4  D64 

Essen,  Leon  van  der. 

The  invasion  &  the  war  in  Belgium. 
[1917]  940.932  E78 

Fayle,   Charles   Ernest. 

The  great  settlement.     1915. 

940.91    F28 


Fried,  Alfred  Hermann. 

The  restoration  of  Europe,  tr.  from  the 
German  by  I^ewis  Stiles  Gannett. 
1916.  172.4  F89 

Gladden,   Washington. 

The  forks  of  the  road.     1916. 

172.4  G54 

GoocH,    George   Peabody,   cG    Masterman, 
John   Howard  Bertram. 
A    century    of    British    foreign    policy. 
[1917]  327.42  G64 

Graham,  John  William. 

Evolution  and  empire.      [1912] 

172.4  G73 
Gulliver,  Lucile. 

The  friendship   of  nations.     cl912. 

172.4  G973 
Headley,  Elroy. 

Patriotic  essays.     1916.  172  H43 

Hemmenway,  John. 

The  daily  remembrancer  on  peace  and 
war.     1875.  172.4  H48 


Holmes,  .John  Haynes. 
New  wars  for  old.     1916. 


172.4  H75 


Jefferson,  Charles  Edward. 
The  cause  of  the  war.     [1914] 

940.912  J  45 


What  the  Avar  is  teaching.    cl916. 

(Merrick  lectures)  172.4  J45w 

Lynch,  Frederick  Henry. 

The  last  war.     cl915.       172.4  L98I 

Ly'ON,  David  Willard. 

The  Christian  equivalent  of  Avar.    1915. 

172.4  L99 

Masaoka,  Naoichi,  comp. 

.Japan's  message  to  America.     1914. 

915.2  M394J 

N  AS  myth,  George  William. 

Social     progress     and     the    DarAvinian 
theory.     1916.  301    N25 

QuiN,  Malcolm. 

The  problem  of  human  peace.     [1916?] 

172.4  Q7 

Keilly,  Henry  Joseph. 

Why   preparedness.      1916.    940.91    R36 


Richard,  Ernst. 

God's  paths  to  peace.     cl914. 


172.4   R51 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIPORNLV    STATE    LIBRARY. 


185 


Shujx.vker,  Bliner  Ellswoi-tli. 

The  world  crisis  and  the  way  to  peace. 
1915.  172.4  S56 


Taylor,   Charles  Fremont. 
A  conclusive  peace.     1916. 


172.4  T23 


Weston,   Stephen  Francis,   ed. 

Prize  orations  of  the  Intercollegiate 
peace  association.     1914.  172.4  W53 

Wise,    Jennings    Cropper. 

Empire  and  armament.     1915. 

327.73  W81 

MIND  AND  BODY. 
Barrett,   Edward  John   Boyd. 

Man  :  his  making  and  unmaking.  1925. 

131   B27 

Burnett,  Charles  Theodore. 

Splitting  the  mind.  [1925]  (Psychol- 
ogical review  publications.  Psychol- 
ogical monographs)  q130  89 

Cutten,  George  Barton. 

Mind,  its   origin   and  goal.     1925. 

150  C991 
Lee,   Gerald   Stanley. 

Rest  working ;  a  study  in  relaxed  con- 
centration.    cl925.  131   L47 

Martin,  Herbert. 

Formative  factors  in  character.     1925. 
136.7  M381 

Van  Teslaak,  .James  Samuel. 
An  outline  of  psychoanalysis.      [1924] 
(The  modern  library   of  the  world's 
best  books)  130  V28 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

JM^VKKS,  Jeanette  Augustus. 

Genius  and  disaster.     1925.      151    IV134 

0\erstreet,   Harry  Allen. 

Influencing  human  behavior.     cl925. 

150  096 
Watson,   John   Broadus. 

Behaviorism.     cl925.  150  W33b 


WiLM,   Emil  Carl. 

The  theories  of  instinct. 


1925. 


158  W74 


RELIGION. 

Angus,  Samuel. 

The  mystery-religions  and  Christianity. 
1925.  270  A59 


Atkins,   Gains   Glenn. 

Modern  religious  cults  and  movements. 
cl923.  280  A87 


Best,  Mary  Agnes. 
Rebel  saints.     cl925. 


289.6  856 


Bible.     0.  T.  Genesis  I-XI.     English. 
The  beginnings  of  history  according  to 
the  Jews.     Tr.  by  Charles  Prospero 
Fagnani.     1925.  222  858 

Bible.     0.  T.  Apocrypha.     English. 
The  Apocrypha  reprinted  according  to 
the  authorized  version,  1611.     1924. 
qv229   85 
Bible.     iV.  T.  Selections. 

The  sermon  on  the  mount.     [1921] 

c225  858s 

Brunnee,  Edmund  de  Schweinitz. 

Surveying     your     community.       cl925. 
(Institute  of  social  and  religious  re- 
search.    Town  and  country  studies) 

261   889 

Charnwood,   Godfrey   Rathbone   Benson, 
1st  iaron. 
According  to  Saint  John.     1925. 

226.5  C48 
Chestekton,  Gilbert  Keith. 

The  everlasting  man.     1925.     270  C52  ' 

Cohen,  Israel. 

The  journal  of  a  Jewish  traveler. 
[1925]  296  C67j 

Deane,  Anthony  Charles. 

How  to  enjoy  the  Bible.  cl925. 
(Hodder  and  Stoughton's  people's 
library)  220.6  D28 

Fowler,  William  AVarde. 

The  religious  experience  of  the  Roman 
people.  1922.  (GifEord  lectures,  for 
1909-10)  292  F78 

H.u.DEiiAN,  Isaac  Massey. 

Dr.  Harry  Emerson  Fosdick's  book : 
"The  modern  use  of  the  Bible."  a 
review.     cl925.  220  H15 

Hallock,  Gerard  Benjamin  Fleet,  ed. 
Cyclopedia     of     sermon     outlines     for 
special   days   and   occasions.      cl925. 
251    HI  9c 

Harris,  Franklin  Stewart,  cG  Butt,  New- 
bern  Isaac. 
The  fruits  of  Mormonism.     1925. 

298   H31 


186 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


HiBSCH,   Emil  Gustav. 
My  religion.     1925. 


296  H66 


Hope,  Sir  William  Henry  St.  John. 
The    history    of    the    London    Charter- 
house from  its  foundation  until  the 
suppression  of  the  monastery.     1925. 
q271    H7 
Joseph,   Oscar  L. 

The  historical  development  of  Chris- 
tianity. 1925.  (The  life  and  reli- 
gion series)  270  J 83 

Kennedy,  Melville  T. 

The  Chaitanya  movement ;  a  study  of 
the  Vaishnavism  of  Bengal.  1925. 
(The  religious  life  of  India) 

294  K35 
Klausner,  Joseph. 

Jesus  of  Nazareth.     1925.  232  K63 


Klyce,  Scudder. 

Sins  of  science.     cl92o. 


215  K66 


Levingee,  Lee  Joseph. 

Anti-Semitism  in  the  United  States. 
1925.  296  L66 

Lewisohn,  Ludwig. 

Israel.     1925.  296  L67 

Ltjnn,  Arnold  Henry  Moore. 

Roman  converts.     1924.  282  L96 

Macintosh,  Douglas  Clyde. 

The  reasonableness  of  Christianity. 
192G.      (The  Bross  library) 

239  IVI15 
Martin,  Kenneth  Lewis  Price. 

Missionaries  and  annexation  in  the 
Pacific.     1924.  266  M38 

Moss,  Rosalind  Louisa  Beaufort. 

The  life  after  death  in  Oceania.     1925. 

237  M91 
RoHDE,  Erwin. 

Psyche,  [tr.  by  W.  B.  Ilillis]  1925. 
(International  library  of  psychology, 
philosophy  and  scientific  method) 

292  R73 
Shaughnessy,  Gerald. 

Has  the  immigrant  kept  the  faith? 
1925.  282  S53 

Stbaton,   John  Roach. 

The  famous  New  York  fundamentalist- 
modernist  debates,  the  orthodox  side. 
cl925.  230  S89f 


Van  Loon,  Ilendrik  Willem. 
Tolerance.      1925. 


272  V26 


Watson,  John  M. 
Science  as  revelation. 


1925.    215  W33 


Whiting,  Jfrs  Isabel  Kimball. 

Dramatic  services  of  worship.     19*25. 

264  W59 

SOCIOLOGY:     GENERAL. 

Carr-Saunders,  Alexander  Morris. 

Population.     1925.     (The  world's  man- 
uals) 312  C31 

Chaddock,  Robert  Emmet. 

Principles    and    methods    of    statistics. 
cl925.  310  C43 

Crum,  William  Leonard,  cG  Patton,  Alsou 
Currie. 
An    introduction     to    the    methods    of 
economic  statistics.     1925.      311   C95 


Day,  Edmund  Ezra. 

Statistical   analysis.     1925. 


310  D27 


DuNLAP,  Knight. 

Social  psychology.     1925.  301   D92 

Good,  Alvin. 

Sociology  and  education.     1926. 

301  G64 
Groves,  Ernest  Rutherford. 

.Social   problems   and   education.     1925. 

301   G88s 
JoHNSEN,  Julia  E.,  comp. 

Selected  articles  on  birth  control.  1925. 
(The  handbook  series)  312  J65 

LiPSKY,  Abram. 

Man  the  puppet.     1925. 


301   L767 


Pearl,   Raymond. 

The     biology     of     population     growth. 
1925.  312  P35b 

Speer,  Robert  Elliott. 

Race  and  race  problems.     cl924. 

304  S74 
Sutcliffe,   William   George. 

Elementary  statistical  methods.     1925. 

310  S95 
Znaniecki,   Florian. 

The  laws  of  social  psychology.     [1925] 

301   Z82 

POLITICAL  SCIENCE. 

[Bronshtein,  Lev  Davidovich]. 

Whither    England,     by    Leon    Trotsky 
[pseud.].     1925.  329.9  B86 

Hughes,   Charles  Evans. 

The  pathAVay  of  peace.     1925. 

327.73  H89 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


181 


I 


Manning,  William  Ray.  ed. 

Diplomatic  correspondeiire  of  the 
United  States  coiicerinug  the  inde- 
pendence of  the  Latin-American 
nations.  3925.  v.  1.  (Publications 
of  the  Carnegie  endowment  for  in- 
ternational peace.  Division  of  inter- 
national laAv)  q327.73  M2 

Maxey,  Chester  Collins. 

The  problem  of  government.     1925. 

320.73   M463 

Mereiam,   Charles  Edward. 

New  aspects  of  politics.     cl925. 

320  M56 
Mow  AT,  Robert  Balmain. 

The     diplomatic     relations     of     Great 

Britain  and  the  United  States.    1925. 

327  M93 

Pott,   William   Sumner  Appleton. 

Chinese  political  philosophy.  1925. 
(Political  science  classics)     320  P86 

Randolph,  Coleman. 

Constitutional  re-adjustment.     cl924. 
320.4  R19 
RocKOW,  Lewis. 

Contemporary  political  thought  in  Eng- 
land.    [1925]  320.9  R68 

ToYNBEE,  xirnold  Joseph. 

Survey  of  international  affairs,  1920- 
1923.     1925.  327  T75 

IMMIGRATION. 

Bercovici,  Konrad. 

On  new  shores.     cl925.  325  B48 

Fairchild,   Henry  Pratt. 

The  melting-pot  mistake.     1926. 

325.73  F16m 

MacLean,  Annie  Marion. 

Modern  immigration.  cl925.  (Lippin- 
cott  sociological  series)  325  M16 

Mariano,  John  Horace. 

The  Italian  immigrant  and  our  courts. 
cl925.  325.73  M33 

NoRLiE,  Olaf  Morgan. 

History  of  the  Norwegian  people  in 
America.     1925.  325.73  N84 

Safford,  Victor. 

Immigration  problems.     1925. 

325.73  S12 
Williamson,  James  A. 

Europe  overseas.  1925.  (The  world's 
manuals)  325.3  W731 


NEGROES. 
Locke,  Alain  Le  Roy.  ed. 
Tlie  new  negro.     1925. 


325.26   L81 


WooiJsoN,  Carter  Godwin. 

Free    negro    heads    of    families    in    the 
United  States  in  1880.     cl925. 

q325.26  W3 

Woodson,  Carter  Godwin,  ed. 

Free    negro    owners    of    slaves    in    the 
United  States  in  1830.     cl924. 

q  325.26  W8f 

LABOR. 

Baldwin,  Stanley. 

Peace  and  goodwill  in  industry.     1925. 

331.8  B18 

HoKROCKS,  John  Wesley. 

A  short  history  of  mercantilism.  [1925] 

331    H81 

National  industrial  conference  board. 
Wages,  hours  and  employment  of  rail- 
road workers.    cl924.     (Its  Research 
report)  331    N277 

Requa,   Mark  Lawrence. 

The  relation  of  government  to  industry. 
1925.  331.8  R42 

Williams,   Whiting. 

Mainsprings  of  men.     cl925. 

331.8  W72m 

FINANCE. 

American  bankers'  association. 
Journal,     v.  16.     1923-1924. 

q332.05  A5 

Bonneville,   Joseph   Howard. 

Elements    of    business    finance.     1925. 

336  B71 

Jamieson,    Gerald   William. 

Practical    banking.      1925.       (Commer- 
cial  education   series)  332.1  J32 

Miller,   Adolph   Caspar. 

Address.        [Aftei"-war      readjustment] 
[1918]  336.73  M64 

Gift. 

National    industrial    conference    board. 

Px'oposals    for    changes    in    the    federal 

revenue    act    of    1924.    cl925.      (Its 

Special  report)  331    N277s 

Reed,    Harold   Lyle. 

Principles      of      corporation      finance. 
cl925.  338.7  R32 


188 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


Sakolski.    Aaron    Morton. 

Prinoiplps    of    invostnipnl.       rl925. 

332.6  S15p 

Skligman,     Edwin    Robert    Anderson. 
Stiidies    in    public    finance.     1925. 

336.2  S46st 
Sisiox,  Leon  Gilbert. 

Inheritance  taxation.  192.5.  (Har- 
per's life  insurance  library) 

336.2  S59 
Skinnee,    Ernest   Brown. 

The  mathematical  theory  of  invest- 
ment.    cl924.  332.6  S62 

ECONOMICS. 
Adams.    Arthur    Barto. 

Economics    of    business    cycles.     1925. 

331  A211 
Begbie,   Harold. 

The    state    of    England.     1925. 

330.942  B41 
BoucKE,  Oswald  Fred. 

Principles    of    economics.     1925. 

330  B75p 
Boyle,   James  Ernest. 

^Marketing  of  agricultural  products. 
1925.  (McGraw-Hill  publications 
in  the  agricultural  and  botanical 
sciences)  338.1   B79 

Brooks,    Sidney. 

America  and  Germany,  1918—1925. 
1925.  330.943  887 

FiSHEB,  Mrs  Lettice   (Ilbert). 

Then   and   now.     1925.        330.942  F53 

Galpin,    "William    Freeman. 

The  grain  supply  of  England  during 
the  Napoleonic  period.  1925.  (Uni- 
versity of  Michigan  publications. 
History    and   political    science. 

338.1   G17 
GiiEER,   Guy. 

The  Ruhr-Lorraine  industrial  problem. 
1925.  (The  Institute  of  economics. 
Investigations  in  international  eco- 
nomic reconstruction)  330.94  G81 

HoKNER,   John   Truman. 

Agricultural  marketing.  1925.  (The 
Wiley  agricultural  series)    338.1    H81 

Katjtsky,  Karl. 

The  economic  doctrines  of  Karl  Marx. 
Trans,   by   H.   J.    Stenning.     1925. 
330  K21 


Kexnedy.  John   P. 

Tin-  h.isis  of  real  estalc  values.     cl925. 

333  K35 

Lloyd.   Edward  Mayow  Hastings. 

Experiments    in    state    control    at    the 
War  office  and  the  Ministry  of  food. 

1924.  (Carnegie  endowment  for 
international  peace.  Division  of 
of  economics  and  history.  Economic 
and  social  history  of  the  world  war. 
British  series)  q330.942  L7 

National   industrial    conference   board. 
The  cost  of  living  in  the  United  States. 

1925.  338  N2772 

PiLLAi,    Purushottama    Padmanabha. 
Economic    conditions    in    India.      1925. 
330.954  P64 

Scott,  William  Robert,  &  Gunnison, 
James. 
The  industries  of  the  Clyde  Valley 
during-  the  war.  1924.  (Carnegie 
endowment  for  international  peace. 
Division  of  economics  and  history. 
Economic  and  social  history  of  the 
world    war.      British   series) 

330.941   S43 

Seligman,    Edwin    Robert   Anderson. 
Essays   in    economics.      1925.     330  S46 

Slemp,   Campbell  Bascom. 

The   mind   of   the   president.     1926. 

308  C77s 

Stein EE,   Jesse  Frederick. 

Community  organization.     1925.      (The 
Social    workers'    library)      334.9  S82 

LAW  AND  ADMINISTRATION. 

Barton,    f^ir   Dunbar    Plunket,    hart.,    d 
others. 
The     story     of     our     Inns     of     court. 
[1924]  340.7  829 

BoLLES,    Albert    Sidney. 

Putnam's     hand.y     law     book     for     the 
layman.     cl921.  347  869 

Bustamante  y  Sirven,  Antonio  Sanchez 
de. 
The    World    court.     1925.      341.1    B982 

Bi'Ti.EE.  <S'ir  Geoffrey  Gilbert. 

A  handbook  to  tlie  League  of  nations. 
1925.  341.1   B98a 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


189 


Fachirt.    Alexander    Pandelli. 

The  perinaneut  conrf  of  interiiatioual 
justice.     1925.  341.1   F13 

Haeriivian,    Edward   Avory. 

The  Constitution  at  the  cross  roads. 
cl925.  341.1   H29 

Harris,  Henry  AVilson. 

AVliat  the  League  of  nations  is. 
[1925]  341.1   H31w 

Medley,   Dudley   Julius. 

A    student's    manual    of    English    con- 
stitutional   history.      6th    ed.      1925. 
342.42   M49 

MOEEY,   William  Carey. 

Diplomatic    episodes.     1926.      341    IVI84 

Rappard,    William    Emmanuel. 

International  relations  as  viewed  from 
Geneva.  1925.  (The  Institute  of 
politics  publications,  Williams  col- 
lege,   Williamstown,   Mass.) 

341.1    R22 

ScHMECKEBiEK,    Laurcuce    Frederick. 

The  Government  printing  office.    1925. 

(Institute    for   government    research. 

Service    monographs    of    the    United 

States   government)  353.8  S34g 

The      statistical      work      of      the 


national  government.  1925.  (The 
Institute  for  government  research. 
Studies   in    administration) 

353.8  S34s 
Smith,  Bruce. 

The  state  police,  organization  and 
administration.      1925.  352.2  S64 

Troup,    Sir    Charles    Edward. 

The  Home  office.  [1925]  (The 
Whitehall    series)  354..42  T86 

Warren,   Charles. 

Congress,  the  Constitution,  and  the 
Supreme  court.     1925.     342.73  W23 

Weber,   Gustavus  Adolphus. 

The  Bureau  of  standards.  1925. 
(Institute  of  government  research. 
Service  monographs  of  the  United 
States   government)         353.8  W37bu 

MILITARY   ART  AND   SCIENCE. 

Andrews,   Lincoln   Clarke. 

Military   manpower.     1921.    355  A56m 

Bywater,    Hector   Charles. 

The   great   Pacific    war.     1925. 

359  B998 


F]ly,   Frank  David. 

Why    dffend    the    nation  V     c1924. 

355   E52 
Lane,    Winthrop   David. 

Military    training    in    schools    and    col- 
leges of  the  United   States.      [1925] 
355  L26 
LiDDELL,    Hart    Basil    Henry. 

Paris ;   or.   The  future   of  war.     1925. 
(To-day   and  to-moi*row  series) 

355  L71 
List,  Major  Single,  pseud. 

The  battle  of  Booby's  Bluffs.     1922. 

355  L77 
Sargent,   Frederic  Homer. 

Hints     to     newly     appointed     officers. 
1920.  355  S24 

SwiNTON,   Ernest  Dunlop. 

The   defence   of   Duffer's   Drift.      1916. 

355  S979 

U.  S.  Army  service  schools.  Fort  Leaven- 
worth. 
Combat  orders.     1925.  355  U58c 


Conventional   signs.      1924. 

355  U58co 


Tactics  and  technique  of  cavalry. 

1925.  355  U58t 

Tactics    and    technique    of    the 


separate   branches.      1925. 

355   U58tT: 

United    States    infantry    association. 
Minor      tactics      from      the      Infantry 
journal.     1920.  q355  U58 


Reserve    officers    examiner.      Part 

A.     1925.  355  U58r 

Waldeon,    William   Henry. 

Terrain   exercises.     1923.       355  W16te 

CRIME  AND  CRIMINALS. 

Burt,  Cyril  Lodowic. 

The  young  delinquent.     1925. 

364.1    B97 
Child,   Richard  Washbui-n. 
Battling    the    criminal.      1925. 

364  C53 

The     child,     the     clinic     and     the     court. 
1925.  364.1   C53 


Goodwin,   John  Cuthbert. 
The  soul  of  a  criminal. 


[1924] 

364  G€5s 


]i)U 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


LlNDSEY,      Bciijiimiii      Bnn-,     <f      Evans, 
Waiiiwrigrlil. 
Tlio    n>\'i)1t    of   iiKxlcni    .TouMi.     1925. 

364.1    L75r 

VA^f  Waters,   Miriain. 

Youth    in    conflict.     1925.        364.1   V28 

WoRTHiNGTON,    George    E.,    cG    Topping, 
Ruth. 
Specialized     courts     dealing     with     sex 
delinquency.       1925.        (Publications 
of  the  Bureau  of  social  hygiene) 

364  W93 

INSURANCE. 

DowLiNG,    Linnaeus   Wayland. 

Mathematics  of  life  insurance.  1925. 
(Modern    mathematical    texts) 

368.3  D74 

ilETROPOLiTAN    life    insurance    company, 
New   York. 
An  epoch   in  life   insurance.     1924. 

368.3   M59a 
Gift. 

National       life       insurance       company, 
MontpeJier,    Tt. 
National    life    insurance    company ;     a 
history    of    its    foundation    and    de- 
velopment.   1S50-1925.      1925. 

q368.3   N2 

EDUCATION. 

African     education     commission,     1923- 
1924. 
Education   in    East   Africa.     1925. 

q370.96  A2e 

Briggs,   Le  Baron  Russell. 

Men,    women,    and    colleges.     1925. 

370.4  B854m 

CuBBERLEY,    Elhvood   Patterson. 

An  introduction  to  the  study  of  educa- 
tion. cl925.  (Riverside  textbooks 
in    education)  370.1   C96 

IIai,lock,   Grace  T. 

Dramatizing  child  health  ;  a  new  book 
of  health  plays.     1925.        371.7  H19 

Hanscom,  Elizabeth  Deering,  tf  Greene, 
Helen  French. 
Sophia  Smith  and  the  beginnings  of 
Smith  college.  1925.  (Smith  col- 
lege fiftietli  anniversary  publica- 
tions) 378.744  SmEh 


Hartzler,   John  Ellswortli, 

Education  among  tlio  ]\ieiinonites  of 
America.     1925.  371.9   H33 

Meek,   Lois   Ilayden. 

A  study  of  learning  and  retention  in 
young  children.  1925.  (Teachers 
college,  Columbia  university.  Con- 
tributions to  education)      372.4  M49 

Metcalf,  Margaret  F. 

^Motivated  primary  activities  for  rural 
teachers.     cl925.  371.3  M58 

Miller,     Harry    Lloyd,     &    Hargreaves, 
Richard  Theodore. 
The    self-directed    school.     cl925. 

370.1   M648 

Newman,   Louis  Israel. 

The  sectarian  invasion  of  our  public 
schools.     1925,  c379.1    N55 

Parker,     Samuel     Chester,     cG     Temple, 
Alice. 
Unified     kindergarten     and     first-grade 
teaching.     cl925.  372.2  P23 

Rice,  Richard,  ed. 

College   and  the  future.      cl915. 

378  R49 

Stearns,   Alfred   Ernest,   cG   others. 

The  education  of  the  modern  boy. 
cl925.  370.1   S799 

Wodehouse,  Helen. 

A   survey   of   the   history   of  education, 

1924.  (The      modern      educator's 
library)  370.9  W83 

COMMERCE.      COMMUNICATION. 

Greenbie,     Sydney,     tG     Greenbie,     Mm 
Marjorie    Latta    (Barstow). 
Gold  of   Ophir.     1925.  380  G79 

Nash,    Luther   Roberts. 

The      economics      of     public      utilities. 

1925.  380     N25 

Woodrtff,   Robert   E. 

The  making  of  a  railroad  officer, 
cl925.  385  W89 

FOLKLORE. 

Beckwith,    Martha    Warren, 

The  Hussay  festival  in  .Jamaica. 
1924.  (Publications  of  the  Folk- 
lore   foundations)  398  B39 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


191 


CoLXJM,  Padraic. 

The  bright  islands.  1925.  (Tales  and 
legends  of  Hawaii)  398   P72b 

Emerson,   Joseph   S. 

Hawaiian  string  games.  1924.  (Pub- 
lications of  the  Folk-lore  founda- 
tions, no.  5)  (A^'assar  college  field- 
work  in  folk-lore)  398  E53 

LAW. 

Brady,   John   Edson. 

The  law  of  forged  and  altered  checks. 
1925. 

California.      Laws,    statutes,    etc. 

Supplement  to  the  codes  and  general 
laws  of  the  state  of  California  of 
1923.     1926. 

Castenholz,  William  Burtis,  d  Johnson, 
Fred    S. 
Manual    of    income    tax    procedure    of 
1924    returns.     cl925. 

CnxNA    (Republic).  Laics,  statutes,   etc. 

Constitution    and  supplementary    laws 

and    documents  of    the    Republic    of 
China.     1924. 

Chitty,  R.  M.  Willes. 

An  abridgment  of  the  Canadian 
criminal  case  law,  1892-1925.     1925. 

Cornelius,  Asher  Lynn. 

The  law  of  search  and  seizure.     cl926. 

Freeman,    Abraham   Clark. 

A  treatise  of  the  law  of  judgments. 
5th  ed.,   rev.  and  greatly  enl.     1925. 

Gentili,  Alberlco. 

De  legationibvs  libri  tres.     1924.     2v. 
(The  Classics  of  international  law) 
Gift. 

Gross,  Hans  Gustav  Adolf. 

Criminal  investigation.  Adapted  [and 
trans.]    by   J.   CoUyer   Adam.      1924. 

Hall,    /Sir  John. 

The  Bravo  mystery  and  other  cases. 
[1923]  ''• 

Irvine,   Leigh  Hadley. 

The  follies   of  the  courts.     1925. 

Johnston,  Frank  jr. 

Modern  conception  of  law.     1925. 

LoOMis,   William   Warner. 

Newspaper   law.      Rev.    ed.      cl924. 

7— 44S05 


New  Jersey.     Laivs,  statutes,   etc. 

Cumulative    supplement    to    the    Com- 
piled statutes  of  New  Jersey,  1911- 

1924,  ioth  inclusive,  published  under 
the  authority  of  the  legislature,  by 
virtue  of  chapter  56  of  the  laws  of 
1923,     approved     March     12,     1923. 

1925.  3   V. 

New  York  (State).     Laics,  statutes,  etc. 
Local   laws   of   the   cities   in   the   state 
of     New     York,     enacted     in     1924. 
1925. 

New  York  law  review.     1923-24.     2  v. 

Oregon  school  cases.     cl925. 

Philippine     Islands.       Laws,    statutes, 
etc. 
The  Code  of  criminal  procedure  of  the 
Philippine     Islands,      annotated     by 
Guillermo   B.   Guevara.      1922. 

The  Penal  code  of  the  Philippine 


Islands,    annotated   by   Guillermo   B. 
Guevera.      [1923] 

Porto   Rico.      Laws,   statutes,    etc. 

Compilacion  de  las  enmiendas  intro- 
ducidas  a  los  codigos  de  Puerto 
Rico  desde  1912  a  1923.     1924. 

Postgate,  Raymond  William. 

Murder,    piracy    and    treason.      [1925] 

Raynolds,   Herbert  Frederick,   comp. 
Digest,     New     Mexico     reports,     vols. 
1-28.     cl925. 

The  South  African  law  reports. 
Transvaal  provincial  division. 
1911. 

The      South      African      law      reports. 
Witwatersrand    local    division.       1911. 

Standard    oil    company   of   New   Jersey. 
Standard    oil    company    et    al.,    appel- 
lants, vs.  The  United  States.     1909. 

Texas.      Laws,    statutes,    etc. 

Penal  code  of  the  state  of  Texas, 
adopted  at  the  regular  session  of  the 
Thirty-ninth    legislature,    1925. 

True,    Ronald,    defendant. 

Trial    of    Ronald    True.      [1925] 

United   States   infantry   association. 
Courts-martial  procedure.     1921. 


192 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


LANGUAGE. 

Fkasek,      Edward,      tG      Gibbo;iy.      John, 

CO))ips. 

Soldier  and  sailor  words  and  phrases. 
1925.  r427  F84 

Hills,   Elijah  Clarence,  cG  others. 

A    Portuguese    grammar.      cl92o. 
(Heath's    modern    language    series) 
469   H65 
Krapp,   George  Philip. 

The  English  language  in  x^merica. 
1925.     2  V.  420.9  K89 

MiCHELET,  Maren  Bastine  Hals. 

First  year  Norse.     6th  rev.  ed.     1924. 
439.8  iV162 
AVhitten,  Wilfred. 

Is  it  good  English?  by  John  O'Lon- 
don    [pseud.}      1925.  425  W624 

WiLKiNS,    Lawrence    Augustus,    cG    San- 

telli,   Catharine  R. 

Beginners'      Italian      reader.        cl925. 

(Heath's    modern    language    series) 

458  W68 

NATURAL   SCIENCE. 

^lOESE,   Sidney  Levi. 

A  map  of  the  world  of  knowledge. 
1925.  501   M88 

NORDMANN,    Charles. 

The  tyranny  of  time,  Einstein  or 
Bergson?  trans,  by  E.  E.  Fournier 
d'Albe.     1925.  529   N83 

Richards,  Charles  Russell. 

The   industrial   museum.      1925. 

507   R51 

AViiiTEHEAD,   Alfred  North. 

Science  and  the  modern   world.     1925. 

504  W59 


MATHEMATICS. 
CooLiDGE,    Julian    Lowell. 

An       introduction       to      mathematical 
probability.     1925.  519  C77 


rJiFFORD,    Mrs   Emma. 

Natural    tangents.      1920. 


514  G45 


Scott.    Charlotte  Angas. 

An     introductory     account     of     certain 

modern   ideas  and   methods  in  plane 

analytical    geometry.      2d    ed.     1924. 

516  S42 


Sullivan,    John   William   Navin. 

The  history  of  mathematics  in  Europe, 
from  the  fall  of  Greek  science  to 
the  rise  of  the  conception  of  mathe- 
matical rig(jur.  1925.  (Chapters  in 
the  history  of  science)         510.9  S91- 

Williams,  A.  Fraucon. 

Surveying   for   everyone.      [1925] 

526.9  W72 

PHYSICS. 

Gibson,   Charles  Robert. 

Electrical   amusements   &    experiments. 

1925.     (Scientific  amusement  series) 

537  G44e 

Newman,  Frederick  Henry. 

The  production  and  measurement  of 
low    pressures.      1925.  533  N55 

Russell.      Hon.      Bertrand      Arthur 
William. 
The    A     B     C     of     relativity.       1925. 
(Harpei*'s    modern     science    series) 
530   R96 
Thomas,    Lowell   Jackson. 
The  first  world   flight.     1925. 

533.6  T453 

CHEMISTRY. 

Akrhenius,   Svante  August. 

Chemistry  in  modern  life.  1925. 
(Library    of    modern    sciences) 

540  A77 
Ellis,   Carleton,   d-  others. 

The  chemical  action  of  ultraviolet 
rays.     1925.  541.3   E47 

Holmyard.    Eric   John. 

Chemistry  to  the  time  of  Dalton. 
1925.  (Chapters  in  the  history  of 
science)  540  H75 

POLLiTT,  Alan  A. 

The  technology  of  water.  1924. 
( Chemical  engineering  library. 
Second    series)  543.3  P77 

GEOLOGY   AND    PALEONTOLOGY. 

Brouwer,    Ilendrick    Albertus. 

The   geology    of    the    Netherlands    East 

Indies.         1925.  (University       of 

^licliigan   studies.      Scientific   series) 

559.1    B87 

Gregg,    Willis    Ray. 

Aeronautical        meteorology.  cl925. 

(Ronald    aeronautic    library) 

551.5  G81 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


19a 


McAdie.    Alexander   George. 
War    weather    vignettes.     1925. 

551.5   M11wr 

Patton,    Milton   John. 

The  coal  resources  of  Canada.  [1925] 
(Bulletin  of  the  departments  of 
history  and  political  and  economic 
science  in  Queen's  university,  Kings- 
ton,   Ontario,    Canada)        553.2  P32 

SiiAND,   Samuel  James. 

Useful   aspects   of  geology.      1925. 

550  S528 

SiiiMEK,   Hervey   Woodburn. 

An  introduction  to  earth  history. 
cl925.  551  S55 

Stigand,   Ivan  Ascanio. 

Outlines  of  the  occurrence  and  geology 
of  petroleum.  1925.  (Griffin's 
mining   series)  553.2  S85 

Stock,   Chester. 

Cenozoic  gravigrade  edentates  of  west- 
ern North  America,  with  special 
reference  to  the  Pleistocene  Megal- 
onychinae  and  Mylodontidae  of 
ranch  La  Brea.  1925.  (Carnegie 
institution  of  Washington.  Publi- 
cation) q560  S8 

Studies  on  the  fossil  flora  and  fauna  of 
the  western  United  States.  1925. 
(Contributions  to  palaeontology 
from  the  Carnegie  institution  of 
Washington.  Carnegie  institution 
of    Washington.      Publication) 

q560  S9 

Ward,   Robert   De   Courcy. 

The  climates  of  the  United  States. 
cl925.  551.5  W28 

AVooDRiNG,    Wendell    Phillips. 

jNIiocene    moUusks    from    Bowden,    Ja- 
maica.      1925.        (Carnegie     institu- 
tion   of    Washington.      Publication) 
q560.9729  W8 

EVOLUTION. 

Allen,  Leslie  Henri,  ed. 

Bryan  and  Darrow  at  Dayton.     cl92o. 

575  A427 

Bryan,    William   Jennings. 

William  Jennings  Bryan's  undelivered 
speech,  "A  call  to  Christianity." 
1925.  575  B91c 


Gates.   Reginald  Ruggles. 

Heredity   and   eugenics.     1923. 

575.1   G25 
jNIachin,  Alfred. 

The    ascent    of   inan.     1925.    575  M149 

OSBORN,     Mrs     Lucretia     Perry      (That- 
cher ) . 
The   chain   of   life.     1925.        575  0813 

Ward,  Henshaw. 

Evolution    for   John    Doe.      cl925. 

575  W25 

BOTANY. 

Bower,  Frederick  Orpen. 

Plants  and  Man.     1925.  581   B78 

Eames,  Arthur  Johnson,  d  MacDaniels, 
Laurence  Howland. 
An  introduction  to  plant  anatomy. 
1925.  (McGraw-Hill  publications 
in  the  agricultural  and  botanical 
sciences)  581    E12 

Huntington,  Annie  Oakes. 

Poison  ivy  and  swamp  sumach.     1916. 

581.6  H94 
Jepson,  Willis  Linn. 

A  flora  of  the  economic  plants  of  Cali- 
fornia.    cl924.  c581  J 54 


A  manual  of  flowering  plants  of 

California.     cl925.  c581   J54m 

Stiles,   Walter. 

Photosynthesis  ;  the  assimilation  of  car- 
bon  by   green   plants.     1925. 

581   S85 

ZOOLOGY. 

Allen,   Glover   Morrill. 

Birds   and   their   attributes.      [1925] 

598.2  A42 
Beebe,   Charles   William. 

Jungle  days.     1925.  591.988  B41j 

Bbskine,  Cicely  (Quicke)  "Mrs  Monteith 
Erskine." 
Sex  at  choice.     1925.  591.3  E73 

HoRNADAY,   William   Temple. 

A    wild-animal    round-up.     1925. 

591.5   H81w 
ROWTLEY,    John. 

Taxidermy     and     museum     exhibition. 
1925.  579.4  R88t 

Yeekes,     Robert     Mearns,     cC-     Learned, 
Blanche  W. 
Chimpanzee   intelligence   and   its   vocal 
expressions.     1925.  599.8  Y47c 


[94: 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  1920 


WiLLiSTON,  Samuel  Wendell. 

The  osteology  of  the  reptiles.     1925. 

598.1   W73 

MEDICINE  AND  HYGIENE. 
Camp,  Walter  Chaimcey. 

The   daily   dozen.      cl925.     613.7  C18d 

Campbell,  Charles  A.  R. 

Bats,  mosquitoes  and  dollars.     1925. 

614.4  C18 
DoESEY,  George  Amos. 

Why  we  behave  like  human  beings. 
1925.  (Harpier's  modern  science 
series)  612  D71 

Janet,  Pierre  Marie  Felix. 

Psychological  healing,  trans,  by  Eden 
and  Cedar  Paul.     [1925] 

,615.85  J33p 

Marshall,  Francis  Hugh  Adam. 
,    An   introduction    to    sexual   physiology. 
1925.  612.6  iVI36i 

Wood,     Thomas     Denison,  cC-     Brownell, 
Clifford   L. 

Source    book    in    health  and    physical 

education.     1925.  613.7  W87 

ENGINEERING. 
Albright,  Owen  S. 

Signal  communications  for  all  arms, 
1922-23.     1922.  623.7  A34 

Barrows,  William   Edward. 

Light,  photometry  and  illuminating 
engineering.     1925.  621.32  B27li 

Cunningham,  Bryssou; 

Port     administration      and     operation. 
.    1925.  627.3  C97p 

Emerson,   William,  tC-  Gromort,   Georges. 
Old  bridges  of  France.     1925. 

f824   E5 

Osborne,  William  Farrand. 

Power  plant  lubrication.     1925. 

621.89  081 

PiCKELS,  George  Wellington. 

Drainage  and  flood-control  engineering. 
1925.  627.5  P59 

Russell,   George   Edmond. 

Text-book  on  hydraulics.     3d  ed.     1925. 

627  R96 
Superheater  company. 

Superheat    engineering   data.      cl925. 

621.1   S95 


World   ports,     v.   9-12,   Nov.   1920-Oct., 

1924.  627.06  A51 

AGRICULTURE. 

The  Book  of  rural  life ;  knowledge  and 
inspiration,  guide  to  the  best  in 
modern   living.      cl925.      r630.3  B72 

Drain,  Brooks  Daniel. 

Essentials      of     systematic      pomology. 

1925.  (The     Wiley     agricultural 
series)  634  D759 

Duggar,    John    Frederick. 

Southern  forage  crops.  1925.  (The 
rural  textbook  series)  633  D85 

Emerson,  Paul. 

Soil  characteristics.  1925.  (McGraw- 
Hill  publications  in  the  agricultural 
and  botanical  sciences)  631   E53 

Herrick,   Glenn  Washington. 

Manual    of    injurious    insects.      cl925. 
632  H56m 
Lorette,  Louis. 

The  Lorette  system  of  pruning.     1925. 

634  L86 
Mills,  Mabel  L.  . 

Reforesters  of  America.     cl925. 

qc634.9  M5 

MooRHOUSE,  Llewellyn  Alexander. 

The   management   of   the   farm.      1925. 

630  IVI82 

Rice,      James      Edward,      cG      Botsford, 
Harold  Eugene. 
Practical    poultry    management.      1925. 
(The  Wiley  farm  series)      636.5  R49 

Scott,  George. 

Modern  poultry-keeping.     1925. 

636.5  S42 
Sloan,  A.,  cG  Farquhar,  A. 

Dog   and   man.  636.7  S63 

BEES  AND  GAME. 
Dailey,  E.  J. 

Traplines  and   trails.      cl925. 

639.1   D13 
Sharp,  Dallas  Lore. 

The  spirit  of  the  hive;  contemplations 
of   the    beekeeper.     1925.         638  S53 

Sturges,  Arthur  Manning. 
Practical  beekeeping.      [19241 

638  S93 
Villiers,  Alan  J. 

Whaling  in  the  frozen  south.     cl925. 

639  V75 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


19J) 


DOMESTIC    ECONOMY. 

Al.PRlOii,       Ijillijiu        (  Wondinaii  )       "Mrs 
Tluimii.s   B;iil<\\    Aldricli." 
Choice  receipts.     1925.  641   A36 

Allen,   Lucy  Grace. 

A  book  of  hors  cl'oeuvres.     1925. 

641   A427b 
Boomer,   Lucius   M. 

Hotel     management ;      principles     and 
practice.      1925.  640  B72 

Gerhard,  Albert  F. 

Handbook    for    bakers.      1925.       (The 
Century    vocational   series)    641   G36 

The  House  beautiful  furnishing  annual, 
1926.     cl925.  q645  HS 


LoEWEN,  Jane. 
Millinery.     1925. 


646.5  L82 


Peterson,    Mrs    Anna    Josephine    (Mur- 
phy), (€  Badenoch,  Mrs  Nena  Fran- 
ces   (Wilson). 
Mrs     Anna     J.     Peterson's     simplified 
cooking.     1925.  641   P48 

PiCKEN,  Mary  Brooks. 

Modern   dressmaking.      1925.    646  P59 

Ransome,   Stafford. 

Modern  wood-working  machinery.  1924. 

621.7  R22 

Scotson-Clark,    George    Frederick. 
Half  hours  in  the  kitchenette.     1925. 

641   S42 
Taylor,  Lucy  D. 

Tour  home  beautiful.     cl925. 

645  T24 

PRINTING. 

Jones,  Sydney  Robert. 

Art    and    publicity,    fine  printing    and 
design.      1925.  q655.3  J 7 

Plomer,  Henry  Robert. 

Wynkyn    de    Worde    &    his    contempo- 
raries.    1925.  q655.1    P7 

Warde,  Frederic. 

Bruce  Rogers,  designer  of  books.    1925. 
€55.4  W26 

BUSINESS   METHODS, 

Barton,  Leslie  M. 

A  study  of  81  principal  American  mar- 
kets.    cl925.  q659  B2 
Gift. 


Brisco,      Norris      Aiilini-,      <(-      Wiiignlc, 
John   W. 
Retail    buying.       1925.       (Retailing 
series)  658  B85re 

Curtis,  John  W. 

Organisation  of  production.  1924. 
(Chemical  engineering  library.  Sec- 
ond series)  658  C97 

Button,  Henry  Post. 

Business  organization  and  management. 
1925.  658  D98b 

Farrar,   Gilbert  Powderly. 

How   advertisements   are   built.      1925. 

659   F24h 

Frederick,  Justus  George,  ed. 

Masters  of  advertising  copy.     1925. 

659  F852 

GuTHMANN,  Harry  George. 

The  analysis  of  financial  statements. 
1925.  657  G98 

Harvard  business  reports,    v.  1,  1925. 

658  H339b 
JoME,  Hiram  Leonard. 

Economics  of  the  radio  industry.    1925. 

654  J 75 

Lawrence,  William  Beaty. 

Cost  accounting.     1925.  657  L42 

Poffenberger,  Albert  Theodor. 
Psychology  in  advertising.     1925. 

659  P74 
Strong,  Edward  Kellogg. 

The  psychology  of  selling  and  advertis- 
ing.    1925.  658  S92 

Swift,  Edgar  James. 

Business  power  through  psychology. 
1925.  .658  S97 

TosDAL,   Harry  Rudolph. 

Principles  of  personal  selling.     1925. 

658  T71p 

CHEMICAL  TECHNOLOGY. 

Bakdorf,     Charles     Frederick,     d     Ball, 
J.  A.  B. 
The  elements  of  sugar  refining.     1925. 

664.1    B24 

California  oil  world,  v.  16-17,  1924. 
fc665.505  CI 
COE,  Arthur. 

The   scientific   promotion   of  gas   sales. 

.    1924.  q665.7  C6 


196 


2s^EWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


CoFFiGNiER,  Charles. 

Colours  and  varnishes.     1925. 

667.6  C67 

Howe,  Harrison  Estell,  ed. 

Chemistry  in  industry ;  a  cooperative 
work  intended  to  give  examples  of 
the  contributions  made  to  industry 
by  chemistry.     1925.  660  H85 

Wallis-Tatler,  Alexander  James. 

Sugar  machinery.     1924.     664.1   W21a 

FINE  ARTS:   GENERAL. 

Blake,  Vernon. 

Relation   in   art.     1925.  701    B63 

COLLINGWOOD,  Robin  George. 

Outlines  of  a  philosophy  of  art.  1925. 
(The  world's  manuals)         701   C711 

CoETissoz,   Royal. 

Personalities  in  art.     1925.     704  C82p 

Heath,  Lionel. 

Examples  of  Indian  art  at  the  British 
Empire  exhibition,   1924.     1925. 

q709.54  H4 

New    York.      Metropolitan    museum    of 
art.     American  wing. 
A    handbook    of    the    American    wing 
opening  exhibition.     1925. 

708.1    N56h 

Raymond,  George  Lansing. 
An  art  philosopher's  cabinet. 

701    R26ar 


The      essentials      of      aesthetics. 

cl921.  701   R26c 

RucKSTUHL,  Fred  Wellington. 

Great   works   of   art   and   what   makes 
them  great.     1925.  704  R91 

GARDENS    AND    GARDENING 

CosGRAVE,  Mrs  .Jessica    (Garretson). 
Gardens :    quick    results    with    flowers 
and  vegetables.     cl925.  716  083 

Macself,  Albert  James. 

Flowering    trees    and    shrubs.      [1924] 
(The  home  garden  books)    715  M17 

Gladioli.      [192o]      (The  home  gar- 
den books)  716  M17g 

Van   Rensselaer,    Mariana    (Griswold) 
"Mrs   Schuyler  Van  Rensselaer." 
Art  out-of-doors.     1925.  710  V27 


Waite,  William  Henry. 

A  little  book  of  modern  dahlia  culture. 
1925.      (The  "Little  book"  series) 

716  W14 

ARCHITECTURE. 

BLOOiiFiELD,  >S'f;-  Reginald  Theodore. 
The  touchstone  of  architecture.     1925. 
720.4  B65t 
BoNTA,  Edwin. 

The  small-house  primer.     1925. 

728  B722 

Calvert,   Albert   Frederick. 

The  Alhambra,  being  a  brief  record  of 
the  Arabian  conquest  of  the  Penin- 
sula with  a  particular  account  of 
the  Mohammedan  architecture  and 
decoration.     [2d   ed.]     1907. 

q723.3  CI  a! 
Newcojib,   Rexford. 

The  old  mission  churches  and  historic 
houses  of  California.     1925. 

qc720.979   N5 
Pichel,  Irving. 

Modern  theatres.     cl925.    725.8  P59 

Weight,  Richardson  Little,  ed. 

House  (fe  garden's  second  book  of 
houses.     1925.  q728  W9a 

CHINA.     GLASSWARE. 

Blunt,  Reginald,  ed. 

The  Cheyne  book  of  Chelsea  china  and 
pottery.      [1924]  q738  B65 

Buckley,  Francis. 

A  history  of  old  English  glass.     1925. 

q738  B92 

Eberlein,    Harold    Donaldson,    <f-    Rams- 
dell,   Roger   Wearne. 
The     practical     book     of     chinaware. 
[1925]  738  El 6 

DRAWING.     DECORATION. 

AlASTxILB, 

Fifty  drawings  by  Alastair.     1925. 

q741   A3f 

Bigelow-Hartfobd  carpet  company. 
A  century  of  carpet  and  rug  making  in 
America.     cl925.  q745  B5 

Gift. 

Bossert,  Helmuth  Theodor,  ed. 
Ornament  in   applied  art.     1924. 

f745  B7 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


197 


Hunter,  George  Leland. 

The  practical  book  of  tapestries.     1925. 

74,6  H94p 
Roberts,  Edna  H. 

How  to  kuow  laces.     1925.        746  R64 

Thomas,  F.  W. 

Low  and  I ;  a  cooked  tour  in  London. 
[1923]  q741  T4 

FURNITURE. 
Halsey.    Richard   T.   Haines,   cG   Towers, 
Elizabeth. 
The  homes  of  our   ancestors.     1925. 

q749   H1 
Hodgson.  Mrs  Willoughby. 

The  quest  of  the  antique.     1924. 

q749   H6 
LoCKWOOD,    Sarah  M. 

Antiques.      1925.  q749   L81 

Penderel-Brodhurst,     .T  a  m  e  s    George 
Joseph,   d  Layton,  Edwin  J. 
A  glossary  of  English  furniture  of  the 
historic  periods.     [1925]        r749   P39 

PAINTING    AND    PAINTERS. 
Abbott,   Charles  D. 

Howard  Pyle,  a  chronicle.     1925. 

759.1  P99 
Baldry,  Alfred  Lys. 

Contemporary  figure  painters.    [1925?] 

q750  B1 

Blanche,  Jacques  Emile. 

Manet,      tr.    by    F.   C.    de    Sumichrast. 
1925.       (Masters    of    modern    art) 

759.4  M 275b  I 
Bode,  Wilhelm. 

Sandro  Botticelli.      [1925] 

q759.5   B75b 
BuRNE- Jones.    »S'(V   Edward. 

Letters  to  Katie.     1925.  759.2  B95 

DowNES,  William  Howe. 

John    S.    Sargent,    his    life    and    work. 
1925.  q759.1   S2 

Ely,  Catherine  Beach. 

The     modern     tendency     i  n    American 
painting.     1925.  759.1    E52 

Figgis,   Darrell. 

The  paintings  of  William  Blake.    1925. 
q759.2  B63f 

Gallatin,  Albert  Eugene,  erf. 

John  Sloan.     1925,  q759.1   S6 


John,  C.  H.  S. 

Bartolozzi,  Zoffany  &  Kauffman.  witli 
other  foreign  members  of  the  Royal 
academy,  1768-1792.  [1924]  (Brit- 
ish   artists)  759.2  J 65 


Phillips,    Claude. 
Emotion  in   art. 


750   P55 


PlERARD,   Louis. 

The  tragic  life  of  Vincent  van  Gogh. 
[1925]  759.9  G61p 

Roe,   Frederic   Gordon. 

David  Cox.      [1924]      (British  artists) 
759.2  C877r 

Southern    California    artist's    directory. 
1921.  c759,1   S72 

YoLLARD,  Ambroise. 

Renoir,  an  intimate  record.  Author- 
ized translation  by  Harold  Van 
Doren  and  Randolph  T.  Weaver. 
1925.  759.4  R41v 

MUSIC. 

Bedford,  Herbert. 

Robert  Schumann,  his  life  and  work. 
1925.      (Masters  of  music) 

780.2  S39b 

Clare,  Eva. 

Musical  appreciation  and  the  studio 
club.     1924.  780.4  C591 

CORDER,  Frederick. 

Ferencz  (Francois)  Liszt.  19  2  5. 
(Ma.sters  of  music)  780.2   L77o 

Dickinson,  Edward. 

The  spirit  of  music,  how  to  find  it  and 
how  to  share  it.     1925.       780.4  D55 

Fraser-Simson,  H. 

Fourteen  songs  from  "When  we  were 
very  young."     cl925.  q784  FS 

Fuller-Maitland,  John  Alexander. 
The  '48'  Bach's  wohltemperirtes  Clav- 
ier.     1925.      2    V.       ('The    musical 
pilgrim')  781    F96f 


The  keyboard  suites  of  .J.  S.  Bach. 

]925.      ("The  musical  pilgrim' I 

781    F96 


Godfrey,  Sir  Daniel  Eyers. 

Memories  and  music.     1924. 

780.2  G583 


198 


NEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


Craveure,  Louis. 

"Siiper-dictioD."      clDlS.       ( Sclikiner's 
scholastic  scries)  q784  G7 

Johnson,  James  Weldon,  ed. 

The  book  of  American  negro  spirituals. 
1925.  q784.7  J  6 

Kennedy,  Robert  Emmet. 

Mellows.     cl925.  q784.7  K3 

LoRENZ,  Edmund  Simon. 

Church  music ;  Avhat  a  minister  should 
know  about  it.     cl923.  783  L86c 


Music     in     work     and     worship. 

cl925.  783   L86 


Marapioti,  Pasqual  Mario. 
The  new  vocal  art.     1925. 


784.9  M29n 


Odum,   Howard  Washington,   c6  Johnson, 
Guy   Benton. 
The  negro  and  his  songs.     1925. 

784.7  027 

Ortmann,   Otto   Rudolph. 

The  physical  basis  of  piano  touch  and 
tone.  1925.  (The  international  li- 
brary of  music)  786  077 

Otis,  Philo  Adams. 

The  Chicago  symphony  orchestra. 
[1925]  785  OSS 

Rice,  William  Gorham. 

Carillon   music   and   singing   towers  of 

the  Old  world  and  the  New.     1925. 

789.5   R49cm 

Scarborough,  Dorothy,   d  GuUedge,   Ola 
Lee. 
On  the  trail  of  negro  folk  songs.     1925. 

784.7  S28 

SCHACK,    Sarah  Pitkowsky. 

Yiddish  folk  songs.     1924.       q784.4  S2 

Shakespeare,    William. 

Plain  words  on   singing.      [1924] 

784.9  S52 
Spaeth,   Sigmund,  ed. 

Barber   shop   ballads.      1925.  784.9  S73 

Standard   modern   piano   pieces.     cl924. 
("Music  for  the  million"  series) 

q786.4  S7 
Wallace,  William. 

Richard  Wagner  as  he  lived.  1925. 
(Masters  of  music)         780.2  W13wr 


Wellesz,  Egoii. 

Arnold     Schihiberg.       tr.     by     W.     11. 
Kerridge.       [1925]        (Dent's    Inter- 
national library   of  books  on   music. 
780.2  S371W 

Witherspoon,  Herbert. 

Singing ;    a    treatise    for    teachers    and 
students.     cl925.  784.9  W82 

Wood,  Thomas. 

Music    and    boyhood.      1925.      (Oxford 
musical  essays)  780.7  W87 

THEATRE. 

AMATEUR  THEATRICALS. 

The  American  legion.     National  Amer- 
icanism  commission. 
The     observance     of     Armistice     day. 
1925.  q792.7  A5 

DiSHEiR,  M.  Willson. 

Clowns   &   pantomimes.     1925. 

q792   D61 
Dobree,  Bonamy. 

Timotheus ;  or,  The  future  of  the 
theatre.  (To-day  and  to-morrow 
series)  792  D63 

Fitz-Gerald,   Shafto  Justin  Adair. 
The  story  of  the  Savoy  opera.     [1924] 

792  F554 
Hinsdell,    Oliver. 

Making  the   little   theater   pay.     1925. 

792  H66 
Jagendorf,   Moritz  Adolf. 

Fairyland    and    footlights ;    five    child- 
ren's plays.     cl925.  793.2  J24f 

Kimball,  Rosamond. 

The  wooing  of  Rebekah  and  other  Bible 
plays.     1925.  793.2  K49 

Kincaid,  Zee. 

Kabuki :   the   popular   stage   of  Japan. 
1925.  q792  K5 

Mitchell,  Roy. 

The  school  theatre.     cl925.    792  M682 

Morse,  Katharine  Duncan. 

Goldtree  and  Silvertree.     1925. 

793.2  M88 
NicOLL,   Allardyce. 

British  drama.     cl925.  792  N64 

Olcott,  Virginia. 

International    plays   for   young   people. 
1925.  793.2  0431 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


199 


.Saylek,  Oliver  Martiu. 

Inside  the  Moscow  art  tlieati-e.     cl925. 

792  S27i 

Webber,     James    Plaisted,     cG     Webster, 
Hanson  Hart,  eds. 
Short  plays  for  junior  and  senior  high 
schools.    cl925.  793  W37 

Wilde,   Percival. 

The  enchanted  Christmas  tree.     1925. 
793.2  W67 
Young,  Stark. 

Sweet  times  and  The  blue   policeman. 
1925.  793.2  Y76 

ZucKER,  Adolph  Eduard. 

The  Chinese  theater.     1925.     792  Z94 


RECREATION. 

Beard,  Daniel  Carter. 

What    to    do    and    how    to    do   it ;    the 
American    boys    handy    book.      1925. 
790  B368w 
Grey,  Zane. 

Tales  of  fishing  virgin  seas.     1925. 

q799.1   G3 
Marsh,  Chester  Geppert. 

Singing  games  and  drills.     1925. 

q793   M3 
[Stewart,  Jean] 
Three  hundred  and  one  things  a  bright 
girl  can  do.     [1925]  793  S849 

Taylor,  William  George  Langworthy. 
The  saddle  horse.     1925.  798  T24 

LITERATURE. 

Addison,  Joseph. 

The  vision  of  Mirzah.     1917. 

qc824  A2 

American   academy   of  arts   and  letters. 
Academy  papers.     1925.  824  A51 

Baudouin,    Charles. 

Contemporary  studies.      [1924] 

844  B34 

Beeson,  Rebecca  Katharine. 

Literary   Indiana.     cl925.     810.9   B415 

Bell,   Aubrey   Fitz   Gerald. 

Contemporary  Spanish  literature.  1925. 

860.9  843 
Braybrooke,  Patrick. 

Considerations      on      Edmund      Gosse. 
[1925]  824  B82 


Browne,  Edward  Grauville. 

A  liistory  of  Persian  literature  in 
inodern  times  (A.  D.  1500-1924). 
1924.     V.  4.  891.5  B88 

Burnet,  John. 

Aristotle.  [1924]  (British  academy. 
Master-mind  lecture,  Henriette 
Hertz  trust)  q888  B9 

Burton,  Robert. 

Burton  the  anatomist.     [1924] 

828  B97m 
Chev alley,  Abel. 

The  modern  English  novel,  ti-ans.  by 
Ben   Ray   Redman.     1925. 

823.01   C52 

Clark,      Barrett      Harper,      d      Lieber, 
Maxim,    comps. 
Great  short  stories  of  the  world.    1925. 

r823  C59 

Cobb,   Irvin   Shrewsbury. 

Many  laughs  for  many  days.    cl925. 

817  C65m 
UuHAMEL,  Georges. 

Civilization,  1914-1917.     1919. 

843  D86a 
Gift  of  Dr.  E.  B.  KrehbieL 

Edda  Saemundar.     Havamal. 

The  Havamal.     1923.  839.6  E211 

Fitzmaueice-Kelly,  James. 

Some  masters  of  Spanish  verse.  1924. 
( Hispanic  notes  &  monographs : 
essays,  studies,  and  brief  biographies 
issued  by  the  Hispanic  society  of 
America)  861.09  F55 

[Gardiner,  Alfred  George]. 

Many  furrows,  by  Alpha  of  the  plough 
[pseud.]     1924.  824  G22 

Gosse,   Sir   Edmund  William. 

Tallemant  des  Reaux ;  or  The  art  of 
miniature  biography.  1925.  (The 
Zaharoff   lecture,    1925)       824  G67ta 

Howard,  Mrs  Inez  G. 

The    chrysalis    of    romance.      1925. 

c814  H84 
Howell,  Edgar  B.,   trans. 

The  inconstancy  of  Madam  Chuang. 
[1925]  895  H95 


Hudson,    William    Henry. 

Collected  works.     1923.     24  v. 


828  H88 


200 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192( 


Kellnek.    Leon. 

Restoring    Shakespeare.      1925. 

822.33   Dke 

•Johnson.    Gertrude    Elizabeth. 

Modern   literature   for    oral   interpreta- 
tion.    1924.  808.8  J  67m 

Lacon,  pseud. 

Lectures    to    living    authors.     1925. 

824  L14 

McClelland,  George  William.  <;£•  Baugh, 
Albert  Croll.    eds. 
Century    types    of    English    literature. 
1925.  820.9  Ml 2 


McDowALL,  Arthur. 
Ruminations.     1925. 


824  1VI13 


^Ialevinsky,  Moses  L. 

The   science   of   playwriting.      cl925. 

808.2  M24 
Masefield,  John. 

With  the  living  voice.      [1925] 

808.1   M39 
3IERRIFIELD,    Fred,    comp. 

Modern     religious     verse     and     prose. 
1925.  808.1   M56 

Milne,  James. 

A    London   book   window.      1924. 

824  M659 
MiRSKY,  D.  S.,  prince. 

]\Iodern      Russian      literature.        1925. 
(The    world's    manuals)      891.7  M67 

^Iontaigne,  Michel  Eyquem  de. 

The    essays    of    Montaigne,    translated 
by  George  B.  Ives.     1925.     4  v. 

844  M76el 
Mxjrasaki    shikibu. 

The    tale    of    Genji,    trans,    by    Arthur 
Waley.      1925.  895  IV197 

MuEKY,   John   Middleton. 

Keats   and   Shakespeare.     1925. 

821    K25zm 
Neihardt,   John   Gneisenau. 

Poetic    values ;    their    reality    and    our 
need   of  them.     1925.  808.1   N39 

XoRTHUP,    George    Tyler. 

An  introduction  to   Spanish  literature. 
cl925.  860.9  N8:' 

Peers,   Edgar  Allison. 

Spanish    mysticism.       [1924]     860  P37 

Piozzi,    Mrs   Hester   Lynch    (Salusbux-y) 
Thrale. 
Piozzi    marginalia.     1925.  828  P66 


Rand,   Edward  Kennard. 

Ovid  and  his  influence.     cl925.      (Our 
debt   to   Greece  and  Rome) 

871   096zr 
Raymond,    George   Lansing. 

Poetry  as  a  representative  art.    cl899. 

808.1   R26 
Gift  of  author. 

ScHAUiTLER,    Robert    Haven. 

Peter  Pantheism.     1925.  814  S31p 

Smith,   Hugh  Allison. 

]Main      currents      of      modern      French 
drama.      cl925.  842.09  S64 

Taylor,   George  Coffin. 

Shakespere's  debt  to  Montaigne.     1925. 
822.33   Dta 
Tolman,    Albert   Harris. 

Falstaff      and      other      Shakespearean 
topics.     1925.  822.33  Dto 

Tompkins,   Dora   Gilbert,   &  MacArthur, 
.Jessie. 
An  introduction  to  expository  writing. 
1926.  808  T662 

Trevely'an,   Robert   Calverley. 

Thamyris.      [1925]       (To-day    and    to- 
morrow) 808.1  T81 

Van  Vechten,  Carl. 

Excavations.     192G.  814  V28 

Wells.  Carolyn. 

Carolyn      Wells'     book     of     American 
limericks.     1925.  817  W45 

Weygandt,  Cornelius. 

A     century     of     the     English      novel. 
1925.  82301   W54 

WnARTON,  Mrs  Edith  Newbold   (.Jones). 
The   writing   of   fiction.     1925. 

808.3  W55 

Wood,    Will    Christopher,    cG    others,    eds. 
America's    message.     cl925.     808  W87 

Wright,    Frederick   Adam,    comp. 

Greek      social      life.        1925.         (The 
library  of  Greek  thought)    880  W94 

Yeats,    William   Butler. 

Early    poems    and    stories.      1925. 

828  Y41 
POETRY. 
The  Arts    anthology ;    Dartmouth   verse. 
1925.  811.08  A79 

Barnes,    Nellie,    comp. 

American  Indian  love  lyrics  and  other 
verse.     1925.  897.1    B26 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


201 


Benkt,    Stephen   Vincent. 

Tiger  joy ;  a  book  of  poems.     cl925. 

811    B465t 

Burton,    Sir   liicliard   Francis. 

The  Kasidah   (couplets)    of  Haji  Abdu 
el-Yezdi.     1919.  qc821   B97 

COBLENTZ,    Stanton   A.     comp. 
Modern    Britisli    lyrics.     1925. 

821.08  C65 
Cook,    George   Cram. 

Greek    coins ;    poems.     cl925. 

811   C7713 
CooLBRiTH,    Ina    Donna. 

California.     1918.  qc811   C7 

Crane,   Nathalia   Clara   Ruth. 

Lava  lane,   and  other  poems.     1925. 

811   C892I 
Divine,   Charles. 

The  road  to   town ;   a  book   of   poems. 
1925.  811   D61r 

Ellis,  Havelock. 

Sonnets,     with     folk    songs    from     the 
Spanish.     1925.  861   E47 

Field,  Charles  Kellogg. 

Prayer.     1921.  c811    F453p 

Gibson,  AVilfrid    Wilson. 

I   heard   a   sailor.     1925.  821   G45i 

Hagedorn,  Hermann. 

Ladders   through  the   blue ;    a   book   of 
lyrics.     1925.  811    H14I 

Hawker,   Robert   Stephen. 

Twenty    poems.     1925.       (Little    nine- 
teenth century  classics)  821    H39 

Inman,   Arthur   Crew. 

American   silhouettes.     cl925. 

811    157am 

Jeffers,   John  Robinson. 

Roan  stallion,  Tamar  and  other  poems. 
1925.  c811   J45r 

Le   Gallienne,    Richard,    ed. 

The    Le    Gallienne    book    of   American 
verse.     [1925]  811.08  L49 

Leonard,    William    EUery    Channing. 
Two  lives;   a  poem.     1925.       811   L58 

Lindsay,    Nicholas    Vachel. 

Collected    poems.     1925.         811    L74col 


Lowell,  Amy. 

What's   o'clock.     1925. 


811   L914w 


Mackinstry,  Elizabeth. 

Puck  in  pasture ;  verse  &  decorations. 
1925.  811   Ml  58 

Macmillan,    Jean    Campbell. 
Candle   light    to    dawn.     1923. 

c811   M167 
Madeleva,  Sister  M[ary]. 

Pearl ;    a    study    in    spiritual    dryness. 
1925.  821   P35zm 

Mary   Angelita     Sister. 

Starshine    and    candlelight.      1925. 

821    M393 

Meynell,  Mrs  Alice  Christiana   (Thomp- 
son)   ed. 
The  flower  of  the  mind.     1925. 

821.08  M61f 
Milne,   Alan   Alexander. 

For    the   luncheon    interval.      [1925] 

821   M6592f 

Montgomery,    Regina   Cleary. 

Ave,   Victoria!     1924.  c811   M788 

Gift. 

Pavellas,     Constantinos     Harpending. 
"In   praise    of   the   sun."      cl925. 

c811    P33 
Raymond,   George  Lansing. 

Dante,    and   collected   verse.      cl91G. 

811    R26d 
Reed,  Edward  Bliss,  ed. 

Songs  from  the  British  drama.     1925. 
821.08  R32 
Rogers,  Cameron,  ed. 

Full  and  by.     1925.  q821.08  R7 

ScHAUFFLER,  Robert  Haven,  comp. 

The    poetry    cure ;    a    pocket    medicine 
chest  of  verse.     1925.  808.1   S31 

ScoLLARD,  Elisabeth. 

Candle  and   cross.     1925.  811   S422 

SiTWELL,   Osbert. 
Out  of  the  flame.     1923.        821   S6234 

Smith,   Clark  Ashtou. 

Sandalwood.     cl925.  c811   S64s 

Smith,    Elva   Sophronia,    comp. 
A   book   of   lullabies.     cl925. 

808.1   S.64 
SouTHEY,  Robert. 

The  lives  and  works  of  the  uneducated 
poets.     1925.  821   S727 

Squire,   John   CoUings,    comp. 

Songs    from    the    Elizabethans.      1924. 
(The  fireside  library)       821.08  S773 


202 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


Yos,  Bort  Jolin,  tG  Barba,  rreston  Albert, 

frf.S. 

CJei'mun    lyrics    aiul    ballads.     11)2.5. 

831.08  V95 

Waenee,    Sylvia   Townseiid. 

The  espalier.     1925.  821   W284 

Wkaver,   John  Van   Alstyne. 

More   "In  American"  poems.     192G. 

811   Q363m 

Wilkinson,      Mrs      Marguerite      Ogden 
(Bigelow). 
Ynle    fire.     [1925]  821.08  W687 

DRAMA. 

Chambeelain,    George   Agnew. 

Lost      (a     play     in     seven     settings). 
1926.  812  C44 

Coward,    Noel. 

Hay    fever,    a  light    comedy    in    three 

acts.     1925.  (Contemporary  British 

dramatists)  822  C87h 

Dri  MED  KUN   Idan. 

Ti-me-kun-dan.       trans,     by     Millicent 
H.  Morrison.     1925.  895.2  D77 

Deinkwater,  John. 

Robert  Burns ;  a  play.     1925. 

822  D78ro 
Dukes,  Ashley. 

The   man   with   a   load   of   mischief ;   a 
comedy   in   three   acts.      1924. 

822  D87 
Flecker,   James   Elroy. 

Don  Juan,  a  play  in  three  acts.     1925. 

822  F59 
Eevine,  St.  John  Greer. 

Anthony  and  Anna,  a  comedy  in  three 
acts.      [1925]  822  E73an 

Ferber,  Edna. 

The  eldest ;  a  drama  of  American  life. 
1925.      (Appleton    short   plays) 

812  F34e 
Galsworthy,  John. 

The  show.     1925.  822  G17sh 

Lincoln,   Joseph   Crosby. 

The    managers ;     a    comedy     of    Cape 
Cod.      1925.      (Appleton    short   plays) 

812  L73 
McCarthy,    Justin    Huntly. 

If    I   were    king ;    a    romantic    play    in 
four  acts.     cl922.  822  Ml 2 

jNIasefield,  John. 

The  trial  of  Jesus.     1925.     822  M39tr 


Megrue,   Roi  Cooper. 

Seven  chances ;  a  comedy  in  three  acts. 
cl924.  (French's  standard  library 
edition)  812  M49s 

Moses,  Montrose  Jonas,  ed. 

Representative  American  dramas. 
1925.  812.08  M91r 

Panchatantea.     English. 

The  Panchatantra,  translated  from  the 
Sanskrit  by  Arthur  W.  Ryder. 
cl925.  891.2  P18p 

Plautus,   Titus   Maccius. 

Three  plays  of  Plautus.  trans,  by 
F.  A.  Wright  and  H.  Lionel 
Rogers.  [1925]  (Broadway  trans- 
lations) 872  P72w 

Saunders,   Louise. 

The  knave  of  hearts,  with  pictures  by 
JMaxfield    Parrish.      1925.     vf812  S2 

Smith,  Winchell,  c6  Bacon,  Frank. 

Lightnin'.  cl918.  (French's  standard 
library   edition)  c812  S66I 

Walker,   Stuart. 

The  king's  great-aunt  sits  on  the  floor. 
1925.      (Appleton  modern  plays) 

812  W18 
Weir,    William   John. 

IJne     des     malheureuse     (One     of     the 

unhappy)     and    other    plays.      1923. 

c812  W42 

CALIFORNIA    FICTION. 

Dawson,  Emma  Frances. 

A  gracious  visitation.     1921.     cD2725g 

FoRMAN,  Henry  James. 

The  pony  express ;   a  romance.     cl9i2o. 

cF724 
Goodwin,  Charles  Carrol. 

The  wedge  of  gold.     1893.         cG656w 

HoLADAY,  Mrs  Alice  May  (Cusick). 
On  the  side  lines.     cl925.  cH722 

MacGowan,  Alice,  d  Newberry,  Perry. 
The  seventh  passenger.     1926. 

cM146s 

NoRRis,  Mrs  Kathleen   (Thompson). 
Little  ships.     1925.  cN856li 

Ogden,  George  Washington. 

The  road  to  Monterey.     1925.        c034 ! 


Wilson,  Harry  Leon. 
Cousin  Jane.     1925. 


cW748c 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


cAlifornixV  state  library. 


203 


BIOGRAPHY:    COLLECTIVE. 

Avery,  Samuel  Putnam. 

The  Warren,  Little,  Lothr'op,  Park, 
Dix,  Whitman,  Fairchild,  Piatt, 
Wheeler,  Lane  and  Avery  pedigrees 
of  Samuel  Putnam  Avery,  1847- 
1920.     1925.  q929.2  A9w 

Gift. 

Banning,  Kate. 

Genealogical  and  biographical  records 
of   the   Banning   and   allied    families. 

1924.  q929.2  B21b 
Gift. 

Beston,  Henry. 

The  book  of. gallant  vagabonds.     cl92o. 

923   B56 

Contents  :  John  Ledyard. — Belzoni. 
— Edward  John  Trelawny. — Thomas 
Morton  of  Merry-mount. — J  a  m  e  s 
Bruce. — ^Arthur  Rimbaud. 

Collins,  Joseph. 

The  doctor  looks  at  biography  ;  psycho- 
logical studies  of  life  and  letters. 
cl925.  920  C71 

[GossELiN,  Louis  Leon  Theodore]. 
Two     royalist     spies     of     the     French 
revolution.      tr.    by    Bernard    Miall. 
[1924]  920.044  G67 

Harden,  Maximilian. 

I  meet  my  contemporaries,  trans,  by 
Wm.  C.  Lawton.     1925.        920  H25i 

Kingston,  Charles. 

A  gallery  of  rogues.     [1924]  923.41 

Marble,  Mrs  Annie   (Russell). 

The  Nobel  prize  winners  in  literature. 

1925.  928  M31 

Palmer,  Frederic. 

Heretics,  saints  and  martyrs.     1925. 

922  P17 
Powers,  Samuel  Leland. 

Portraits  of  a  half  century.  1925. 

920.07  P88 

S'EILiiamer.  George  Ovorcash. 

The  Bard  family.     1908.        929.2  B24s 


Smith,  Chellis  Y. 

Americans  all.     cl925. 


920.07  S64 


Wilder,  Mrs  Eloise   (Walker). 

A  memorial  of  the  one  hundredth  an- 
niversary of  the  marriage  of  Philip 
Schoff  and  Elizabeth  Ramsay,  April 
10,  1794.     1922.  929.2  S36w 


BIOGRAPHY:    INDIVIDUAL. 

Adams.    Adams,  .John,  pres.  TJ.  8. 

Correspondence  of  .John  Adams  and 
Thomas  Jefferson  (1S12-182G) . 
cl925.  B  A214w 

Bancroft.      Bancroft,    8ir    Squire   Ban- 
croft. 
Empty  chairs.     1925.  B   B2132 

Beaconsfield.      Raymond,    Edward 
Thompson. 
Disraeli :  alien  patriot.     cl925. 

B   B365r 

Bell.     KiTCHiN,   Frederick   Harcourt. 
Moberly    Bell   and   his   times ;    an    un- 
official narrative.     3925.      B   B4332k 

Benson.    Benson,  Edward  Frederic. 
Mother.     cl925.  B  B4745b 

Bierce.     Bierce,  Ambrose. 

The  letters  of  Ambrose  Bierce.     1922. 

cB   B588p 
Boucher.    Boucher.  Jonathan. 

Reminiscences  of  an  American  loyalist, 
1738-1789.     1925.  B  B753 

Bryan.    Heerick,  Mrs  Genevieve  Forbes, 
d  Herrick,  John  Origen. 
The    life    of   William    Jennings   Bryan. 
cl925.  B   B915h 

Bui  finch.    Place,  Charles  Alpheus. 

Charles  Bulfinch,  architect  and  citizen. 
1925.  qB   B933p 

Buriis.     Drinkwater,  John. 

Robert  Burns.    1924.  B   B9:67dr 

Burroughs.      Barrus,    Clara. 

The  life  and  letters  of  .John  Burroughs. 
1925.     2  V.  B  B972bl 

Burroughs.  John. 

-John  Burrough.'s  and  Ijiidella  Peck. 
1925.  B  B972p 

Bute.     MoNTAGU-Stuart-W  o  r  1 1  e  y.  Hon 
Mrs  Violet  Hunter   (Guthrie)    efl. 
A  prime  minister  and  his  son.     19i25. 

B   B983m 

Callivell.      C  A  L  L  w  e  L  L,     Sir     Charles 
Edward. 
Stray  recollections.  1923.     2  v. 

B  C163 

Candler.     Candler,    Edmund. 

Youth  and  the  East,  an  unconventional 
autobiography.     1924.  B  C213 


204 


NEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1920 


Corn.     KiKG,  R.  W. 

'•I'arson  Primrose"  the  life,  work  and 
friendships  of  Henry  Francis  Carv 
(1772-1S44).     ]02n.  B  C332k 

Chekhov.     Chekhov,  Auton  Pavlovicli. 

The     letters     of     Anton     Pavlovitch 

Tchehov  to  Olga  Leonardovna  Knip- 

per.        tr.     liv      Constance     Garnett. 

[1924]  B  C5152ga 

Chirkc.      Cr.ARKE,    Joseph    Ignatiiis    Con- 
stantine. 
jNIy  life  and  memories.     1925. 

B  C5982 

Coleridge.     Watson,  Mrs  Lucy   Eleanor 
(Gillman). 
Coleridge  at  Highgate.     192o. 

B  C693w 

Columhiis.     Colombo,  Cristoforo. 

The  letter  of  Christopher  Columbus 
concerning  his  first  voyage  to  the  new 
world,      trans,   by   Donald   B.   Clark. 

1924.  cB  C718 

CooUdge.    White,  William  Allen. 

Calvin  Coolidge,  the  man  who  is  presi- 
dent.     192.5.  B  C774whi 

Crane.     Griffin.   Solomon  Bulkley. 

W.  Murray  Crane,  a  man  and  brother. 
1926.  B  C8914g 

Cremer.     Evaks,  Howard. 

Sir  Randal  Cremer ;  his  life  and  work. 
1910.  B  C914e 

Gift  of  Dr  E.   B.  Krehbiel. 

JJutidet.     Daudet,  Leon  A. 

Memoirs  of  Leon  Daudet,  edited  and 
trans,    by   Arthur  Kingsland   Griggs. 

1925.  ^        B  D2384g 

Dotvning.     Beresfoed,  John. 

The  godfather  of  Downing  street. 
cl925.  B  D751b 

Ford.     LocHNER,   Louis  Paul. 

Henry  Ford — America's  Don  Quixote. 
1925.  B  F699IO 

Oandhi.     Rolland,  Romain. 

Mahatma  Gandhi.     cl924.  B  G1'95r 

Gardner.    Carter,  Morris. 

Isabella  Stewart  Gardner  and  Fenway 
court.      1925.  B  G227c 

Garfield.     Smith,  Theodore  Clarke. 

The  life  and  letters  of  James  Abram 
Garfield.     1925.     2   v.  B  G231s 


Grant.     Grant,   Jesse   Root,   c(-   Granger, 
Henry  Francis. 
In    the    days    of    my    father,    General 
Grant.     192.->.  B  G763gr 

Grcij.     Grey,  Edward  Grey,  1st  viscount. 
Twenty-five  yeare,  1892-1916.     1925. 

B  G8423 

Hamilton.     Hamilton,  Yereker  Monteith. 
Things  that  happened.     1925. 

B   H221 

Hardman.     Haedman,  Sir  William. 
A  mid- Victorian  Pepys.     [1923] 

B   H264 

Harris.      Harris,    Corra    May    (White) 
"Mrs  L.  H.  Harris." 
As  a  woman  thinks.     1925.   B   H313as 

Hed.in.     Hedin,   Sven  Anders. 
My  life  as  an  explorer.     1925. 

B   H454 

Hergesheimer.     Hergesheimer,  Joseph. 
From  an  old  house.     1925.       qB   H545 

Hines.     [HiNES,  Joseph  Wilkinson] 

Touching  incidents  in  the  life  and 
labors  of  a  pioneer  on  the  Pacific 
coast  since  1853.     1911.       cB  H6624 

Hoichcrt.     HowBEET,  Irving. 

ilemories  of  a  lifetime  in  the  Pike's 
Peak  region.     1925.  B   H853 

Hoire.     Richards,  Mrs  Laura  Elizabeth 
(Howe),     d     Elliott.     Mrs     Maud 
(Howe). 
Julia   Ward   Howe,    1819-1910.     1925. 

B   H856r 

Hnneker.     De   Casseees,   Benjamin. 
James  Gibbons  Huneker.     cl925. 

B   H834d 
■Jeanne  d.'Are.     Denis,  Leon. 

The  mystery  of  Joun  of  Arc.     [1925] 

B  J43cl 

Paine,  Albert  Bigelow.  J 

.loan   of   Arc.    maid   of   France.      1925.      ' 
2  V.  B  J43pa 

Jefferson.     Hirst,  Francis  Wrigley. 
Life   and   letters  of   Thomas   Jefferson. 
1926.  B  J45h 

Johnson.     Boswell,  James. 

Boswell's  note  book,  1776—1777,  record- 
ing particulars  of  Johnson's  early 
life  communicated  by  him  and  others 
in  those  years.     1925.  B  J69bn 


vol.  21,  no.  2 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


205 


Piozzi,  Rlrs   Hester  Lyneli    (Sal- 

usbury)    Tlirale. 
Anecdotes  of  tlie  Into   Saimii'l  .Tolinsoii. 
l!>2r..  B  J69p 

Lafuijcttc.    Dale,  Edward  Everett,  cd. 
Lafa.yette  letters.     1925.  B   L161 

Jjatcrcjice.    Lawrence,  William,  hp. 
Fifty  years.     1923.  B   L242 

lA'on.     Bell,  Aubrey  Fitz  Gerald. 

Luis  de  Leon.     1925.  B   L579b 

l.iiKolii.     Grout,  .lo.siali. 
A   Lincoln  book,   a   soldier's  tribute   to 
his  chief.     1925.  B   L736grt 

Macartney.      Clarence     Edward 

Noble. 
Lincoln  and  his  generals.     [192G] 

B   L736mac 
SoMERS,  William  H. 


A  new  light  on  Abraham  Lincoln  as  an 
advocate.     1925.  cB  L736so 

Lovelace.     Hartmann,  Cyril  Hughes. 
The  Cavalier  spirit  and  its  influence  on 
the  life  and  work  of  Richard  Lovelace 
(1G1S-165S).     1925.  B  L898h 

Liicos.     Lucas,  Netley. 

The  autobiography  of  a  crook.     [1925] 

B   L933 

Marrcad!/.     Macready,  Sir  Nevil,  hart. 
Annals  of  an  active  life.     2  v.     [19124] 

B   M1741 

McDouguU.     McDougall,   Walter  Hugh. 
This  is  the  life  !     1920.  BM137 

]\Iarden.     Connolly,  Margaret. 

The  life  story  of  Orison  Swett  Marden. 
cl925.  B   M322c 

Mcath.    Meath,  Reginald  Brabazou,  J2th 
earl  of. 
Memories     of     the     twentieth     century. 
1924.  B  M484a 

Melhoiirne.        Airlie,      Mabell      Frances 
Elizabeth  (Gore)  Ogilvy,  countess  of. 
In. Whig  society,  1775-1818.    1921. 

B   M5172 
Mencken.     Goldberg,  Isaac. 

The  man  Mencken  ;  a  biographical  and 
critical  survey.     1925.  B   M536g 

Montagu.    Benjamin,  Lewis  S. 

Lady  Mary  Wortley  Montagu:  her  life 
and  letters  (1689-1762)  by  Lewis 
Melville  [pseud.]      [1925] 

B   M 7585b 


Xaj)icr.     Holmes,  Thomas  Rice  Edward. 
Sir  Cliarles  Napier.      1925.      B   N1973h 

Xapolcoii.     Geer,  AValter. 

Napoleon  and  Marie-Louise ;  the  fall  of 
the  empire.     1925.  B   N216gee 

Peahodij.     Peabody,  Josephine  Preston. 
Diary  and  letters.     1925.  B   P3524b 

L'rcscott.     Prescott,  William  Hickling. 
The   correspondence   of    William   Hick- 
ling  Pres'cott.     1925.  B   P933w 

Prlchard.     Parker,  Eric. 

Hesketh   Prichard.    a   memoir.      [1924] 

B   P947p 

Proctor.     Proctor,  Henry  Hugh. 

Between    black     and     white ;     autobio- 
graphical sketches.     cl9i2o.     B   P9643 

Roosevelt.    Moore,  Joseph  Hampton. 
Roosevelt  and  the  Old  guard.    cl92o. 

B    R781mo 

Russell.    Russell,  John  Russell,  1st  carl. 
The  later  correspondence  of  Lord  John 
Russell.  18-10-1878.     1925.     2  v. 

B   R9645g 

Haltus.     Saltus,  Mrs  Marie  (Giles). 
Edgar  Saltus,  the  man.     1925. 

B   S179s 

Sciidaiitore.     Scudamore.  Frank. 
A  sheaf  of  memories.      [1925] 

B  S436 

Scjiiiheda.  Bell,  Aubrey  Fitz  Gerald. 
Juan  Gines  de  Sepulveda.  1925. 
( Hispanic  notes  and  monographs ; 
essays,  studies,  and'  brief  biogr'aphies 
issued  by  the  Hispanic  society  of 
America)  B  S479b 

Shaic.     CoLLis,  John  Stuart. 

Shaw.     [1925]  B  S534co 

Sheldon.     Sheldon,  Charles  Monroe. 
Charles    M.     Sheldon :     his    life    story. 
cl925.  B  S544 

'Strad.     Whyte,  Frederic. 

The  life  of  W.  T.  Stead.     [1925]     2  v. 

B   S811w 

Stcrenson.     Hellman,  George  Sidney. 
The  true  Stevenson.     1925.       B  S848he 


206 


NEWS   NOTES    OF   CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


Stuart.     Stuart,  Granville.. 

Forty  years  on  the  frontier.  1925. 
2  V.      (Early  western  journals) 

B  S9312 

Ti/iidalc.     Cooper,  William  Barrett. 
The  life  and  work  of  William  Tindale. 
2d  ed.    192.5.  B  T987c 

Washhiirn.     HuNT,  Gaillard,  comp. 

Israel,  Elihu  and  Cadwallader  Wash- 
burn ;  a  chapter  in  American  biog- 
raphy.    1925.  B  W3154h 

Washington.     Prussing,  Eugene  E. 

George  Washington,  in  love  and  other- 
wise.    1925.  B  W318pr 

Washington,  George,  prcs.  U.  S. 


The     diaries     of    George    Washington. 
1748-1799.     1925.     4  v.        B  W318fi 

Wir/rjiii.     SMITH,  Nora  Archibald. 

Kate    Douglas    Wiggin    as    her    sister 
knew  her.     1925.  B  W654s 

Williams.     Dickson,  Harris. 
■  An  old-fashioned  senator.     1925. 

.  B  W7243d 

WitJierspooii.    Collins,  Varnum  Lansing. 
President  Witherspoon.     1925. 

B  W824c 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Institute    of    social    and    religious    re- 
search. 
World   missionary    atlas,    containing    a 
directory     of     missionary     societies. 
1925.  f912  15 

RlDGLEY,  Douglas   Clay. 

Geographic    principles ;    their    applica- 
tion to  the  elementary  school.    cl925. 
(Riverside  educational  monographs) 
910.7   R54 

United    States    infantry    association. 
Map  reading.     cl924.  912  U58 

DESCRIPTION   AND  TRAVEL: 
GENERAL. 

Benson.    Stella. 

The   little   world.      1925.  910  B47 

Canfield,   Mrs  Flavia   A.    (Camp). 
Around  the  world  at  eighty.     1925. 

910  C22 
Foulke,   William  Dudley. 

A   random   record  of   travel.     1925. 

910.4  F76 


Fkothingham,  Robert. 
Around  the  world.     1925.      (The  Park 
street  library)  910.4  F941 

Halliburton,  Richard. 

The  royal  road  to  romance.     cl925. 

910  HIS 
HuED,   Archibald   Spicer. 

The  reign  of  the  pirates.     1925. 

910.4  H95 
Knight,    Lucian    Lamar. 

Tracking    the    sunset.      1925. 

910.4  K69 
Marble,  Fred  Elmer. 

Marble's      round      the      world      travel- 
guide.     cl925.  910.4  M31 

Parry,    Charles  Norman  dc  Courcy. 

Wanderings  in   the   Pacific.      [1924] 

919.3  P25 
SiiiTH,   C.   Harold. 

Rahwedia.     1925.  919.31   S64 

EUROPE. 

Bone,   James. 
The  London  perambulator.     1926. 

q914.21    B7 

Capek,  Karel. 

Letters  from  England.     1925. 

914.2  C23 

Chancellor,    Edwin   Beresford. 

The  pleasure  haunts  of  London.     1925. 
914.21   C45p 
Dexter,  Walter. 

The  England  of  Dickens.      [1925] 

914.2  D52 
Edwards,   George   F. 

Old   time   Paris,    a    plain   guide   to   its 
chief    survivals.       [1925] 

914.43  E263 
Feuilleeat,  Albert. 

French  life  &  ideals,     trans,   by   Vera 
Barbour.      1925.  914.4  F42 


Fox,  Ralph. 

People  of  the  steppes.     1925. 


914.7  F79 


Geering,   Thomas. 

Our   Sussex  parish.      [1925] 

914.22  G29 

GOSTLING,  Mrs  Frances  M.    (Parkinson). 

The  Bretons  at  home.     1925. 

914.41   068 
Hielscher,  Kurt. 

Picturesque    Germany.  q914.3  H6 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


207 


HuTTON,   Edward. 

Floi-ence   and   iioi'tiierii    Tuscany,    with 
Genoa.     4tli  cd.      [1924] 

914.55   H984f 

^- ■-   Milan    and    Lombardy.      [1925] 

914.52   H98m 
Kingston,  Charles. 

The  romanoe  of  Monte  Carlo.     1925. 
914.49  K55 
NiTTTiNG,   Wallace. 

Ireland   beautiful.      cl925. 

q914.15  N9 
I'AKKES,   .Toan. 

Travel  in   England  in   the  seventeenth 
century.      1925.  914.2   P24 

Phillips,  Arthur. 

The  gay  city,  being  a  guide  to  the  fun 
of  the  fair  in  Paris.     cl925. 

914.43   P55 

RiMiNGTON,   Frank   C. 

Motor  rambles  through  France.     1925. 

914.4  R57 
Wilson,    llobert   Forrest. 
I'aris   on   Parade.      cl925. 

914.43  W76 

ASIA. 

Ayscoitgh,  Mrs  Florence. 
A    Chinese    mirror.      [1925] 


Cooper,  Merian   C. 
Grass.     1925. 


915.1   A98 
915.5  C77 


Franck,  Harry  Alverson. 

lloving  through  southern  China.     cl925. 

915.1  F82 
MiLLSPAUGn,   Arthur   Chester. 

The  American   task  in  Persia.     cl925. 
915.5  M65 
The   Osaka   Asahi. 

Present-day    Japan.     1925.      f915.2  08 

SuGiMOTO,  Etsu    (Inagaki). 

A  daughter  of  the  Samurai.     1925. 

915.2  S94 
Thomas,   Lowell  Jackson. 

Beyond  Khyber  Pass.     cl925. 

915.8  T45 

AFRICA. 

Dawson,  William  Harbutt. 

South     Africa :      people,      places      and 
problems.      1925.  916.8  D27 

Perkins,   Mrs   Edna    (Brush). 

A  red  carpet  on  the  Sahara.     cl925. 

916.61   P44 

Gift  of  author. 
8—44805 


NORTH  AMERICA. 

Barbour,  Ralph  Henry. 

Lot's    go    to    Florida  !      ];t2(), 

917.59   B239 

Breeden,  Marshall. 

California,    all    of    it.     cl925. 

C917.94  B83c 

Carpenter,  Frank  George. 

Lands  of  the  Caribbean.  1925.  (Car- 
penter's world  travels)       917.29  C29 

Crevecoeur,   Michel   Guillaume   St.  Jean 
de. 
Sketches   of   eighteenth    century   Amer- 
ica.    1925.  917.3  C92s 

De   Casseres,    Benjamin. 

Mirrors    of    NeAV    York.     cl925. 

917.471    D29 

Flagg,    James   Montgomery. 

Boulevards  all  the  way  —  maybe. 
cl925.  917.3  F57 

I'ox,    Charles   Donald. 

The    truth    about    Florida.     1925. 

917.59   F79 

Freeman,    Lewis   Ransome. 

On  the  roof  of  the  Rockies,  the  great 
Columbia  icefield  of  the  Canadian 
Rockies,     1925.  917.11    F85 

Gerould,  Mrs  Katharine    (Fullerton). 
The    aristocratic    Yv''est.     1925. 

917.8  G37 
Gillett,   James  B. 

Six  years  with  the  Texas  rangers, 
1875-1881.     1925.  917.64  G47 

Manington,  George. 

The  West  Indies,  with  British  Guiana 
and   British   Honduras.      [1925] 

917.29   M27 

MtiRPUY,    Thomas    Dowler. 

Seven  wonderlands  of  the  American 
West.  cl925.  ("See  America  first" 
series)  917.8   M97s 

SCHMOE,    F.    W. 

Our'  greatest  mountain  ;  a  handbook  for 

Mount  Rainier  national  park.    1925. 

917.97  S35 

WiLLixiMS,    Samuel. 

The   city   of   the   golden   gate.     1921. 

C917.9461    W72 


208 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


SOUTH  AMERICA. 

CHAintAN,   Charles  Edward. 

A  Californian  in  South  i^merica.    1917. 

c918  C46 

Foster,  Harry  La  Toiu-ette. 

A    tropical    tramp    with    the    tourists. 
1925.  918  F75 

McFee,  William. 

Sunlight    in    New    Granada.     1925. 

918.6  IVI14 
Prodgers,   Cecil  Herbert. 

Adventures  in   Peru.      [1924] 

918.5   P9,6 

HISTORY.     GENERAL. 

FouRNiER  d'Albe,   Edmund  Edward. 
Hephaestus ;      or     The     soul     of     the 
machine.      [To-day     and     to-morrow 
series]  901   F77h 

George,  Henry. 

The  law  of  human  progress.     cl917. 

901   G34 

The  g-ift  of  Dr  E.  B.  Krehbiel. 

Ploetz,  Karl  Julius. 

Ploetz'    manual    of    universal    history. 
cl925.  r909  P72o 


Teggart,    Frederick    John. 
Theory   of   history.     1925. 


907  T26t 


ANCIENT. 

Ckoiset,  Maurice. 

Hellenic  civilization,  trans,  by  Paul 
B.   Thomas.     1925.  938  C94 

Eeskine,    Beatrice,    "Mrs    Steuart    Ers- 
kine." 
The   vanished   cities   of  Arabia.      1925. 
913.947  E73 
Glotz,    Gustave. 

The  Aegean  civilization.  trans,  by 
M.  II.  Dobic  and  E.  M.  Riley.  1925. 
(The  history  of  civilization.  [Pre- 
history and  antiquity])     913  38  G56 

OSBORN,    Edward    Bolland. 

The  heritage  of  Greece  and  the  legacy 
of  Rome.  [1925]  (Doran's  modern 
readers'   bookshelf)  938  081 

QuENNELL,    Blrs    Marjorie  ■  cG    Quenuell, 

Charles   Henry   Bourne. 

Everyday     life     in      Roman      Britain. 

[1924]      (The    everyday   life    series) 

913.42  Q3 


Sandys,  Sir  John  Edwin,  ed. 

A   companion   to   Latin   studies.     1925. 

937  S22 

EUROPE. 

Belloc,    Hilaire. 

A  history  of  England.     1925. 

942  B44 
Child,    Richard   Washburn. 

A  diplomat  looks  at  Europe.     1925. 

940.98  C53 

CoiT,    Charles   Wheeler. 

The    royal    martyr.      [1924] 

942.06  C68 

Commission  for   relief   in   Belgium. 

Statistical  review   of   relief  operations. 
[1925]  q940.937  C7s 

Gift. 

Eastman,  Max. 

Since   Lenin   died.     [1925] 

947.08   El 3 

EuLALiA,  infanta  of  Spain. 
Courts    and    countries    after    the    war. 
1925.  940.98  E88 

Glasgow,   George; 

From   Dawes  to  Locarno.     1926. 

940.98  G54 
Hardy,    G.    Gathorne. 

Norway.     1925.      (The  modern  world) 

948.1    H26 
John,  Gwen. 

Queen   Elizabeth    (1533-1603)     [1924] 
(The  roadmaker  series)      942.05  J 65 

MouFFLE  d'Angerville. 

The  private  life   of  Louis  XV.     1924. 
944.03  M925p 

Platonov,   Sergiei  Fedorovich. 

History    of    Russia,    tr.    by    E.    Arons- 
berg.     1925.  947  P71 

Stanoyevich,  Milivoy   Stoyan,   comp. 
Slavonic   nations   of  yesterday   and   to- 
day.    1925.      (The  handbook  series) 
947  S78 

Sully,   Maximilien   de   Bethune,   due   de. 

Tlie  great  design  of  Henry  IV.     1909. 

944.03  S95g 

Gift   of   Dr   E.    B.   Krehbiel. 

ToYNBEE,   Arnold   Joseph. 

The  world  after  the  Peace  conference. 
1925.  940.98  T75 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY. 


209 


VTS80HER,  Charles  (h\ 

Belgium's    case.      tr.  I).v    K.    F.    .Foiir- 

daiii.     191G.  949.3  VS3 

Gift  of  Dr   E.   B.  Krehbiel. 

ASIA. 

Haevey,   Godfrey   Eric. 

History  of  Burma.     1920.      959.2  H34 

0"DWYEK.  »S'/;-  Michael  Francis. 

India  as  I  knew  it,  1885-1925.    [1925] 

954  027 

Whitehead,  Henry,   hp.  of  Madras. 
Indian  problems  in  religion,  education, 
politics.     1924.  954  W59 

UNITED  STATES. 

DoscH,   Henry  Ernst. 

Vigilante      days      at      Virginia      City. 
[1924]  C979.3  D72 

Jesuits.     Letters  from  missions    (North 
America ) . 
The   Jesuit    relations   and   allied    docu- 
ments.        1925.         [The      American 
library]  971   J582 

Kerkick,    Harrison    Summers. 

"The  flag  of  the  United   States,"   your 
flag  and  mine.     cl925.        q929.9  K4 

Mansfield,   James   Carroll. 
Highlights  of  history.     cl925. 

973  M287 
Pollaed,    Albert    Frederick. 

Factors  in  American  history.     1925. 

973   P77 
Reed,   Charles  Bert. 

The  curse  of  Cahawba.     1925. 

976.1    R32 
Saunders,   Charles  Francis. 

A    little    book    of    California    missions. 
1925.  C979.402  S25! 

Society     of     California     pioneers,      San 
Francisco. 
Quarterly   of   the    Society    of    California 
pioneers.     1924.  c979.405  867 

Steele,  Matthew  Forney. 

American    campaigns.      1922.    973  S81 

Stratton,   R.   B. 

Captivity   of  the   Oatman  girls.     1909. 
C970.6  S91a 
Todd,   Charles   Burr. 

The  battles   of   San   Pasqual.      cl925. 
C979.4  T63 


Wrr.MAMS,    William    Carlos. 

In    the    American    grain.     li>25. 

973  W72 

EUROPEAN  WAR. 

Hoffman,    Max   von. 

The  war   of  lost   opportunities.      1925. 
940.91    H71 
Howland,   Charles  Roscoe. 

A   military   history   of   the   world   war. 
1923.     2  V.  940.91    H86 

Utah.     Council  of  defense. 

Utah  in  the  world  war.     1924. 

940.973  U89 
Gift. 

CALIFORNIA  STATE  PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED  DURING 
JANUARY,  FEBRUARY  AND 
MARCH,    1926.t 

Many  of  the  administrative  depart- 
ments of  the  state  are  from  time  to  time 
publishing  reports,  bulletins,  etc.,  which 
are  of  considerable  interest.  Copies  can 
usually  be  obtained  free  by  writing  to 
the  departments  issuing  them.  The  pub- 
lications of  the  LTniversity  of  California 
are  offered  for  sale  or  in  exchange  by  the 
University  Press,  Berkeley,  with  the  ex- 
ception of  the  publications  of  the  Agri- 
cultural Experiment  station  and  some  of 
the  administrative  bulletins,  Avhich  are 
distributed  free.  Most  of  the  publications 
of  the  State  Mining  Bureau  are  required 
by  law  to  be  sold.  Price  is  given  after 
each  entry.  The  titles  are  listed  in  News 
Notes  of  California  Libraries  as  they  are 
received   at   the    State   Library. 

Adjutant  General.  Special  regula- 
tions no.  1.  Care  and  accounting  of 
funds  and  property.     1926.     76  p.     illus. 

Agriculture  Department.  Monthly 
bulletin,  vol.  15,  nos.  1- G  (in  1),  Janu- 
ary-June, 1926. 

Proceedings  of  tiie  58tli  Convention 
of  Fruitgrowers  and  Farmers,  Sacra- 
mento, Nov.   3-5,   1925. 

Special     publication     no.     61. 

Commercial   fertilizers,    agricultural   min- 
erals    (1925).     1926.     63  p. 

Athletic  Commission.  [First  an- 
nual] report,  November,  1925.  1926. 
[3  p.] 


tExcept  when  otherwise  noted,  publica- 
tions are  printed  at  the  state  printing 
ofHce,  Sacramento,  and  are  octavo  In  size. 


210 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES.  [April,  192G 


Rules   and   regulation   and   the 

laws     regulating     boxing     and     wrestling 
matches.     1926.     42  p.     32°. 

AnoENEY  General.  Biennial  report, 
1922-1924.     1925.     103  p. 

CniROPRACTic  Examiners,  State 
Board  of.  Directory  of  licensed  chiro- 
practors of  the  state  of  California.  1926. 
49  p. 

Fish   and   Game   Commission.      Cali- 
fornia   fish    and    game,    vol.    11,    no.    4, 
October,    1925.      p.    149-202.      illus. 
Index,   vol.    11,   p.    195-202. 

Forestry,  State  Board  of.  Forest 
and  fire  laws  and  regulations,  1925- 
1927.      1926.     71   p.      32°. 

Health,  State  Board  of.  Rules  and 
regulations  governing  maternity  hospitals 
and  homes,  adopted  November  7,  1925. 
1925.     22   p.     32°. 

"Weekly    bulletin,    vol.    4,    nos. 

47-52,    January-February ;    vol.    5,    nos. 
1-7,    February-March,    192G. 

Bureau  of  Tuberculosis.  Pre- 
ventorium  standards.      1920.      11    p. 

Highway  Co^fMissiON.  California 
highways,  vol.  3,  nos.  1-2,  January- 
February,    1926.     illus.     maps. 

Important   statutes   relating   to 

tlie     California      Highway      Commission, 
compiled  November,  1925.     1926.     104  p. 

Manual  of  instructions.  Bridge 

Department.      1925.      179    p.      illus. 

Manual  of  instructions,  Con- 
struction Department.     1925.     69  p.  24°. 

Manual  of  instructions,  De- 
partment of  surveys  and  plans.  1925. 
71  p.     illus.     24°. 

Industrial  Accident  Commission 
(San  Francisco).*  Reports,  from  July 
1.  1924,  to  June  30,  1925.  1926.  35  p. 
charts. 

California  safety  news,  vol.  10, 

no.   1,   March,   1920.     16  p.     illus. 


*The  location  of  an  office  or  institution 
is  in  Sacramento,  except  when  otherwise 
noted. 


Insurance  Department  (San  Fran- 
cisco). List  of  persons,  partnerships 
and  corporations  licensed  as  insurance 
brokers  in  California  term  ending  July  1, 
1920,  includiu,^'  licenses  issued  between 
August  1,  1925,  and  December  31,  1925. 
1926.     23  p. 

Labor  Statistics,  Bureau  of  (San 
Francisco ) .  Labor  laws  of  the  state 
of  California,   1925.     1925.     298  p.   16°. 

Legislative  Counsel  Bureau.  Con- 
stitution of  California  and  summary  of 
amendments,  to  which  are  appended 
Magna  Charta,  Declaration  of  Rights, 
Declaration  of  Independence,  the  articles 
of  Confederation  and  the  Constitution  of 
the    United    States.      1925.      449    p.    16°. 

LiBRAHY,  State.  Library  laws  of  the 
state  of  California,  1925  edition.  1925. 
151   p.     32°. 

News     Notes     of     California 


Libraries,   vol.  21,  no.  1,  January,   1926. 
p.   1-93.     map. 


-    Books    for    the    blind    depart- 
News     Notes.       Reprinted     from 


ment. 


Aeirs     Notes     of     California     Libraries, 
.January,  1926.     18  p.     32°. 

Medical  Examiners,  Board  of. 
Annual   report,    1925.      1925.     32   p. 

Mining  Bureau  (San  Francisco). 
Bulletin  no.  79.  Maguesite  in  Calirornia, 
by   Walter   W.   Bradley.      1925.      147   p. 

illus. 

Price   $1.00. 

Bulletin   no.   95.      Geology   and 


ore  deposits  of  the  Randsburg  Quad- 
rangle, California,  Carlton  D.  Hulin. 
1925.  152  p.,  i-ix.  illus.  6  maps,  in 
pocket. 

Price   $2.00. 

Same,     no.      96.        California 

mineral  production  for  1924.  1925. 
174    p.     illus. 

Monthly     chapter     of     report 


XXI  of  the  State  ^Mineralogist  covering 
mining  in  California  and  the  activities 
of  the  State  Mining  Bureau,  vol.  21,  no. 
4,  October,  1925.  illus.  maps.  p.  412- 
624. 


.1.21,110.2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


211 


Summary  of  operations  Cali- 
fornia oil  fields,  vol.  11,  nos.  2-6, 
August-December,    1925.      illus.      maps. 

Real  Estate  Department.  Cali- 
fornia real  estate  directory-bulletin, 
vol.  6,  no.  2,  November,  1925.  Supple- 
ment containing  list  of  brokers  and 
salesmen  to  October  1,  1925,  together 
with  a  report  of  the  work  of  the  twenty- 
first  annual  convention  of  the  California 
real  estate  association,  held  at  Fresno, 
October    6-10,    1925.     1925.     334  p. 

Secretaey  of  State.  General  elec- 
tion laws  of  California.     1925.     281   p. 

University  of  California  (Berke- 
ley). Bulletin,  third  series,  vol.  19,  no. 
7.  Register  1924-1925,  with  announce- 
ments for  1925-26,  in  two  volumes. 
Berkeley,    January,    1926.     12°. 

Same,    vol.    19,    no.    8.      An- 


nouncement of  the  graduate  division,  for 
the  academic  year,  1926-27.  Berkeley, 
February,    1926.      59    p.      12°. 

Same,    vol.    19,    no.    9.      Inter- 


session,  May  10  to  June  19  and  Summer 
session,  June  21  to  July  31,  1926,  at 
Berkeley.  Berkeley,  March,  1926.  147 
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503. 


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i 


vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


21[ 


Same,  vol.  2S,  nos.  8-9. 

The  effect  of  certain  drugs  and  dyes  upon 
the  growth  of  eudamoeba"  gingivalis 
(Gros)  in  vitro;  and  Experiments  with 
endomoeba  gingivalis  (Gros)  in  mixed 
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a  solid  base ;  with  peritoneal  cells ; 
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On  oxyphysis  oxytoxoides  gen.  nov.,  sp. 
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11-13.  Mitochondria  in  euglena  gr'acilis 
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lans  (Macartney  1810)  ;  Mitochondria  in 
ciliates  with  especial  reference  to  Para- 
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Studies  on  the  ingestion  of  leucocytes, 
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16.  On  Oxymonas,  a  flagellate  with  an 
extensile  and  retractile  proboscis  from 
kalotermes  from  British  Guiana ;  On 
Proboscidiella  multinucleata  gen.  nov., 
sp.  nov.,  from  planocryptotermes  nocens 
from  the  Philippine  Islands,  a  multinu- 
cleate flagellate  with  a  remarkable  organ 
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On    the    cestode    genus    dipylidium    from 
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— ■  ■  Same,  vol.  28,  nos.  18-- 

19.  A  useful  modification  of  a  clearing 
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Berkeley,  February  26,  1926.  p.  357-64. 
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The  biological  relationships  of  Leich- 
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Ann  Koch.  Berkeley,  March  16,  1926. 
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RECEIVED  DURING  JANUARY, 
FEBRUARY   AND    MARCH,    1926. 

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April,  1926 


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B^avorite  hymns  and  familiar  tunes. 
Compiled  _for  use  in  the  Illinois  In- 
stitution for  the  blind,  by  D,  F, 
Stillman, 

Gift  of  E.  B.  Deckurd. 

*LiszT,  Franz.  Auf  dem  Wasser  zu 
Singeu.  (To  be  sung  on  the  water.) 
Barcarolle.  Song  by  Franz  Schubert. 
Transcription  by  Franz  Liszt.  Edited 
and   fingered   by   W.    M.    Scharfenberg. 

*Van  der  Stucken,  Frank.  Found 
(Gefunden).     Op.  23, 


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tasie   impromptu. 

Gift  of  Illinois  School  for  the  Blind. 

*GoDARD,  Benjamin.  Espagnole  Bolero. 
Edited  and  fingered  by  L.  O.   Sterle. 

*Mendelssohn-Bartholdy,       Felix. 
Concerto.     Op.  25  for  pianoforte  solo. 

WiENiAWSKi,  Joseph.     Valse  de  concert. 

VOCAL. 

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fect day. 


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In  European  Braille. 

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BKONra,  Cu-U{LOTTE.  YiUette.  7  vols. 
Personal  experiences  and  observa- 
tions of  life  in  the  Brussels  pension- 
nat  where  Charlotte  Bronte  spent 
some  years  among  many  singulai: 
people  whose  portraits  she  here  puts 
on   record. — Baker. 

French  Text. 
*  Bordeaux,     Henry.       La     croisee     des 
chemius.     3   vols. 

*B0YLES\"E,  Rene.  La  becquee ;  roman. 
2  vols. 

*Clemens,  Samuel  Langhorne  ("Mark 
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*Cltrwood,  James  Oliver.  Le  piege 
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*Fabre,  Jean  Henri  Casimir.  Souve- 
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* ser.  6.     4  vols. 

* ser.  7.     4  vols. 


'" -^—  ser.  8.     4  vols. 

•' ser.  9.     4  vols. 

* • ser.  10.    4  vols. 

Ser,  1-4  previously  added. 

^GoBiNEAU,   Joseph  Arthur,   comte   de. 
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vol.  21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBgARY. 


21i 


*Larousse,  Pierre.  Nouveau  Larousse, 
adapte  a  I'usage  des  aveugles  par 
Geo.  L.  Raverat.  Dictionnaire  ency- 
clopedique.     4  vols. 

*Legros,  Georges  Victor.  La  vie  de 
J.  H.  Fabre  (naturaliste),  suivie  du 
repertoire  general  et  analytique  des 
Souvenirs  entomologiques.     4  vols. 

*LoTi,      Pierre,      pseud.        Ramuntcho. 

2  vols. 

*Tharaud,  Jerome  et  Jean.  Un 
royaume   de   Dieu.     2  vols. 

*ToLSTOi,  Leo  Nikolaievitch,  count. 
Les    cosaques.      Nouvelle    de    Caucase. 

3  vols. 

magazines. 
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9— 44S05 


PIANO. 

tCHRiSTiNE,      H.        Attends      moi      sou 
I'horlage. 

t Elle  n'est  pas  si  mal  que  ca. 

t Madame     fox-trot.        Sur     les 

motifs    de    I'operette    nouvelle    de    Mr 
Albert   Villemetz. 

DussEK,  Olh^a  Buckley.     Les  adieux, 
rondo  in  B  flat. 

Gift  of  J.  R.  Lewarton. 

*FiLBERTO,  Juan  de  Dios.    El  paiiuelito, 
tango. 

*  Grieg,      Edvard.        Humoresque     pour 
piano. 

*Hahn,    Reynaldo.     Ciboulette-valse. 

*Herpin.      Premier   oui,   valse-hesitation. 

tHuGXJET,    RoGELio.      Corrientes,    tan  go- 
mil  onga. 

•  Nanouk,   one-step. 

Gift  of  Mrs  Dollie  Franklin. 

fJovEs,  Manuel.     Loca,   tango. 

fLEARSi.     El  as  de  copas,  tango-milonga. 

fMESSAGER,    Andre.      L'amour    masque, 
tango. 

fMONACO,     JIMMIE,     d     GiMBLE,     ALBERT. 
Tempting ;    fox-trot    et    blues. 


tMoRETTi,    Raoul.     Ah ! 
milonga. 


.    Tango- 


•  Quand    les    femmes    font    comme 

les  enfants. 

Sevillana,  paso  doble  bolero. 

•  Toi  et  moi,  fox-trot. 


iPEARLY,    Fred,    tC-    Chagnon,    Pierre. 
Emmene-moi,  one-step. 

t Le    moment   de    m'en    aller,    fox- 


trot. 


tRivET,     Jeanne.       Libellule,     scottisch 
e.spagnole. 

*ScoTTO,   Vincent.     Tchike,  tchike,  one- 
step. 


*Gift  of  American  Braille  Press,  Inc. 
tGift  of  Frances  Phillips. 


216 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


''Tavan,  Emile.  M  i  r  e  i  1 1  e  ;  opera 
comique  en  3  actes  de  Charles  Gounod. 
Grand  fantasie  pour  piano. 

•■■ Yeronique,    fautasie   pour'  piano. 

Muj^    caiii !      Schot- 


tTELLERiA,    Juan. 
tisch. 


tYvAiN,  Maurice.  Les  chansons  d' 
amour,   fox-trot   et  shimmy. 

t Miss  Blues. 

t Si  Ton  reflechissait,  one-step. 

VIOLIN. 

*Kreislek,  Fritz.  Chant  Hindou.  Vio- 
lin and  piano. 

VOCAL. 

Balakirew,  M.  Trois  melodies  Russes. 
Pour  une  voix  avec  aecompagnement 
de  piano. 

Contents  i  (a)  Chanson  de  Brigand  ; 
(b)  Berceuse;  (c)  Chanson  Georgi- 
enne. 

Gift  of  J.  G.   Poole. 

*Offenbach,  Jacques.  Les  contes  d' 
Hoffman,  acte  III,  entr'acte  et  bar- 
carolle, duo,  soprano  et  mezzo-soprano. 

In    Moon    Typ«. 

BOOKS. 

Allen,  James  Lane.  A  Kentucky 
cardinal.     2  vols. 

A  study  of  personality  and  senti- 
ment, penetrated  with  a  tender  love 
of  nature. — Baker. 

Longfellow,  Henry  Wadsworth.  The 
golden  legend.     3  vols. 

An  excellent  and  sympathetic  treat- 
ment of  the  Middle  Ages  in  poetic 
drama. 

Ward,  Adolphus  William.  Dickens. 
G  vols. 

Interesting  biography  of  Charles 
Dickens. 

MAGAZINES. 

Dawn,  part  158. 

The  Moon,  weekly  newspaper,  for  Janu- 
ary-March. 

Moon   magazine    for    January-March. 

In  New  York  Point. 

books. 
Bowles,    William    A.,    comp.      Memory 


Duplicate    copy. 
McComb. 


Gift   of   Mrs   Rose 


*Gift  of  American  Braille  Press,  Inc. 
f-Gift  of  Frances  Phillips. 


MAGAZINES. 
Catuolic   transcript  for  January-March. 

Christian    record    for    February-March. 

Gospel  trumpet  for  January  and  March. 

Lux  vera.  Catholic  monthly,  for  Janu- 
ary-March. 

Matilda  Ziegler  magazine  for  February- 
March. 

In   Revised   Braille. 

Books  marked  c  are  piinted  with  contraptions. 

BOOKS. 

cAtherton,  Mrs  Gertrude  Franklin 
(  Horn  ) .      The    splendid    idle    forties  ; 

stories  of  old  California. 

Library  has  vols.  1,  2  and  3.  Vols. 
4-7    to   be   added   later. 

Contents :  v.  1,  Pearls  of  Loreto. 
V.  2,  First  ten  parts  of  "Ears  of 
twenty  Americans."  v.  3,  Concluding 
chapters  of  "Ears  of  twenty  Ameri- 
cans" and  "The  Wash-tub  man." 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland. 

Bbyce,  Catherine  Turner.  Aldine 
supplementary  readers :  Fables  from 
afar.     2  vols. 

Aldine     supplementary     readers : 


That's  why  stor'ies.     2  vols. 

cBunneb,  Henry  Cuyler.  Love  letters 
of  Smith.  Includes  The  forest  fire, 
by  Winifred  Sanford. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
W.  W.  Sawyer. 

cCameron,  Anne.  Gramp  and  Wesley 
sees  the  world. 

Stories  of  automobile  camps. 
Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland. 

cChater,  Melville.  Through  the  back 
doors  of  Belgium. 

From  the  National  Geographic 
Magazine   for   May,    1925. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Hazel 
B.   De   Silva. 

cComstock,  Mrs  Belle  Jessie  (Wood). 

A  series  of  fourteeen  lectures  on  health. 

Hand   copied   by   Daniel   D.    Griggs. 

Gift  of  National  Braille  Transcriber  « 

Society. 

cCooPER,  James  Fenimore.  The  last  of 
the  Mohicans  ;  or,  A  narrative  of  1757. 
0  vols. 

The  adventures  of  Hawkeye, 
Cooper's  inimitable  backwoodsman, 
and  Chingachgook  his  Indian  coun- 
terpart. 


vol.21,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY. 


217 


cCox,  Coleman.     Think  it  over. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
M.  L.  Brereton. 

cCkawbord,  James  Fyle  AVickersiiam. 
A  first  book  in  Spanish.     6  vols. 

Dawson,  Coning sby.  The  seventh 
Christmas. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
Grace   Morgan. 

cEggleston,  Edward.  The  hoosier 
school-boy.     2  vols. 

A  tale  of  school  life  in  tlie  bacli- 
woods  of  Indiana  about  1850  when 
"  lickin'  "  and  "  larnin'  "  went  hand  in 
hand."^Bafcer. 

cFarrar,  John  Chipman,  ed.  Selec- 
tions from  the  literary  spotlight. 

Includes  sketches  of  Bootli  Tark- 
ington,  Mary  Johnson,  Amy  Lowell, 
H.  L.  Mencken,  Edna  Ferber,  and 
John  Farrar. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
M.   L.   Brereton. 

cHall,  Manly  Palmer,  The  lost  keys 
of  Masonry ;  The  legend  of  Hiram 
Abiff.     2  vols. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Mrs 
Kate  Chalmers. 

cHalleck,  Reuben  Post.  New  English 
literature.     7  vols. 

cHaa'ergal,  Frances  Ridley.  Selected 
poems  from  Life  mosaic  and  other 
poems. 

eHiLDEBRAND,  Jesse  Richardson.  Man's 
progress  in  conquering  the  air.  Includes 
Seeing  America  from  the  Shenandoah, 
by  Junius  B.  Wood. 

Gift  of  American  Brotherhood  of 
Free  Reading  for  the  Blind.  Dupli- 
cate copy  gift  of  Kate  M.  Foley. 

cHoLLEY,  Marietta.  Josiah  Allen's  wife 
as  a  P.  A.  and  P.  I.  Samantha  at  the 
Centennial.     5  vols. 

Designed  as  a  bright  and  shining 
light  to  pierce  the  fogs  of  error  and 
injustice  that  surround  society  and 
Josiah  and  to  bring  more  clearly  lo 
view  the  path  that  leads  straight  on 
to   virtue    and    happiness. 

cIsiNG,  Walter  K.  Among  the  Arabs 
in  Bible  lands.     2  vols. 

Hand  copied  by  Mrs  Kate  Baker 
Kerby.  Gift  of  National  Braille 
Transcriber's    Society. 

c Jackson,  Mrs  Helen  Maria  (Fiske) 
Hunt.     Ramona.     5  vols. 

Written  in  1884  to  expose  tlie  in- 
justice of  the  United  States  govern- 
ment's policy  towards  the  Indian  in 
southern  California.  A  mission 
Indian  is  the  hero  in  this  tragic  love 
storj-. — Baker. 


cJoiiNSTON,  Mary.     To  have  and  to  hold. 
4  vols. 

A  beautiful  maid-of-honor.  ward  of 
the  king,  escapes  a  libertine  noble- 
man, by  fleeing  to  Virginia  with  the 
cargo  of  brides  sent  out  by  tlie  com- 
pany (1621).  She  marries  a  rough, 
staunch  settler,  a  famous  swords- 
man, who  defends  his  wife  against 
the  nobleman,  and  they  meet  with 
strange    adventures. 

cKensington,  J.  J.     Talking  with  God : 

some    suggestions    for    the    practice    of 

private  prayer. 

Gift  of  the  Department  of  Missions, 
National    Council,    Episcopal    Church. 

cReese,    Lowell    Otus.      "I    got    Hono- 
lulu." 

A   good  radio  story. 
Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of   Oakland. 

cRichmond,     Mrs     Grace     Louise 
(Smith).     Rufus.     5  vols. 

A  doctor,  crippled  by  the  war  and 
incapacitated  for  practice,  a  little 
foundling,  and  the  woman  who  briags 
the  two  together  are  the  characters 
who  appear  in  this  story. — Bfc.  rev. 
digest. 

Hand  copied  by  Lillian  A.  Ross. 
Gift  of  San  Francisco  Chapter,  Amer- 
ican Red  Cross. 

cRiEGEL,     Robert,     <f-     Loman,     Harry 

James.       Insurance      principles      and 

practices.     3   vols. 

Gift  of  Hadley  Correspondence 
School  for  the   Blind. 

cShawe,    Victor.      "McElvaney's    third 

one." 

A  good  Western   story   for  men. 
Hand  copied  by  and  g-ift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland. 

cShipman,      Nell.       The      movie      that 
couldn't    be   screened. 

The  personal  adventures  of  a  movie 
company  in  the  Northwest — more 
thrilling  than  their  scenario.  Ap- 
peared in  the  Atlantic  Monthly, 
March-May,   1925. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of   Oakland. 

cShort    articles    from    Popular    Science 
Monthly. 

Contents :  Battle  of  the  ants,  by 
Carl  Shoup ;  What  airways  promise 
us,  by  Robert  E.  Martin  ;  Scientific 
inventions  ;  Earth  cracks  menace  big 
American  cities,  by  Arthur  S.  Brown  ; 
How  much  do  you  know  about 
science? 

Hand  copied  by  Mrs  W.  W.  Sawyer. 
Gift  of  San  Francisco  Chapter, 
American    Red    Cross. 


218 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES.  [April,  1926 


cSlosson,"  Edwin  Emery.  Creative 
chemistry. 

Chapters   4    and    5  :  ■  Coal-tar   colors 
and    synthetic    perfumes    and    flavors. 
Tlie  object  of  this  book  is  to  inter- 
est  the   general   reader  in   the   recent 
achievements    of    industrial   science. 

cThomas,  T.  H.     Caillaux. 

Hand  copied  by  Mrs  W.  W.  Sawyer. 
Gift  of  San  Francisco  Chapter, 
American  Red  Cross. 

cWallace,  Lewis.     Ben  Hur.     7  vols. 

A  long-  and  gorgeously  colored 
romance  of  Oriental  life  in  the  1st 
century. — Bak.er. 

cWestcott,  Edward  Noyes.  David 
Harum.     4  vols. 

David  Harum  is  a  shrewd  country 
banker  in  central  New  York,  sharp 
at  a  bargain,  kind-hearted,  with  an 
unfailing  flow  of   dry   humor. 

cWiLSON,  WoODROW.  The  President's 
war  message,  April  2,  1917.  Includes 
I  am  ready,  by  Ambrose  Elwell. 

Duplicate  copy.  Gift  of  Mrs  G.  W. 
Wickeson. 


MAGAZINES. 

cThe  Braille  courier  for  February- 
March. 

cCatholic    review    for    February-March. 

cCiiRiSTiAN  record  for  January-March. 

cGosPEL  trumpet  for  January-March. 

cMatilda    Ziegler    magazine    for    Febru- 
ary-March. 

Messenger  to  the  sightless  for  January- 
March. 

Searchlight  for'  March. 

MUSIC. 

'•'American   music    (bar   over   bar)    cata- 
logue. 


^European  music    (catalogue). 

cLiST  of  music,  1923.     The  Braille  nota- 
tion. 

Gift  of  C.  W.  Bailey. 


VOCAL. 

^cBaer,   Abel.     June   night. 
Cliff  Friend. 


Words  by 


*Berlin,  Irving.  The  waltz  of  long 
ago ;  from  the  third  annual  Music  Box 
Revue,  1923^24. 

*c What'll   I   do  ;   featured  in   the 


new  Music  Box  Revue. 

*cGershwin,  George.  Somebody  loves 
me.  Words  by  Ballard  MacDonald 
and  B.  G.  de  Sylva. 


*cGoLD,    Lew. 
Gus  Kahn. 


Driftwood.      Words    by 


*Gift  of  Ameiican  Braille  Press,  Inc. 
(formerly  Permanent  Blind  P.'.nijf  \\'..r 
Fund,  Inc.). 


cMeyer,  Joseph.  All  aboard  for  heaven. 
Words  by  Billy  Rose. 

Gift  of  Mrs  Dollie  Franklin. 

*cSantley,  Joseph  H.  There's  yes,  yes 
in  j-our  eyes.     Words  by  Cliff  Friend. 

cA  small  collection  of  standard  hymns. 
Gift    of    the    Society    for    Providing 
Evangelical    Religious    Literature    for 
the   Blind. 

*cSpeaks,  Oley.  On  the  road'  to  Manda- 
lay. 

*cTiERNEY,  Harry.  Adoring  you ;  from 
Ziegfeld  Follies,  1924.  Lyrics  by  Jo- 
seph McCarthy. 

*c Someone    loves    you    after    all : 

The  rain  song  from  Kid  Boots.     Lyrics 
by   Joseph   McCarthy. 

In   Ink  Print. 

MAGAZINES. 

The  Beacon  for  January-March. 

St.  Dunstan's  review  for  January  and 
February. 


.*Gift  of  American  Braille  Press,  Inc. 


44S05      5-26      1400 


Vol.  21,  No.  3  JULY  1926 


News  Notes 


OF 


California  Libraries 


IN  THIS  NUMBER-SOME  OF  THE  ITEMS  OF  INTEREST. 


BOND  ISSUES— SANTA  MONICA,  HIGHLAND. 

BUILDING   ACTIVITIES— CARMEL,   PLACENTIA,    REDLANDS,   SAN    BER- 

NARDINO. 

CUSTODIANS'     MEETINGS— KINGS    COUNTY,    SACRAMENTO     COUNTY. 

FRIENDSHIP    GARDEN— RIVERBANK    BRANCH,    STANISLAUS    COUNTY 
FREE  LIBRARY. 

GIFT  OF   BACH   COLLECTION— SAN    FRANCISCO   PUBLIC    LIBRARY. 

PUBLICITY— TEHAMA   COUNTY    FREE    LIBRARY. 

RUSSIAN      COLLECTION      ACQUIRED— POMONA      COLLEGE      LIBRARY, 
CLAREMONT. 

FOR   SPECIAL   ARTICLES,   SEE   CONTENTS. 


California  State  Library 


CALIFOKNIA    STATE    PBINTINQ    OFFICE 

JOHN  E.  KING,  State  Printer 

SACBAMGNTO.  1926 


46213 


CONTENTS. 


Page 
A  REPEATED  SUCCESS 219 

CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIES  IN  SESSION 223 

COUNTY  LIBRARIES  IN  THE  HAWAIIAN  ISLANDS 227 

CALIFORNIA  MAP  AT  PHILADELPHIA 233 

THE  NEW  HOME  OF  THE  LOS  ANGELES  PUBLIC  LIBRARY 234 

MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA  SHOWING  COUNTIES 237 

LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARIES 238 

LIST  OF  LARGER  PUBLIC  LIBRARIES 239 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES— NEWS  ITEMS 240 

DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES    AND    OTHER    ITEMS    OF 

GENERAL    INTEREST 261 ' 

CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY   ASSOCIATION 268 

CALIFORNIA   COUNTY   LIBRARIANS 272 

LIBRARY   CLUBS,    ETC 273 

BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS 275 

CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY 278 

Staff,    Etc 278 

Depabtments    . 279 

Recent  Accessions  '  284 

Califoenia   State  Publications   Received   Ditbing   Apbil,   May   and 
June,   1926   317 

Califoenia    City   Publications    Received    Dueing   Apbil,    I\Iay    and 
June,  1926  320 

Books  foe  the  Blind  Added  Dueing  Apeil,  May  and  June,  1926 321 


Issued  quarterly  in  the  interests  of  the  libraries  of  the  State  by  the  California 
State  Libbaky, 

All    communications    should    be    addressed    to    the    California    State    Library, 
Sacramento,  California. 

Note. — Standing  matter  is  set  solid  and  new  matter  leaded. 

Entered  as  second-class  matter  December,  1913,  at  the  post  oflSce  at  Sacramento, 
California,  under  the  act  of  August  24,  1912. 

Acceptance  for  mailing  at  the  special  rate  of  postage  provided  for  in  Section 
1103,  Act  of  October  3,  1917,  authorized  August  27,  1918. 


i 


A  REPEATED  SUCCESS ! 


1910— LONG  BEACH— 1926. 

By  Chas.  S.  Greene,  Librarian  of  Oaliland  Free  Library. 


Sixteen  years  is  not  a  long  period  in 
the  life  of  a  city,  but  it  served  to  trans- 
form a  quaint  and  charming  beach  resort 
clustered  around  a  fine  tourist  hotel  and 
a  good  town  library  to  "the  fourth  city 
in  California.''  if  you  please,  reaching  out 
over  a  wide  stretch  of  country,  with  some 
of  its  finest  residential  hills  covered  with 
bristling  oil  derricks,  with  skyscrapers, 
both  hotels  and  business  blocks,  going  up 
on  every  hand,  with  a  veritable  Coney 
Island  of  beach  attractions.  The  only 
familiar  things  were  the  Library  in  its 
pretty  plaza,  the  Hotel  Virginia  with  its 
abounding  hospitality  and  the  restless 
surges  of  the  unchanging  sea !  And  I 
did  notice  a  change  in  the  Virginia,  rates 
in  1910,  three  dollars  a  day. 

The  first  day,  Wednesday,  June  2,  of 
the  thirty-first  gathering  of  the  Cali- 
fornia librarians  was  County  Day,  and 
thirty-nine  of  the  forty-two  county  libra- 
rians answered  the  call.  State  Librarian 
Ferguson  presided  with  his  usual  grace. 
I  pould  not  help  contrasting  this  session 
with  some  of  the  earliest  gatherings  of 
the  county  librarians.  Then  Mr  Gillis, 
himself  new  to  the  art  of  presiding  over 
a  group  of  girls,  had  some  trouble  in 
breaking  the  ice  and  getting  them  to  "talk 
out  '  in  meeting."  Soon,  however,  the 
contagious  enthusiasm  for  the  great  prob- 
lem before  them  melted  away  all  restraint, 
and  one  after  another  answered  his  call 
to  tell  her  experiences  in  this  or  that 
phase  of  this  pioneering  work.  When 
they  got  through  with  a  subject,  it  had 
been  viewed  from  every  standpoint,  and 
a  real  advance  had  been  made  in  this 
new  field  of  library  science. 

The  meeting  this  year  was  more  staid. 
Fundamentals  had  long  been  settled  and 
eager  hope  had  settled  down  into  the 
satisfaction  of  recorded  accomplishment. 
There  was  a  warm  welcome  to  new 
comers  in  the  work,  a  word  of  farewell 
to  those  who  were  putting  off  their 
armor,  but  the  bulk  of  the  talk  was  of 
solid  achievement.  The  new  problem  that 
occupied  most  of  the  time  was  the  mat- 
ter of  housing  the  branch  libraries  in 
permanent    and    suitable    quarters.     The 

46213 


reports  were  not  of  libraries  in  stables, 
in  chicken  brooders,  or  in  windmills,  but 
of  successes  in  getting  the  supervisors  or 
the  town  authorities  to  build  and  equip 
real  library  buildings.  One  discussion 
was  not  on  how  to  get  enough  books  to 
make  a  showing  on  empty  shelves,  but  on 
how  best  to  get  rid  of  a  surplus  of  books 
that  were  no  longer  in  demand.  The 
charm  of  youth  had  merged  into  the 
responsibilities  that  come  with  maturity. 
President  Ferguson's  address  stressed 
this  condition ;  for  he  talked  on  Fortifi- 
cations,— that  is,  permanent  holding  of 
ground  well  taken, — rather  than  on  the 
reconnoisances  necessary  in  the  explor- 
ing of  enemy  territory.  But  let  nobody 
libel  the  county  library  movement  in 
California  by  saying  it  has  lost  vitality. 
It  is  thoroughly  alive  in  every  fiber  and 
functioning  more  and  more  effectively 
day  by  day. 

That  this  is  the  faith  of  the  County 
Librarians  was  shown  by  their  applause 
after  the  glowing  prophecy  of  Miss  Liv- 
ingston, which  closed  the  session. 

Constant  arrivals  swelled  the  attend- 
ance so  that  when  President  Brewitt  of 
the  C.  L.  A.  swung  her  gavel  on  the 
morning  of  Thursday,  June  3,  several 
hundred  library  people  were  there,  and 
the  registration  before  the  meeting  ended 
exceeded  five  hundred. 

Mayor  Fillmore  Condit  of  Long  Beach 
made  his  greeting  address  something  more 
than  the  iisual  perfunctory  welcome ;  for 
he  showed  a  real  knowledge  and  appre- 
ciation of  the  work  the  libraries,  particu- 
larly the  Long  Beach  Library,  were 
doing.  He  especially  praised  the  work 
with  hospitals. 

I  do  not  need  to  summarize  the  reports 
that  followed,  for  are  they  not  recorded 
in  the  archives  of  the  C.  L.  A.  and  some 
of  them  printed  in  News  Notes  of  Cali- 
fornia Lihraries  and  The  Handbook? 
Madam  President's  review  and  outlook 
were  thoughtful,  broadminded,  and  en- 
couraging. It,  too,  will  doubtless  be 
printed  in  fvdl.  Many  of  the  speeches 
of  the  meeting,   taking  note  of  the  50th 


220 


NEWS  NOTES  OF  CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES. 


[July,  1926 


anniversary  of  the  A.  L.  A.,  had  the 
theme  of  fifty  years  back  and  the  half 
century  to  come. 

In  the  afternoon  Dr  Constantine  Pan- 
nunzio,  whose  "Soul  of  an  immigrant" 
is  in  our  libraries  and  who  is  a  distin- 
guished student  of  social  welfare,  told  of 
his  researches  conducted  in  twenty-nine 
different  libraries  into  the  history,  theory 
and  position  of  the  American  public 
library,  giving  it  high  place  as  one  of  the 
shaping  forces  in  world  progress.  He 
cautioned  us  against  a  too  abject  yield- 
ing to  the  "Great  God  Public  Demand." 

Miss  Leta  Adams  of  Cleveland  Public 
Library  was  very  interesting  in  her  exact 
account  of  the  work  of  the  notable  library 
she  represents,  carrying  it  into  practical 
detail  of  the  work  with  all  sorts  and  con- 
ditions of  men,  women,  and  children.. 

In  the  evening  the  carnival  spirit  of 
the  occasion  broke  loose.  A  call  for 
Spanish  costumes  had  brought  together 
a  wonderful  collection  of  colorful  gar- 
ments, and  the  Hidalgo  Room  of  the  hotel 
was  filled  with  people  who  would  hardly 
have  been  recognized  by  the'  patrons  of 
their  home  libraries.  Costume  "maketh 
man"  a  good  deal,  and  the  coquetry  of  the 
seuoritas  and  the  gallantry  of  the  cabal- 
leros,  was  further  awakened  by  the  beau- 
tiful Spanish  songs  and  dance  music 
furnished  by  Don  Jose  Arias  and  his 
company.  The  dinner,  given  on  the  menu 
in  fearful  and  wonderful  Spanish  with  a 
list  of  wines  entirely  made  up  of  fiction, 
proved  to  be  the  usual  good  fare  of  the 
Virginia. 

Jinksmaster  Hood  introduced  Captain 
Gilbert  Frankau,  who  spoke  to  us  at  first 
in  Spanish, — and  it  was  interesting  to  see 
the  C.  L.  A.  trying  to  look  intelligent 
when  so  addressed, — and  then  had  the 
kindness  to  translate  it  into  English. 
His  talk  was  a  fine  specimen  of  the  after 
dinner  speech,  full  of  fun  and  gentle 
badinage,  but  he  wound  up  with  an 
earnest  plea,  backed  up  by  a  full  war 
experience,  for  a  strong  understanding 
between  the  English  speaking  peoples  as 
the  best  preventive  of  the  recurrence  of 
a  world  war. 

Charles  Lummis,  who  "needs  no  intro- 
duction," was  the  final  speaker,  and  made 
an  argument  for  a  fuller  study  and 
appreciation  of  the  romantic  history  of 
California. 


Dancing  followed  with  an  interlude  of 
a  fearsome  improvised  "bull-fight,"  in 
which  Librarians  Joeckel  and  Wood 
played  leading  roles, — I  should  have  said 
rolls. 

The  third  general  session,  on  Friday 
morning,  was  marked  by  three  important 
papers.  Mr  Ferguson's  on  "Fifty  Years 
After"  was  an  able  summary  of  A.  L.  A. 
and  general  library  history.  It  will 
undoubtedly  be  printed  for  all  to  read. 
C.  E.  Graves,  Librarian  of  Humboldt 
State  Teachers'  College,  told  of  a  very 
interesting  experiment  in  promoting 
"right  reading  habits"  in  the  Areata  col- 
lege. Pleasant  surroundings,  easy  chairs, 
semi-privacy,  and  a  free  choice  of  books 
made  up  the  details  of  an  elective  course, 
which  attracted  all  the  students  that 
could  be  gathered  around  the  open  fire. 
It  is  so  joyful  to  know  of  school  people 
coming  to  the  conclusion  by  "pedagogical" 
and  "psychological"  reasoning  that  libra- 
rians have  long  made  the  basis  of  their 
practice, — namely,  that  reading  should  be 
made  pleasant. 

Mr  M.  Irving  Way,  of  the  former 
publishing  firm  of  Way  &  Williams,  under 
the  title  "Windlestraw," — which  sent  us 
to  our  dictionaries, — told  the  story  'of 
several  notable  typographers  and  firms  of 
book  publishers  in  the  '90s  who  gave  a 
great  impetus  to  the  cause  of  fine  print- 
ing, Mosher,  Bruce  Rogers.  Copeland 
and  Day,  Small  and  Maynard,  Stone,and 
Kimball,  Porter  Garnett,  all  of  them 
willing  to  spend  their  money  on  the  pro- 
ducing of  books  in  a  style  that  suited 
their  own  tastes.  Many  of  these  men 
ai"e  gone,  but  the  impress  they  made  on 
American   printing   still   persists. 

Friday  afternoon  was  taken  up  by  a 
trip  by  special  electric  train  to  see  the 
new  building  of  the  Los  Angeles  Public 
Library.  All  the  accounts  in  the  daily 
press  and  library  ijublications  give  small 
idea  of  this  beautiful  structure.  It  is 
different  in  many  ways  from  other  library 
buildings,  and  shows  in  all  its  appoint- 
ments and  arrangements  close  and  cordial 
cooperation,  lasting  for  months  and  years, 
between  architect  and  librarian.  As  this 
issue  of  News  Notes  is  printing,  the  peo- 
ple of  Los  Angeles  are  enjoying  this  fruit 
of  their  enlightened  liberality.  The  meet- 
ing was  saddened  by  the  thought  that 
Mr  Pettingell,  an  active  force  in  all  this 


vol.  21,  no.  3] 


A    REPEATED    SUCCESS. 


221 


Los  Angeles  development,  was  no  longer 
there  to  welcome  ns. 

The  fourth  general  session  in  the 
evening  was  opened  by  Miss  Helen  E. 
Haines  on  "Books  and  the  Daj-'s  Work." 
All  who  know  Miss  Haines, — and  what 
library  worker  does  not? — will  be  sure 
that  her  paper  was  a  scholarly  and 
earnest  plea,  enforced  by  the  power  of 
a  magnetic  personality,  for  making  the 
book,  and  the  knowledge  and  the  love  of 
it,  central  in  the  librarian's  life.  Miss 
Darlow  narrowed  her  view"  to  one  class 
of  books,  poetry,  and  recent  poetry  at 
that,  but  in  that  field  was  enticing  and 
inspiring. 

It  was  an  honor  to  appear  on  the  plat- 
form with  these  two  ladies,  and  one  that 
was  much  appreciated  by  the  present 
writer,  who  under  the  title  "A  Bale  of 
Hay"  gathered  iip  the  experiences  of 
fifty  years  in  California  and  twenty- 
seven  in  library  work,  into  a  ten  minute 
talk.  The  growth  of  the  University  of 
California  from  less  than  four  hundred 
people,  all  told,  to  the  largest  college  in 
the  land  was  recounted  and  a  similar 
great  growth  in  the  library  system.  The 
cause  of  the  rapid  expansion  in  both 
cases  was  placed  as  the  earnest  desire  to 
extend  by  sound  methods,  service  to 
every  man,  woman,  and  child  in  the  State. 
The  world-wide  spread  of  this  principle 
was  the  hope  of  the  future. 

The  fifth  general  session,  on  Saturday 
afternoon,  was  notable  for  a  thoughtful 
paper  on  the  News-stand  magazine  prob- 
lem, by  Mrs  E.  Fletcher  Scott,  Editor  of 
the  Los  Angeles  Parent  Teacher  Journal. 
The  great  difficulty  in  handling  this 
problem  comes  from  the  necessity  of 
keeping  the  campaign  quiet,  in  order  to 
avoid  advertising  the  objectionable  pub- 
lications. In  spite  of  this  handicap  much 
had  been  accomplished,  though  much  yet 
remains  to  be  done. 

Ella  Young,  herself  of  the  goodly  fel- 
lowship of  shamrock-crowned  bards,  told 
the  story  of  the  Celtic  Renaissance  with 
dignity  and  charm.  Her  personal  knowl- 
edge of  Douglas  Hyde,  Wm.  Butler  Yeats, 
and  Standish  O'Grady,  enabled  her  to 
bring  to  us  the  very  flavor  of  the  move- 
ment. 

W.  L.  Stephens.  Superintendent  of 
Schools  of  Long  Beach,  began  the  session 
with   a  fine  account  of  what   that  lively 


city  is  doing  for  and  with  its  school 
libraries.  Backed  by  an  array  of  statis- 
tics gathered  in  three  years  of  experience 
with  elementary  school  libraries,  each 
with  a  trained  librarian,  he  showed  a 
285  per  cent  of  increase  in  reading  with 
such  a  librarian  as  against  only  61  per 
cent  in  a  similar  school  supplied  with 
books,  but  without  a  librarian.  Further, 
this  increase  was  not  obtained  at  the 
expense  of  juvenile  circulation  in  the 
neighboring  public  library ;  for  the  read- 
ing there  had  increased  32  per  cent  in  the 
same  year.  The  need  of  instructing  par- 
ents in  the  kind  of  books  they  should 
give  their  children  had  been  shown  by 
the  fact  that  out  of  137  books  collected 
from  homes  by  a  library  drive  only 
thirty-seven  were  of  a  grade  good  enough 
for  librax-y  use.  President  Brewitt  con- 
firmed all  that  Mr  Stephens  had  said 
about  the  helpfulness  of  the  new  school 
library  system  to  her  own  public  library. 

President  Brewitt,  on  nomination  of 
Mr  Ferguson,  was  made  delegate  from  the 
C.  L.  A.  to  the  A.  L.  A.  for  the  session 
at  Atlajitic  City  and  Philadelphia. 

The  resolutions  committee's  report  was 
read  by  Chairman  Whitbeck,  and  was 
unanimously  adopted.  It  contained, 
beside  the  usual,  but  none  the  less  hearty, 
votes  of  thanks  to  all  who  had  helped 
the  Conference,  and  the  expressions  of 
sorrow  for  the  loss  of  those  who  had  been 
taken  during  the  year,  resolutions  (1) 
favoring  a  joint  meeting  with  the  Pacific 
Northwest  Library  Association  next  year 
at  some  point  in  Oregon  to  be  selected 
by  the  North  westerners,  (2)  asking  for 
more  adequate  library  training  facilities 
in  California,  (3)  commending  the  Sac- 
ramento Chamber  of  Commerce  for 
financing  the  large  library  map  to  be 
shown  at  the  Philadelphia  Exposition, 
(4)  favoring  the  appointment  of  a  Com- 
mittee to  plan  for  a  library  radio  broad- 
casting service,  (5)  urging  the  State 
authorities  to  extend  the  kind  of  library 
Avork  that  the  Sacramento  County  Free 
Library  is  doing  for  the  Folsom  pris- 
oners to  all  the  wards  of  the  State. 

Followed  the  election  of  officers,  and 
Mr  Ferguson  was  "struck  by  lightning" 
a  second  time,  as  he  expressed  it,  by  being 
made  President  once  more.  The  ladies 
were  quite  scornful,  however,  when  one 
of  the  local  papers  said  it  was  because 


222 


XEWS  XOTES  OF  CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES. 


[July,  1926 


the  C.  L.  A.  in  going  North  next  year 
needed  a  '"man  jiresident."' 

It  will  be  noticed  that  I  have  made 
no  attempt  to  report  the  section  meetings, 
which  were  varied  and  valuable.  I  did 
not  hear  it,  but  reverberations  reached 
me  of  Mrs  Perry's  attack  on  the  man- 
agement of  the  Los  Angeles  Public 
Library  for  its  neglect  of  her  boys.  I 
did  hear  ^Misses  Ott  and  Cooley  in  their 
symposium  on  the  reference  work  at  Los 
Angeles  and  Miss  Smith's  good  talk  on 
publicity  for  the  library's  reference  serv- 
ice. 

After  all.  the  most  valuable  gain  from 
such  a  convention  is  not  in  the  written 
papers,    which   can   be    read    when    after- 


ward printed,  nor  in  the  set  discussions 
in  the  round  tables  and  section  meetings, 
but  in  the  all  day  and  long  into  the  night 
conversing  of  groups  of  two,  three,  or  a 
dozen,  eld  friends,  or  quickly  made  new 
friends,  in  going  over  together  the  prob- 
lems which  all  alike  find  pressing  for 
solution.  At  breakfast,  lunch,  or  dinner, 
walk  on  the  beach,  stroll  about  the  town, 
or  gatherings  in  the  lobby  or  around  the 
exhibits, — anywhere,  everywhere,  all  day 
long  these  little  informal  meetings  go 
on.  In  them  friendships  are  strength- 
ened, knowledge  is  gained,  and  as  a 
grand  result  of  it  all,  inspiration  is 
poured  into  all  present,  the  real  library 
spirit  that  glorifies  the  work  for  all  of 
the  year  to  come. 


vol.  21,  no.  3] 


COUNTY    LIBRARIANS    IN    SESSION. 


223 


CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS  IN  SESSION, 

June  2,  1926. 

Hotel  Virginia,  Long  Beach,  California. 

By  Anne  Makgeave,  Librarian,  Inyo  County  Free  Library. 


County  Library  Day  of  the  C.  L.  A. 
is  like  Old  Home  Week  to  the  county 
librarians  scattered  over  the  length  and 
breadth  of  California,  whether  they  meet 
among  the  flowers  of  Humboldt  County 
or  the  tourists  of  Long  Beach.  The 
"family  group,"  as  they  are  fond  of  call- 
ing it,  is  getting  almost  too  large  for  that 
designation,  since  the  forty-three  county 
librarians  have  formed  the  habit  of 
bringing  from  one  to  six  of  their  staff 
with  them,  especially  when  so  nearly  all 
are  present  as  was  this  time  the  case — 
the  only  four  absentees  being  Miss  Bur- 
ket,  Miss  Gantt,  Mr  Rea  and  Miss  Water- 
man. But  the  presence  of  those  who 
pioneered  in  the  county  library  move- 
ment, and  the  number  who  emulate  the 
Rotarians  by  calling  one  another  by 
Christian  names,  makes  for  an  atmos- 
phere of  reunion  and  cordiality  not  always 
found  at  conventions.  Just  to  see  Miss 
Huntington,  "Librarian-at-Large,"  ar- 
ranging tlie  details  of  the  State  and 
County  Library  dinner,  made  the  Hotel 
Virginia  "home"  for  the  nonce. 

Called  to  order  by  Mr  Ferguson  for  a 
short  morning  session,  we  were  invited 
to  admire  the  new  gavel,  souvenir  of  the 
redwoods.  Miss  Silverthorn  was  called 
to  the  secretary's  chair,  and  the  day's 
work  was  on.  The  usual  roll-call  was 
omitted,  to  the  delight  of  those  who  could 
boast  of  no  new  thing — yet  we  missed 
the  inspiration  of  hearing  all  those  won- 
derful deeds  that  are  carried  out  by  our 
co-workers.  Talks  by  various  librarians 
on  interesting  developments  in  a  few 
lines,  and  some  of  the  features  of  the 
exhibits,  gave  us  the  cream  of  the  year's 
work.  Miss  Frink  led  off  with  an 
account  of  her  experiment  in  the  dis- 
posal of  school  texts.  In  the  Siskiyou 
County  Library,  as  there  have  been  in 
many  others,  was  a  large  quantity  of 
school  texts,  in  good  condition,  but 
unusable  because  no  longer  on  the  list 
of  the  County  Board  of  Education. 
Space  being  very  valuable,  she  asked  the 
consent  of  the  Supervisors  to  send  the 
books    to    any    one    who    would    pay    for 


transportation  on  them.  Then  she  mim- 
eographed lists,  and  sent  them  to  the 
county  libraries.  About  five  hundred 
were  of  use  to  other  libraries.  Lists 
were  then  sent  to  institutions,  such  as  the 
Seamen's  Church  Institute,  and  other 
public  and  private  institutions.  A  good 
many  more  were  thus  put  into,  active 
service  again,  and  Miss*  Frink  is  stili 
cogitating  means  of  placing  the  small 
remainder  where  they  can  fill  a  need. 
This  is  a  good  example  of  the  way  in 
which  libraries  may  and  do  co-operato, 
so  that  a  dead  book  may  live  again. 

One  of  the  pleasant  things  about  the 
convention  was  the  number  of  State 
Library  people  with  us.  It  was  delight- 
ful to  see  again  Miss  Garoutte.  Miss 
Munsoji  and  Miss  Mumm,  who  had 
missed  a  number  of  meetings,  as  well  as 
those  who  have  more  often  managed  to 
attend  them.  Miss  Mumm  was  down  for 
"A  Few  Thoughts  on  Requests."  Slie 
said  that  when  the  subject  was  assigned 
to  her,  she  thought  she  had  a  great  deal 
to  say.  Evidently  we  have  been  causing 
the  Reference  Department  many  trou- 
bles. But  when  she  came  to  marshal  I 
the  facts,  all  seemed  too  unimportant  to 
mention  i  However,  she  referred  us  to 
the  article  in  News  Note  of  .Calilornia 
Libraries,  July,  1925,  p.  227.  and  offered 
extra  copies  of  these.  (We  have  so 
much  and  such  constant  help  from  the 
State  Library,  that  we  should  be  careful 
to  follow  the  forms  which  they  find  most 
convenient,  without  compelling  them  to 
repeat  an  already  twice-told  tale.)  She 
urged  us  to  be  definite  in  our  requests, 
and  to  indicate  whether  a  substitute 
would  be  acceptable.  Often  the  book 
requested  is  not  in  the  State  Library,  or 
is  in  use,  but  as  good  or  a  better  bool:  on 
the  subject  may  be  available.  (I  have 
in  mind  such  an  instance — a  club  sent,  a 
list  of  requests,  not  suggesting  substi- 
tutes, many  of  which  were  not  in  the 
State  Library.  I  had  the  impiessioii 
that  we  had  covered  the  same  subject 
much  better  before,  from  our  own  and  the 
State  Library  collection,  and  on  inquiry 


224: 


NEWS  NOTES  OF  CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES. 


:  July,  1926 


found  tliat  they  were  using  an  out-of- 
date  bibliography  from  a  certain  maga- 
zine). Miss  Mimim  also  spoke  of  the 
lists  of  the  pictures  in  the  State  Library 
collection,  which  should  be  of  great  use 
in  choosing  for  an  exhibit  or  a  study. 

Business  meetings  are  not  dull  ^slien 
Mr  Ferguson,  Miss  Provines  and  Mr 
Greene  lighten  necessary  routine  with 
wit  and  humor.  The  A.  L.  A.  Fiftierli 
Anniversary  Fund  was  discussed  by  Mr 
Ferguson,  who  spoke  of  his  pleasure  than 
at  last  accounts  California  was.  the  lead- 
ing state  in  this  important  library  matter, 
and  urged  all  who  have  not  eoutriimted 
to  this  fund  to  so  do,  reminding  us  that 
the  A.  L.  A.  Anniversary  publications, 
which  every  library  feels  it  must  have, 
are  sent  to  libraries  contributing  a  laiiii- 
mum  of  $25.00. 

California's  share  in  the  A.  L.  A. 
Exhibit  at  the  Sesqui-ceutennial  Exposi- 
tion at  Philadelphia,  is  a  hugh  electric- 
lighted  map — at  the  suggestion  of  Joseph 
L.  Wheeler,  chairman  of  the  Exposition 
Committee.  Mr  Wheeler,  remembering 
the  successful  map  of  California  library 
service  at  the  Panama-Pacific  Exposition, 
asked  if  it  might  not  be  used  at  Pliila- 
delphia.  Not  that  map,  but  its  grand- 
daughter, said  Mr.  Ferguson,  v/orked 
out  by  the  latest  methods  of  electric 
lighting  and  display,  and  sho^^■ing  the 
great  development  of  California  library 
.service  since  1915,  will  occcupy  one  end 
of  a  large  upper  wall  space  in  the  A.  L.  A. 
exhibit.  The  other  end  will  have  a  sim- 
ilar map  of  Sacramento  County's  library 
service.  This  cotmty  was  chosen  because 
it  has  certain  types  of  library  not  found 
elscAvhere  in  one  county :  the  State  Li- 
brary, the  Sacramento  City  Library,  and 
the  Sacramento  County  Library,  serving 
branches,  schools,  county  farm  adviser 
and  other  offices,  county  hospital  and  jail, 
and  Folsom  State  Prison.  Choosing  any 
other  county,  Mr  Ferguson  feared  forty- 
two  out  of  the  forty-three  of  us  v.'ould 
have  firmly  believed  the  choJ!;e  v.rong, 
but  he  felt  sure  we  would  all  concur  in 
this.  Financing  of  the  exhibit  was  d'-ne 
partly  by  the  A.  L.  A.,  but  chiciiy  by  the 
Sacramento  Chamber  of  Commerce,  of 
which  the  Sacramento  librarians  ate  evi- 
dently very  influential  members. 

Branch  buildings  are  becoming  of 
greater  interest  each  year,  as  more  county 


libraries  reach  the  point  of  acquiring 
permanent  quarters  for  their  branches. 
Talks,  illustrated  by  photographs,  on  the 
various  branches  built  or  planned  recently, 
were  given  by  several  librarians.  Mrs 
Whitbeck  told  of  a  new  branch  built  by 
a  community,  which  combined  the  hous- 
ing together  of  a  library,  a  fire-hall,  a 
chibhouse,  and  a  jail !  Well  planned  and 
worked  out,  it  is  a  source  of  pride  to  the 
town  and  of  satisfaction  to  the  county 
library.  The  building  committee  called 
the  county  librarian  into  consultation, 
and  made  the  library  the  conspicuous 
feature  of  the  building.  Its  openijg  was 
made  the  occasion  of  a  celebratioi^  Vvith 
all  the  prominent  citizens — and  the 
county  librarian,  of  course — taking;  part. 
In  the  cotirse  of  the  mayor's  speocii,  he 
said  "The  more  you  use  this  (the 
library),  the  less  you'll  use  tha';,  [the 
jail)."  Mrs  Whitbeck  says  she  is  look- 
ing for  more  places  which  need  ,'V  riew 
jail  and  will  think  of  the  lib.-arv  at  the 
same  time.  The  buildings  in  wai<-h  i  'm- 
tra  Costa's  branch  libraries  are  hotised 
include  several  Carnegie  buildings,  an 
old  school  building,  a  room  in  an  Amer- 
ican Legion  hall,  and  a  bandstand 
enclosed  to  make  a  pleasant  reading  loom. 

Kern  County,  said  Mrs  Babcock.  has 
eight  county  library  branches  all  built 
and  equipped  by  taxation  and  o\yned  by 
the  county.  The  community  S'jcuros  the 
ground,  but  turns  it  over  to  the  county 
before  bttilding  commences.  Bqttipment 
is  of  Library  Bureati  furniture.  TJie 
best  is  none  too  good  for  Kern  Cotmty. 
The  most  satisfactory  building  has  tlie 
long  way  across  the  front  of  the  lot, 
entrance  in  the  center,  and  librarif>a"s 
desk  so  situated  that  one  person  has 
supervision  of  the  room.  Eveir  in  a 
small  branch,  separate  work  room  and 
store  room  shottld  be  pi-ovided. 

Miss  Vogleson  is  still  iit  charge  of  a 
county  library,  in  spite  of  the  peculiar 
condition  in  Los  Augeles  County,  wliere 
a  vote  of  annexation  may  transfer  a 
brattch  overnight  from  the  jurisdiction 
of  the  cotmty  to  that  of  the  city  of  Los 
Angeles !  The  county  has  adopted  the 
policy  of  encouraging  a  community  to 
build  its  own  library  building ;  the 
county  library  eqtiippiug  it  and  carrying 
the  expense.  They  consider  that  this 
arouses  more  local  pride  and  local  inter- 


vol.  21,  no.  3] 


CiJUXTY   LIBRARIANS    IX    SESSIOK. 


225 


est  ill  the  librarj-.  Most  of  their 
branches  are  in  renter!  buildings,  and 
they  build  standardized  book-shelves  to 
permit  more  easy  moving.  '"Moving  day" 
seems  to  be  too  frequent  to  call  for  com- 
ment in  the  Los  Angeles  County  Library, 
and  is  provided  for  accordingly.  Branch 
quarters  may  be  of  store-room,  bungalow 
or  other  type,  but  all  have  a  work-room 
and  lavatory. 

Miss  Stoddard  told  of  the  beautiful 
George  Thompson  Bloss  Memorial  Li- 
brary, built  at  Atwater,  in  honor  of  the 
donor's  grandson.  Not  only  is  the  library 
itself  a  delight,  but  a  landscape  gardener 
has  given  it  beautiful  surroundings.  The 
library  is  built  of  concrete,  with  a  green 
tile  roof ;  the  woodwork  inside,  and  the 
very  comfortable  and  inviting  furniture, 
are  finished  in  a  soft  shade  of  grayish 
green,  reflecting  the  color  tints  of  the 
exterior.  In  the  basement  rooms  are 
provided  for  the  Boy  Scouts. 

In  San  Bernardino  County,  said  Miss 
Waters,  there  remains  a  library  district, 
which  is  building  a  library.  Funds  were 
raised  by  taxation  of  the  district,  bonds 
and  popular  subscription.  The  contract 
calls  for  a  party  wall  with  the  clubhouse, 
which  will  lessen  the  expense.  Bear  Val- 
ley Branch  Library  has  been  built  by 
the  Woman's  Club,  and  furnished  and 
equipped  by  the  county  library.  The 
grounds  are  held  by  lease,  as  almost  all 
lands  belong  to  the  Bear  Valley  Develop- 
ment Co.  The  building,  charmingly  in 
keeping  v\-ith  its  surroundings,  is  a  cabin, 
built  uf  shingles  with  peeled  bark  slab 
trimmings,  rustic  inside  finishing  and 
furniture. 

Mrs  Singletary's  example  of  a  branch 
library  in  Santa  Clara  County  is  built 
by  the  community  and  equipped  by  the 
county  library.  There  is  a  movement  to 
deed  the  building  also  to  the  County. 

Miss  Laugenour  brought  pictures  and 
plans  of  the  branch  at  Davis,  rebuilt 
and  equipped  by  Yolo  County.  The  orig- 
inal btiilding.  too  small  for  present  use, 
was  financed  by  the  Bachelor  Girls  Club 
of  Davis..  It  is  of  bungalow  type,  and 
because  of  the  proximity  of  Davis  Farm 
School,  and  the  necessity  of  serving  the 
students,  there  is  less  space  than  usual 
given  to  the  children's  department. 

Many  ways  appear  of  reaching  the 
same   end,    that   highly   desirable   one   of 


providing  permanent,  attractive  and  ade- 
quate housing  for  the  branch  library.  All 
these  county  branches  are  interesting 
examples  of  suitable  buildings  for  vari- 
ous sizes  and  types  of  community,  and 
the  photographs  on  exhibit  would  be  of 
much  interest  to  any  place  desiring  to 
build  a  library. 

Miss  Dills  told  of  several  interesting 
developments  .  in  the  co-operation  of 
county  library  and  women's  clubs,  and 
suggested  other  desirable  ways  of  serv- 
ing the  clubs. 

Mr  Ferguson,  under  the  heading  "For- 
tifications," gave  a  most  practical  and 
pointed  talk  on  the  advisability  of  hold- 
ing ground  already  won,  by  "digging  in" 
in  various  ways.  Not  counting  that  the 
library  is  considered  by  every  one  a 
necessity,  we  should  realize  the  impor- 
tance of  our  job,  but  also  the  possible 
point  of  view  of  the  outsider.  The 
librarian  should  be  as  familiar  with  the 
whole  tax  system  as  any  other  ofiicial, 
and  should  especially  know  the  compara- 
tive expense  of  the  library  and  other 
public  undertakings.  In  graphs  showing 
the  proportionate  use  of  county  funds, 
it  would  be  helpful  if  the  library  were 
not  lumped,  as  is  usual,  with  the  schools, 
but  were  given  its  'separate  slice — it' 
would  not  look  like  such  a  large  slice. 

In  some  of  the  lists  of  county  officials 
in  the  California  Blue  Book,  the  libra- 
rian is  not  included,  although  she  is 
actually  an  ofiicial.  The  librarian  should 
connect  regularly  with-  the  local  news- 
papers, being  on  the  lookout  for  library 
items  which  are  real  news.  Custodians' 
meetings,  such  as  are  held  in  several 
counties,  are  of  great  value,  and  may  be 
supplemented  to  advantage  by  letters  to 
custodians,  which  are  also  useful  in 
counties  where  the  meetings  are  imprac- 
ticable. One's  standing  with  the  super- 
visors and  with  the  people  should  be 
carefully  guarded. 

Reports  to  the  trustees  of  each  school 
on  the  year's  service  are  given  by  a  num- 
ber of  libraries.  It  is  surely  the  only 
businesslike  thing,  if  one  has  a  contract 
with  another,  to  give  a  report  at  least 
once  a  year,  on  the  fulfilling  of  that  con- 
tract. It  has  had  a  most  favorable 
result. 

Miss  ilargaret  Livingston  proved  her- 
self blessed  with  second  sight  in  "Looking. 


226 


NEWS  NOTES  OF  CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES. 


Julv,  192(; 


to  the  Future."'  Referring  to  the  tribute 
of  a  Florida  librarian  to  the  California 
county  library — "the  best  system  of  any 
state  in  the  Union,"  she  spoke  of  ways 
in  which  we  may  hope  to  advance ;  e.  g., 
a  trained  librarian  in  every  branch,  a 
correlation  with  all  other  organizations, 
a  development  of  telephone  service  for 
all  sorts  of  information  ;  a  use  of  experts 
by  recording  those  who  ■  have  special 
knowledge  along  any  line ;  publicity,  con- 
stant, courteous  and  well-directed,  pub- 
licity   about    books    and    information— in 


short,  making  the  library  as  essential  as 
a  corner  grocery.  We  should  tie  up  our 
information  and  our  service  with  the 
actual  currents  of  life. 

Inspired  by  the  brushing  up  which 
comes  from  contact  with  other  workers 
in  the  same  field,  we  were  all  ready, 
nevertheless,  for  the  more  informal  and 
social  contacts  of  the  evening.  Our  spe- 
cial dav  closed  with  a  dinner  especially 
enjoyable,  the  remainder  of  the  county 
librarians"  convention  being  a  part  of 
the  C.  L.  A.  meeting. 


vol.  21,  no.  3]       COUNTY    libraries   in    HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS. 


227 


COUNTY  LIBRARIES  IN  THE  HAWAIIAN  ISLANDS. 

By  Marion  Morse,  Librarian,  Maui  County  Library,  Wailuku. 


The  Hawaiian  Islands  are  most  delight- 
fully and  strategically  located  at  the 
"Crossroads  of  the  Pacific"  where  boats 
connecting  the  old  world  with  the  new, 
the  Orient  with  the  Occident,  meet  and 
pass.  They  are  2100  miles  west  and 
south  of  San  Francisco  and  3400  miles 
from  Yokohama.  Boats  from  Australia 
to  Canada  make  a  break  in  the  monotony 
of  the  trip  by  putting  in  at  Honolulu.  It 
is  a  charming  place,  with  a  marvelous 
climate.  Just  within  the  tropic  zone 
with  cool  trade  winds  and  the  waters  of 
the  Pacific  to  moderate  the  heat,  one  is 
always  comfortable.  If  you  want  it 
cooler  you  can  go  up  a  mountain.  The 
Hawaiians  had  no  word  for  climate  or 
weather,  the  nearest  to  it  was  the  word 
for  altitude. 

The  Islands  are  not  all  white  sandy 
beaches  with  waving  palm  trees.  Most 
of  the  shore  line  is  rugged  and  rocky 
with  sheer  precipices  and  "palis."  Lofty 
mountains  rise  from  the  water's  edge, 
mountain  ranges  with  bare  jagged  peaks 
and  lovely  valleys  filled  with  tropical 
verdure.  On  the  lower  ground  are  vast 
fields  of  waving  green,  usually,  sugar  cane 
but  sometimes  rice.  Higher  up  grow 
the  pineapples  in  mathematically  straight 
rows.  Over  the  rocky  hillsides  pasture 
large  herds  of  cattle. 

Eight  of  the  Islands  are  inhabited. 
Honolulu,  the  capital  city  and  chief  port 
of  the  Territory,  is  located  on  the  Island 
of  Oahu.  Oahu  is  third  in  size  in  the 
group,  having  an  area  of  598  square 
miles.  It  has  a  population  of  123,496,  of 
whom  S3,327  live  in  Honolulu.  The 
entire  Island  is  known  for  political  pur- 
poses as  the  City  and  County  of  Hono- 
lulu, with  the  county  seat  at  Honolulu. 

North  of  Oahu  is  the  Island  of  Kauai, 
often  called  the  Garden  Isle.  It  is  fourth 
in  size  having  an  area  of  546  square 
miles  and  a  population  of  29,438,  includ- 
ing that  of  the  Island  of  Niihau,  located 
a  few  miles  to  the  west  and  having  an 
area  of  seventy-two  square  miles.  It  is 
included  in  the  County  of  Kauai  which 
has  its  county  seat  at  Lihue.  The  near- 
est port  on  Kauai  is  ninety-eight  miles 
from  Honolulu. 


Maui  with  an  area  of  728.1  square 
miles  is  the  second  largest.  It  is  third 
in  population  having  36,083  inhabitants. 
It  is  south  and  east  of  Oahu,  its  nearest 
port,  Lahaina,  being  seventy-two  miles 
from  Honolulu.  Wailuku  is  the  chief 
town  and  the  county  seat  of  Maui 
County.  Maui  County  also  includes  Ka- 
hoolawe,  Lanai,  and  Molokai,  exclusive 
of  the  leper  settlement.  ^Molokai  is 
located  between  Oahu  and  Maui.  It  has 
an  area  of  about  270  square  miles  and  a 
population  of  18S4.  Lanai  is  nine  miles 
west  of  Maui.  It  has  an  area  of  1.39 
square  miles.  In  1920  its  population  was 
185  and  its  chief  industrj'  raising  cattle. 
Since  then  a  good  many  acres  have  been 
put  into  pineapples  and  the  population 
largely  increased.  Kahoolawe  scarcely 
counts — it  has  an  area  of  fortj^-four 
square  miles  and  a  population   of  three. 

The  "big  island,"  or  Hawaii,  is  twenty- 
six  miles  south  of  Maui,  and  Hilo,  the 
county  seat  and  chief  port  of  the  Island 
and  County  of  Hawaii,  is  196  miles  from 
Honolulu.  It  has  an  area  of  4015  square 
miles  and  a  population  of  64,895. 

Captain  Cook  came  to  the  islands  in 
1778  bringing  the  first  real  contact  with 
the  outside  world.  This  and  the  influence 
of  the  other  boats  that  followed  him 
tended  to  break  down  the  ancient  customs 
and  tabus  of  which  the  Hawaiian  religion 
consisted,  and  so  shortly  before  the  mis- 
sionaries arrived  in  1820 — 200  years 
after  the  Pilgrims  landed  on  Plymouth 
Rock — King  Liholiho  had  broken  the 
sacred  tabus  and  Avith  his  sanction  the 
idols  were  destroyed,  temples  dismantled 
and  razed,  and  the  national  religion -abol- 
ished. The  missionaries  were  received 
most  cordially,  their  religion  accepted  and 
also  the  opportunities  for  education 
which  they  were  able  to  extend.  The 
entire  nation  went  to  school ;  first  the 
adults,  foremost  among  whom  was  the 
King ;  later  the  children.  In  1835  the 
Governor  of  Maui  passed  a  law  forbid- 
ding anyone  to  hold  public  office  or  even 
marry  who  could  not  read  or  write.  In 
1822  the  first  book  printed  in  Hawaii 
came  ofE  the  press.  It  was  a  speller  in 
the  Hawaiian  language  as  written  down 


228 


NEWS  NOTES  OF  CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES. 


[July,  192G 


by    the    missionaries.     Other    books    fol- 
lowed as  fast  as  possible. 

The  first  real  industry  in  the  Islands 
was  the  exporting  of  sandalwood.  From 
1810  to  1S25  they  worked  at  it  so  ■  dili- 
gently that  they  managed  almost  to 
exterminate  all  the  sandalwood  there 
was.  About  1819  whaling  ships  began 
to  come  to  the  Islands.  They  found  it  a 
convenient  place  for  refitting  and  repair- 
ing their  boats.  From  here  they  re- 
shipped  their  suplies  of  oil  and  bone, 
took  on  new  supplies  ajid  started  off  once 
more.  But  by  1871  the  whaling  industry 
had  so  declined  that  nothing  could  be 
expected  from  it  for  the  future. 

Sugar  cane  was  indigenous  in  the 
Islands  and  since  1825  had  been  culti- 
vated for  the  making  of  sugar.  Nothing 
really  serious  was  done  to  develop  this 
industry  until  1876  when  by  the  United 
States  reciprocity  treaty  sugar  cane  prod- 
ucts were  admitted  into  the  United 
States  free  of  duty.  Then  it  was  possible 
to  interest  capital  to  be  invested  in  the 
work  of  clearing  new  land,  bringing 
water  from  the  mountains  for  irrigation 
and  planting  cane. 

The  Hawaiians  did  not  care  for  the 
work  in  the  cane  fields  so  it  became 
necessary  to  import  large  numbers  of 
unskilled  labor  capable  of  doing  it.  First 
they  brought  in  Chinese.  Today  they 
make  up  7.94  per  cent  of  the  population 
of  the  Islands.  When  it  was  no  longer 
possible  to  get  Chinese,  Japanese  were 
imported.  They  are  now  the  largest 
racial  group,  40.40  per  cent  of  the  total 
population.  Since  the  '  supply  of  them 
has  been  cut  off,  Filipinos  and  Porto 
Ricans  have  come  in  larger  numbers 
until  now  they  claim  12.15  per  cent  and 
2.44  per  cent  respectively.  Of  the  rest 
8.84  pel*  cent  are  Portuguese,  13.68  per 
cent  Hawaiians  and  part-Hawaiians,  and 
11.98  per  cent  of  Anglo-Saxon  stock. 
These  are  the  people  to  whom  we  are 
trying  to  give  library  service. 

They  live  scattered  around  in  small 
camps  convenient  to  their  work.  Each 
camp  has  a  plantation  store,  the  lai'ger 
ones  have  besides  a  few  small  shops 
usually  kept  by  Chinese,  a  Buddhist  tem- 
ple, and  a  Catholic,  Hawaiian  Board  or 
Mormon  church,  sometimes  all  three. 
There  are  often  community  clubs  for  the 
white    employees    and    these    make    good 


places  for  branch  libraries.  Honolulu 
is  the  only  real  city  in  the  Islands.  The 
rest  are  just  larger  plantation  camps, 
none  of  which  has  as  yet  taken  on  munic- 
ipal government. 

The  first  libraries  in  the  Islands  were 
subscription  libraries,  one  having  been 
organized  in  each  county.  The  most 
important  of  these  was  the  Honolulu 
Library  and  Reading  Room  Association, 
usually  known  as  the  Honolulu  Library, 
which  was  organized  in  1876.  The  , 
money  paid  as  dues  was  used  for  the 
piirchase  of  books  and  that  for  running 
expenses  was  derived  from  "public  enter- 
tainments and  gifts.  In  1880  the  Terri- 
tory gave  land  for  a  site  and  a  building 
was   erected. 

The  first  mention  of  a  Territorial  library 
is  found  in  the  report  of  Governor  Car- 
ter for  1907  in  which  he  says :  "Legis- 
lative session  of  1907  laid  the  founda- 
tion for  a  public  library,  the  Territory 
at  present  having  no  library  of  an  en- 
tirely public  nature.  The  Territory  owns 
many  books  gathered  during  the  times 
of  the  various  governments  that  have 
existed  here,  which  can  be  used  as  the 
basis  of  a  good  public  library.  Isolated 
as  this  community  is,  the  need  of  such 
an  institution  with  branches  scattered 
throughout  the  Territory  if  possible,  is 
at  once  apparent,  particularly  in  its  rela- 
tion to  the  school  children  of  the  com- 
munity. The  act  of  legislature  establish- 
ing the  library  aims  to  meet  this  want, 
and  for  the  first  two  years  an  appropria- 
tion of  .$10,000  has  been  made  for  the 
support  and  maintenance  of  the  library." 

In  1911  the  Library  of  Hawaii,  Hono- 
lulu Library  and  Reading  Room  Associa- 
tion, and  the  Hawaiian  Historical  Society 
united  to  secure  a  gift  of  $100,000  from 
x\.ndrew  Carnegie  for  a  new  building. 
The  Territory  pledged  $10,000  a  year 
support  for  the  new  library,  the  .  Hono- 
lulu Library  and  Reading  Room  Associa- 
tion turned  over  its  collection  of  books ; 
it  had  18,071  volumes  and  further  prom- 
ised $4000  per  year,  interest  on  bonds 
belonging  to  the  Association,  to  be  used 
for  the  purchase  of  books  only.  The 
Hawaiian  Historical  Society,  whose 
object  was  "the  collection,  study  and  ' 
utilization  of  all  material  illustrating  the 
ethnology,  archaeology  and  history  of 
the     Hawaiian     Islands"     had     collected 


vol.  21,  no.  3]       COUNTY   libraries  in   HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS. 


229 


1326  books.  These  Avere  to  be  kept  as 
a  special  collection  in  the  new  building. 

The  new  building  was  completed  in 
1913  and  Miss  Edna  I.  AUyn  was  ap- 
pointed librarian.  She  conducted  the 
work  along  the  most  modern  lines  and 
has  built  up  a  library  which  is  a  credit 
to  the  Territory  and  Honolulu.  It  is  not 
only  a  collection  of  books,  wisely  selected 
and  ably  administered,  it  is  also  a  com- 
munity center.  Many  societies  and  com- 
mittees meet  there,  it  is  the  headquarters 
of  the  Dramatic  and  Story-telling  League, 
library  clubs  and  story  hours  are  con- 
ducted. Instruction  in  the  use  of  the 
library  in  the  schools  is  given  and  story- 
tellers make  the  rounds  of  the  school 
rooms.  Miss  Mary  Laurence,  head  of 
the  Children's  Department  in  the  library, 
has  charge  of  the  course  in  library  work 
at  the  Territorial  Normal  School  and 
supervises  the  training  of  "library 
cadets.'' 

When  !Miss  Allyn  came  to  Honolulu 
there  were  twelve  branch  libraries  scat- 
tered throughout  theTerritory.  The  most 
important  one  was  at  Hilo,  which  had 
been  given  a  Cariaegie  building  also,  and 
was  supported  by  Territorial  appropria- 
tion. It  had  a  trained  librarian,  and 
Avas  doing  excellent  work  in  serving  Hilo 
and  Eastern  Hawaii.  The  other  branches 
were  simply  stations  for  traveling  libra- 
ries. 

In  1915  Miss  Stearns,  from  the  State 
Commission  of  Minnesota,  was  secured 
to  organize  the  work  of  the  "Islands 
Department"'  and  make  a  survey  of  the 
Territory  to  find  out  where  library 
branches  were  needed.  As  a  result  the 
work  of  the  department  increased  largely. 
In  1913  it  had  sent  out  2364  volumes  to 
branches.  In  1918  it  sent  out  13,528  to 
192  branches.  Of  these  sixty-four  were 
school  branches,  forty-four  community 
branches  and  eighty-four  home  libraries. 

It  soon  became  evident  that  the  work 
Avas  too  big  to  be  handled  by  any  one 
agency.  The  Islands  Department  was 
doing  all  it  possibly  could  Avith  the  books 
and  assistance  at  its  disposal  and  at  that 
Avas  just  barely  beginning  the  work. 
There  Avere  in  the  Territory  175  public 
schools  and  sixty  private  schools.  It 
Avas  sending  books  to  112  of  these  in 
1920  and  many  schools  with  several  hun- 
dred   children    received    only    seventy-five 


books  at  a  time.  One  hundred  tAvo  of  the 
289  branches  it  maintained  at  that  time 
Avere  home  libraries  of  six  to  tAventy  vol- 
umes. These  greatly  increased  the 
amount  of  Avork  but  reached  practically 
only  the  family  to  Avhom  they  were 
addressed.  In  1920  there  was  a  popu- 
lation jf  172,585  outside  of  Honolulu  and 
24,209  volumes  had  been  sent  out. 

There  was  also  the  difficulty  of  trans- 
portation. The  Islands  are  not  so  far 
distant  from  each  other  when  you  con- 
sider that  distance  as  the  crow  flies. 
But  it  is  different  as  the  fish  SAvim  or 
the  Inter-Island  boats  go,  particularly  the 
latter.  They  make  something  like  three 
to  thirteen  miles  an  hour  only  unless 
you  count  in  the  motion  up  and  doAvn 
and  sideAvays.  And  that  is  Avhen  they 
go  at  all.  Maui  and  HaAvaii  had  three 
mails  a  Aveek  from  Honolulu,  Kauai  tAvo 
and  Molokai  one.  Such  conditions  made 
it  extremely  difficult  to  give  prompt 
service.  Miss  Allyn  mentioned  some  of 
these  facts  in  her  report  of  1920  and 
suggested  the  establishment  of  county 
libraries  as  the  best  Avay  to  provide  com- 
plete  and   efBcient   service. 

Maui  and  Kauai  Avere  the  two  Islands 
Avhich  felt  most  keenly  the  need  for  bet- 
ter library  facilities.  In  1919  the  Maui 
Woman's  Club  Avas  organized  on  Maui. 
It  had  for  its  chief  aim  the  establish- 
ment of  a  public  library.  December  6, 
1919  it  had  a  library  meeting  and  invited 
Miss  Laura  Robson  Avho  Avas  then  in 
charge  of  the  Islands  Department  of  the 
Library  of  HaAvaii  to  come  over  and 
address  them  on  the  subject  of  County 
Libraries.  ^liss  Robson  had  come  from 
California,  Avhere  she  had  been  librarian 
first  of  Glenn  County  Free  Library  and 
later  of  Trinity  County  Free  Library, 
and  so  she  Avas  able  to  speak  on  the 
subject  Avith  authority. 

Early  in  January  ^Mrs  D.  H.  Case, 
Avho  Avas  chairman  of  the  Library  Commit- 
tee for  the  club,  called  a  meeting  to  con- 
sider the  first  draft  of  the  county  library 
laAV,  Avhich  her  husband,  a  prominent 
laAvyer  of  Wailuku,  had  draAvn  up.  She 
invited  to  this  meeting  representatives 
from  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  Board 
of  Education,  County  Board  of  Super- 
visors, and  Mr  H.  W.  Rice,  a  senator. 
The  proposed  laAv  AA^as  read  and  dis- 
cussed  and    some    minor    changes    made. 


230 


NEWS  NOTES  OF  CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES. 


;july,  1926 


It  was  then  sent  to  the  Governor  and  to 
the  Attorney  General.  The  Attorney 
General  gave  it  his  approval  and  the 
Governor  in  his  message  to  legislature 
February  16,  1921  recommended  that 
such  a  law  be  passed.  .  March  4,  Mr 
Harold  W.  Rice  from  Maui  introduced 
the  bill  in  the  Senate.  It  passed  through 
all  the  regular  routine  of  legislature, 
came  up  for  its  last  reading  the  23d, 
Avlien  it  passed  unanimously,  and  Avas 
signed  by  the  Governor  April  6. 

The  law  as  passed  is  an  adaptation 
of  the  California  County  Library  Law, 
simplified  to  suit  Island  conditions.  The 
County  Board  of  Supervisors  is  given 
the  power  to  establish  the  library.  It 
then  appoints  the  Board  of  Library  Man- 
agers to  look  after  the  affairs  of  the 
library  and  provide  a  permanent  site  for 
the  library.  The  Board  of  Library  Man- 
agers consists  of  five  members  serving 
two  years.  They  make  the  general  rules 
and  regulations  governing  the  library, 
appoint  the  librarian  and  other  employees, 
and  establish  library  stations  and 
branches.  Every  year  they  are  required 
to  submit  reports  to  the  Board  of  Super- 
visors and  the  Library  of  Hawaii. 

Provision  is  made  that  no  one  can  be 
eligible  for  the  ofiice  of  librarian  who 
has  not  first  a  certificate  of  qualifi- 
cation from  the  Trustees  of  the  Library 
of  Hawaii.  She  is  required  to  file  oath 
of  office  and  bond,  the  amount  to  be 
determined  by  the  Board  of  Managers. 
Her  duties  are  to  build  up  and  manage 
the  library  for  the  use  of  the  county, 
recommending  to  the  managing  board 
books  and  library  equipment  for  pur- 
chase. She  is  also  required  to  attend  an 
annual  library  meeting  to  be  called  each 
year  by  the  Trustees  of  the  Library  of 
Hawaii,  and  to  make  the  annual  reports 
directed  by  the  Board  of  Managers. 

If  so  desired  the  County  Board  of 
Supervisors,  instead  of  establishing  a 
separate  county  free  library  may  con- 
tract with  the  board  of  library  trustees 
of  a  free  library  already  existing  and 
operating  within  the  county,  to  assume 
the  functions  of  a  county  free  library. 

Section  8  gave  the  amounts  of  the 
Territorial  appropriations  for  the  1921— 
23  biennial  period  and  the  regulations 
regarding  their  use.  No  money  could  be 
drawn  until  the  Governor  should  certify 


to  the  Territorial  Auditor  that  the  county 
had  acquired  a  permanent  library  site, 
had  established  a  county  library  accord- 
ing to  the  provisions  of  the  law,  or  had 
entered  into  contract  with  an  existing 
library. 

No  appropriation  was  made  for  the 
Library  of  Hawaii  in  this  act.  That 
came  in  the  regular  appropriation  bill. 
As  official  Territorial  Library,  hoAvever, 
it  was  given  the  position  of  sponsor  and 
adviser  to  the  new  county  libraries  and 
required  to  assist  them  by  interchange 
and  loaning  of  books  and  other  reading 
matter  and  in  all  other  appropriate  ways. 
Its  Board  of  Trustees  was  made  the  board 
to  pass  on  the  certification  of  librarians, 
to  call  the  annual  meeting,  to  receive  the 
agreement  of  a  free  public  library  con- 
tracting to  give  county  library  service 
and  the  reports  from  the  county  libraries 
when  established,  which  reports  it  was 
to  incorporate  with  its  own  to  the 
Governor. 

The  Library  of  Hawaii  has  more  than 
lived  up  to  what  was  enjoined  of  it  in  the 
matter  of  helping  the  new  libraries.  It 
pro-rated  the  books  owned  by  the  Islands 
Department  among  them,  assisted  in  the 
work  of  establishing  them  and  in  times 
of  special  need  has  loaned  assistants  to 
tide  them  over  difficult  times.  It  main- 
tains a  special  request  service  which  has 
been  most  convenient  to  these  younger 
institutions. 

In  comparing  the  Hawaii  County 
Library  Law  with  that  of  California  the 
first  point  of  difference  that  would  strike 
one  is  in  the  separate  library  board.  For 
this  country  it  seems  the  better  plan. 
The  County  Board  of  Supervisors  has  so 
many  things  to  look  after  and  so  little 
time  to  devote  to  library  affairs  that  it 
prefers  to  be  relieved  of  the  responsibility 
of  the  library.  The  Board  as  appointed 
here  on  Maui  consists  of  people  who  are 
interested  in  books  and  libraries  and  being 
residents  of  the  county  and  knowing  its 
conditions,  past  and  present,  they  have 
been  able  to  give  sound  and  constructive 
advice  on  plans  for  the  future. 

It  was  not  necessary  to  make  pro- 
visions for  incorporated  towns ;  there  are 
none  in  the  counties  for  which  the  law 
was  passed.  The  Library  of  Hawaii  and 
the  Hilo  Public  Library  had  previously 
been  financed  by  the  Territory  so  it  was 


vol.  21,  no.  3]       COUNTY   libraries   in    HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS. 


231 


only  no.tui-al  that  the  new  libraries 
which  v.cre  to  carry  on  their  work  more 
fully  should  be  supported  in  the  same 
way.  Indirectly,  however,  it  is  the 
county  which  pays  since  the  money  is 
taken  from  the  Territorial  income  tax. 
In  making  out  their  budgets  for  legisla- 
ture, the  librarians  from  the  several 
counties  meet  together  and  compare  their 
items,  and  then  the  whole  is  pre.sented  by 
the  Library  of  Hawaii.  No  mention  is 
made  of  the  librarian's  salary  in  the  law. 
That  is  determined  by  the  library  boards, 
a  much  more  flexible  method  than  that 
of  California. 

No  red  tape  is  necessary  when  a  school 
joins  the  library.  If  it  wants  books  and 
there  are  any  available,  they  are  sent. 
But  the  libraries  do  not  handle  text- 
books. Free  supplementary  texts  are 
taken  care  of  by  the  School  Department. 
They  are  selected  and  purchased  either 
by  the  office  in  Honolulu  or  the  County 
School  Supervisor,  the  latter  attending 
to  their  distribution  and  circulation  from 
one  school  to  another. 

After  the  passing  of  the  County 
Library  Law.  the  Library  of  Hawaii 
continued  the  work  on  the  Islands  until 
the  new  libraries  were  organized  and  able 
to  handle  it  themselves.  Then  the 
Islands  Department  became  the  Stations 
Department  and  devoted  itself  to  the 
extension  work  in  Honolulu  and  on  the 
Island  of  Oahu.  It  now  supplies  eighty- 
nine  branches,  of  which  twenty-nine  are 
community  branches,  fifty-nine  school 
branches  and  one  a  home  station. 

The  Board  of  Trustees  of  the  Hilo 
Public  Library  immediately  took  the 
necessary  steps  to  take  over  the  work  of 
serving  the  County  of  Hawaii  and  at  the 
pbeginning  of  the  fiscal  year,  July  1,  1921 
itarted  work  as  a  County  Library.  It 
ow  has  eighty  branches,  seventeen  corn- 
unity  and  sixty-three  school.  The  chil- 
dren's librarian  from  Hilo  goes  out  to 
these  branches,  telling  stories  and  giv- 
ing instruction  in  the  use  of  books  and 
libraries.  Last  year  the  branches  re- 
ported a  circulation  of  63,848  which 
added  to  the  64,699  books  loaned  from 
the  Hilo  Library  makes  a  total  of  128,- 
547  for  the  county. 

The  Maui  County  Free  Library  is  the 
only  real  and  bona  fide  county  library. 
It  was  established  by  the  Board  of  Super- 


visors who  then  appointed  the  Board  of 
Library  Managers  and  purchased  the 
permanent  site  required.  In  September, 
1921  the  Board  of  Manager^  appointed 
a  librarian  and  work  was  begun.  The 
building  provided  had  to  be  remodeled 
and  equipment  bought  so  it  was  not 
until  January  1,  1922  that  the  Library 
of  Hawaii  could  be  relieved  of  the  branch 
work  on  Maui.  Books  are  now  sent  to 
nine  community  branches  and  forty 
schools.  This  last  year  the  branches 
reported  a  circulation  of  33,198.  At  the 
main  lihrarj'  in  "Wailuku  31.308  were 
loaned  bringing  up  the  total  to  64,.506. 

Kauai  was  the  last  county  to  organize. 
There  the  County  Board  of  Supervisors 
contracted  with  the  Kauai  Public  Library 
Association  to  carry  on  the  work  and 
assume  the  functions  of  a  county  library. 
A  site  was  provided  and  .$7-5,000  was 
given  by  Mrs  A.  S.  Wilcox  for  a  library 
building  to  be  erected  as  a  memorial  to 
her  husband.  March  1922  a  librarian 
was  appointed  and  the  work  was  carried 
on  in  temporary  quarters  until  April 
1924  when  the  new  building  was  ready 
for  use.  Kauai  has  twenty  -  three 
branches,  eight  community  branches  and 
fifteen  school  branches.  These  latter  do 
marvelous  work,  reporting  a  circulation 
of  114,674  for  the  last  year.  Thirty-one 
thousand  five  hundred  eighteen  books 
were  loaned  from  the  Main  Library  at 
Lihue. 

The  county  libraries  have  now  become 
an  accepted  and  popular  institution  in 
the  Islands.  Some  opposed  them  at  first 
because  they  preferred  to  borrow  from 
a  large  library  like  the  one  in  Honolulu 
and  were  afraid  they  could  never  find 
what  they  wanted  in  a  local  library. 
They  complain  no  more  on  that  score. 
Hilo  now  has  a  collection  of  22,298 
books,  Maui  1-5,384,  Kauai  10,640,  and 
any  of  the  76,808  of  the  Library  of  Ha- 
waii are  available  on  request. 

The  children's  work  is  perhaps  the 
most  important  here  where  so  many  come 
from  homes  where  English  is  not  the 
native  tongue.  Their  acquaintance  with 
books  before  was  limited  to  their  school 
texts.  Library  books  have  opened  up  a 
new  world  to  them.  Children  in  the 
states  who  have  so  many  things  could 
hardly  miderstand  just  how  much  books 
mean   to    these    children.     And    it   makes 


232 


NEWS  NOTES  OF  CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES. 


Mnly,  1926 


the  library  work  seem  so  much  more 
interesting  and  -worth  ^Yhile  Avhen  it  is 
so  much  appreciated. 

Most  of  felie  teachers  are  eager  to  avail 
themselves  and  their  schools  of  the  oppor- 
tunity of  having  library  books,  but  as  in 
all  places  there  are  some  who  are  not  so 
interested  and  consequently  reports  are 
often  difficult  to  obtain.  Some  use  the 
books  only  in  the  schoolroom  so  there 
are  no  reports.  Pictures  and  music 
records  are  included  in  library  service 
and  have  proved  most  popular. 

Community  branch  work  is  difficult  to 
develop  in  most  places  because  of  the 
few  adult  people  capable  of  reading ;  the 
children  are  usually  supplied  through  the 
schools.  Also  in  this  day  of  automo- 
biles, many  who  would  otherwise  borrow 
from  a  branch  prefer  to  come  to  the 
Main  Library,  where  they  have  a  larger 
collection  from  which  to  select.  Branches 
are  usually  located  in  the  Post  Office, 
Community  House,  plantation  store  or 
office.  Here  on  Maui  there  a