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California  State   Library 


N  EWS    N  OTES 


OF 


California  Libraries 


VOL  25 
NOS.  1-4 

JANUARY-OCTOBER,  1930 


HARRY  HAMMOND,  STATE  PRINTER 
SACRAMENTO,  1931 


83997 


(INDEX  SUPPLEMENT) 


Vol.  25,  No.  1  JANUARY  1930 


News  Notes 


OF 


California  Libraries 


IN  this  number-some  of  the  items  of  interest 

gifts— UNIVERSITY     OF     REDLANDS     LIBRARY,     MUNK     LIBRARY    OF 
ARIZONIANA    (LOS   ANGELES,   SOUTHWEST    MUSEUM),   RIVERSIDE 
PUBLIC   LIBRARY,  RED   BLUFF  PUBLIC  LIBRARY,  REDLANDS  PUB- 
LIC    LIBRARY,     PACIFIC     GROVE      PUBLIC      LIBRARY,      ELSINORE 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY. 

BUILDING  ACTIVITIES— ARCADIA,  REDONDO  BEACH,  MONTEBELLO 
(LOS  ANGELES  COUNTY),  SOUTH  PASADENA,  SAN  DIEGO  STATE 
TEACHERS    COLLEGE,    MONTCLAIR    BRANCH    OF    OAKLAND. 

CUSTODIANS'    MEETINGS— AMADOR,    FRESNO,    MERCED    COUNTIES. 

CHANGE  IN   LIBRARIAN  AT  ALAMEDA  PUBLIC  LIBRARY. 

DAMAGE  BY   FIRE  TO  SOLANO  COUNTY  LIBRARY   HEADQUARTERS. 

FOR  SPECIAL  ARTICLES,  SEE  CONTENTS. 


California  State  Library 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  PRINTING  OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO,  1930 


73829 


CONTENTS 

Page 
PARTIAL  BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  THE  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF   CALI- 
FORNIA         1 

MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA  SHOWING  COUNTIES—— - 23 

LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARIES 24 

LIST  OF  LARGER  PUBLIC  LIBRARIES 25 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES— NEWS  ITEMS 1 26 

DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES    AND    OTHER    ITEMS    OF 

GENERAL  INTEREST : 55 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION 63 

CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS 67 

LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC 68 

BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS 69 

CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY 71 

Staff,  Etc 71 

Departments    72 

Recext  Accessions 77 

C.U.IFORNIA  State  Publications  Received  During  October,  NovEiiBER 
AND  December,  1929 119 

Caxifoenia  City  Publications  Received  During  October,  November 
AND  December,  1929 125 

Books  for  the  Blind  Added  During  OcTOBiai,  November  and  December, 
1929 126 


Issued  quarterly  in  the  interest  of  the  libraries  of  the  State  by  the  California 
State  Libeaby. 

All    communications    should    be    addressed    to   the    California    State    Library, 
Sacramento,  California. 

Note. — Standing  matter  is  set  solid  and  new  matter  leaded. 

Entered  as  second-class  matter  December,  1913,  at  the  post  office  at  Sacramento, 
California,  under  the  Act  of  August  24,  1912. 

Acceptance  for  mailing  at  the  special  rate  of  postage  provided  for  in  Section 
1103.  Act  of  October  3.  1917,  authorized  August  27,  1918. 


126226 


A  PARTIAL  BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  THE  NATURAL  HISTORY 

OF  CALIFORNIA* 


By  Tract  I.  Stoker 


Information  concerning  the  plants  and 
animals  of  California  has  been  accumulat- 
ing for  about  a  century  and  a  half.  Inci- 
dental mention  of  a  few  common  native 
species  is  to  be  found  in  the  accounts  of 
travelers  during  the  Mission  period  and 
brief  comments  on  the  fur  resources  and 
fisheries  are  to  be  found  in  some  of  the 
early  historical  works,  but  little  of  a 
serious  character  was  published  prior  to 
1830.  The  earliest  collection  of  plants 
of  which  there  is  record  is  that  made  by 
Martiniere  and  Collignon,  who  with  La 
Perouse  visited  Monterey  Bay  and  vicin- 
ity in  1786,  and  first  comments  on  defi- 
nite species  of  animals  are  found  in  the 
repox-t  of  La  Perouse's  expedition  by  Mil- 
et-Mureau  (1797).  A  work  by  Shaw  and 
Nodder  (also  1797)  described  the  Cali- 
fornia Condor  and  California  Quail.  The 
visits  of  Kotzebue  and  Eschscholtz  in 
1816  and  1824  (who  were  accompanied  in 
1816  by  Chamisso),  and  of  Beechey  in 
1826,  and  Belcher  in  1837,  and  the  travels 
of  Douglas  (1830)  and  of  Nuttall  (1835) 
are  notable  in  that  there  resulted  from  the 
collections  of  these  early  visitors  publica- 
tions which  served  to  indicate  the  charac- 
ter of  the  native  biota.  In  the  ensuing 
years  an  ever  increasing  body  of  litera- 
ture has  appeared,  describing  the  native 
(and  now  introduced)  plant  and  animal 
life  of  the  state. 

To  date,  there  has  appeared,  so  far  as 
I  am  aware,  only  one  bibliography  com- 
plete for  any  group  of  California  ani- 
mals, that  by  Grinnell  (1909,  1924)  deal- 
ing with  birds.  The  monograph  by  Van 
Denburgh  (1922)  on  reptiles  includes 
citations  to  a  very  large  part  of  the 
literature  on  reptiles,  and  that  by  Storer 
(1925)  includes  in  the  bibliog:raphy  prac- 
.tically  everything  on  amphibians.  There 
is  a  manuscript  bibliography  on  Califor- 
nia mammals  in  the  University  of  Cali- 
fornia Museum  of  Vertebrate  Zoology. 
Gill  (1882)  listed  the  papers  dealing  with 
fishes  on  the.  Pacific  coast  to  the  end  of 
1879,  and  this  includes  much  Californian 
material.     The  index   to  economic  mate- 


rial in  state  documents  of  California  by 
Hasse  (1908)  includes  many  items  relat- 
ing to  forests,  fish  and  game.  Professor 
B.  O.  Essig  of  the  University  of  Cali- 
fornia at  Berkeley  has  a  manuscript  card 
index  which  contains  references  to  many 
of  the  insects  of  California  and  there  is 
much  bibliographic  material  for  Califor- 
nia entomology  in  his  1915  and  1926 
works  listed  beyond.  Dr.  S.  S.  Berry  of 
Redlands  has  a  manuscript  bibliography 
dealing  with  molluscs,  especially  the  land 
and  freshwater  species  of  the  state.  Refer- 
ences to  the  important  papers  dealing 
with  Californian  marine  invertebrates  are 
included  in  the  terminal  bibliography  of 
Johnson  and  Snook  ( 1927 ) . 

The  situation  with  regard  to  botanical 
literature  is  even  less  satisfactory  than 
with  respect  to  animals.  For  that  reason 
I  have  included  proportionately  more  of 
the  minor  items  in  the  list  for  "plant.s" 
in  this  bibliography.  A  bibliography  on 
plants  of  the  five  southern  counties  of 
California  was  published  by  Parish  (1909, 
1910)  ;  this  excluded  general  works  and 
popular  papers.  Important  items  deal- 
ing with  plant  distribution  in  the  state 
are  listed  by  Harshberger  (1911)  and 
titles  dealing  specifically  with  chaparral 
are  given  by  Cooper  (1922).  Series  of 
references  on  particular  groups  of  plants 
are  to  be  found  in  the  terminal  bibliogra- 
phies of  papers  by  Hall  (1902,  1907), 
Jepson  (1910),  Setchell  and  Gardner 
(1919,  1920,  1925)   and  Smiley   (1921). 

The  bibliography  presented  herewith 
includes  for  each  group  the  separate 
books  and  a  few  important  items  from 
the  serial  literature.  It  is  manifestly 
impossible  to  list  many  items  of  impor- 
tance which  have  appeared  in  scientific 
and  popular  periodicals ;  general  mono- 
graphic works  which  include  material 
from  California  have  rarely  been  entered. 
The  total  number  of  titles  on  birds  alone 
to  the  end  of  1923  was  4071 ;  a  complete 
bibliography  on  California  natural  his- 
tory down  to  date  would  probably  exceed 
ten  thousand  entries. 

*  Contribution  from  the  Division  of  Zoology,  College  of  Agriculture,  University  of 
California. 

73829 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


It  is  hoped  that  the  listing  of  these 
items  pertaining  to  the  natural  history 
of  California  will  induce  public  and  pri- 
vate librarians  and  individuals  having 
personal  libraries  to  seek  out  and  con- 
serve copies  of  such  as  still  can  be  ob- 
tained. Interest  in  the  human  history 
of  the  west  and  in  "Californiana"  has 
focused  attention  on  documents  in  that 
field  and  has  saved  many  items  rare  or 
otherwise  from  oblivion.  There  is  need 
to  turn  attention  to  many  natural  history 
items  relating  to  California ;  some  of 
these  will  prove  difficult  to  secure. 

The  asterisk  (*)  marks  items  suitable 
for  general  libraries,  large  or  small,  which 
are  in  print  or  readily  obtainable  at  the 
time  this  bibliography  is  published. 

CALIFORNIA  PERIODICALS  RE- 
LATING IMPORTANTLY  TO  NAT- 
URAL   HISTORY 

References  to  the  natural  history  of 
California  are  scattered  widely  through 
the  periodical  literature,  but  there  are  a 
few  series  which  deal  largely  or  exclusive- 
ly with  the  biota  of  the  state  and  the 
student  of  any  particular  group  of  ani- 
mals or  plants  will  need  to  become  ac- 
quainted with  one  or  more  of  these. 

In  addition  to  the  periodicals  listed 
below,  there  are  certain  scientific  journals 
which  contain  large  numbers  of  references 
pertaining  to  California.  Clues  to  these 
may  be  obtained  by  consulting  the  appro- 
priate special  bibliogi*aphic  sources  indi- 
cated above. 

American  Plants.  San  Diego.  C.  R. 
Orcutt.  Irregular,  v.  1,  columns  1-387 
(2  per  page).  1907-08;  v.  2,  col.  385- 
788,  1909;  v.  3,  col.  789-1076,  pis. 
12-39,  1912. 

Contains  a  "Botany  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia." 

Audubon  Society  of  California.  Glendora. 
Annual  reports,  1-  ,  1907-  . 

Avifauna,  The.  Los  Angeles  and  Santa 
Barbara.  W.  A.  Hoffman,  1895,  1897. 
3  numbers. 

A  minor  bird  journal  containing  ma- 
terial pertaining-  to  the  Cooper 
Ornithological  Club.  [See  Burns, 
F.  L.,  1915.  A  bib'iography  of 
scarce  or  out  of  print  North  Ameri- 
can amateur  trade  periodicals  de- 
voted more  or  less  to  ornithology, 
32  pp.] 

Bird  News.  San  Francisco.  Avicultural 
Society  of  California.  Bi-monthly.  1, 
nos.  1-6  (all  published)  ;  1909. 


Notes  on  wild  and  captive  birds  ;  sev- 
eral California  items. 

Butterfly  Farmer,  The.  Truckee.  Ximena 
McGlashan,  author  and  publisher. 
Monthly.  v.  1,  nos.  1-11  (all  pub- 
lished). Sept.  1913-Aug.  1914.   208  pp. 

"A  monthly  magazine  for  amateur 
entomologists,"  containing  data  on 
food  plants  of  niany  butterflies. 

California  Academy  of  Sciences.  San 
Francisco.  Irregular.  Bulletin,  1-2, 
1884-87;  Memoirs,  1-5,  1868-1905; 
Occasional  papers,  1-  ,  1890  to  date 
(no.  16,  1928)  ;  Proceedings,  series  1, 
1-7,  1854-1876  ;  series  2,  1-6,  1888-96  ; 
series  3,  botany,  1-2,  1897-1904;  zo- 
ology, 1-4,  1897-1906;  series  4,  1-  , 
1907  to  date  (v.  18  in  progress).  Also 
occasional  miscellaneous  nonserial 
items. 

Practically    all    papers    are    technical 

in  character ;  much  of  the  material 

relates    to    California. 

California  Fish  and  Game  Commission. 
[Official  designation  varies.]  Biennial 
report,  1- ,  1870-72  to  date  (30th, 
1926-28)  ;  Calif oniia  Fish  and  Game, 
Quarterly,  1-,  1914  to  date  (v.  15, 
1929)  ;  Fish  Commission  Bulletins, 
1-6,  1891-92;  Bulletin  Calif.  Fish 
and  Game  Commission.  1,  1911 ;  Fish 
Bulletin  (irregular),  1-  ,  1913-  (no. 
16,  1928)  ;  Game  Bulletin  no.  1,  1913 
(all  published)  ;  Teachers  Bulletin, 
1-  ,  1912-   (no.  9,  1928). 

California  Nature  Study  League.  Sacra- 
mento. C.  M.  Goethe.  Press  Bulle- 
tins. Monthly,  nos.  1-90,  1916-Dec., 
1922. 

Popular  news  articles,  many  on  Cali- 
fornia material. 

California  State  Board  of  Forestry.    Sac- 
ramento.     Biennial    reports.    1885-86, 
1887-88,  1889-90.     All  published. 
Description     of     forests     and     forest 
trees    by    J.    G.    and    Mrs   Lemmon, 
Abbot  Kinney  and  others. 

California  State  Commission  of  Horti- 
culture. Sacramento.  Monthly  Bulle- 
tin, V.  1  to  V.  8,  no.  7,  1912-1919. 

Continued  as  Monthly  Bulletin  of 
California  State  Department  of 
Agriculture. 

California  State  Department  of  Agricul- 
ture. Sacramento.  Monthly  Bulletin, 
V.  9.  1920  to  date  (v.  18.  1929). 

\ .  1  to  V.  8,  no.  7,  issued  by  California 
State  Commission  of  Horticulture. 
Numerous  technical  and  popular 
articles  dealing  with  agricultural 
pests,  native  and  introduced. 

California  Traveler  and  Naturalist,  The. 
Napa  and  San  Jose.  1892-93. 
Uriah  L.  Hertz,   et   al.     [vol.  2,  no.  1, 


vol.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA 


April,  1893,  16  pp.,  only  number  seen 

by  me.] 

An  erratic  minor  journal  of  natural 
history  and  miscellaneous  mate- 
rial. 

Condor,  The.   [first  volume  entitled  Bull. 
Cooper    Ornithological    Club.]       Eagle 
Rock,    Los    Angeles.      [various   offices 
of  publication.]     Cooper  Ornithological 
Club.     Bi-monthly.     1-  ,  1899  to  date 
(v.  31,  1929). 
"A  magazine  of  western  ornithology," 
containing    a    great    deal    of    Cali- 
fornia  material,   popular  and  tech- 
nical. 

Erythea.  Bei-keley.  W.  L.  Jepson,  edi- 
tor and  publisher.  Irregular.  1—  , 
1893  to  date   (v.  8  in  progress). 

"A  journal  of  botany,  west  Ameri- 
can and  general  .  .  ." ;  much 
California  material. 

Gull,  The.  San  Francisco.  Audubon 
Association  of  the  Pacific.  Monthly. 
1-  ,  1919  to  date  (v.  11,  1929). 

News  monthly  and  record  of  the  as- 
sociation with  short  popular  arti- 
cles  on   California   birds. 

Invertebrata  Paeifica.  Claremont  [Calif.], 
and  Santiago  de  las  Vegas,  Cuba.  C. 
F.  Baker,  author  and  publisher.  Ir- 
regular, vol.  1,  pp.  1-198  (all  pub- 
lished), 1903-07. 

A  brief  journal,  reporting  insects  col- 
lected by  the  author,  many  of  them 
in  California. 
[See  Essig,   E.   O.,  Journ.   Econ.  Ent., 
20:749.  1927.] 

Journal  of  Entomology  and  Zoology, 
[title  varies.]  Pomona  College,  Clare- 
mont. Monthly.  1-  ,  1909  to  date  (v. 
21,  1929). 

Technical  and  semi-popular  articles 
on  insects  and  various  animals ; 
much   California,  material. 

Journal  of  the  Museum  of  Comparative 
Oology.  Santa  Barbara.  W.  L.  Daw- 
son, editor.  Annual.  1-2  (no.  4)  (all 
published),  1919-1922. 

Miscellaneous  articles  relating  to  bird 
eggs  and  egg  collectors ;  some  of 
these  relate  to  California. 

Live  Oak,  The.  Angwin,  Napa  Co.  How- 
ell Mountain  Nature  Club.  Monthly 
( September  to  June,  10  numbers  an- 
nually). V.  1-,  September,  1927,  to 
date. 

"Pacific  Coast  Nature  Monthly.  Pub- 
lished by  Pacific  LTnion  College 
Press.  Harold  W.  Clark,  Editor." 
General    natural    history. 

Lorquinia.  Los  Angeles.  Lorquin  Nat- 
ural History  Club.  Irregular.  1—2 
(all  published),  1916-1919. 

Miscellaneous  short  items,  chiefly  on 
the  natural  history  of  southern 
California. 


Los  Angeles  County  Museum  of  History, 
Science  and  Art.  Los  Angeles.  De- 
partment of  Natural  Sciences.  Mis- 
cellaneous publications,  no.  1,  1915 ; 
no.  2,  1918    (all  published?). 

Both  items  deal  with  fossil  remains 
from  the  Rancho  La  Brea  asphalt. 

Madroiio.  Berkeley.  California  Botani- 
cal Society.  Irregular.  1- ,  1916  to 
date  (v.  1  in  progress,  9  numbers 
published  to  end  of  1929). 

Contains  brief  articles  and  systematic 
revisions  of  certain  genera  of  Cali- 
fornia plants. 

Nature  Club  of  Southern  California, 
The.  Bulletin.  Los  Angeles.  Publ. 
by  the  Club.  Monthly,  [v.  6,  no.  9, 
December,  1928,  only  number  seen.] 

Miscellaneous  natural  history  mate- 
rial. 

Nid[i]ologist,  The.  Alameda  [later  New 
York,  N.  Y.].  H.R.Taylor.  Monthly. 
1-4  (all  published),  1893-97. 

Popular  articles  on  birds,  chiefly 
Californian. 

Osprey,  The.     Galesburg,  111.,  etc.     Vari- 
ous editors.    Monthly.     1-5,  n.s.  1   (in- 
complete;  all  published).     1896-1902. 
Popular   articles   on  birds  ;   a  regular 
"California  department"  was  main- 
tained.    For  the  data  on  the  Nidi- 
ologist  and   Osprey,   see   the   Burns 
"Bibliography"     cited    under     "The 
Avifauna." 

Pacific    Coast    Avifauna.      Eagle    Rock, 

Los    Angeles.      Cooper    Ornithological 

Club.      Irregular.      1-  ,    1900    to    date 

(no.  18  issued  in  1927). 

A  series  of  individual  lengthy  papers 

dealing   with    western    ornithology ; 

ten   are   on  California  birds. 

Pan  Pacific  Entomologist.  San  Fran- 
cisco. [Issued  from  the  California 
Academy  of  Sciences.]  Monthly.  1-  , 
1924  to  date   (v.  5,  1929). 

Technical  entomology ;  many  Califor- 
nia items. 

Pasadena  Academy  of  Science.  Pasadena. 
Irregular.     Publ.  1  and  2,  1897,  1898 
(all  published). 
Both   papers   deal  with  birds. 

Phainopepla,  The.  Los  Angeles.  Bulle- 
tin of  the  California  Audubon  Society. 
Monthly,  v.  1,  no.  1,  October,  1928, 
4  pp.,   (all  seen). 

Pittonia.      Berkeley    [v.    1    and    2]    and 

Washington,    D.    C,    E.    L.     Greene, 

author  and  publisher.     Irregular.     1-5 

(all    published),    1887-92;    1896-1905. 

"A  series  of  papers  relating  to  botany 

and  botanists     .     .     ." ;  many  items 

dealing  with  California. 

Pomona  College  Journal  of  Economic 
Botany  as  applied  to  subtropical  horti- 


NEWS  NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


culture.       Claremont,     Department     of 
Biology,    Pomona    College.      Quarterly. 
1-3    (all   published).      1911-1913. 
Deals  with  ornamental  and  horticul- 
tural   species    of    plants    suited    to 
subtropical   areas. 

Riverside  Junior  College.  Occasional 
pai>ers   (v.  1,  no.  1,  1926,  all  seen). 

San  Diego  Society  of  Natural  History. 
Transactions.  Iregular  1-  ,  1905  to 
date.     (v.  5  in  progress.) 

Short  papers  dealing  for  the  most 
part  with  the  flora  and  fauna  of 
San  Diego   County. 

San  Diego  Zoological  Society.  Bulletin. 
Irregular,     no.  1-,  1924  to  date. 

Brief  papers  on  the  zoologj'  of  south- 
western California. 

Santa  Barbara  Society  of  Natural  His- 
tory. Bulletin.  Irregular,  vol.  1,  no. 
1-3  (all  published).  Mar.  1887- Jan. 
1902.     illus.,  pis. 

Vol.  1,  no.  1  has  title  :  Report  of 
proceedings  of  the  Santa  Barbara 
Society  of  natural  history  from  its 
organization  in  1876,  to  1887  [data 
from  L.  C.   Card;  not  seen]. 

Southern  California  Academy  of  Sci- 
ences. Los  Angeles.  Irregular.  Bulle- 
tin. 1-,  1902  to  date  (at  least  24  vol- 
umes) ;  Proceedings,  no.  1-6  (all  pub- 
lished), 1896-1899. 

Miscellaneous  short  papers,  some  on 
the  biology  of  southern  California 
and  the  American  southwest. 

Stanford  University.  Irregular.  Contri- 
butions to  biology,  Hopkins  Seaside 
Laboratory,  1-32,  1895-1904;  Publica- 
tions in  biological  sciences,  1-,  1920  to 
date;  University  series,  1-41,  1908- 
1920. 

Technical ;  some  papers  deal  with 
California  material. 

University  of  California.     Berkeley.     Ir- 
regular.     Publications    in    Botany    1-. 
1902  to  date  (v.  16  in  progress,  1929)  ; 
Publications   in   Entomology,    1-,    1900 
to  date   (v.  5  in  progress,  1929)  ;  Pub- 
lications in  Zoology  1-,   1902  to  date 
(v.  33  in  progress,  1929). 
Technical ;   many  items  relate  to  the 
fauna    and    flora    of    California ;    a 
few    important    items    from    these 
series    are    listed    m    the    detailed 
bibliographies   below. 

University  of  California.  Agricultural 
Experiment  Station.  Berkeley.  Ir- 
regular. Bulletins,  1-  ,  1884  to  date 
(no.  478,  1929).  Circular,  1- ,  1903 
to  date  (no.  315,  1929).  Agricultural 
Extension  Service  Circulars,  1-  ,  1926 
to  date    (no.  38,  1929). 

Occasional  bulletins  and  circulars, 
contain  information  on  native  or 
introduced  plants  and  animals. 


West  American  Scientist.  San  Diego. 
C.  R.  Orcutt,  author,  editor  and  pub- 
lisher. Irregular,  nos.  1-158,  20  vol- 
umes, 1884-1919. 

A  minor  journal  with  numerous  brief 
items  on  the  biology  of  the  Ameri- 
can southwest,  including  Califor- 
nia. 

Western  Bird  Banding  News.  Pasadena. 
Western  Bird  Banding  Association. 
Quarterly. 

A  mimeographed  news  letter  with 
numerous  original  items  relating 
to  birds,  chiefly  Calif ornian. 

Wren-tit,  The.  San  Jose.  Bulletin  of 
the  Santa  Clara  Valley  Audubon  So- 
ciety. Quarterly,  v.  1,  no.  1,  Jan- 
uary, 1929,  4  pp.    ( all  seen ) . 

Yosemite  Nature  Notes.  Yosemite  Val- 
ley. National  Parks  Service  and 
Yosemite  Natural  History  Association. 
Monthly,  v.  1-,  1922  to  date  (v.  8, 
1929 ) .  Published  weekly  during  sum- 
mer of  1924-25. 

Much  local  information  on  natural 
history  of  the  Valley  and  Park. 

Zoe.  San  Francisco,  [v.  1-4]  and  San 
Diego  [v.  5].  Zoe  Publishing  Co. 
Monthly,  later  irregular.  1-5  (all  pub- 
lished),  1890-94;   1900-08. 

Many  technical  and  semi-popular  arti- 
cles of  major  importance  in  Cali- 
fornia to  botany  and  zoology. 

In  addition  to  the  serials  mentioned 
in  the  foregoing  list,  articles  dealing  with 
various  aspects  of  the  natural  history  of 
California  have  appeared  in  the  Sierra 
Club  Bulletin,  Land  of  Sunshine  (and 
its  successor,  Out-West),  Mount  Whit- 
ney Club  Journal,  Western  Field,  Sunset 
Magazine  (especially  the  earlier  vol- 
umes). Forest  and  Stream  (in  the  70's 
and  80's  particularly),  and,  scatteringly, 
in  other  periodicals  of  similar  character. 

EXPLORING  EXPEDITIONS  AND 
GOVERNMENT  SURVEYS 

Beechey,  F.  W.  Narrative  of  a  voyage  to 
the  Pacific  and  Beering's  Strait,  to 
cooperate  with  the  polar  expeditions : 
performed  in  His  Majesty's  Ship  Blos- 
som, under  the  command  of  Captain 
P.  W.  Beechey  ...  in  the  years 
1825,  26,  27,  28  .  .  .  London.  H. 
Colburn  and  R.  Bentley.  1831.  2  vols. 
1  :  xvii-l- 1-472  pp.,  13  pis.,  3  charts ;  2 : 
iv+1^52  pp.,  10  pis. 

San  Francisco  and  Monterey  were 
visited  Dec.  7-28,  1826.  The  nar- 
rative of  the  visit  2:1-87,  contains 
mention  of  various  animals  and  a 
few  plants. 

Belcher,  [Sir]  Edward.  Narrative  of  a 
voyage  round  the  world,  performed  in 


YO'l.  25,  no.  Ij       BIBLIOGRAPHY  OX  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  OALIFORXL^ 


Her  Majesty's  Ship  Sulphur,  during 
the  years  1836-1842  .  .  .  Pub- 
lished under  the  authority  of  the  Lords 
Commissioners  of  the  Admiralty.  Lon- 
don. H.  Colburn.  1843.  2  vols.  1, 
i— xxxyiii-f-2-M-3S7  pp.,  3  maps,  illus. ; 
2,  i-vi-l-2-f- 1-474  pp.,  illus. 

The  expedition  visited  California  in 
1837  (October  19  to  December  6) 
at  Monterey  and  San  Francisco 
and  up  the  Sacramento  River.  See 
the  items  by  Hinds,  et  al.  (1844) 
on  zoology  and  Bentham  (184  4) 
on   plants. 

"Blossom."       The     zoology     of     Captain 
Beeehey's    voyage    compiled    from    the 
collections  and  notes  made  by  Captain 
Beechey,  the  olBcers  and  naturalist  of 
the  Expedition,  during  a  voyage  to  the 
Pacific     and     Behring's     Straits     per- 
formed in  H.  M.  S.  Blossom,  1825-28. 
London.       Henry     G.     Bohn.       1839. 
xii-h  1-180     [  =  186]     pp.      44    pis.,    3 
charts. 
Mammals,  by  J.  Richardson   [includes 
first    description    of    the    California 
Ground  Squirrel,  Citellus  heecheyi']  ; 
Birds   by   N.    A.    Vigors ;    F'ishes   bv 
G.  T.  Lay  and  E.  T.  Bennett;  Crus- 
tacea   by    R.    Owen  ; '  Reptiles    and 
batrachians    by    J.    E.    Gray ;    Mol- 
lusca  by  J.  B.  Gray. 

Emory,  W.  H.,  d;  others.  Notes  of  a 
military  reconnoissance,  from  Fort 
Leavenyrorth,  in  Missouri,  to  San 
Diego,  in  California  .  .  .  Wash- 
ington. Wendell  and  Van  Benthuysen, 
Printers.  1848.  30th  Cong.  1st  Sess. 
House  Ex.  Doc.  41.  614  pp.,  pis., 
maps. 

The  report  by  Emory  with  appendices 
occupies  pp.  1-385  ;  incidental  notes 
on  plants  and  animals  by  Emory, 
report  on  plants  by  John  Torrey, 
on   cacti   by   Engelmann. 

Eschscholtz,  J.  P.  Zoologischer  atlas, 
enhalten  Abbildungen  und  Beschrei- 
bungen  neuer  Thierarten,  wahrend  des 
Flotteapitains  Von  Kotzebue  zyreiter 
Reise  um  die  Welt,  auf  der  Russisch- 
Kaiserlichen  Kriegschlupp  Predpriaetie 
in  den  Jahren  1823-1826.  Berlin.  G. 
Reimer.  1829-33.  5  parts  in  1  vol., 
front.,  25  col.  pis.  Pt.  5  edited  by  M. 
H.  Rathke. 

A  number  of  species  of  California 
animals  including  the  coyote,  sever- 
al salamanders  and  insects  are 
here  described  and  given  scientific 
names.  These  are  the  first  detailed 
accounts  of  any  California  animals. 

Fremont,  J.  C.  Report  of  the  exploring 
expedition  to  the  Rocky  Mountains  in 
the  year  1842,  and  to  Oregon  and 
north  California  in  the  years  1843- 
44.      Washington.      Gales   and    Seaton, 


printers.     1845.     28th  Cong.,  2d  Sess.. 

Senate  Ex.  Doc.  174.     693  pp.,  22  pis., 

5  maps. 

New  plants  of  the  second  expedition 
are  described  by  John  Torrey  and 
Fremont,  pp.  311-319  ;  there  is  in- 
cidental mention  of  animals  and 
plants  in  the  narrative,  pp.  105-290. 

Hinds,  R.  B.,  ed.  The  zoology  of  the 
voyage  of  H.  M.  S.  Sulphiii*.  under 
the  command  of  Captain  Sir  Edward 
Belcher  .  .  .  during  the  years 
1836-42.  Pub.  under  the  authority  of 
the  Lords  Commissioners  of  the  Ad- 
miralty. Ed.  and  superintended  by 
Richard  Bi-inslev  Hinds.  .  .  .  Lon- 
don. Smith.  Elder  &  Co.  1844.  [1843- 
45.]  1,  2-hl50  pp.,  64  pis. ;  2,  2-H72-f-v 
pp.,  21  col.  pis. 

Ives,   J.   C.     Report   upon   the   Colorado 
River   of  the   West,    explored   in   1857 
and    1858    by    Lieutenant    Joseph    C. 
Ives,     Corps    of    Topographical    Engi- 
neers, under  the  direction  of  the  Office 
of    Explorations    and    Suiweys,    A.    A. 
Humphreys,     Captain,     Topographical 
Engineers,  in  charge.     By  order  of  the 
Secretary  of  War.    Wa.shington.     1861. 
1-131 -f  1-154+6  +  1-30  -f-  1-31+1   pp., 
front.  +19  pis.,  1  map,  41+27  figs. 
The    botanical    report    (part    IV)    by 
Gray,   Torrey,   Thurber  and   Engel- 
mann, comprises  30  pages;  the  zo- 
ological  part    (V)    by   S.    F.    Baird 
consists    of    a    2-page    list    of    birds 
collected  by  Mollhausen. 

Kotzebue,  Otto  von.  Neue  Reise  um  die 
Welt,  in  den  Jahren  1823,  24,  25,  and 
26  .  .  .  Weimar.  Wilhelm  Hoff- 
mann. 1830.  2  vols.  1,  xxu+191 
pp.;  2,  2+177+2+34  pp.,  2  pis.,  3 
ch.B.v\s. 

See  notes   on   English   edition. 

— — —  A  new  voyage  round  the  world, 
in  the  years  1823,  24,  25,  and  26.    Lon- 
don.      Henry     Colbum     and     Richard 
Bentley.     1830.     2  vols.     1,  8+341  pp., 
front.,  3  maps ;  2,  2+362+1  pp.,  4  pis. 
Kotzebue    visited    San    Francisco    Oc- 
tober 1  to  November  1,  1816,  on  his 
first  voyage,  but  little  or  no  infor- 
mation   on    California   is    contained 
in  his  "voyage  of  discovery"   (1821, 
3      vols.)      describing      that      visit. 
Eschscholtz        (18  2  2)        described 
plants  gathered  on  that  trip.     The 
second  visit,   September  to  Novem- 
ber,   1824,    resulted   in   collection   of 
numerous     specimens      (see     Esch- 
scholtz   1829-33  ;     some    details    of 
the  visit  are  summarized  in  Storer, 
1925,    pp.    47-48,    79-80).      The    zoo- 
logical   collections    are   reviewed    in 
Kotzebue,  v.   2,  pp.   325-362. 

[La  Perouse.]  A  voyage  round  the 
world,    performed    in    the    years    1785, 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


1786,  1787,  1788,  by  the  Boussole  and 
Astrolabe,  under  the  command  of  J.  F. 
G.  de  la  Perouse.  .  .  .  Translated 
from  the  French.  London.  G.  G.  and 
J.  Robinson,  et  al.  1799.  2  vols.  + 
folio  atlas.  1,  6+i-lvi+l-539  pp., 
front. ;  2,  i-viii+1-531+16  pp.  [Vari- 
ous later  editions.] 

Chapter  XI  (v.  1),  pp.  436-462 
(charts  and  plates  34,  36,  37),  is 
devoted  to  description  of  Monterey 
and  its  environs  v^ith  brief  com- 
ments on  plants  and  animals. 

Merriam,  O.  H.  Results  of  a  biological 
sui'vey  of  Mount  Shasta,  California. 
U.  S.  Dept.  Agr.,  Div.  Biol.  Surv., 
N.  Amer.  Fauna  No.  16  :1-179,  5  pis., 
46  figs.  1899. 

The  forests  and  other  plant  life,  effect 
of  slope  exposure  and  of  fire,  and 
detailed  study  of  the  birds  and 
mammals. 

Merriam,  C.  H.,  &  others.  The  Death 
Valley  Expedition,  a  biological  survey 
of  parts  of  California,  Nevada,  Aiizona, 
and  Utah.  U.  S.  Dept.  Agric,  Div. 
Ornithology  and  Mammalogy,  N.  Amer. 
Fauna,  7  :l-402,  pis.  i-xiv,  5  maps. 
1893. 

Birds  by  A.  K.  Fisher ;  Reptiles  and 
Batrachians  by  Leonhard  Stejn- 
eg-er ;  Fishes  by  C.  H.  Gilbert ;  In- 
sects by  C.  V.  Riley ;  MoUusks  by 
R.  E.  C.  Stearns  ;  Desert  trees  and 
shrubs  and  desert  cactuses  and  yuc- 
cas by  C.  Hart  Merriam ;  List  of 
localities  by  T.  S.  Palmer.  See  also, 
Coville,  F.  V.  Botany  of  the  Death 
Valley  Expedition,  189  3. 

"Mexican  Boundary  Sui-vey."  Report  on 
the  United  States  and  Mexican  Boup- 
dary  Survey,  made  under  the  direction 
of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  by 
William  H.  Emory.  Washington. 
A.  O.  P.  Nicholson,  printer.  1857-59. 
2  vols,   (in  3). 

Vol.  1,  pt.  1,  contains  itinerary,  pt.  2, 
g'eological  and  paleontological  re- 
ports;  V.  2,  pt.  1,  1-270  +  1-78  pp., 
61  +  75  +  1  pis.,  the  botanical  report 
by  Torrey  and  report  on  cactus  by 
Engelmann  ;  v.  2,  pt.  2,  1-62  +  1-32 
+  l-35  +  l-35+ii  pp.,  134  pis.,  the 
zoological  report,  mammals,  birds 
and  reptiles  by  Baird,  fishes  by 
Girard. 

Milet-Mureau,   M.   L.   A.     Voyage   de  la 
Perouse     autour     du     Monde. 
Paris,      de  I'lmprimerie    de   la   Repub- 
lique.      1797.     4   vols,    and  folio   atlas 
of  69  pis.    2,  398  pp. 

Chap.  XI  deals  with  experiences  at 
Monterey.  The  California  Quail 
and  California  Thrasher  are  figured 
on  plates  36  and  37.  This  was  the 
first  work  to  mention  animals  and 
plants  of  California  more  than 
casually.  [Not  seen,  title  from 
Grinnell,    1909.] 


"Pacific  Railroad  Reports."  Reports  of 
explorations  and  surveys,  to  ascertain 
the  niost  practicable  and  economical 
route  for  a  railroad  from  the  Missis- 
sippi River  to  the  Pacific  Ocean.  Made 
under  the  direction  of  the  Secretary  of 
War,  in  1853^,  according  to  Acts  of 
Congress  of  March  3,  1853,  May  31, 
1854  and  August  5,  1854.  Volume  I 
[to  XII].  Washington.  Beverly 
Tucker  [v.  XII,  Thomas  H.  Ford], 
1854  [to  I860]. 

Five  surveys  were  made,  in  general 
along  the  lines  of  the  3  2d,  35  th, 
38th  and  39th,  41st  and  49th  paral- 
lels of  north  latitude.  Each  party 
collected  natural  history  specimens. 
The  itineraries  contain  incidental 
information  on  plants  and  animals 
observed  and  collected.  Formal 
reports  on  the  natural  history  col- 
lections were  planned  to  accom- 
pany the  engineering  report  of  each 
survey  party,  but  several  of  the 
former  were  later  condensed.  Re- 
ports on  plants  and  animals  of 
individual  surveys  appear  in  vol- 
umes 2,  4,  5,  6,  and  7.  Vol.  8  is 
a  general  report  on  the  mammals, 
vol.  9  on  birds,  vol.  10  is  an  omni- 
bus volume  containing  materials 
from  Several  surveys.  Only  the 
plates  of  the  general  report  on  the 
reptiles  were  issued.  A  general 
account  of  the  fishes  is  included  in 
this  volume.  Vol.  11  includes  maps 
of  importance  in  determining  lo- 
calities, and  vol.  12,  book  2,  com- 
prises the  natural  history  of  Wash- 
ington Territory,  with  incidental 
mention   of   California  material. 

PoweU,  J.  W.  Exploration  of  the  Colo- 
rado River  of  the  West  and  its  tribu- 
taries, explored  in  1869,  1870,  1871, 
and  1872,  under  the  direction  of  the 
Smithsonian  Institution.  Washington. 
1875.  xi+291  pp.,  80  figs.,  2  maps. 
Part  III,  Zoology,  pp.  215-285. 

Sitgreaves,  L.  Report  of  an  expedition 
down  the  Zuni  and  Colorado  rivers, 
1851  .  .  .  U.  S.  Engineer.  Bur. 
1853.    198  pp.,  77  pis.,  1  map. 

Includes  mention  of  some  California 
material ;  the  "report  on  the  nat- 
ural history"  by  S.  W.  Wood- 
house  includes  mammals  and  birds, 
"reptiles"  are  reported  by  Edw. 
Hallowell,  "fishes"  by  Baird  and 
Girard,    "botany"    by   John   Torrey. 

United  States  Exploring  Expedition.  Dur- 
ing the  years  1838  ...  42.  Under 
the  command  of  Charles  Wilkes.  U.  S. 
N.  Philadelphia.  C.  Sherman.  1844- 
74. 

A  series  of  20  quarto  volumes,  many 
of  them  -accompanied  by  folio 
atlases,  with  formal  reports  on  the 
specimens  and  materials  collected 
by  the  expedition.  No  government 
scientific  periodicals  existed  when 
the    collections    were    received,    so 


vol.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA 


many  of  the  technical  descriptions 
of  new  species  appeared  in  the 
publications  of  the  Academy  of 
Natural  Sciences  of  Philadelphia 
and  other  similar  series.  The  re- 
ports include  volumes  by  Cassin  on 
mammals  and  birds,  by  Girard  on 
herpetology,  Dana  on  Crustacea 
and  zoophytes,  Gould  on  mollusks, 
and  by  Graj^  and  by  Brackenridge 
on  plants.  Projected  volumes  on 
fishes,  a  further  botanical  report 
and  a  volume  on  geographical  dis- 
tribution of  animals  and  plants 
were  never  published.  [See  Hasse, 
A.  R.  Reports  of  Explorations 
printed  in  the  documents  of  the 
United  iStates  Government.  U.  S. 
Superintendent  of  Documents  [Bull. 
2].     1899.     90  pp.] 

"Wheeler  Survey."  Geographical  surveys 
west  of  the  one  hundredth  m,eridian. 
Annual  Reports  1869-1884  [California 
material  in  reports  for  1872,  1875,  1876, 
1877-,  1878,  1879].  Monographs  I-VII 
[V  contains  synoptic  reports  on  Zool- 
ogy,  VI   on   botany]. 

Important  collections  were  made  in 
a  number  of  places  in  Califorania. 

"Wilkes.  Charles.  Narrative  of  the  United 
States  Exploring  Expedition,  during 
the  years  18-38,  1839,  1840,  1841,  1842. 
.  .  .  Philadelphia.  Lea  and  Blan- 
chard.  184.5.  5  vols.  5,  591  pp.,  71 
pis. 

In  vol.  5,  pp.  149-214  (with  folded 
map")  is  an  account  of  the  visit  to 
California.  The  scientific  material, 
including  that  for  California,  was 
published  in  a  series  of  20  volumes 
under  various  authorships :  See 
U.    S.    Exploring  Expedition. 

Narrative   of   the   United    States 

Exploring  Expedition,  during  the  years 
1838,  1839.  1.S10,  1841,  1842  .  .  . 
condensed  and  abridged.  London. 
Wliittaker  &  Co.  [1845.]  1  vol. 
i-vii+1-372  pp. 

Chapter  34,  pp.  301-306,  describes 
the  visit  to  California. 

Xantus,  John.  Travel  in  the  southern 
parts  of  California  [Translated  title]. 
Pest.  Lauifer  and  Stolp.  1860.  5+ 
191  pp.,  1  map,  16  figs.  [Not  seen ; 
title,  etc..  from  English  MS  translation 
of  the  Hungarian  original  by  B.  H. 
Volland,  304  MS  pp.  in  University  of 
California  Library,   Berkeley.] 

Xantus  resided  at  Ft.  Tejon,  Kern 
County,  for  about  two  years,  dur- 
ing which  time  he  collected  and  de- 
scribed several  new  species  of  birds. 
[See :  Palmer,  T.  S.,  The  Condor, 
30  :  304,  1928.]  The  item  cited  here 
contains  miscellaneous  information 
on  the  natural  history  of  the  re- 
gion. 

MAMMALS 

^Anthony,  H.  E.  Field  book  of  North 
American    mammals.     New    York.     G. 


P.  Putnam's  Sons.     1928.     625  pp.,  32 
col.  pis.,  175  photos. 

Includes    all    the    California   mammal 
fauna. 

Bonnot,  Paul.     Report  on  the  seals  and 
and    sea    lions    of    California.      Calif. 
Fish  and  Game  Comm.,  Fish  Bull.  no. 
14  :l-62,  38  figs.     1928. 
Bibliography,    p.    61. 

Camp,  C.  L.  Excavations  of  burrows  of 
the  rodent  Aplodontia,  with  observa- 
tions on  the  habits  of  the  animal.  Univ. 
Calif.  Publ.  ZooL,  17:  517-536,  6  figs. 
1918. 

The  "Mountain  beaver,"  a  distinctive 
Pacific  coast  mammal. 

Dixon,  Joseph.  Notes  on  the  natural 
history  of  the  bushy-tailed  wood  rats  of 
California.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool., 
21:49-74,  pis.  1-3,  3  figs.     1919. 

Inhabitants    of    the    high    Sierra    Ne- 
vada  and    northern   mountains. 

Gi-innell,  H.  W.     A  synopsis  of  the  bats 
of  California.     Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool. 
17  :22.3-404,  pis.  1^24,  24  figs.     1918. 
Keys  for   identification,   technical   de- 
scriptions   and    information    on    the 
ranges   and    life-histories. 

Griunell,  Joseph.  An  account  of  the  mam- 
mals and  birds  of  the  Lower  Colorado 
Valley      .      .      .      Univ.    Calif.    Publ. 
Zool.,  12  :51-294,  pis.  3-13,  9  figs.  1914. 
With  especial   reference  to  local  dis- 
tribution;    bibliography,    pp.    269-273. 


The  biota  of  the  San  Bernardino 

Mountains.      Univ.    Calif.   Publ.   Zool., 
5:1-170,  pis.  1-24.     1908. 

Includes   critical   study    of   the   mam- 
mals. 

A  distributional  list  of  the  mam- 


mals of  California.     Proc.  Calif.  Acad. 
Sci.,   4th   ser.,   3:265-390,    pis.   15,   16 
(maps).     1913. 
Scientific  and  popular  name  and  range 
of   each   species   or   subspecies. 

A  geographical  study  of  the  kan- 
garoo i-ats  of  California.  Univ.  Calif. 
Publ.  Zool.,  24:1-124,  pis.  1-7  (1  col- 
ored), 24  figs.     1922. 

A  systematic  list  of  the  mammals 


of  California.    Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool., 
21 :31.3-.324.     1923. 

Grinnell,  .Joseph,  and  Dixon,  .Joseph. 
Natural  history  of  the  ground  squirrels 
of  California.  Monthly  BuU.  Calif. 
State  Comm.  Hort.,  7  :597-708,  5  pis., 
30  figs.     1918. 

Technical  descriptions,  ranges  and  life 
histories  in   detail. 


NEWS  NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


*Griiinell,  Joseph,  and  Storer,  T.  I.  Ani- 
mal life  in  the  Yosemite.  Berkeley. 
University  Press.  1924.  xviii+1-752 
pp.,  60  pis.  (12  in  color),  2  maps,  65 
figs. 

Includes  discussion  of  all  the  species 
of  mammals  in  a  cross-section  of 
the  Sierra  Nevada  in  the  latitude 
of  Yosemite  Valley;  pp.   43-246. 

Grinnell,  Joseph,  and  Swarth,  H.  S.  An 
account  of  the  birds  and  mammals  of 
the  San  Jacinto  area  of  southern 
California.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool., 
10 :197-^06,  pis.  6-10,  3  figs.    1913. 

Kellogg,  Louise.  Report  upon  mammals 
and  birds  found  in  portions  of  Trinity, 
Siskiyou  and  Shasta  Counties,  Cali- 
fornia .  .  .  Univ.  Calif.  Publ. 
Zool.,  12:  335-398,  pis.  15-18.     1916. 

Mearns,  E.  A.  Mammals  of  the  Mexi- 
can boundary  of  the  United  States. 
U.  S.  National  Mus.,  Bull.  56:  xv+1- 
530,  pis.  1-13,  126  figs.     1907. 

Part  I  (all  published)  deals  with 
hoofed  animals  and  rodents. 

Nelson,  E.  W.  The  larger  North  Ameri- 
can mammals.  Nat.  Geog.  Mag.,  30 : 
385-472,  front.,  many  col.  illus.     1916. 

Smaller  mammals  of  North  Amer- 
ica. Nat.  Geog.  Mag.,  33  :371^93,  many 
col.   illus.     1918. 

Excellent  brief  nontechnical  ac- 
counts ;  includes  representatives  of 
the  mammals  of  California. 


* Wild  animals  of  North  America. 

Washington.     National  Geographic  So- 
ciety.    1918.     227  pp.,  col.  illus. 

The  two  preceding  articles  in  book 
form. 

Scammon,  C.  M.  The  marine  mammals  of 
the  northwestern  coast  of  North  Amer- 
ica, described  and  illustrated :  together 
with  an  account  of  the  American  whale 
fishery.  San  Francisco.  J.  H.  Car- 
many  &  Co.  1874.  1-319+v  pp., 
front,  -f 26  pis.,  many  text  illus. 

Includes  much  material  relating-  to 
whales,  sea  lions,  etc.,  of  the  Cali- 
fornia  coast. 

Starks,  E.  C.  A  history  of  Califoraia 
shore  whaling.  Calif.  Fish  and  Game 
Comm.,  Fish  Bull.,  no.  6  :l-38,  22  figs. 
1922. 

*  Stephens,  Frank.  California  mammals. 
San  Diego.  West  Coast  Publishing  Co. 
1906.     351   pp.,   illus. 

Brief  technical  descriptions  and  notes 
on  range  and  life  history. 

Taylor,  W.  P.  .  .  .  The  habits  and 
distribution  of  Phenacomys  longicaudus 


True.    Proc.  Calif.  Acad.  Sci.,  4th  ser., 
5   (no.  5)   :111-161,  pi.  15.     1915. 
The  tree  mouse  of  northwestern  Cali- 
fornia. 

BIRDS 

*Bailey,    Mrs    F.    M.      A-birding    on    a 

broncho.      Boston.      Houghton     MifBin 

Co.     1896.     i-x-f  1-226  pp.,  34  illus. 

Popular     account     of     birds     in     San 

Diego      County,     chiefly     at     Twin 

Oaks. 


* Handbook    of    birds    of    western 

United  States  .  .  .  Boston.  Hough- 
tan  Mifflin  Co.  1902.  i-xcii+ 1-512 
pp.,  33  pis.,  601  figs.  Six  subsequent 
reprints,  with  addenda,  but  no  com- 
plete revision. 

For  many  years  the  standard  manual 
in   the  west. 

Belding,  Lyman.  Land  birds  of  the  Pa- 
cific district.  Occ.  Papers,  Calif. 
Acad.    Sci.,   2:1-274.     1890. 

A  compilation  of  data  of  the  author 
and  other  observers  on  the  distri- 
bution and  migration  of  westevn 
birds;  about  2.50  species  accredited 
to   California. 

Bent,    A.    C.       [Life    histories    of    North 
American     birds.]        U.      S.     National 
Museum,  Bull.  107,  113,  121,  126,  130, 
135,  142,   146.     Many  pis.   1919-1929. 
A    series    of   volumes,    with    half-tone 
illustrations,     giving     detailed     ac- 
coimts  of  the  life  histories,  habits, 
nests,      eggs,      young,      distribution 
and   migration   of   North   American 
birds.     The  volumes  issued  thus  far 
deal    with    water    birds.      All    Cali- 
fornia  species   in   these   groups   are 
included. 

Coues,  Elliott.  Birds  of  the  Colorado 
Valley,  a  repository  of  scientific  and 
popular  information  concerning  North 
American  ornithology.  U.  S.  Geol. 
Surv.  of  the  Terr.  [Hayden  Survey.] 
Misc.  Publ.  no.  11  :i-xvi-M-807.  70 
illus.     1878. 

Includes  considerable  material  on 
California  species ;  there  is  a 
"bibliographic  appendix,"  pij.  566— 
784,  of  faunal  publications,  includ- 
ing many  California  items.  The 
author's  own  interleaved  copy  of 
the  bibliography  with  MS  supple- 
ments is  in  the  University  of  Cali- 
fornia  Library. 

Dawson,  W.  L.  The  birds  of  California. 
San  Diego.  South  Moulton  Co.  1923 
[  =  1924].  4  (or  3)  vols.  xviii-{-l- 
2122  pp.,  numerous  pis.  (some  colored) 
and  text  illus.  [number  varies  with 
the  edition]. 

An  elaborate  work  with  excellent 
illustrations  and  much  original  mat- 
ter in  the  spirited  text  accounts  of 
species.  [See  reviews  in :  Auk, 
41:353-8,  1924;  Condor,  26  :lK-7, 
1924.] 


vol.  25.  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNL^ 


Eliot.  W.  A.  Birds  of  the  Pacific  coast. 
New  Yorli.  G.  P.  Putnam's  Sons. 
1923.     xvii+ 1-211  pp.,  56  col.  pis. 

Some  attention  to   California  species. 

Finley.  W.  L.  American  birds.  New 
York.  Charles  Scribner's  Sons.  1907. 
xvi'+ 1-256  pp.  illus. 

Several    accounts    are     of     California 
species. 

Griiinell.  Elizabeth,  and  Grinnell,  Joseph. 
Birds  of  song  and  story.  Chicago. 
A.  W.  Mumford.  1901.  150  pp., 
colored  illus. 

Brief  popular  stories  of  birds,  mostly 
western. 


Our    feathered    friends.      Boston. 

D.  C.  Heath  &  Co.  [clS98.]  1902. 
xii  + 1—144  pp.,  illus.  photos  and  pen 
sketches. 

Accurate  popular  accounts  of  the  gen- 
eral habits  of  birds. 

Stories  of  our  western  birds.    San 


Francisco.    Whitaker  &  Ray  Co.   1903. 
203  pp..  illus.  by  W.  K.  Fisher. 

Popular  accounts  of  birds,  chiefly 
California  species. 

Grinnell,  Joseph.  An  account  of  the 
mammals  and  birds  of  the  Lower  Colo- 
rado Valley,  with  especial  reference 
to  the  distributional  problems  pre- 
sented. Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool.,  12  :51- 
294,  pis.  3-18,  9  figs.     1914. 

A      bibliography      of      Califernia 

ornithology.     Pac.  Coast  Avifauna,  no. 
5:1-166.    1909. 

Includes  1785  titles  from  1797  to  end 
of  1907  ;  numerous  critical  com- 
ments. 


Bibliography  of  California  orni- 
thology. Pac.  Coast  Avifauna,  no.  16 : 
1-191.     1924. 

Includes  additional  early  titles  from 
182  9  on,  and  full  list  of  items  from 
1908  to  1923,  inclusive,  totaling 
2286   entries. 

The  biota  of  the  San  Bernardino 


Mountains.      Univ.    Calif.    Publ.   Zool., 
5:1-170,  pis.  1-24.     1908. 

Includes    detailed    discussion    of    the 
birds,   their  ranges,  habits,  etc. 

Check-list     of     California     birds. 


Pac.  Coast  Avifauna,  no.  3:1-98,  1  pi. 
1902. 

With  brief  statement  of  range  for 
each  species. 

A  distributional  list  of  the  birds 

of    California.      Pac.    Coast    Avifauna, 
no.  11:1-217,  3  pis.     1915. 

Scientific  and  vernacular  names  used 
for  each  form  and  a  rather  de- 
tailed statement  of  range  for  each  ; 
includes  life-zone  map  for  Cali- 
fornia. 


A  systematic  list  of  the  birds  of 

California.     Pac.   Coast  Avifauna,   no. 
8:1-21.     1912. 

Scientific  and  vernacular  names  of 
higher  groups,  species  and  sub- 
species. 

*Grinnell,  Joseph,  Bryant,  H.  C,  and 
Storer,  T.  I.  The  game  birds  of  Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley.  University  Press. 
1918.  X -I- 1-642  pp.,  16  col.  pis..  94 
figs. 

Detailed  nontechnical  descriptions 
and  accounts  of  the  108  species  of 
birds  considered  as  "game"  in 
California. 

*Grinnell,     Joseph,     and     Storer.     T.     I. 

Animal  life  in  the  Yosemite.  Berkeley. 

University    Press.     1924.     xviii  + 1—752 

pp.,   60  pis.    (12  in  color),  65  figs.,   2 

maps. 

Nontechnical ;  includes  birds  found 
in  a  cross-section  reaching  from 
the  San  Joaquin  Valley  to  Mono 
Lake,  through  the  region  of  Yosem- 
ite Valley. 

Grinnell,  Jose^ih,  and  Swarth,  H.  S.  An 
account  of  the  birds  and  mammals  of 
the  San  Jacinto  area  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia, with  remarks  upon  the  behavior 
of  geographic  races  on  the  margins  of 
their  habitats.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ. 
Zool.,  10:197-406,  pis.  6-10,  3  figs. 
1913. 

Includes  San  Jacinto  Mountains  and 
portions   of   adjacent  lowlands. 

Grinnell,  Joseph,  and  Wythe,  Margaret 
W.  Directory  to  the  bird  life  of  the 
San  Francisco  Bay  region.  Pac.  Coast 
Avifauna,  no.  18 :1— 160,  col.  front. 
1927. 

Detailed  distribution  of  the  bird 
species  in  counties  surrounding 
San  Francisco  Bay,  with  many 
references  to  the  literature  on 
those   species. 

*Henshaw,  H.  W.,  d  others.  The  book 
of  birds.  Washington.  National 
Geographic  Society.  1918.  viii-M95 
pp.,  colored  illus. 

Material  assembled  from  several 
illustrated  articles  in  the  National 
Geographic  Magazine ;  many  Cali- 
fornia species  figTired. 

*Hoffman,  Ralph.  Birds  of  the  Pacific 
states.  Boston.  Houghton  Mifflin  Co. 
1927.  353  pp.,  10  col.  pis.,  many  text 
illus. 

An  outstanding  manual  for  field  iden- 
tification, based  on  much  first  hand 
accurate  observation. 

Howell,  A.  B.  Birds  of  the  islands  off 
the  coast  of  southern  California.  Pac. 
Coast  Avifauna,  no.  12  :1-127,  1  map. 
1917. 


10 


NEWS   NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


Jan.,  1930 


Keeler.  C.  A.  Bird  notes  afield.  San 
Francisco.  D.  P.  Elder  &  Morgan 
Shepard.      1899.      i-viii +1-353    pp. 

2d    ed.      San    Francisco. 

Paul   Elder   &   Co.    1907.    i-ix+1-226 
pp.,  16  pis. 

A  serviceable  volume  when  published  ; 
much  local  information  for  the 
San   Francisco    Bay   region. 

McGregor,  R.  C.  A  list  of  the  land  birds 
of  Santa  Cruz  County,  California.  Pac. 
Coast  Avifauna,  no.  2  :l-22.     1901. 

Merriam.  Florence  M.  See  Bailey,  Mrs 
F.  M. 

Myers,  J/?-s  H.  W.  Western  birds.  New 
York.  MacmiUan  Co.  1922.  xii+1- 
391  pp.,  53  pis. 

Some  original  material  on  birds  of 
southern  California ;  otherwise  an 
unsatisfactorj'  compilation  with 
numerous  errors. 

Payne,  H.  T.  Game  birds  and  game 
fishes  of  the  Pacific  coast.  Los  An- 
geles. News  Publishing  Co.  1913. 
1-181  +  5  pp.,  67  illus. 

Popular  accounts  of  species  sought 
for  sport,  with  sketch  illustrations. 

*Reed.  C.  K.  Western  bird  guide.  Wor- 
cester, Mass.  C.  K.  Reed,  publisher. 
1913.  (Later  published  at  New  York 
by  Doubleday,  Doran  and  Co.)  255 
pp.,  231  figs,  in  color. 

Popular ;  colored  illustrations  fairly 
correct,   but  many   errors   in  text. 

Ridgway.  Robert.  The  birds  of  North 
and  Middle  America :  A  descriptive 
catalogue  of  the  higher  groups,  genera, 
species  and  subspecies  of  birds  known 
to  occur  in  North  America,  from  the 
Arctic  Lands  to  the  Isthmus  of 
Panama  .  .  .  U.  S.  National  Mu- 
seum. Bull.  50  (parts  I-VIII  pub- 
lished).    1900-1919. 

Technical  and  critical ;  keys,  refer- 
ences to  literature,  descriptions, 
measurements  of  specimens,  exact 
ranges.  Indispensable  for  the  seri- 
ous student ;  includes  California 
species  in  groups  treated  to  date ; 
at  least  2  volumes  to  follow. 

*Torrey,  Bradford.  Field  days  in  Cali- 
fornia. Boston.  Houghton  Mifflin  Co. 
1913.     9  +  1-235  pp.,  illus. 

Accurate  and  pleasing  accounts  of 
experiences  with  birds. 

Tyler,  J.  G.  Some  birds  of  the  Fresno 
District.  California.  Pac.  Coast  Avi- 
fauna, no.  9:1-114.     1913. 

Original  observations  over  a  period 
of  years  on  birds,  chiefly  of  the 
central    San    Joaquin    Vallej^    floor. 

Van  Dyke,  T.   S.     Game  birds  at  home. 


New  York.     Fords,  Howard  and  Hul- 
bert.     1895.     219  pp. 
'Chap.   XI,   deals  with  the   "Quails   of 
•      California,"    pp.    159-177. 

Wheelock,  Mrs  I.  G.  Birds  of  California. 
Chicago.  A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.  1904. 
xxviii+ 1-578  pp.,  illus. 

Willett,  George.  Birds  of  the  Pacific 
slope  of  southern  California.  Pac. 
Coast  Avifauna,  no.  7  :1-122.    1912. 

*Wyman,  L.  E.,  and  Burnell,  Elizabeth 
F.  Field  book  of  the  birds  of  the 
southwestern  United  States.  Boston. 
Houghton  Mifflin  Co.  1925.  308  pp., 
illus. 

REPTILES  AND   AMPHIBIANS 

Atsatt,  Sarah  R.  The  reptiles  of  the  San 
Jacinto  area  of  southern  California. 
Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool.,  12:31-50. 
1913. 

Camp,  C.  L.  Notes  on  the  local  distribu- 
tion and  habits  of  the  amphibians  and 
reptiles  of  southeastern  California  in 
the  vicinity  of  the  Turtle  Mountains. 
Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool.,  17:503-544, 
pis.  19-22.     1916. 

Cope,    E.    D.      The   Batrachia   of   North 

America.       U.     S.     National    Museum 

Bull.  34  :l-525,  86  pis.,  119  figs.    1889. 

Technical ;  includes  California  species 

then   known. 


The     crocodilians,     lizards,     and 

snakes     of     North   -America.       U.     S. 
National   Mus.   Ann.   Rept.   for   1898: 
153-1270,  36  pis.,  347  figs.     1900. 
Technical. 

*Dickerson,  Mary  O.  The  frog  book. 
New  York.  Doubleday,  Page  &  Co. 
1906.  xvii+1-253  pp.,  1-16  col.  pis., 
96  halftone  pis.,  35  text  figs. 

Mentions    several    California    species. 

*Ditmars,  R.  L.  The  reptile  book.  New 
York.  Doubleday,  Page  &  Co.  1907. 
xxxii  + 1-472  pp.,  136  pis.,  400  photog. 
figs. 

Includes  many  of  the  California  spe- 
cies. 

Grinnell,  Joseph,  and  Camp,  C.  L.  A 
distributional  list  of  the  amphibians 
and  reptiles  of  California.  Univ.  Calif. 
Publ.  Zool.  17:127-208,  14  figs  (maps). 
1917. 

Technical  names  and  range  for  each 
species. 

Grinnell,  Joseph,  and  Grinnell,  H.  W. 
The   reptiles   of   Los   Angeles   County, 


vol.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA  11 


California.  Throop  Inst.  Bull.,  no.  35 
(Science  Ser.,  no.  1)  :  1-64,  2.3  figs. 
1907. 

Klauber.  L.  M.  A  list  of  the  amphibians 
and  reptiles  of  San  Diego  County, 
California.  Bull.  Zool.  Soc.  San  Diego, 
no.   4:    1-8.      1928. 

—  Notes     on     the     distribution     of 

snakes  in  San  Diego  County,  Cali- 
fornia. Bull.  Zool.  Soc.  San  Diego,  no. 
1:1-22,  5  figs.     1924. 

Slevin.  J.  R.    The  amphibians  of  western 

North    America.      Occ.    Papers    Calif. 

Acad.  Sci.,  16:1-152,  1-23  pis.     1928. 

Keys,  descriptions  and  ranges  for  all 

species. 

Stephens,  Frank.  An  annotated  list  of 
the  amphibians  and  reptiles  of  San 
Diego  County,  California.  Trans.  San 
Diego  Soc.  Nat.  Hist.,  3  (no.  4)  :57- 
69.     1921. 

Storer.  T.  I.    A  synopsis  of  the  amphibia 

of  California.     Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool., 

27  :l-342,  1-18  pis.,  42  figs.     1925. 

Life  histories,  range,  habits,  keys  for 

identifying  adults,  eggs  and  larvae. 

Van  Denburgh,  John.  The  reptiles  of 
western  North  America.  Occ.  Papers, 
Calif.  Acad.  Sci.,  no.  10  (2  vols.)  : 
1-1028,  1-128  pis.     1922. 

"Very    comprehensive ;    excellent   illus- 
trations. 


FISHES 

Eigenmann,  C.  H.  The  fishes  of  San 
Diego,  California. .  U.  S.  National 
Museum,  Proc.  15:123-178,  pis.  10-18. 
1892. 

Evei'mann,   B.   W.     The  golden  trout  of 
the  southern  high  Sierras.     U.  S.  Bur. 
Fisheries,     Bull.,    25:1-51,    pis.    1-16 
(several  colored),  1  map.     1905. 
Bibliography,  pp.  50-51. 

Gill,  Theodore.  Bibliography  of  the 
fishes  of  the  Pacific  Coast  of  the  United 
States  to  the  end  of  1879.  U.  S. 
National  Museum,  Bull.,  11:1-73. 
1882. 

Annotated  ;  many  references  to  Cali- 
fornia species. 

Holder,  C.  F.  The  fishes  of  the  Pacific 
Coast.  New  York.  Dodge  Publishing 
Co.     1912.     1+7-122  pp.,  illus. 

Jordan,  D.  S.  Fishes  of  the  Pacific 
Coast,  in  "Nature  and  Science  on  the 


Pacific  Coast."     San  Francisco.     Paul 

Elder  &  Co.     1915. 

Excellent  resume  of  California  fish 
fauna,  pp.  115-123  ;  brief  bibli- 
ography,  p.    123. 

*Jordan,  D.  S.,  and  Evermann,  B.  W. 
American  food  and  game  fishes.  New 
York.  Doubleday,  Page  &  Co.  1902. 
3+1+V-1+1-573  pp.,  illus.  Several 
reprints,  that  of  1923  with  added  pages 
1.50a-d,  202  a-b. 

Popular  brief  accounts  of  important 
species. 

The   fishes  of  North   and   Middle 

America.  U.  S.  Nat.  Mus.,  Bull.  47 
(4  parts),  l:lx+l-1240,  1896;  2: 
xxx+1241-2183,  1898;  3  :xxiv+2183a- 
3136,  1898;  4  :ci+3137-3313,  pis.  1- 
392,  1900.     1896-1900. 

Teclmical,  systematic  account ;  all 
species  then  known  for  California 
are    included. 

Rutter,  Cloudsley.  The  fishes  of  the 
Sacramento-San  Joaquin  Basin,  with 
a  study  of  their  distribution  and  varia- 
tion. U.  S.  Bureau  of  Fisheries,  Bull. 
27:103-152,  pi.  6,  4  figs.     1908. 

The  only  synoptic  paper  ever  issued 
on  the  fishes  of  interior  California. 
Gives  a  digest  of  previous  litera- 
ture   on    the    subject. 

Natural   history   of    the   Quinnat 


Salmon.  A  report  on  investigations  in 
the  Sacramento  River,  1896-1901.  U. 
S.  Fish  Comm.,  Bull.  22:65-141,  pis. 
10-18.     1903. 

Much   exact   original   information. 

Smith,  H.  M.  A  review  of  the  history 
and  results  of  the  attempts  to  acclima- 
tize fish  and  other  water  animals  in 
the  Pacific  states.  U.  S.  Fish  Comm., 
Bull.,  15:379-472,  pis.  73-83.  1896. 
Much   Californian   material. 

Snyder,  J.  O.  The  fishes  of  the  coastal 
streams  of  Oregon  and  northern  Cali- 
fornia. U.  S.  Bur.  Fisheries,  Bull.  27 : 
153-189,  1  map,  5  figs.     1908. 

The  fishes  of  the  Lahontan  system 

of  Nevada  and  northeastern  California, 
foruia.  U.  S.  Bur.  Fisheries,  Bull.  27  : 
pis.  3-5,  9  figs.     1917. 

The  fishes  of  the  streams  tribu- 
tary to  Monterey  Bay,  California. 
U.  S.  Bur.  Fisheries,  Bull.  32:47-72, 
pis.  19-24,  3  figs.    1913. 

These  three  and  other  short  papers 
by  the  same  author  and  that  by 
Rutter  (1908)  constitute  the  prin- 
cipal literature  on  the  distribution 
of   freshwater   fishes    in    California. 

Starks,  E.  C.  A  key  to  the  families  of 
marine  fishes  of  the  west  coast.     Calif. 


12 


XEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


Jan.,  1930 


Fish  and  Game  Ck>mm.,  Fish  Bull.  uo. 
5:1-16.  4  figs.     1921. 

Semitechnical ;  aids  in  use  of  Jordan 

and   Evermann's    (1896-1900;    large 

work. 

Starks,  E.  C.  and  Morris,  E.  L.  The 
marine  fishes  of  southern  California. 
Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool.,  3:159-251. 
pi.  21.     1907. 

A  systematic  list  with  annotations ; 
literature  cited,   pp.    248-251. 

Thompson,  W.  F.,  d  others.  The  Cali- 
fornia sai-dine.  Calif.  Fish  and  Game 
Comm..  Fish  Bull.,  no.  11:1-221,  74 
figs.      1926. 

See,  also,  nos.  2,  8,  12  and  13  of  tliis 
series  for  further  data  on  the  sar- 
dine. 

INSECTS  AND   MARINE  ANIMALS 

Berrj^,  S.  S.  A  review  of  the  Cephalopods 
of  western  North  America.  U.  S. 
Bureau  of  Fisheries,  Bull.  30  :267-336, 
pis.  32-56,  18  figs.     1912. 

Boisduval,   D.      Lepidopteres   de  la   Cali- 
forniae.     n.p.     n.d.    94  pp.      [?  extract 
from  Society  Entom.  de  Belgique.  12.] 
A  checl<:list  only. 

*Comstock,  J.  A.  Butterflies  of  Cali- 
fornia. Los  Angeles.  Publ.  by  the 
author.  1927.  334  pp.,  1-63  eol.  pi., 
80+  text  figs. 

Essig,  E.  O.  Injurious  and  beneficial  in- 
sects of  California.  Calif.  State  Comm. 
of  Hort.,  Mo.  BuU.,  v.  2  :xxxi+l-365, 
321  figs.     1913. 

2d   ed.      Suppl.   to   Calif. 

State  Comm.  of  Hort.,  Mo.  Bull.,  v.  4 : 
Ixxxi-f  1-541,  503  fig.s.     1915. 

Systematic  account  of  economic  spe- 
cies giving-  description,  life  history, 
nature  of  work,  distribution,  food 
and  control.  Footnote  references 
to  teclmical  literature  abound  in 
both   editions. 


* The    insects    of    western    North 

America.     New  York.     Macmillan  Co. 
1926.     xi-f- 1-1035  pp.,  766  figs. 

A  very  comprehensive  work,  dealing 
primarily  with  species  of  economic 
importance,  but  Including  many 
others  as  well.  Excellent  illustra- 
tions and  many  footnote  references 
to   important   literature. 

Esterly,  C.  O.  The  occurrence  and  veri;i- 
cal  distribution  of  the  Copepoda  of  the 
San  Diego  region  with  paiidcular  refer- 
ence to  nineteen  species.  Univ.  Calif. 
Publ.  Zool.,  9 : 253-340,  7  figs.    1912. 

Fi'eeborn,  S.  B.     The  mosquitoes  of  Cali- 


fornia.    Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Entom.,  3 : 
3  -3-460,  41  figs.    1926. 

Technical  account,  v/ith  life  historj^ 
material  on  certain  species. 

Hannibal,  Harold.  A  synopsis  of  the 
Recent  and  Tertiary  Freshwater  Mol- 
lusca  of  the  Californian  Province  .  .  . 
Proc.  Malacological  Society  of  London, 
10:112-166,  167-211.     1912. 

Technical ;  includes  species  •  from 
Pacific  Coast  of  North  America. 

*Johnson,   Myrtle  E.,    and   Snook.   H.   J. 

Seashore  animals  of  the  Pacific  Coast. 

New     York.       Macmillan     Co.       1927. 

xiv-+- 1-659  pp.,  col.  front. +10  col.  pis., 

700  figs,  in  text. 

Excellent  summary  of  marine  ani- 
mals (excluding  fish,  birds  and 
mammals)  with  many  pliotographs 
and  drawings  of  important  species. 
Semitechnical  and  authoritative. 
The  bibliography,  pp.  608-620,  in- 
cludes all  the  important  original 
papers.  Footnote  references  are 
added  in  the  text  for  many  species. 

Keep.  Josiah.  Common  sea-shells  of 
California.  [Status  uncertain,  issued 
prior  to  1887 ;  not  seen  by  me.] 

Shells  and  sea-life.  San  Fran- 
cisco. Whitaker  &  Ray  Co.  1901.  200 
pp..  illus. 

Popular ;  mostly  Californian  species. 
[=vol.  8  Western  series  of  read- 
ers.] 


West      American      shells.        San 

Francisco.    AA'hitaker  &  Ray  Co.    1904. 
360  pp.,  front.,  30]  figs. 


West  coast  shells.  San  Fran- 
cisco. Bancroft  Bros.  &  Co.  1887. 
230  pp.,  col.  front.,  182  text  figs. 

San    Francisco.       Whit- 


aker &  Ray  Wiggin  Co.  1911.  346  pp. 
These  three  volumes  are  probably  to 
be  considered  as  successive  editions 
of  the  same  work.  The  1887  item 
includes  "marine,  freshwater  and 
land  mollusks  of  the  United  States, 
west  of  the  Rocky  Mountains" ; 
the  1904  issue  adds  "including  those 
of  British  Columbia  and  Alaska" 
and  includes  (pp.  272-351)  "a  clas- 
sified list  of  West  American  shells"  ; 
the  1911  volume  covers  the  "prin- 
cipal marine  mollusks  ...  on 
the  west  coast  of  the  United  States, 
and  .  .  .  the  land  shells  of  the 
adjacent  region."  To  this  a  chap- 
ter on  Pacific  slope  freshwater  mol- 
lusks is  added  by  Harold  Hannibal. 
The  style  of  all  is  easy  and  popular. 

Kellogg,  y.  L.  American  insects.  New 
York.  Henry  Holt  Co.  1908.  xiv+ 
694  pp.,  13  pis.,  812  figs. 

A  general  work  with  incidental  men- 
tion of  some  California  species. 


TOI.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA  13 


Leng,  C.  W.  Catalogue  of  the  Coleoptera 
of  America,  north  of  Mexico.  Mt.  Ver- 
non, N.  Y.  J.  D.  Sherman,  Jr.,  pub- 
lisher.    1920.     x-M-470  pp. 

Technical  catalogue  of  beetles  with 
abbreviated  indication  of  ranges. 

Michael,  E.  L.  Classification  and  verti- 
cal distribution  of  the  Chaetognatha 
of  the  San  Diego  region,  including  re- 
description  of  some  doubtful  species 
of  the  group.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool., 
8:21-186,  pis.  1-8,  1  fig.     1911. 

Oldroyd,  Mrs  I.  S.  The  marine  shells  of 
the  west  coast  of  North  America.  Stan- 
ford Univ.  Publ.  Geol.  Sci.,  1  (no.  1)  : 
1-247,   pis.   1-47.     1924. 

Packard,  E.  L.  MoUuscan  fauna  of  San 
Francisco  Bay.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ. 
Zool.,  14:   19^-452,  pis.  14-60.     1918. 

Ritter,  W.  E.,  and  Forsyth,  Ruth  A. 
Ascidiaus  of  the  littoral  zone  of 
southern  California.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ. 
Zool.,    16:439^512,    pis.    38-46.      1917. 

Schmitt,  W.  L.  The  marine  decapod 
Crustacea  of  California  .  .  .  Univ. 
Calif.  Publ.  Zool.,  23:1^70,  pis.  1-50, 
165  figs.     1921. 

Swain,  A.  F.  A  synopsis  of  the  Aphid- 
idae  of  California.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ. 
Ent.,  3:1-221,  pis.  1-17.     1919. 

Technical,  with  keys  for  identifica- 
tion, and  list  of  host  plants  of  the 
"plant  lice." 

Torx-ey,  H.  B.  The  Hydroidea  of  the 
Pacific  Coast  of  North  America,  with 
especial  reference  to  the  species  in  the 
collection  of  the  University  of  Cali- 
fornia. Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Zool.,  1: 
1-104,  pis.  1-11.     1902. 

Van  Duzee,  E.  P.  Catalogue  of  the 
hemiptera  of  America,  north  of  Mexico, 
excepting  the  Aphididae,  Coccidae  and 
x\leuodidae.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Ent., 
2  :i-xiv+l-902.     1917. 

Technical  list  with  references  to 
literature  on  the   "true  bugs." 

Weymouth,  F.  W.  The  edible  clams,  mus- 
sels and  scallops  of  California.  Calif. 
Fish  and  Game  Comm.,  Fish  Bull.  no. 
4  :l-74  pp.,  19  pis.,  26  figs.    1921. 

Excellent  nontechnical  account,  well 
illustrated. 

The   life   history   and   growth   of 

the  Pismo  clam.  Calif.  Fish  and  Game 
Comm.,  Fish  Bull.  no.  7:1-120  pp., 
15  figs.,  18  graphs.     1923. 


Woodworth,  C.  W.  Guide  to  California 
insects.  Berkeley.  The  Law  Press. 
1913.     v-l- 1-360  pp.,  illus. 

Scheme  for  identifying  larger  groups 
and-  names  of  many  Calif ornian 
species. 

Wright,    W.    G.      The   butterflies    of   the 

west  coast"  of  the  United  States.     San 

Bernardino.     Publ.    by    the    author.   2d 

ed.    1906.    1-257 -I- vii  pp.,  pis.  1-32. 

Stock     of     original     edition     of     1905 

destroyed  in  San   Francisco   fire   of 

April  18,  1906. 

PLANTS 

Abrams,  LeR.  Flora  of  Los  Angeles  and 
vicinity.  Palo  Alto.  Stanford  Univ. 
Press.'    1904.     xi+474  pp. 

Excellent  local  manual,  keys,  brief 
descriptions  and  notations  as  to 
range. 

* ■  An  illustrated  flora  of  the  Pa- 
cific states.    Palo  Alto.    Stanford  Univ. 
Press.     1923.     1  :i-xi+l-557,  illus. 
Excellent    systematic    account    of    all 
species   on  the   coast ;    each   species 
illustrated.     Two  volumes  to  follow. 

— A  phytogeographic  and  taxonomic 

study  of  the  southern  California  trees 
and  shrubs.  Bull.  N.  Y.  Bot.  Garden, 
6:.300-485,  10  pis.    1910. 

Technical  preliminary  discussion  of 
climate,  local  botanical  areas,  and 
kej'S,  followed  by  an  annotated 
"catalogue"  by  species  with  local 
range. 

*Armstrong,  M.  N.,  and  Thornber,  J.  J. 
Field  book  of  western  wild  flowers. 
New  York.  G.  P.  Putnam's  Sons. 
1915.     596  pp.,  48  col.  pis. 

Behr,  H.  H.  Flora  of  the  vicinity  of 
San  Francisco.  San  Francisco.  1888. 
3644-i-xiv  pp.  [?=2d  ed.  of  1884 
item.] 

Synopsis  of  the  genera  of  vascu- 


lar plants  in  the  vicinity  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, with  an  attempt  to  arrange  them 
according  to  evolutionary  principles. 
San  Francisco.  Payot,  Upham  &  Co. 
1884.     165  pp. 

Bentham,  G.  The  botany  of  the  voyage 
of  H.  M.  S.  Sulphur  under  the  com- 
mand of  Capt.  Sir  E.  Belcher  during 
the  years  1836-42.  London.  Smith, 
Elder  &  Co.  1844.  ?  pp.,  60  pis. 
[not  seen]. 
Includes  material  from  California. 

Blankenship,  .1.  W.,  and  Keeler,  C.  A. 
On  the  natural  history  of  the  Farallone 
Islands.     Zoe,  3 :144-165.     1892. 

Geology,  plants,  native  and  intro- 
duced, mollusks,  insects,  Crustacea, 
birds,  mammals  and  amphibia. 


14 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES. 


[Jan.,  1930 


Blasdale,  W.  C.  A  preliminary  list  of 
the  Uredinales  of  California.  Univ. 
Calif.    Publ.  Bot.,  7 :101-157.    1919. 

Bolandei*,  H.  N.  A  catalogue  of  the 
plants  growing  in  the  vicinity  of  San 
Francisco.  San  Francisco.  A.  Roman 
&  Co.     1870.     43  pp. 

Nominal  list  by  families  with  scien- 
tific and  common  names  and  a  word 
for  each  as  to  "natural  habitat." 
Species  within  100  miles  north  and 
south  of  San  Francisco  and  east 
to  Mount  Diablo  included. 

Brandegee,  K.  Plants  of  San  Francisco. 
Zoe,  2:334-386+2  pp.,  pi.  17  (map). 
1892. 

Annotated    systematic    list. 

Brandegee,  T.  S.  Flora  of  the  Califor- 
nian  Islands.     Zoe,   1:129-148.     1890. 

List  of  species  for  iSan  MigTiel,  Santa 
Rosa,  iSanta  Cruz,  Santa  Catalina 
and  iS'an  Clemente,  with  comments. 

The    plants    of    Santa    Catalina 


Island.  Zoe,  1 :107-115,  pis.  4,  5.   1890. 

List,  with  scientific  names,  and  com- 
ments  on  certain   species. 

Cannon,  W.  A.  Tree  distribution  in  cen- 
tral California.  Fop.  Sci.  Monthly, 
85  :41 7-424.     1914. 

*Chandler,  Katherine.  As  California  wild 
flowers  grow ;  suggestions  to  nature 
lovers.  San  Francisco.  Harr  Wagner 
Publ.  Co.     1922.     132  pp.,  illus. 


■  Habits  of  California  plants.    San 

Francisco.        Educational     Publ.     Co. 
1903.     204  pp.,  illus. 

•  Stories  of  wild  flowers  children 


love ;  a  science  reader  for  the  primary 
grades.  Philadelphia.  P.  Blakiston's 
Sons.    1923.    xi  +  141  pp.,  illus. 

Chase,  J.  S.  Cone-bearing  trees  of  the 
California  mountains.  Chicago.  A.  C. 
McClurg  &  Co.  1911.    99  pp.,  illus. 

Clark,  Galen.  The  big  trees  of  California, 
their  history  and  characteristics.  Yo- 
semite  Valley.  Galen  Clark.  1907.  104 
pp.,  illus. 

^elements,  Mrs  E.  S.  Flowers  of  Coast 
and  Sierra.  New  York.  H.  W.  Wilson 
Co.    1928.   xii+226  pp.,  col.  pis. 

Wild  flowers  of  the  west.     Nat. 

Geog.  Mag.,  51 :566-622,  illus.     1927. 
Includes   wide   ranging   species ;    brief 
text  descriptions  of  plants  and  their 
habitats. 

Clock,  Mrs  E.  G.  Wild  flowers  from  the 
mountains,  canons  and  valleys  of  Cali- 
fornia ;    a    selection    of    favorite    blos- 


soms,   with    reproductions    from    water 
colors.    San  Francisco.     H.  S.  Crocker 
Co.    1915.    v-f  32  pp.,  illus. 
Colored  illustrations  of  17  species. 

Collins,  F.  S.  The  green  algae  of  North 
America.  Tufts  College  Studies,  Sci- 
entific series  2  (no.  3?)  :  79-480,  pis. 
1-18.     1909. 

Includes  some   California,  species. 

Condon,  Th.  Plants  used  by  the  Indians 
of  Mendocino  County,  California.  Contr. 
U.  S.  National  Herbarium,  7:295^08. 
1902. 

Cooper,  Elwood.  Forest  culture  and  euca- 
lyptus trees.  San  Francisco.  Cubery 
&  Co.   1876.   237+2  +  1  pp.,  front.,  pis. 

Cooper,  W.  S.  The  broad-sclerophyll 
vegetation  of  California,  an  ecological 
study  of  the  chaparral  and  its  related 
communities.  Carnegie  Inst,  of  Wash- 
ington. Publ.  319:1-124,  pis.  1-21,  43 
text  figs.     1922. 

An  important  study  with  lists  of 
species  and  discussion  of  factors  im- 
portant in  chaparral  maintenance. 
Bibliography,  pp.  122-124,  of  91 
titles  relating  to  the  chaparral. 

Redwoods,      rainfall,      and      fog. 


Plant  World,  20:179-189.     1917. 

Coville,  F.  V.  Botany  of  the  Death  Val- 
ley Expedition.  U.  S.  Dept.  Agric,  Div. 
Botany,  Contr.  U.  S.  National  Herba- 
rium, 4  :l-363,  front.  +21  pis.,  1  map. 
1893. 

Extensive  catalogue  of  plants  col- 
lected in  Death  Valley,  southern 
Sierra  Nevada  and  adjacent  region. 

Davidson,  Alice  M.  California  plants  in 
their  homes ;  a  botanical  reader  for 
children,  with  supplement  for  use  of 
teachers.  Los  Angeles.  B.  R.  Baum- 
gardt  &  Co.  1898.  216  +  133  +  1  pp., 
illus. 

Davidson,  Anstruther.     Catalogue  of  the 
plants  of  Los  Angeles  County.     Proc. 
So.  Calif.  Acad.  Sci.,  1:4  +  1-36,  1  pi. 
Part  I.     Phaenogamia.     1896. 
Systematic  list  with  localities. 

*Davidson,  Anstruther,  and  Moxley,  G.  L. 
Flora  of  southern  California.  Los  An- 
geles. Times-Mirror  Press.  1923.  452 
pp. 

Keys  to  species  and  higher  groups ; 
notations  as  to  distribution  of 
species.  Embraces  Santa  Barbara, 
iSan  Bernardino,  Riverside,  Im- 
perial, San  Diego,.  Orange  [and 
Ventura?]   counties. 

Davy,  J.  B.  Stock  ranges  of  northwest- 
ern California :  notes  on  the  grasses 
and  forage  plants  and  range  conditions. 


vol.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA  15 


U.  S.  Dept.  AgT.,  Bur.  Plant  Ind., 
Bull.,  12  :1-81,  pis.  1-8,  3  maps,  4  figs. 
1902. 

Lake    and    Mendocino    counties    nortli 
and  westerly. 

Description  of  the  great  tree,  recently 
felled  upon  the  Sierra  Nevada,  Cali- 
fornia, now  placed  for  public  exhibi- 
tion, in  the  spacious  Racket  Court  of 
the  Union  Club,  No.  596  Broadway 
.  .  .  New  York.  New  York  Herald 
Job  Printing  Office.  1854.  8  pp.,  illus. 
Leaflet. 

Description  of  the  mammoth  tree  from 
California,  now  erected  at  the  Crystal 
Palace,  Sydenham.  London?  Ca.  1856. 
24  pp. -|- cover.     1  illus. 

Douglas,  A.  E.  Climatic  cycles  and  tree 
growth.  A  study  of  the  annual  rings 
of  trees  in  relation  to  climate  and  solar 
activity.  Carnegie  Inst,  of  Washing- 
ton, Publ.  289:  [Vol.  1]  1-127,  12  pis., 
40  figs.  1919;  vol.  2,  vii-|- 1-166,  9 
pis.,   19   figs.     1928. 

Includes    much    material    relating    to 
California  trees. 

Dudley,  W.  R.  Zonal  distribution  of  trees 
and  shrubs  in  the  southern  Sierra. 
Sierra  Club  Bull.,  3  (no.  24)  :298-312. 
1901. 

Eastwood,  Alice,  in  Bergen,  J.  Y.  "Foun- 
dations of  Botany."  Boston.  Ginn  & 
Co.     1901. 

A  local  key  and  flora  as  appendix  to 
the  Pacific   coast   edition. 

Eastwood,  Alice.  A  flora  of  the  South 
Fork  of  Kings  River  from  Millwood  to 
the  head  waters  of  Bubbs  Ci-eek.  Sierra 
Club  Bull.,  [Special]  publ.  no.  27:1-96, 
9  figs.     1902. 

A  handbook  of  the  trees  of  Cali- 


fornia.    Occ.  Papers,  Calif.  Acad.  Sci., 
9  :l-86,  57  pis.     1905. 

^'Ellsworth,  R.  S.  The  giant  sequoia,  an 
account  of  the  history  and  character- 
istics of  the  big  trees  of  California. 
Oakland.     J.  D.  Berger.    1924.   167  pp. 

Bibliography,  pp.   159-167. 

Eschscholtz,  J.  F.  Descriptio  Plantarum 
Novae  Californiae.  Mem.  St.  Peters- 
burg Acad.   Sci.,    :281-292.     1821-22. 

Not  seen;  title  from  Harshburger, 
1911;  evidently  material  from 
Kotzebue's  first  vo5'age,   which   see. 

Fewkes,  J.  W.  On  certain  peculiarities 
in  the  flora  of  the  Santa  Barbara 
Islands.  Amer.  Naturalist,  24:216- 
224.     1890. 


Fisher,  R.  R.  The  redwood.  U.  S.  Dept. 
Agric,  Div.  of  Forestry,  Bull.  38  :l-40, 
front. +.12  pis.,  6  figs.     1903. 

iStudy  of  tlie  coast  redwood,  its  lum- 
bering, and  behavior  of  cut-over 
areas ;  the  brown  rot  disease  and 
the  few  insect  enemies  of  the  tree. 

Franceschi,  F.  Santa  Barbara  exotic 
flora  :  a  handbook  of  plants  from  for- 
eign countries  grown  at  Santa  Bar- 
bara, California.  Santa  Barbara  [no 
publ.]     1895.     88  pp. 

A  running  account  with  scientific 
names ;  a  note  states  the  material 
was  first  published  in  the  "Morn- 
ing Press"    [of  S'anta  Barbara]. 

*Fultz,   F.  M.     The  elfin-forest  of   Cali- 
fornia.     Los    Angeles.      Times— Mirror 
Press.     1923.     267  pp.,  illus. 
Popular   account  of    chaparral. 

Gray,  A.,  Brewer,  W.  H.,  and  Watson, 
S.  Botany  [of  California].  Geological 
Survey  of  California.  Cambridge, 
Mass.  [Harvard]  Univ.  Press.  2  vols. 
1,  1876,  XX +  628  pp.;  2,  1880,  xv  + 
559  pp. 

The  first  comprehensive  systematic 
treatise  on  the  plants  of  the  state. 
See  vol.  2,  pp.  553-559,  for  an  ac- 
count of  early  botanical  collectors 
in   California. 

Greene,  E.  L.  Flora  Franciscana,  an 
attempt  to  classify  and  describe  the 
vascular  plants  of  middle  California. 
San  Francisco.  Cubery  &  Co. ;  Doxey 
&  Co.  1891-97.  480  pp.,  issued  in  4 
parts,  paged  cont.,   each  with  t.  p. 

Illustrations    of    west    American 

oaks,  from  drawings  by  the  late  Albert 
Kellogg,  M.  D.  Text  by  Edward  L. 
Greene.  San  Francisco.  [Bosqui  En- 
graving and  Printing  Co.]  1889 
[-1890?].     xii  +  84  pp.,  37  pis. 

Leaflets  of  botanical  observation 

and  criticism.  Washington,  D.  C.  1, 
1903-06,  253  pp. ;  2,  1910-12,  275  pp. 

Many  comments  on  California  mate- 
rial. 


•  Manual    of    the    botany    of    the 

region  of  San  Francisco  Bay.  San  Fran- 
cisco. Cubery  &  Co.  1894.  xiii  + 
328  pp. 

Griffiths,  David.  Forage  conditions  and 
problems  in  eastern  Washington,  east- 
ern Oregon,  northeastern  California, 
and  northwestern  Nevada.  U.  S.  Dept. 
Agric,  Bur.  Plant  Ind.,  Bull.  38  :l-52, 
9  pis.     1903. 

Discusses  m^eadows,  hay  crops  of 
native  and  introduced  plants,  dis- 
eases of  forage  crops  and  native 
grasses  worthy  of  cultivation. 


16 


NEWS  NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Grinnell,  J.  The  biota  of  the  San  Ber- 
nardino Mountains.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ. 
Zool.  5:1-170,  pis.  1-24.     1908. 

"Some  plants  of  the  region,''  pp.  28— 
50,  is  a  systematic  list  of  trees, 
shrubs  and  conspicuous  herbs  with 
remarks  on  local  distribution. 

Hall,  H.  M.  A  botanical  survey  of  San 
Jacinto  Mountain.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ. 
Bot.,  1 :1-140,  pis.  1-14.     1902. 

General  discussion,  plant  zones,  and 
annotated  list  of  species. 


Compositae  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia. Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Bot., 
3  :l-302,  pis.  1-3,  1  map.     1907. 

Systematic  accounts  of  species  with 
notes  on  distribution. 

Studies    in    ornamental    trees    and 

shrubs.     Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Bot.,  4:1- 
74,  pis.  1-11,  15  text  figs.     1910. 
"Critical    discussion    of   certain   species 
cultivated  in   California,   with   keys 
for  identification. 

Hall,  H.  M.,  and  Clements,  F.  E.  The 
phj'logenetic  method  in  taxonomy.  The 
North  American  species  of  Artemesia, 
Chrysothamnus  and  Atriplex.  Carnegie 
Inst,  of  Washington,  Publ.  326  :iv  +  l- 
355,  58  pis.,  47  text  figs.    1923. 

Hall,  H.  M.,  and  Grinnell,  Joseph.  Life- 
zone  indicators  in  California.  Proc. 
Calif.  Acad.  Sci.,  4th  ser.,  9:37-67. 
1919. 

Brief  discussion  of  the  life-zone  con- 
cept, the  factors  influencing  the 
position  and  extent  of  the  zones, 
and  lists  of  characteristic  ("indi- 
cator") species  of  plants  and  ani- 
mals for  the  zones  represented  in 
California. 

Hall,  H.  M..  and  Hall,  C.  C.     A  Yosemite 

flora.      San   Francisco.     Paul   Elder  & 

Co.     1912.     vii-l-1-282   pp.,   pis.,  illus. 

Excellent   for   central    Sierra   Nevada. 

Hansen,  Geo.  Where  the  big  trees  grow. 
Ilora  of  the  sequoia  region.  Collected 
in  the  counties  of  Amador,  Calaveras 
and  Alpine,  State  of  California.  San 
Franr-isco.  Bacon  Printing  Co.  1895. 
23-M4  pp. 

Rambling  account  of  travels,  with 
list  of  species. 

Harkness,  H.  W.,  and  Moore,  J.  P.   Cata- 
logue of  the  Pacific  Coast  Fungi.     San 
Francisco.     Calif.  Acad.  Sci.     [?1880; 
?  Separate  Publ.]     46  pp. 
Nominal   list   with   some   localities   of 
occurrence. 

Harshberger,  J.  W.  Phytogeographic 
survey  of  North  America  in  Engler,  A., 
and  Drude,  O.  "Die  Vegetation  der 
Erde,"    [  =  vol.    XIII].     Leipsig.     Wil- 


helm    Engelmann.      1911.      lxiii-hl-790 
pp.,  pis.  1-18,  1  map,  .32  text  figs. 

Chapter  I,  part  VI,  pp.  24-29,  gives 
an  excellent  historical  resume  of 
botanical  exploration  in  California 
down  to  about  1906  ;  the  bibliog- 
raphy, Chapter  II,  Section  VI,  pp. 
7S-82,  on  the  Pacific  Coast  states, 
contains  numerous  entries  impor- 
tant for  California ;  Chapter  IV, 
part  3,  pp.  602-633,  deals  with  the 
plants  of  the  Californian  region  by 
local  areas. 

Heller,  A.  A.  Ribes — reprints  of  original 
descriptions  of  the  species  which  occur 
in  North  Araerica,  north  of  IMexico. 
Los  Gatos,  Calif.  [?  publ.  by  author]. 
[1905?] 
Similar  volumes  have  appeared  for 
the  genera  Lupinus  and  Trifolium. 

Henshaw,  Julia  W.  Mountain  wild 
flowers  of  America ;  a  simple  and  popu- 
lar guide  to  the  names  and  descriptions 
of  the  flowers  that  bloom  above  the 
clouds.  Boston.  Ginn  &  Co.  1906. 
xxi-l-384  pp.,  99  pis. 

Herre,  A.  W.  C.  T.     The  lichen  flora  of 
the  Santa   Cruz  Peninsula,   California. 
Proc.   Wash.    [D.   C]    Acad.   Sci.,   12: 
27-269.     1910, 
Technical. 

Hooker,  W.  J.,  and  Walker,  W.  A.     The 
botany   of   Captain   Beeehey's  voyage ; 
comprising    an    account    of    the    plants 
collected    by   Messrs.    Lay    and   Collie, 
and    other    officers    of    the    expedition, 
during  the  voyage  to  the  Pacific  and 
iBehring's     Strait,     performed    in    His 
Majesty's  ship  Blossom,  under  the  com- 
mand of  Captain  F.   W.  Beechey   .  .  . 
in  the  years  1825,  26,  27,  and  28.    Lon- 
don.   H.  G.  Bohn.     1841.    2-fii-f 3^85 
pp.,   99  pis. 
At   pp.    316-409    there    is  a   California 
Supplement,  including  description  of 
material   collected  at  Monterey  and 
San  Francisco  by  Douglas. 

Ho'we,    M.    A.      Hepaticae    and    Antho- 
cerotes    of    California.      Mem.    Torrey 
Bot.  Club,  7 : 1-208,  pis.  88-122.     1899. 
Technical. 

Jaeger,  E.  C.  Mountain  trees  of  southern 
California.  Pasadena,  Calif.  A.  C 
Yroman.     1919.     104  pp.,  illus. 

2d   ed.     Pasadena.      Post 


Printing  and  Binding  Co.     1920.     116 
pp.,    illus. 

Jepson,  W.  L.  Botany  of  the  Marysville 
Buttes,  Sacramento  Valley.  Bull.  Tor- 
rey Bot.  Club,  18:317-327.     1891. 


vol.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA  17 


A  flora  of  California.  San  Fran- 
cisco. Cunningham,  Curtis  &  Welch ; 
H.  S.  Crocker  Co. ;  Berkeley.  Associ- 
ated Students  Store.  1909-1922. 
Seven  parts  published  to  date :  pp.  33- 
64,  1909;  337-368,  1909;  65-192, 
1912;  369-464,  1914;  465-528,  1914; 
193-366,  1922;  529-578,  1922. 

Numerous  illus.  A  technical  flora 
with  keys,  scientific  descriptions 
and  important  localities  of  occur- 
rence and  references  to  the  litera- 
ture ;  other  parts  to  follow. 

A  flora  of  the  economic  plants  of 


California.     Berkeley.    Associated  Stu- 
dents Store.     1924.    223  pp. 

A  systematic  flora  with  analytical 
keys  to  the  plants  of  economic  im- 
portance. 

Flora    of    Western    Middle    Cali- 


fornia.     Berkeley.      Encina    Publ.    Co. 
1901.     iv-h  1-625  pp. 


2d    ed.       San    Francisco. 

Cunningham,    Curtis   &   Welch.      1911. 
515  pp. 

The  standard  for  many  years ;  super- 
seded by  his  1925  manual. 


A  manual  of  the  flowering  plants 

of    California.      Berkeley.      Associated 
Students  Store.     1925.     1238  pp.,  illus. 

The  first  general  field  and  laboratory 
volume  for  the  state  ;  includes  over 
4000    species. 

A    school    flora    for    the    Pacific 


Coast.    New  York.    D.  Appleton  &  Co. 
1902.     vi-l-1-96  pp. 
Terse. 


A    silva     of     California.       Univ. 

Calif.    Memoirs,    2:1-185,    85    pis.,    3 
maps,  10  figs.     1910. 

Large,  handsome  volume,  much  origi- 
nal data ;  the  standard  reference 
on   the   subject. 


The    trees    of    California.       San 

Francisco.        Cunningham,      Curtis     & 
Welch.    1909.     228  pp.,  125  illus. 

*- 2d  ed.     Berkeley.  Sather 

Gate  Book  Shop.     1923.     240  pp.,  124 
illus. 

Excellent  general  discussion  followed 
by  keys  and  technical  descriptions. 

Johnston,  I.  M.  The  flora  of  the  pine 
belt  of  the  San  Antonio  Mountains  of 
southern  California.  Plant  World,  22  : 
71-122.     1919. 

Annotated  list  of  species  from  east- 
ern portion  of  the  Sierra  San 
Gabriel. 

Jones,   M.   E.      Contributions   to  western 
botany.     Eai-lier  numbers  published  in 
2 — 73S29 


Zoe,  and  in  Proc.  Calif.  Acad.  Sci. ; 
nos.  8,  and  10  to  15  issued  separately 
by  the  author  at  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah. 

Ferns   of   the   west.      Salt   Lake 


City,  Utah.     1882.     28-1-2  pp. 
Account     includes     the     then     known 
California    species   in   a    systematic 
list. 

Kellogg,  Albert.  Forest  trees  of  Cali- 
fornia. Appendix,  Second  Rept.  Calif. 
State  Mineralogist,  1880-1882:  1-116 
( separately  paged ) .  Also  reprinted 
separately.     148  pp.     1882. 

Running  account  of  trees  and  shrubs. 

Kennedy,  P.  B.  Annotated  list  of  the 
wild  flowers  of  California.  San  Fran- 
cisco.    1917.     165  pp. 

A  systematic  list  of  2164  species,  in- 
cluding grasses  and  ferns,  with 
brief  notes  on  places  of  occurrence. 

Kinney,  Abbot.  Eucalyptus.  Los  An- 
geles. B.  R.  Baumgardt  &  Co.  1895. 
298-fvi  pp.,  illus. 

Largely  an  account  of  the  species 
introduced  into  California. 

Leiberg,  J.  B.      [Descriptions  of  various 
forest   reserves.]      U.    S.    Geol.    Surv., 
Ann.  Rept.,  19,  pt.  5:  351-371;  ibid., 
.  20,  pt.  5  :409-478.    1899  and  1900. 

Deals  with  San  Gabriel,  San  Ber- 
nardino and  San  Jacinto  Forest 
Reserves. 

Forest  conditions  in  the  northern 


Sierra  Nevada.  California.  U.  S.  Geol. 
Surv.,  Prof.  Paper,  8:1-194,  8  pis. 
1902. 

Lemmon,  J.  G.  Cone-bearers  of  Cali- 
fornia. Calif.  State  Bd.  of  Forestry, 
Bien.  Rept,  3:79-201,  front.  H-2-30 
pis.     1890. 

Either   this    item    or    one    of   the   two 

"Pines  of  the  Pacific  slope"  is  pos- 

*    sibly    to    be    considered    the    "first 

edition"    of    the    "handbook"    listed 

next  below. 

Handbook     of     W  e  s  t-American 

cone-bearers.  Oakland.  Pacific  Press 
Publ.  Co.  1892.  [2d  ed.]  24  pp.,  1 
Pl. 


1895.      3d     (pocket)     ed. 

104  pp.,   front.    -M6  pis.      [Not   seen ; 
title  from  L.  S.  J.  U.  library  card.] 

1900.      4th    (pocket)    ed. 

xv-l-H-17-116  pp.,  17  pis.     [Not  seen : 
title  from  U.  S.  D.  A.  library  card.] 


How  to  tell  the  trees  and  forest 

endowment  of  the  Pacific  slope.  Oak- 
land. [Publ.  by  author?]  1902.  6-f- 
67  pp. 


18 


NEWS   NOTES   OF   CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Oaks    of    Pacific    slope.      Trans. 

Pac.  States  Floral  Congress.    1902.    19 
pp. 

Also   reprinted   separately.     Key   and 
brief  popular  accounts. 

Pines  of   the   Pacific   slope,    par- 


ticularly those  of  California.  From 
the  report  of  J.  G.  Lemmon,  botanist 
for  the  California  State  Board  of 
Forestry.  Oakland.  Publ.  by  the 
author.  1888.  cover  +13  pp.  [Not 
seen ;  title  from  U.  S.  D.  A.  library 
card.] 


Pines  of  the  Pacific  slope,  par- 
ticularly those  of  California.  Calif. 
State  Bd.  of  Forestry,  Bien.  Kept.,  2 : 
67-140,  16  pis.    1888. 

McClatchie,  A.  J.  Eucalyptus  culti- 
vated in  the  United  States.  U.  S. 
Dept.  Agric,  Bur.  of  Forestry,  Bull. 
35  :1-106,  front.+l-91  pis.     1902. 

Characteristics,  use,   propagation  and 
principal  species  grown  in  America. 

Flora   of   Pasadena  and   vicinity. 


in  Reid,  H.  A.  "History  of  Pasadena." 
Los  Angeles.  Kingsley-Barnes  and 
Neuner  Co.    1895.     pp.  605-649. 

Includes  scientific  names,  local  occur- 
rence and  season  for  everything 
from   slime  molds   to   composites. 

McDermott,  Laura  F.  An  illustrated 
key  to  the  North  American  species  of 
Trifolium.  San  Francisco.  Cunning- 
ham, Curtis  &  Welch.  1910.  325  pp., 
136  pi.  [  =  figs.] 

MacDougal,  D.  T.  Botanical  features  of 
North  American  deserts.  Carnegie 
Inst,  of  Washington,  Publ.  99 :1-111, 
62  pis.     1908. 

MacDougal,  D.  T.,  d  others.  The  Salton 
Sea.  A  study  of  the  geography,  the 
geology,  the  floristics  and  the  ec61ogy 
of  a  desert  basin.  Carnegie  Inst,  of 
Washington,  Publ.  193  :ix  + 1-182,  32 
pis.,  4  figs.     1914. 

McKenney,  R.  B.  B.  Notes  on  plant  dis- 
tribution in  southern  California.  Bei- 
hefte  zur  Botanisches  Centralblatt, 
10 :166-178.     1901. 

Merriam,  C.  H.  Notes  on  the  distribu- 
tion of  trees  and  shrubs  in  the  deserts 
and  desert  ranges  of  southern  Califor- 
nia, southern  Nevada,  northwestern 
Arizona,  and  southwestern  Utah.  U. 
S.  Dept.  Agric,  N.  Amer.  Fauna, 
7 :2S5-343.     1893. 

Results  of  a  biological  survey  of 


Agric,     Div.     Biol.     Surv.,     N.     Amer. 
Fauna,  16  :1-179,  5  pis.,  46  figs.   1899. 

Miller,  L.  C.  Chaparral  as  a  watershed 
cover  in  southern  California.  Proe. 
Amer.  Soc  Foresters,  1 :147-157.  1906. 

Nuttall,  Thomas.  Descriptions  of  new 
species  and  genera  of  plants  in  the 
natural  order  of  the  Compositae  col- 
lected in  a  tour  across  the  continent 
to  the  Pacific,  a  residence  in  Oregon, 
and  a  visit  to  the  Sandwich  Islands 
and  Upper  California  during  the  years 
1834  and  1835.  Trans.  Amer.  Philos. 
Soc,  7:283-^53.     1841. 

Orcutt,  C.  F.  Botany  of  southern  Cali- 
fornia. A  check-list  of  the  fiowering 
plants,  ferns,  marine  algae,  etc.,  known 
to  occur  in  San  Diego,  Riverside,  San 
Bernardino,  Orange  and  Los  Angeles 
counties,  California,  and  north  Baja 
California,  with  notes,  and  descriptions 
of  many  species.  San  Diego.  [Publ. 
by  author]  1901.  2+41-172  columns 
[  =  66  pp.] 

—  California  trees  and  flowers.    San 

Diego.      Orcutt    Seed    and    Plant    Co. 
32  pp. 

Brief    notes    on    species    suitable    for 
cultivation,  with  scientific  names. 


Flora    of    southern    and    Lower 

California.       San     Diego.       [Publ.    by 
author]   1885.     13  pp. 

Nominal  list. 

Pai-ish,  S.  B.  A  bibliography  of  the 
southern  California  flora.  Bull.  So. 
Calif.  Acad.  Sci.,  8  (no.  2):71-75; 
9   (no.  1)  : 57-62.     1909  and  1910. 

Scientific  papers  dealing  with  Los 
Angeles,  San  Diego,  S'an  Bernar- 
dino, Riverside  and  Orange  coun- 
ties are  listed ;  excludes  general 
works   and   popular   papers. 

An    enumeration   of    the   pterido- 


Mount  Shasta,  California.    U.  S.  Dept. 


phytes  and  spermatophytes  of  the  San 
Bernardino  Mountains,  California. 
Plant  World,  20:163-178,  208-223, 
245-259.     1903. 

The  immigrant  plants  of  southern 


California.  Bull.  So.  Calif.  Acad.  Sci., 
19 :3-30.     1920. 

Much  exact  data. 

■  Notes   on   the  naturalized   plants 

of  southern  California.  Zoe,  1 :7-10, 
56-59,  122-126,  182-188,  205-210, 
261-265.  300-303  ;  2  :26-34.  1890  and 
1891. 


A  sketch  of  the  flora  of  southern 

California.       Bot.     Gaz.,     36:203-222, 
259-279.     1903. 


vol.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA 


19 


Parsons,  M.  E.  The  wild  flowers  of  Cali- 
fornia. Their  names,  haunts  and  hab- 
its. .  San  Francisco.  W.  Doxey.  1897, 
xlvii-|-410  pp.,  illus.,  6  col.  pis. 


1902. 


Payot,     Upham     &     Co. 

4th  ed.    xlviii+411  pp.,  illus. 

—  1904.       6th     ed.       S-fv- 
xlviii+411  pp.,  illus. 

Cunningham,      Curtis     & 

Welch.      1907.      8th    thousand.      3+v- 
cvi+417  pp.,  illus. 


H.  S.  Crocker  Co.  1914. 
-  Calif.    School   Book   De- 


pository.    1925. 

Illustration  by  Margaret  W.  Buck. 
Excellent  popular  handbook  of  com- 
moner species. 

Plummer,  F.  G.  Chaparral.  U.  S.  Dept. 
Agr.,  For.  Serv.  Bull.  85:1^8,  pis. 
1-8,  7  figs.     1911. 

*Pratt,  M.  B.  Shade  and  ornamental 
trees  of  California.  Calif.  State  Bd.  of 
Forestry.  Sacramento.  1922.  132  pp., 
137  pis. 

Running-  account  of  native  and  intro- 
duced species  with  excellent  half- 
tones  of   notable   individual    trees. 

Rattan,  Volney.  Analytical  key  to  West 
Coast  Botany.  San  Francisco.  1887. 
[Not  seen  ;  title  from  Proc.  Calif.  Acad. 
Sci.,  Ser.  2,- vol.  1.] 

Exercises   in  botany  for  the  Pa- 


cific states.  San  Francisco.  The  Whit- 
aker  &  Ray  Co.  1897.  i-f  iii+120  pp., 
illus. ;  also  a  1900  reprint.  [Title  from 
L.  C.  card.] 

A    popxilar    California    flora,    or 

Manual  of  botany  for  beginners,  con- 
taining descriptions  of  exogenous 
plants  growing  in  central  California, 
and  westward  to  the  ocean.  San  Fran- 
cisco. A.  L.  Bancroft  &  Co.  1879. 
106  pp. 

2d    ed.    "with    illustrated 

introductory  lessons."  1880.  xviii-1- 
138  pp.    [Title  from  L.  C.  card.] 

6th  rev.  ed.  "with  illus- 
trated introductory  lessons,  especially 
adapted  to  the  Pacific  coast."  1885. 
xxviii  +  138  [  =  176  total]  pp. 

Popular    west    coast    flora :     an 


analytical  key  to  the  flora  of  the  Pa- 
cific coast,  in  which  are  described  over 
eighteen  hundred  species  of  flowering 
plants  growing  west  of  the  Sierra 
Nevada  and  Cascade  crests,  from  San 


Diego  to  Puget  Sound.  Rev.  ed.  San 
Francisco.  The  Whitaker  &  Rav  Co. 
1905.   221  pp.,  illus.,  plates. 

West   coast   botany.      San   Fran- 


cisco. The  Whitaker  &  Ray  Co.  1898. 
221  p.   [  =  lst  ed.  of  1905  item.]   illus. 

Rice,  Mrs  B.  M.  and  Rice,  Ronald.  Popu- 
lar studies  of  California  wild  flowers. 
San  Francisco.  Upton  Bros.  &  Del- 
zelle.    1920.     127  pp.,  illus. 

Running   discussion    of  many    species. 

*  Sampson,  A.  W.     Native  American  for- 

age plants.  New  York.  John  Wiley 
&  Sons,  Inc.  1924.  xxv-f435  pp.  col. 
front.,   illus.,   diagrs. 

*  Sargent,  C.  P.   Trees  of  North  America. 

Boston.  Houghton  Mifflin  and  Co. 
new  ed.  1922.     812  pp. 

A  general  manual  including  the  Cali- 
fornian  species. 

*  Saunders,    C.    F.     Trees    and    shrubs   of 

California  gardens.  New  York.  Robert 
M.  McBride  Co.  1926.  xiv+323  pp., 
illus. 

A  pleasing  popular  account  of  com- 
mon and  conspicuous  native  and 
introduced  plants  of  the  garden, 
roadside  and  open  places,  with  com- 
ment on  plants  used  by  the  Indians 
and   the    Mission   fathers. 

* Useful  wild  plants  of  the  United 

States  and  Canada.  New  York.  Robt. 
M.  McBride  Co.  1920  (rev.  ed.  1926.) 
6-1-275  pp.,  illus. 

Western  flower  guide.    Wild  flow- 
ers  of   the   Rockies    and    west   to    the 
Pacific.     New  York.     Doubleday,  Page 
&  Co.   1917.   5-M-h3-286  pp.,  col.  iUus. 
Pocket  size,   brief  notes. 

* Wild  gardens  of  old  California. 

Santa  Barbara.  W.  Hebberd.  1927. 
6-f24-fl  pp.,  front,  and  plates. 

Deals  with  work  of  Padre  Juan 
Crespi   and   David   Douglas. 

* With   the   flowers   and   trees   in 

California.  New  York.  Robt.  M.  Mc- 
Bride  Co.    1914.    8-i-286   pp.,   illus. 

Saunders,  C.  F.,  and  Saunders,  Mrs  E.  M. 
California  wild  flowers ;  12  reproduc- 
tions in  natural  colors  from  water  color 
drawings.  Philadelphia.  Bains.  1905. 
21  pp.  illus. 

Setchell,  W.  A.,  and  Gardner,  N.  L.   The 

marine   algae   of   the   Pacific   coast   of 

North  America.  Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Bot., 

8 : 1-898,  pis.  1-107.     1919,  1920,  1925. 

Technical  and  critical. 

Shinn,  C.  H.  Let's  know  some  trees.  U. 
S.  Dept.  Agric.  Misc.  circ.  31.  1925. 
15  pp. 


20 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


A  short  account  of  the  big  trees  of  Cali- 
fornia. U.  S.  Dept.  Agric,  Div.  of 
Forestry,  Bull.,  28:1-30,  pis.  1-15,  1 
folded  map.  [Also  issued  as  "Report  on 
the  Big  Trees  of  California,"  56th 
Cong.,  1st  Sess.,  Senate  Doc.  393.] 
1900. 

Brief,  popular  account  of  the  groves 
and  of  notable  trees  and  the  then 
ownership  of  big  tree  lands ;  map 
shows   location   of  all   groves. 

Smiley,  F.  J.  A  report  upon  the  boreal 
flora  of  the  Sierra  Nevada  of  Cali- 
fornia. Univ.  Calif.  Publ.  Botany, 
9  :l-^23,  pis.  1-7.     1921. 

Smiley,  F.  J.  d  others.  Weeds  of  Cali- 
fornia and  methods  of  control.  Calif. 
State  Dept.  Agric,  Mo.  Bull.  7  :xxii-F 
13-360,  front. +1  chart,  text.  figs.  16- 
138.     1922. 

Keys,  brief  nontechnical  descriptions 
and  distribution  within  the  state,  of 
principal  weeds ;  manner  of  dis- 
persal and  methods  for  control. 

Smith,  E.  E.  (The)  golden  poppy.  Palo 
Alto.  Printed  by  Murdock  Press,  San 
Francisco.  Distributed  by  S.  P.  News 
Co.     1902.     230-f  2  pp.,  illus. 

A  popular  account  of  the  State  flower, 
including  the  original  scientific  de- 
scription, notes  on  the  growing  of 
the  Eschsclioltzia,  poems,  etc. 

Sudworth,  G.  B.  Forest  trees  of  the  Pa- 
cific Slope.  U.  S.  Dept.  of  Agric.  For- 
est Service.     1908.    441  pp.,  illus. 

Good  nontechnical  account.  Figures 
of  practically  all  species.  Much  de- 
tailed information  on  local  occur- 
rence. 

Stanislaus  and  Lake  Tahoe  Forest 


Reserves  and  adjacent  territory.  U.  S. 
Geol.  Surv.,  Ann.  Rep.,  21,  pt.  5: 
499-561,  pis.  85-114.     1900. 

Thayer,  Mrs  E.  H.  Wild  flowers  of  the 
Pacific  Coast.  New  York.  Cassell  & 
Co.  Ltd.    1887. 

Colored  plates  of  24  species  from 
water  color  laaintings,  with  popu- 
lar text.  Mostly  Californian  spe- 
cies. 

Vasey,  George.  Illustrations  of  North 
American  Grasses.  Vol.  I.  Grasses  of 
the  southwest  ...  of  the  desert 
region  of  western  Texas,  New  Mexico, 
Arizona  and  southern  California.  U. 
S.  Dept.  Agric,  Div.  of  Botany,  Bui. 
12.  (part  I)  :vi+2  +  l-7  pp.,  50  pis. 
each  with  separate  explanatory  page 
facing;  (pt.  II)  :l-7  pp.,  50  pis.  1890 
and  1891. 

Generic  and  species  characters  on 
pages  facing  plates. 

Vol.   II.     Grasses  of  the 


Pacific  Slope,  including  Alaska  and  the 


adjacent  islands,  ibid.,  Bui.  13  (parts 
1  and  2)  :viii  pp.,  100  pis.  each  with 
explanatory  separate  page  facing.  1892 
and  1893. 

Form  like  that  of  the  preceding  item ; 
some  new  species  described.  The 
two  also  issued  separately  as  a 
unit  in  two  volumes  by  U.  S.  Dept. 
Agric,  Div.  of  Botany. 

Vischer,    Edward.      The   forest   trees    of 

California.    Sequoia  gigantea  Calaveras 

Mammoth    Tree    Grove.      Photographs 

from  the  original  drawings  of  Edward 

Vischer.      San    Francisco.     [Publ.    by 

author]  1864.    4+1-13-M-iii  pp. 

Contains  also   material   from   a   publ. 

on    the    mammoth    trees    in     1862, 

printed  by  Agnew  and  Deffebach. 

Vischer's  pictorial  of  California. 


Landscape,  trees  and  forest  scenes 
.  .  .  Photographs  from  the  original 
drawings.  In  five  series  of  twelve 
numbers  each  .  .  .  San  Francisco. 
Joseph  Winterburn  &  Co.  1870.  132  + 
misc.   pages. 

Watson,  Sereno,  &  others.  Botany.  U. 
S.  Geol.  Expl.  of  Fortieth  Parallel. 
liii-M-525   pp.,   map,   1-40   pis.    1871. 

Area  between  111°-120°  W.  and 
39°— 42°  N.  at  the  outside;  mentions 
many  Californian  species.  A  cata- 
logue of  the  collections  of  the  Sur- 
vey. 

Williams,  J.  O.     Mammoth  trees  of  Cali- 
fornia,    illustrated    by    a    comparison 
with    other    noted    trees,-  ancient    and 
modern.      Boston.      Alfred    Mudge    & 
Son.     1871.     54-1-1   pp.    woodcuts. 
"With  a  handbook  in  brief,  for  a  trip 
to   the   Calaveras   Groves,   and   To- 
semite  Valley." 

Yates,  L.  G.  Insular  floras.  Ann.  Rept. 
California  State  Mineralogist,  9 :11- 
20,  179-188,  1  pi.   1890. 

Comparison  of  the  floras  of  the  sev- 
eral islands  of  the  Santa  Barbara 
Channel  group. 

GENERAL     AND     MISCELLANEOUS 
WORKS 

Carlin,   Eva   V.,   ed.  A  Berkeley  year,  a 
sheaf     of     nature     essays.       Berkeley. 
Women's      Auxil.        First      Unitarian 
Church.     1S9S.     8  +  1-92  pp. 
Birds  by  C.  A.  Keeler,  Trees  by  E.  L. 
Greene,  Bird  and  wild-flower  calen- 
dar by  Eva  V.  Carlin  and  Hannah 
P.  Stearns. 

*Chase,  J.  S.  California  coast  trails ; 
a  horseback  ride  from  Mexico  to  Ore- 
gon. Boston.  Houghton  MilHin  Co. 
1913.     326  pp. 

■' California    desert   trails     .     .     . 


and  an  appendix  of  plants,  also  hints 


vol.  25,  no.  1]       BIBLIOGRAPHY  ON  NATURAL  HISTORY  OF  CALIFORNIA  21 


on  desert  traveling.  Boston.  Hough- 
ton Mifflin  Co.     1919.    387  pp.,  iUus. 

Our   Araby ;    Palm    Springs    and 

the  garden  of  the  sun  .  .  .  [with 
a]  list  of  desert  plants  .  .  .  New 
York.  J.  J.  Little  &  Ives  Co.  1923. 
112  pp. 

* Yosemite  trails ;  camp  and  pack- 
train  in  the  Yosemite  region  of  the 
Sierra  Nevada.  Boston.  Houghton 
Mifflin  Co.     1911.     s-h  1-354  pp.,  iUus. 

Cronise,  T.  F.  The  natural  wealth  of 
California.  San  Francisco.  H.  H. 
Bancroft    Co.      1868.      xvi-M-696    pp. 

Chapter  VIL  PP.  4,34-501,  Zoology, 
and  Chapter  VIII,  pp.  502-528,  Bot- 
any, constitute  general  summaries 
of  the  native  animal  life  (by  J.  G. 
Cooper)  and  plant  life  (author 
unknown ) . 

*Hall,  A.  F.,  ed.  Handbook  of  Yosemite 
National  Park.  New  York.  G.  P. 
Putnam's  Sons.  1921.  xiii-|- 1-347  pp., 
illus. 

Chapters  by  various  authors  on 
plants,    trees,    mammals,    fish,    etc. 

Hasse,   Adelaide  R.     Index  of   economic 

material  in  documents  of  the  states  of 

the    United    States ;    California    1849- 

1904.     Carnegie   Inst,   of  Washington, 

publ.  85    (California)    316  pp.  1908. 

Material  pertaining  to  plants  is  under 

"Natural    resources — forests,"    that 

relating    to    animals    under    "Fish 

and  Game." 

Hittel,  J.  S.  The  resources  of  California. 
San  Francisco.  A.  Roman  and  Co. 
1863  (and  later  editions).  xvi-M- 
464  pp. 

iChapter  V,  Botany,  pp.  91-107,  and 
Chapter  VI,  Zoology,  pp.  108-150, 
quote  from  Heermann  and  New- 
berry in  the  Pacific  Railroad  Re- 
ports but  there  is  some  original 
material.  The  first  general  state- 
ment of  natural  history  resources 
in  the  state. 

Holder,  C.  F.  The  Channel  islands  of 
California ;  a  book  for  the  angler, 
sportsman,  and  tourist  .  .  .  Chi- 
cago. A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co..  1910. 
xvi-h  1-397  pp.,  front.,  pis.,  maps. 

— ■  An  isle  of  summer,   Santa  Cata- 


lina ;     .     .     .     Los  Angeles.  R.  Y.  Mc- 
Bride.     1901.    91  pp.,  iUus. 

This  is  another  issue  of  the  1895  item, 
"rSanta  Catalina,  an  isle  of  summer 

Life  in  the  open ;  sport  with  rod, 


gun,  horse,  and  hound  in  southern 
California  .  .  .  New  York  and 
London.  G.  P.  Putnam's  Sons.  1906. 
xv-f- 1-401  pp.,  front.,  illus.,  66  pis. 


Recreations    of    a    sportsman    on 

the  Pacific  coast  .  .  .  New  York 
and  London.  G.  P.  Putnam's  Sons. 
1910.    ix+1-399   pp.,   front.,   pis. 

Santa  Cataliua,  an  isle  of  sum- 
mer, its  history,  climate,  sports,  and 
antiquities  .  .  .  San  Francisco.  C. 
A.  Murdoek  &  Co.  1895.  1  +  1-126 
pp.,  front.,  illus. 

The  five  preceding  items  while  written 
principally  from  the  standpoint  of 
the  sportsman,  contain  incidental 
material  of  value  on  the  native 
animal  life. 

*Jaeger,  E.  C.  Denizens  of  the  desert. 
Boston.  Houghton  Mifflin  Co.  1922. 
299  pp.,  illus. 

Brief  popular  accounts  of  animals  of 
the  California  deserts  and  semi- 
desert   areas. 

* Denizens      of      the      mountains. 

Springfield,  111.  C.  C.  Thomas.  1929. 
xiii-M68  pp.,  illus. 

Chapters  on  common  birds  and  mam- 
mals of  the  southern  Sierras. 

James,  G.  W.  The  wonders  of  the  Colo- 
rado Desert  (southern  California). 
Boston.  Little,  Brown  &  Co.  1907.  2 
vols.  1:xliv  +  l-270  pp.;  2:xiv4-271- 
547  pp.,  illus. 

Frequent  mention  of  desert  plants 
and  animals. 

King,  Clarence.  Mountaineering  in  the 
Sierra  Nevada.  New  York.  Charles 
Scribner's  Sons.  1872.  378  pp.  [Also 
later  editions.] 

Incidental  mention  of  plants  and  ani- 
mals. 

Laguna  Marine  Laboratory.  Department 
of  Biology,  Pomona  College,  Clare- 
mont.  First  annual  report.  (All  pub- 
lished.)     1912.     218  pp.,  130  figs. 

The  laboratory  was  established  at 
Laguna  Beach,  Orange  County, 
under  the  sponsorship  of  A.  J.  Cook. 
Faculty  and  students  in  summer 
school  of  1911  collected  the  mate- 
rials forming  the  basis  of  the  17 
articles  in  this  volume,  which  was 
edited  by  C.   F'.   Baker. 

*Muir,  John.  [Collected  works.  Edited 
and  arranged  by  W.  F.  Badfe.]  Boston. 
Houghton  Mifflin  Co.  1917-1924.  10 
vols.,  illus. 

Muir's  writings  originally  appeared 
in  magazine  articles  and  several 
separate  volumes.  In  the  latter 
there  was  some  duplication  of 
chapters.  The  "collected  works" 
'bring  the  miscellaneous  material 
together  and  eliminate  duplication. 
"My  first  summer  in  the  Sierra," 
a  diary  of  1869,  presents  much  on 
the  plant  and  animal  life  of  the 
Yosemite  region.  "The  Mountains 
of  California''  [first  issued  in  189  4, 
by  the  Century  Co.],  contains  chap- 
ters on  the  forests,  Douglas  squirrel, 


22 


NEWS  NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


water  ouzel,  and  the  Wild  sheep 
and  one  on  the  bee  pastures  of 
the  San  Joaquin  Valley.  In  "The 
Yosemite"  is  a  chapter  on  the  trees 
of  the  Valley.  "Our  National 
Parks"  contains  chapters  on  the 
forests,  wild  gardens,  animals,  and 
birds  of  the  Yosemite.  "Steep 
Trails"  has  an  account  of  moun- 
tain sheep.  Beside  these  specific 
items  there  are  many  incidental 
references  to  plants  and  animals 
throughout  Muir's  writings. 

Pacific  Coast  Committee,  Amer.  Assoc. 
Adv.  Sci.  Nature  and  science  on  the 
Pacific  coast.  San  Francisco.  Paul 
Elder  &  Co.  1915.  xii  +  1+1-302  pp., 
pis.  1-29,  maps  30-43. 

Chapters  (with  brief  bibliography) 
on  native  plants  and  animals  by 
various  specialists,  with  much  per- 
taining to  California. 

*  Saunders,  C.  F.  The  Southern  Sierras 
of  California.  Boston.  Houghton 
Mifflin  Co.    1923.    xii  + 1-367  pp.  illus. 

Account  of  travels  in  the  ranges  of 
southern  California,  with  frequent 
mention  of  plants  and  animals. 

Tyson,    P.    T.     Geology    and  industrial 

resources     of     California.  Baltimore. 

Wm.  Minifie  &  Co.  1851.  xxxiv  +  l- 
127  pp.,  various  maps.  [31  Cong.  1st 
Sess.  Senate  Ex.  Doc.  47.] 

At  pp.    43-49    is   a  crude  account  of 

indigenous    plants    and  animals. 


Van   Dyke,    T.    S.     Flirtation    camp :  or. 

The  rifle,   rod,  and  gun  in   California, 

a  sporting  romance.   New  York.   Fords, 

Howard  &  Hulbert.  1881.  6  +  1-299  pp. 

Hunting    experiences. 

Southern  California  :  Its  valleys. 


hUls  and  streams ;  its  animals,  birds, 
and  fishes ;  its  gardens,  farms,  and  cli- 
mate. New  York.  Fords,  Howard  & 
Hulbert.     1886.    xii  + 13-233  pp. 


The    still    hunter. 


treatise  on  deer  stalking. 
Fords,  Howard  &  Hulbert 


A    practical 
New  York. 

1882. 


New    edition. 


1904. 


[Neither  seen.] 


Special  Edition.     Boston. 

The  National  Sportsman.    1912.    viii  + 
2+1-390  pp.,  illus. 

Includes  chapters  on  deer  hunting  in 
southern   California  in   the   '80s. 

Wagner,  Harr,  ed.  Pacific  Nature  Stories. 
San  Francisco.  Whitaker  &  Ray  Co. 
1896.     V.  2,  152  pp.,  illus. 

Some     articles    from     other    sources. 
Popular,     [v.    1    not   seen.] 

Whitney,  J.  D.  California.  Boston.  Lit- 
tle, Brown  &  Co.    1875.    60  pp. 

Brief    summary    on    the    fauna    and 
flora,  pp.   45-52. 


vol.  25,  no.  1]  MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA,  SHOWING  COUNTIES 


23 


MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA,  SHOWING  COUNTIES 


i-erf/furfe  cf  Or/It  C^ 

.     -^Z-  N        / 


D — W 

SISKIYOU  I    MOOOC 


SHASTA 


LASSEN 


TEHAMA       ,^ 


/     PLUMAS 


5  *SLENN!     BUTTT^v/'"-' '" 

S    ;'     !  7 '«'V'^  '  iwsma" 

OV        V_-\V0L0V ■'    EU  DORADO, ,'V 

7^1      /■    'X       /TUOU/MME^, 


/ar /rtcA—oi/.  fit.    5*NnW(CISC0  /1\     -,, -1   *■'       J     V         ^-.^y'^sj    ""    "      \ 


\    \ 


\  KERN 


t 


^.  ffrguri*^ 


\  BARBAflAi     "'v^  I 


SAN   BERNARDINO 


r^<"~'-'-- 


%. 


33' N.  _ 
/-ffr  (harftsfon.  S<. 


24 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARIES 

Statistics  of  July  1,  1929 


County 

Librarian 

Established 

Income, 
1928-29' 

Books,  etc. 

Branches 

Total 
active 
school 
dists. 

in 
oounty2 

Active 
school 
oists. 
that 
have 
joined 

Sept.  26.  19in 

S60,021  GO 
7,092  36 
18,553  09 
12,407  50 
62,954  14 

148,400  66 

17.844  68 
18,757  59 
21,168  96 
10,057  34 

129,651  01 
27,351  63 
14,846  97 

206,943  01 
26,682  64 
15,606  00 
3,616  77 
40,068  76 
4,755  00 
25,150  00 
10,200  CO 
30,546  24 
13,202  78 
16,747  50 
46,749  26 
10,213  77 
44,925  04 

40.845  95 

170,155 

23,371 

? 8,833 

a.  59,860 

202,443 

■  466,017 

63,318 
112,663 

92,042 

32,785 
280,282 
132,864 

53,846 
588,630 
102,814 
8,833 
5,227 
146,405 

19,844 
100,177 

34,128 
110,826 

46,535 

0 

112,281 

45,559 
122,483 
107,731 

95 
39 
89 
44 

109 

241 
51 

152 
63 
40 

190 
57 
64 

264 
70 
56 
32 
84 
37 

126 
80 
65 
83 
91 

117 
76 

135 

150 

53 
32 
64 
32 
64 

171 
42 

109 
55 
29 

103 
42 
36 

149 
51 
48 
27 
69 
42 
98 
49 
56 
28 
79 
84 
37 
74 

120 

37 

Mrs  Henrietta  G.  Budey.- 
Ida  M.  Reagan 

June    2 
Sept.   3 
June    8 
July  21 
Mar.  12 
April  8 
May  12 
Feb.     6 
Sept.  15 
Nov.  16 
June    4 
Sept.    7 
Sept.    5 
May    3 
Aug.    3 
Oct.     4 
June    6 
July     8 
Aug.    6 
Feb.     9 
Dec.    9 
Sept.    7 
Nov.    8 
Oct.     1 
Feb.    4 
July  14 
April  5 

1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1912 
1910 
1926 
1926 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 

27 

Butte 

56 

MrsEUa  P.  Morse 

Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck  .. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle 

Mrs  Faye  K.  Russell 

Edna  D.  Davis 

27 

Contra  Costa 

58 
156 

36 

100 

Dorothy  Deming 

50 

28 

Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock 

Marion  L.  Gregory 

Lenala  A.  Martin 

Helen  E.  Vogleson 

Blanche  Galloway 

98 

38 

35 

Los  Angeles 

108 
49 

36 

Mariposa 

MinetteL.  Stoddard 

Minette  L.  Stoddard 

Anna  L.  WiUiams 

*  Ellen  B.  Frink 

25 
5S 

Modoc 

32 

89 

Estella  DeFord 

47 

Margaret  Livingston 

Katherine  R.  Woods 

Chas.  F.  Woods 

37 

28 

43 

Sacramento 

San  Benito 

San  Bernardino ._ 

Cornelia  D.  Provines 

Mrs  Florence  W.  Townsend 

Caroline  S.  Waters 

Eleanor  Hitt 

69 
37 
65 
104 

IdaE.  Condit 

Mar.    7 
Julv     6 
Sep't.   5 
Feb.  16 
July  20 
Oct.   13 
Aug.    2 
June    7 
April   6 
Aug.  14 
May    9 
Aug.    8 
Sept.    8 
June  10 
July     3 
April  9 
July  12 

1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1926 
1915 
1914 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 

31,611  13 
16,344  15 
22,162  00 
26,640  00 
31,674  22 

9,322  88 

2,529  01 
13,155  71 
26,828  50 
29,826  97 
14,761  93 
12,102  36 

4,620  00 
62,180  75 

8,479  53 
45,270  65 
23,795  77 

0 

49,922 

a,  204,677 

0 

155,083 

0 

1,023 

82,660 

99,828 

109,535 

53,127 

51,435 

20,274 

165,285 

30,705 

122,963 

127,083 

154 
95 
65 
97 
91 
89 
11 

148 
60 
67 
44 
71 
48 

146 
51 
92 
65 

92 
90 
41 
66 
81 
54 
11 
85 
50 
68 
37 
54 
25 
129 
29 
57 
47 

77 

81 

San  Mateo 

Santa  Barbara. -- 

Santa  Clara 

Santa  Cruz 

Mrs  Edna  H.  Yelland... 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Mrs  Elizabeth  Singletary. 
Minerva  H.  Waterman... 

Katherine  R.  Woods 

Celia  Gleason 

28 
60 
74 
52 

7 

82 

Clara  B.  Dills 

42 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn 

Frances  M.  Burket 

Anne  Bell  Bailey 

MrsLila  D.  Adams 

Gretchen  Flower 

Mrs  Helen  R.  Dambacher 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping 

Nancy  C.  Laugenour 

45 
37 

49 

Trinity 

25 

Tulare  . 

102 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

25 
53 

Yolo 

41 

46 

0  1,'08-0  4.'26 

?1,466,665  21 

a.  4,593,552 

4,094 

2,859 

2,453 

'  The  income  as  given  does  not  include  balance  in  fund,  July  1,  1928. 

2  Includes  elementary  and  high. 

'  Sm  Francisco  city  and  county  are  coterminous.    The  city  library  therefore  covers  the  entire  county.   For  statistics 
see  under  "Public  Libraries,  etc."  next  page. 

*  Appointed  October  14,  1929;  began  work  November  18,  1929. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


LIST    OP   LARGER   PUBLIC    LIBRARIES 


25 


PUBLIC  LIBRARIES  OF  20,000  BOOKS,  ETC.,  AND  OVER 


City 


Librarian 


Established 


Income, 
1928-29 


Books, 
etc. 


Card- 
holders 


Alameda 

ALhambra 

Berkeley 

ElCentro 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Huntington  Beach 

Long  Beach—. 

Los  Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Orange 

Oxnard 

Palo  Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San  Bernardino. . . 

San  Diego 

San  Francisco 

San  Jose 

San  Mateo 

Santa  Ana 

Santa  Barbara 

Santa  Cruz.. 

Santa  Monica 

Santa  Paula 

Santa  Rosa 

South  Pasadena... 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 


Jane  I.  Curtis 

Marian  P.  Greene 

Susan  T.  Smith 

Agnes  F.  Ferris 

Gertruae  De  Gelder 

Mrs  Alma  J.  Danford 

Mrs  Bertha  P.  Reynolds. 
Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt 

Everett  R.  Perry 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn 

John  B.  Kaiser 

Mrs  Mabel  F.  Faulkner.. 

Ethel  CarroU 

Anne  Hadden 

Jeannette  M.  Drake 

Sarah  M.  Jacobus . 

Mabel  Inness ... 

Norah  McNeiU 

Chas.  F.  Woods 

W.  F.  PurneU 

May  Coddington 

Cornelia  D.  Plaister 

Robert  Rea 

Mrs  Edith  Daley 

Inez  M.  Crawford 

Jeannette  E.'  McFadden.. 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Minerva  H.  Waterman... 

ELfie  A.  Mosse 

'Mrs.  Helen  F.  Webster.. 

Margaret  A.  Barnett 

Mrs  NeUie  E.  Keith 

IdaE.  Condit 

L.  Gertrude  Doyle 

Ruth  Ellis.... 


1877; 

1893; 
19C7: 
1906; 
19C6; 

1895 
1872 
1905 
1868 
1885 

1896: 
1882; 
1887; 
1893; 
19C7; 
1899; 
1857; 


1874: 
1884: 


188P; 


1869; 
1889; 


as  F.  P  1879 

1906 
as  F.  P.  1895 
as  F.  P.  1909 
as  F.  P.  1907 
as  F.  P.  1907 

19C9 
as  F.  P.  1901 
as  F.  P.  1891 
as  F.  P.  1907 
as  F.  P.  1878 
as  F.  P.  1894 

1906 
as  F.  P.  1902 
as  F.  P.  1890 
as  F.  P.  1902 
as  F.  P.  1894 
as  F.  P.  1909 
as  F.  P.  1907 
as  F.  P.  1879 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as  F.  P.  1880 
as  F.  P.  1899 

1891 

1882 
as  F.  P.  1881 
as  F.  P.  1890 

1907 
as  F.  P.  1884 
as  F.  P.  1895 

1880 
as  F.  P.  1884 

1900 


$40,922  87 
35,675  28 
92,756  33 
12,558  57 
a.  15,438  67 
64,519  84 
19,288  81 

160,949  55 

1,420,307  96 

19,812  7i 

252,581  97 
12,155  11 
10,458  87 
29,432  03 

167,391  23 
37,364  25 
32,485  28 
38,732  51 
60,425  88 
49,646  40 
25,000  00 

108,868  52 

324,619  85 
27,135  66 
17,861  20 
29,685  70 
57,073  34 
18,409  78 
37,879  75 
12,243  45 
12,171  25 
18,127  00 
48,718  29 
15,825  00 
24,608  75 


88,917 
34,643 

148,107 
27,853 
a.  23,626 
74,359 
21,181 

124,299 

1,214,030 

29,943 

382,755 
23,025 
42,266 
33,580 

146,772 
99,327 
82,428 
91,592 

134,782 

127,392 
37,889 

164,688 

475,744 
39,172 
23,089 
53,580 

111,618 
77,734 
59,473 
23,834 
33,106 
33,191 

174,911 
29,321 
26,430 


10,319 
18,218 
40,795 

5,268 

a.  6,548 

38,893 

4,438 
46,537 
300,951 

8,063 
61,406 
113,976 

4,fil2 
11,954 
59,026 
12,485 

9.706 
11,165 
10,561 
24,781 

8,044 
61,487 
119,333 
1C,693 

6,901 
11,165 
24,885 

6,448 
14,950 

4,560 

6,940 


10,617 
6,539 
6,833 


*Acting  Librarian. 


26 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [Jan.,  1930 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY  NEWS   ITEMS 


Only  those  California  libraries  are  listed  for  which  there  were  news  items, 
complete  list  of  libraries,  see  Annual  Statistics  Number,  October,  1929. 


For 


CALIFORNIA 

Area,  158,297  sq.  miles. 
Second  in  size  among  the  states. 
,    Population,  3,426,536. 
Assessed  valuation,  $9,885,903,184. 
Number  of  counties,  58. 

ALAMEDA  COUNTY 

(Third  class) 

County  seat,  Oakland. 
Area,  840  sq.  mi.     Pop.  344,127. 
Assessed  valuation,  $572,875,533   (tax- 
able for  county  $489,009,612). 

ALAiiEDA  Co.  Free  Libkahy,  Oak- 
land.     Miss    Mary    Barmby,    Lib'n. 

Book  week  was  celebrated  in  all  of  the 
branch  libraries  by  the  librarians  mak- 
ing displays  of  some  of  the  worth-while 
children's  books  they  have  in  their  li- 
braries. Mrs  Constance  Mitchell  and 
Miss  Barmby  visited  three  schools  and 
one  library  during  the  first  two  days. 
Mrs  Mitchell  talked  to  the  children  and 
to  the  teachers  at  the  schools  and  to 
the  townspeople  at  the  branch.  Three 
of  the  pictorial  maps  with  the  books 
that  they  illustrate  were  used  to  advan- 
tage and  created  much  interest. 

Mrs  Roland  Bendel,  a  former  librarian, 
is  giving  the  story  hour  once  a  week  on 
Monday  afternoons  at  the  Niles  library. 
The  attendance  grows  so  that  it  has 
been  necessary  to  go  downstairs  to  the 
larger  reading  room. 

The  Teachers'  Institute  was  held  in 
Oakland  the  third  week  in  December.  A 
letter  had  been  sent  to  our  county  teach- 
ers inviting  them  to  visit  the  county 
library  during  the  week.  Tea  was  served 
each  afternoon  and  a  number  of  teachers 
dropped  in  to  look  over  the  books  and 
the  material  on  the  schoolroom   shelves. 

Invoicing  the  school  libraries  started 
in  September  and  each  week  since,  one 
or  more  schools  has  been  visited  and 
invoiced.  This  is  proving  of  great  value 
not  only  in  getting  a  check  on  the  books 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continuet 

but  also  in  getting  in  closer  touch  with 
the  teachers  and  pupils. 

W.    G.   Ferguson   is   now   custodian   of 
Tractor  Branch ;  he  succeeds  Mr  Moffatt. 
Mary  Barmby.  Lib'n. 

Alameda 

Alameda  Free  Pitblic  Library. 
Miss  Jane  I.  Curtis,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Marcella  H.  Krauth,  librarian  of 
Alameda  Free  Public  Library,  is  resign- 
ing her  position  January  1,  1930.  Mrs 
Krauth  has  been  in  the  Alameda  Library 
for  thirty-three  years  and  has  been  li- 
brarian for  twenty-one  years  of  that  time. 
There  were  33,343  volumes  on  the  shelves 
when  she  became  librarian ;  now  there 
are  77,680.  The  circulation  of  the  li- 
brary has  also  increased  greatly,  from 
143,596  in  1908  to  332,422  for  the  past 
year.  During  her  librarianship  the 
Webster  street  branch  library  was  opened 
in  1922,  and  the  Juvenile  Library,  ad- 
joining the  main  library  at  Santa  Clara 
Avenue  and  Oak  Street,  was  opened  in 
1927.  Mrs  Krauth  plans  to  spend  her 
time  in  Alameda  and  in  San  Jose. 

She  will  be  succeeded  as  librarian  by 
Miss  Jane  Isabel  Curtis  of  Alameda,  now 
librarian  of  Alden  Branch  Library  in 
Oakland. — San  Francisco  Chronicle,  N  7 


Berkeley 

[Free]     Public 


Library. 


Berkeley' 
Susan  T.  Smith,  Lib'n. 

Berkeley  is  rich  in  the  possession  of 
an  elementary  school  principal  who  has 
the  spirit  of  the  true  adventurer  and 
explorer.  He  px*efers  to  make  a  detour 
now  and  then  on  the  Road  to  Education, 
instead  of  following  the  direct  route. 
He  believes  that  books  are  a  great  pan- 
acea for  delinquency  and  crime,  and 
rightly  presented  to  children  can  mean 
far  more  in  their  lives  than  conventional, 
formal  methods  of  teaching.  One  of  his 
theories  is  that  in  his  school  located  in 
the   heart    of   the   industrial   center,    the 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


27 


ALAMEDA   CO. — Continued 
Berkeley — Continued 

school  library  as  such  has  no  place.  It 
can  hardly  brush  the  lives  of  the  chil- 
dren of  varied  nationalities  who  leave 
school  early  in  life.  But  a  contact  with 
books  there  must  be  and  since  the  Branch 
Library  mil  furnish  their  reading  in 
later  years,  he  feels  that  it  is  here  that 
the  children  should  be  introduced  to 
books  as  a  source  of  recreation  for  leisure 
-as  well  as  information  for  their  school 
work. 

Fortunately  the  branch  librarian  was 
an  adventurer  too,  and  between  them  they 
evolved  a  plan,  approved  by  the  Board 
of  Education  and  the  library,  whereby 
the  Burbank  School  would  pay  the  sal- 
ary of  a  trained  school  librarian,  selected 
and  supervised  by  the  Librarian,  to  carry 
on  the  work  of  a  school  library  in  the 
West  Berkeley  Branch  Library.  A  visit 
any  day  to  the  library  would  convince  the 
most  skeptical  that  the  experiment  has 
proved  a  sucess,  and  that  Mr  Preston's* 
theory  is  a  practical  one.  After  school  the 
branch  is  filled  with  eager,  enthusiastic 
c-hildren,  each  taking  his  or  her  quota 
of  books.  Since  the  advent  of  the  'li- 
brary teacher,"  many  have  persuaded 
their  parents  to  "join"  or  they  them- 
selves carry  foreign  language  books  home 
to  mothers  and  fathers  who  read  only 
their  native  tongue. 

During  National  Book  Week,  both  the 
branch  and  the  school  celebrated  with 
special  exhibits.  At  the  branch  was  an 
exhibit  of  early  printed  and  crude  chil- 
dren's books,  about  which  the  boys  and 
girls  had  much  to  say.  A  loan  of  ex- 
quisitely carved  wooden  figures  from 
"Alice  Through  the  Looking-glass,"  drew 
many  visitors.  There  were  new  books 
and  old  books  with  new  illustrations  as 
well  as  colorful  book  jackets,  displayed 
in  every  available  inch  of  space,  but  the 
masterpiece  of  the  occasion  was  a  tall 
rectangular  box  covered  with  book  jackets 
near  the  circulation  desk.  In  the  slit  at 
the  top  were  dropped  votes  for  "my 
favorite  book."  A  record  clear  of  fines 
and  missing  books  was  the  single  quali- 
fication for   voting  and  the  prize  offered 


*  Since  this  was  written,  Mr  Preston  has 
passed  away.  The  Berkeley  Public  Li- 
brary has  sent  notice  of  his  death  on 
January  28,  1930. 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued 
Berkeley — Continued 

by  the  branch  was  the  purchase  of  the 
five  titles  receiving  the  greatest  number 
of  votes  for  the  library  collection. 

The  gum  and  ice-cream  cone  market 
suffered  a  slump  in  business  before  and 
during  the  week.  Every  child  wanted  to 
vote.  It  was  comical  to  see  how  seriously 
they  entered  into  the  affair.  The  ballot 
was  folded  very  carefully  to  hide  the 
name  from  inquisitive  eyes.  Those  who 
had  no  ready  choice  sat  on  the  floor  and 
turned  the  box  round  and  round  until 
the  great  decision  was  made.  After  the 
ballot  was  deposited  they  returned  again 
and  again  to  peer  through  the  slit.  After 
dropping  his  vote,  one  little  boy  re- 
marked, "I  am  just  going  to  use  my  legs 
so  as  to  get  those  new  books  first !"  The 
ballots  were  counted  each  night  and  the 
highest  title  posted,  "Chi-wee,"  and 
■'Huck  Finn"  ran  neck  and  neck  until 
the  last  day,  when  the  former  forged 
ahead.  In  such  a  neighborhood  the  result 
was  remarkable.  Two  hundred  eighty-seven 
legitimate  votes  were  cast  and  the  five 
books  selected  were  "Chi-wee,"  "Huck 
Finn,"  "Tom  Sawyer,"  "Little  Women," 
and  ""Heidi."  Thus  Berkeley  is  on  the 
way  towards  solving  one  of  its  social 
problems. 

Susan  T.  Smith,  Lib'n. 

SiUxivEBSiTY  OF  Califoknia  Li- 
BKAJRY.  W.  W.  Campbell,  Pres.  J.  C. 
Rowell,  Lib'n  Emeritus ;  Harold  L. 
Leupp,  Lib'n. 

The  library  of  Dr.  Paul  MHiukov,  for- 
merly professor  of  history  and  law  at  the 
University  of  Moscow,  and  later  minister 
of  foreign  affairs  for  the  provisional 
government  of  Russia,  will  be  purchased 
by  the  University  of  California  at  a  cost 
of  $10,000,  President  W.  W.  Campbell 
announced  December  7.  The  library  was 
taken  secretly  from  Russia  before  the 
Bolshevik  government  prohibited  the  ex- 
port of  such  articles,  was  shipped  to 
America  and  has  been  in  •  this  country 
since  that  time.  The  library  consists 
of  three  to  four  thousand  books,  periodi- 
cals, pamphlets  and  manuscripts.  It  is 
said  by  Dr.  R.  J.  Kerner,  professor  of 
modern  European  history  at  the  Univer- 
sity of  California,  to  be  one  of  the  best 


28 


NEWS   NOTES   OP   CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued 

Berkeley — Continued 

private  collections  of  Russian  history  and 
civilization  outside  of  Slavic  Europe. 
Since  the  embargo  by  the  Soviet  govern- 
ment on  the  export  of  books  published 
before  the  Revolution,  many  of  the  books 
and  pamphlets,  as  well  as  the  periodicals, 
are  virtually  unobtainable. — Oakland 
Tribune,  D  8 

Oakland 

JOaexand  Free  [Public]  Libbaby. 
John  B.  Kaiser,  Lib'n ;  Chas.  S.  Greene, 
Lib'n  Emeritus. 

The  Library  Board's  major  work  of 
the  calendar  year,  1929,  was  the  develop- 
ment of  a  splendid  branch  housing  pro- 
gram which  contemplates  attractive,  city- 
owned  buildings  for  all  branches  now 
in  rented  quarters,  several  additional 
branches  where  badly  needed,  and  a  fine 
Administration  and  District  Branch  in 
the  Grand-Lake  neighborhood.  Archi- 
tect's tentative  plans  for  the  latter  have 
already  been  approved  after  much  study 
by  the  Board,  building  committee  and 
staff. 

The  new  Lakeview  Branch,  located  in 
a  portable  on  the  Lakeview  School 
grounds,  451  Santa  Clara  Avenue,  is  to 
open  January  2,  1930.  Miss  McQuaid, 
formerly  Branch  Librarian  at  Allendale, 
will  be  in  charge,  with  Miss  Frances 
Smith  of  the  Branch  Department  staff 
to  assist  her.  For  the  present  the  hours 
of  opening  are  to  be  from  2  to  9  p.m. 

A  new  branch  will  be  opened  at  3424 
Grove  Street  as  near  February  1  as 
possible,  and  the  Montclair  Branch  wUl 
be  opened  as  soon  as  the  building  Mr 
Gibson  is  having  built  for  it  is  completed. 

The  Civil  Service  Board  has  ruled 
that  appointees  to  all  city  positions,  in- 
cluding temporary  and  part-time  work, 
must  pass  a  physical  and  medical  examin- 
ation and  appointees  to  temporary  posi- 
tions may  not  be  over  the  age  limit  set 
for  permanent  appointees  to  the  same 
positions.  Physical  examinations  for  li- 
brary pages  and  messengers  are  conducted 
without  charge  by  the  city  physician. 

Two  resolutions  of  special  interest  to 
the  staff  have  been  passed  by  the  Library 
Board,  namely : 

Resolution  No.  4552— "Resolved,   that 


ALAMEDA  CO. — Continued 

Oakland — Continued 

the  staff  be  informed  by  the  Administra- 
tion Committee  through  the  Staff  Bulle- 
tin of  the  realization  on  the  part  of  the 
Board  and  Librarian  of  the  inadequate 
accommodations  and  crowded  working 
conditions  in  the  main  building  which  the 
Board  and  Librarian  are  trying  to  remedy 
as  far  as  seems  practical  in  this  building 
and  which  will  be  fully  remedied  in  the 
plans  for  the  new  administration  and 
district  branch." 

Resolution  No.  4544 — '"Resolved,  that 
whereas  the  by-laws  of  the  Oakland  Free 
Library  adopted  by  the  Board  of  Library 
Directors,  October  13,  1913,  provide  in 
Rule  4,  Page  6,  that  the  salary  scale 
shall  be  enacted  from  time  to  time  by 
the  Board  of  Library  Directors,  and 

'"Whereas,  the  Board,  on  December  T, 

1925,  fixed  the  schedule  of  compensation 
for    its    employees    effective    January    1, 

1926,  by  Resolution  No.  3642  and  estab- 
lished a  graded,  sliding-scale,  minimum- 
maximum  salary  schedule  based  on  one, 
two,  three  and  five  years  of  experience ; 

"Hereafter  in  determining,  within  the 
established  salary  scale,  the  initial  salary 
for  new  appointees,  credit  may  be  given 
for  equivalent  successful  experience  in 
other  libraries  of  recognized  standing, 
and  for  the  successful  completion  of  pro- 
fessional library  school  and  training  class 
courses,  as  the  Board  of  Library  Direc- 
tors may  determine  on  recommendation 
of  the  Librarian,  and  in  voting  salary 
increases  to  all  staff  members  credit  in 
the  form  of  double  or  otherwise  acceler- 
ated increases  may  be  given  for  service 
of  exceptional  merit,  for  University 
courses.  University  Extension  courses, 
and  for  Library  Training  courses,  and 
Library  School  c-ourses  successfully  com- 
pleted, as  the  Board  of  Library  Direc- 
tors may  determine,  on  recommendation 
of  the  Librarian." 

Miss  Hartley  has  been  given  a  tem- 
porary appointment,  pending  Civil  Service 
examination,  as  Branch  Librarian  at 
Alden,  succeeding  Miss  Curtis,  who  re- 
signed December  1,  to  become  Librarian 
of  the  Alameda  Public  Library  on  Jan- 
uary 1,  1930.  Miss  Bluman  has  also 
been  given  a  temporary  appointment  as 
assistant  in  the  Branch  Department. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


29 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continued 
Oakland — Continued 

New  lights  have  improved  matters  con- 
siderably at  the  23d  Avenue  Branch, 
Piedmont  Branch,  Main  Reference  and 
Circulation  Departments  and  the  Boys' 
and  Girls'  Room.  Running  the  partition 
of  the  Trustees  Room  to  the  ceiling  has 
helped  to  deaden  the  noise  of  typewriters 
in  that  room  and  to  eliminate  drafts  in 
the  upper  hall. 

Compliments  have  been  received  on  our 
Summer  Vacation  Reading  Program  with 
the  schools ;  the  service  to  the  Boy  Scout 
Summer  Camp ;  Miss  Thomas'  work  as 
chairman  of  the  Exhibits  Committee  dur- 
ing the  Convention  of  the  League  of 
California  Municipalities ;  our  Quarterly 
Bulletin  of  Publications  relating  to  Munic- 
ipal Government  and  Administration ; 
our  plan  of  "contacting"  and  "auditing" 
all  University  Extension  courses  in  Oak- 
land. 

An  exhibit  of  books  by  and  about  the 
Negro  is  attracting  considerable  atten- 
tion at  the  West  Oakland  Branch.  Thirty- 
six  books  in  the  Croatian  language  have 
been  received  at  the  Branch  Department ; 
they  will  be  sent  to  West  Oakland  as 
soon  as  they  have  been  cataloged  and 
bound.  It  is  interesting  to  note  that 
these  books  may  be  obtained  in  San  Fran- 
cisco, which  would  indicate  a  demand  for 
literature  in  this  language  about  the  Bay. 

At  the  request  of  the  School  Depart- 
ment, Book  Week  was  observed  this  year 
with  American  Education  Week.  A  per- 
manent committee  entitled  "The  Better 
Books  Committee"  was  formed,  composed 
of  representatives  from  twelve  organiza- 
tions interested  in  child  welfare.  Con- 
tacts were  made  with  public  and  paro- 
chial schools,  P.-T.  A.  groups,  churches, 
and  men's  and  women's  clubs,  as  well 
as  Boy  Scouts,  Camp  Fire  Girls,  etc. 

Many  talks  were  given  and  programs 
held  in  branch  libraries,  clubs,  etc.  The 
high  light  of  the  week  was  the  lecture 
given  by  Professor  Craig,  of  Stanford 
University,  in  Hunter  Hall.  Though 
there  was  not  as  much  publicity  given 
the  work  of  the  committee  through  the 
newspapers  as  we  had  hoped,  the  com- 
mittee feels  that  many  more  people  than 
usual  were  reached  with  a  message  about 
children's    books.      And    one   of    the   best 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continued 

Oakland — Continued 

by-products  was  the  cooperation  between 
the  leaders  of  so  many  organizations 
which  are  interested  in  one  way  or  an- 
other in  children. 

The  new  Staff  Executive  Committee, 
elected  to  serve  as  officers  of  the  Staff 
Association  for  the  year  1930,  is  as  fol- 
lows :  Chairman,  Irene  M.  Farrell.  De- 
partment Representatives :  Chief  of  De- 
partment, Elsie  Schaufler ;  First  Assist- 
ant, Adah  Chidlaw ;  Branch  Librarian, 
Mary  McQuaid ;  Library  Assistant,  Thel- 
ma  Reid ;  Library  Substitute,  Amalia 
Silver ;    Bookmendei-,   Minnie   Spilman. 

The  Staff  Bulletin  Committee  for  1930, 
as  appointed  by  the  Librarian,  is  as  fol- 
lows :  Chairman,  Leona  Alexander ;  As- 
sistants, Olive  Hartley  and  Elvezia  Lor- 
enzini. 

"From  the  Sierra  to  the  Sea"  is  the 
published  title  of  the  poems  of  Chas.  S. 
Greene,  Librarian  Emeritus ;  copies  of 
which  have  been  presented  to  the  main 
library  and  branches  by  Mr  Greene.  The 
book  bears  the  imprint  of  The  Sather 
Gate  Book  Shop  and  may  be  purchased 
from  it. 

John  B.  Kaiser,  Lib'n. 

Oakland  Dikectoey  Libbaky.  L.  B. 
Gripp,  Lib'n. 

This  library  has  been  moved  to  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce  in  Oakland.  We 
have  also  included  additional  copies  of 
various  directories  throughout  the  Uni- 
ted States  in  the  Oakland  Library,  mak- 
ing same  a  Directory  Library  of  "A" 
class. 

R.  L.  Polk  &  Company. 

Public  Health  Libeaey.  Marion  H. 
Clark,  Lib'n. 

The  Public  Health  Library  makes 
available  to  the  general  public,  as  well 
as  to  the  social  agencies  and  schools  of 
Oakland,  a  collection  of  books,  magazines 
and  visual  material  on  personal  and  com- 
munity health  and  welfare. 

Miss  Marion  Clark,  librarian,  was 
asked  to  become  a  member  of  the  Com- 
mittee on  Cooperation  between  Public 
Schools  and  Public  Libraries  of  Oakland. 
The  Public  Health  Library  has  loaned 
a  great  deal  of  supplementary  material 
in  health  education  to  teachers. 


30 


NEWS  NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


ALAMEDA   CO. — Continued 

Oak  I  a  n  d — Continued 

Miss  Pauline  Dikeman,  formerly  of  the 
Los  Angeles  Public  Library,  has  been 
added  to  the  staff  as  assistant. 

Marion  H.  Clark,  Lib'n. 

Piedmont 

Piedmont  High  School  Library. 
Harry  W.  Jones,  Prin.  Gladys  English, 
Lib'n. 

A  successful  Book  Week  Exhibit  was 
held,  attended  by  all  junior  high  school 
students  by  classes  Avith  teachers.  Mrs 
Esther  Birdsall  Darling  talked  to  students 
in  the  general  assembly  about  her  ex- 
periences with  dogs  in  Alaska.  The  li- 
brarian talked  to  junior  high  students  in 
their  assembly  on  the  use  of  the  library 
and  the  new  junior  high  reading  list, 
which  was  distributed.  Short  printed 
lists  were  also  given  to  the  students  in 
the  grammar  and  elementary  grades. 

The  book  fund  for  1929-30  is  $2,000 
instead  of  the  usual  $1,000.  A  new  En- 
cyclopaedia Britannica  was  purchased. 

Books  were  taken  out  at  the  end  of 
the  first  semester  for  the  Christmas  holi- 
days. Over  500  books  were  circulated, 
showing  that  the  students  appreciated  the 
privilege. 

Gladys  English,  Lib'n. 

San    Leandro 

San  Leandro  Free  Public  Library 
AND  Branch,  Alameda  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Mary  Brown,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Crystal  Weir  has  been  appointed 
as  an  assistant  to  take  the  place  of  Miss 
Leone  Black,  who  moved  to  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

The  library  trustees  are  contemplating 
making  a  number  of  necessary  improve- 
ments on  the  building — putting  in  new 
stone  steps,  reconditioning  woodwork, 
painting,  etc. 

Our  periodical  burglar  paid  us  another 
visit  recently.  Finding  it  difficult  to 
enter  the  building  he  demolished  win- 
dows and  Avoodwork  but  found  no  money 
for  his  pains. 

Mary  Brown,  Lib'n. 

ALPINE   COUNTY 

(Fifty-eighth   class) 
County  seat,  Markleeville. 
Area,  57.5  sq.  mi.    Pop.  243. 


ALPINE    CO.— Continued 

Assessed    valuation    $898,009    (taxable 
for  county  $721,173). 


AMADOR  COUNTY 

(Forty-fifth  class) 
County  seat,  Jackson. 
Area,  568  sq.  mi.    Pop.   7793. 
Assessed  valuation  $8,308,111   (taxable 
for  county  .$7,222,503). 

Amador  Co.  Free  Library,  Jackson. 
Mrs  Henrietta  G.  Eudey,  Lib'n. 

Amador  County  Free  Library  counts 
the  first  meeting  of  the  branch  custodians 
its  outstanding  event  for  the  quarter. 
This  meeting  Avas  held  November  4, 
Supervisors'  Day,  arrangements  having 
been  made  with  the  Supervisors  to  take 
the  custodians  to  Jackson. 

The  morning  session  Avas  held  at  the 
main  library  and  was  spent  introducing 
the  custodians  to  each  other  and  to  the 
work  done  at  headquarters.  Custo- 
dians Avere  asked  to  choose  collections 
for  their  branches  and  the  process  of 
charging,  shelving,  and  cataloging  ex- 
plained. 

Luncheon  was  served  in  the  private 
dining  room  of  the  National  Hotel,  the 
County  Supervisors  being  the  special 
guests.  Informal  talks  Avere  given,  and 
songs  by  the  assistant  librarian,  Mrs 
Leah   Peters. 

The  afternoon  session  Avas  held  in  the 
Jackson  Woman's  Club  rooms,  in  Avhich 
Ave  had  an  attractive  display  of  chil- 
dren's books  and  posters.  Librarian 
Eudey  talked  about  Book  Week,  promis- 
ing a  distribution  of  the  books  and  posters 
to  the  branches  and  asking  their  coopera- 
tion in  displays  and  talks  to  the  children. 
The  California  library  laAvs  AA'ere  explained 
and  a  brief  sketch  of  the  Avork  of  the 
State  Library  given. 

Mrs  Sabra  Greenhalgh,  County  School 
Superintendent,  and  Mrs  Eva  Camp, 
School  Supervisor,  gave  interesting  talks 
on  the  Avork  done  by  the  library  in  the 
schools. 

Book  Week  Avas  marked  by  a  special 
display  of  books  at  the  main  library, 
tAVO  AvindoAV  displays  at  the  largest 
branches,  talks  at  a  number  of  schools 
and  a  Book  Week  play  put  on  by  a  dis- 
trict school  at  a  County  Teachers'  meet- 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


31 


AMADOR    CO.— Continued 
iiig.     Fine  copies  of  every  book  character- 
ized were  displayed. 

Henrietta  G.  Eudey,  Lib'n. 

Waterman 

Preston  School  of  Industry  Li- 
brary. O.  H.  Close,  Supt.  Mrs  Maude 
Parker,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Maude  Parker,  librarian,  has 
taken  over  this  library  and  plans  to  de- 
velop and  direct  the  boys'  reading  tastes. 
The  library  is  open  from  7.30  a.m.  to 
4.30  p.m.  It  has  recently  moved  from 
the  administration  building  to  modern, 
well-equipped  quarters  in  the  new  school 
building,  soon  to  be  dedicated  as  "Camin- 
etti  Hall." 

The  total  number  of  volumes  is  now 
6380,  and  271  magazines  are  received 
regularly.  225  books  were  added  during 
the  past  quarter. 

Mrs  Maude  Parker,  Lib'n. 

BUTTE  COUNTY 

(Twenty-second  class) 
County  seat,  Oroville. 
Area,   1764  sq.  mi.     Pop.   30,030. 
Assessed    valuation    $46,634,956    (tax- 
able for  county  $37,232,123). 

Butte  Co.  Free  Library,  Oroville. 
Miss  Ida  M.  Reagan,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Leah  Johnson  resigned  as  First 
Assistant  in  September,  and  Miss  Jean 
McCallum,  A.  B.,  University  of  Califor- 
nia, 1929,  was  appointed  to  fill  the 
vacancy.  Miss  McCallum  began  work 
October  9,   1929. 

The  Biggs  Grammar  School  was  burned 
in  December.  The  County  Library  lost 
several  hundred  books  in  the  fire. 

Ida  M.  Reagan,  Lib'n. 

Chico 

State  Teachers  College  Library. 
C.  M.  Osenbaugh,  Pres.  Alice  Anderson, 
Lib'n. 

Chico  State  Teachers  College  Library 
opened  its  new  reference  and  reading 
room  in  temporary  quarters  in  the  new 
administration  building,  November  12, 
1929.  The  Professional  Collection,  Chil- 
dren's Library,  Textbook  Station  and 
Work  Room  will  remain  in  the  Training 
School  building  until  a  new  library  build- 
ing is  provided. 

Alice  Anderson,  Lib'n. 


CALAVERAS  COUNTY 

(Forty-ninth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Andreas. 
Area,  990  sq.   mi.     Pop.  6183. 
Assessed  valuation  $9,186,532   (taxable 
for  county  $7,413,740). 

COLUSA  COUNTY 

(Forty-second  class) 
County  seat,  Colusa. 
Area,  1080  sq.  mi.     Pop.  9290. 
Assessed    valuation    $27,750,849     (tax- 
able for  county  $22,758,310). 

Colusa  Co.  Free  Library,  Colusa. 
Mrs  Ella  Packer  Morse,  Lib'n. 

The  County  Supervisors  reappointed 
Mrs  Ella  Packer  Morse  for  another  four- 
year  term  as  county  librarian,  October 
23,  1929.— Colusa  Herald,  O  24 

CONTRA  COSTA  COUNTY 

(Thirteenth  class) 
County  seat,  Martinez. 
Area,  750  sq.  mi.    Pop.  53,889. 
Assessed  valuation   $108,521,900    (tax- 
able for  county  $95,528,755). 

Richmond 

Richmond  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Norah  McNeill,  Lib'n  (on  leave  of 
absence).  Miss  Josephine  L.  Whitbeck, 
Acting  Lib'n. 

Miss  Norah  McNeill,  city  librarian,  had 
a  novel  Christmas  this  year,  spending  it 
in  the  sunny  climes  of  southern  Italy. 
She  is  spending  most  of  the  month  of 
December  in  Naples  and  other  cities  of 
southern  Italy. — Richmond  Independent, 
D  26 


DEL   NORTE  COUNTY 

(Fifty-fourth  class) 
County  seat.  Crescent  City. 
Area,  1546  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2759. 
Assessed    valuation    $11,448,753     (tax- 
able for  county  $11,302,282). 

EL   DORADO   COUNTY 

( Forty-eighth   class ) 
County  seat,  Placerville. 
Area,  1891  sq.  mi.     Pop.  6426. 
Assessed    valuation    $13,497,030    (tax- 
able for  county  $10,917,672). 


32 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


FRESNO  COUNTY 

(Fourth   class) 
County  seat,  Fresno. 
Area,  5696  sq.  mi.     Fop.  128,779. 
Assessed  valuation  $207,641,992    (tax- 
able for  county  $158,822,540). 

tFEESNO  Co.  Free  Library,  Fresno. 
Miss  Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Lib'n. 

Selma  Branch  has  organized  a  Gold 
Star  Club.  A  special  privilege  is  given 
to  the  twenty  gold  star  winners  of  the 
Summer  Vacation  Reading  Club.  The 
club,  under  the  supervision  of  Mrs  Hodge 
met  and  elected  their  own  officers  and 
called  themselves  the  Gold  Star  Club  of 
the  Selma  Library,  so  that  they  might 
carry  on  their  work  in  the  library.  They 
are  learning  to  use  the  card  catalog  and 
other  indexes  by  questions  prepared  for 
them  in  the  way  of  puzzles,  besides  learn- 
ing to  read  shelves  and  shelving  books. 
They  are  now  assisting  other  children  in 
working  the  puzzles  so  they  may  become 
members  of  the  "Winter  Honor  Roll"  as 
gold  stars  are  given  when  the  required 
number  of  puzzles  is  complete.  At  the 
close  of  Book  Week  the  club  held  a 
character  costume  party  in  the  home  arts 
room  of  the  high  school.  A  gold  star  was 
offered  to  the  member  and  guest  who  suc- 
ceeded in  guessing  the  most  characters 
correctly.  Eighteen  new  members  were 
initiated  into  the  club  as  they  had  won 
their  gold  stars  to  become  members  of 
the  "Winter  Honor  Roll"  since  school 
opened. 

Book  Week  was  observed  in  other 
branches  in  various  ways,  with  displays 
of  books,  story  hours,  and  in  one  of  our 
town  branches  a  little  play  was  given, 
"Friends  in  Bookland."  This  was  quite 
a  success  and  was  well  attended. 

The  17th  annual  custodians'  meeting 
was  held  on  November  5,  with  twenty- 
eight  custodians  in  attendance.  The  morn- 
ing meeting,  as  usual,  was  given  over  to 
the  custodians,  with  outside  speakers  for 
the  afternoon.  One  of  these  was  Miss 
Feurt  of  the  State  Teachers  College,  who 
spoke  on  "Personality  in  Business,"  a 
talk  which  gave  us  all  something  to  think 
about. 

We  have  started  our  monthly  book 
review  hours  again,  having  discontinued 
them  during  the  hot  months.  We  meet 
at  eight  o'clock  on  the  first  Saturday  of 


FRESNO  CO.— Continued 

the  month  and  reviews  of  recent  books 
along  all  lines  are  given  by  staff  mem- 
bers. After  the  formal  review  there  is 
a  general  discussion  of  the  book  by  those 
who  have  read  it,  and  we  all  profit. 

In  October,  we  opened  a  branch  in  the 
prison  road  camp  which  is  situated  in 
the  mountains  near  General  Grant  Park, 
known  as  Road  Camp  Branch.  There 
are  one  hundred  and  fifty  prisoners  and 
thirty  free  men  in  the  camp.  We  have 
sent  several  large  shipments  of  books 
and  the  men  appreciate  the  service  very 
much. 

Sarah  E.  MoCardle,  Lib'n. 

Fresno 

Edison  Technical  High  School  Li- 
brary.   W.  P.  Potts,  Prin. 

Edison  Technical  High  School  has  had 
a  library  for  several  years.  It  now  has 
about  2000  volumes  and  subscribes  to 
20  periodicals.  It  is  open  on  school  days 
from  9.45  a.m.  to  4.15  p.m.  Miss  Tomp- 
kins, teacher-librarian,  is  in  charge. 

Fresno  High  School  Libbaby. 
Howard  R.  Gaines,  Prin.  Mrs  Dorotha 
Elliott,   Lib'n. 

The  total  volumes  now  number  about 
5500,   270   having   been   added   this   fall. 

Since  the  Technical  High  School 
Library  has  no  librarian  this  year,  Mrs 
Elliott  cataloged  the  new  books  for  it 
during  the  fall.  She  did  it  by  closing 
her  library  one  day  a  week  and  Avorking 
in  the  Technical  Library. 

Roosevelt  High  School  Library. 
William  Otto,  Prin. 

This  high  school  and  library  were 
established  in  1928.  The  library  now 
contains  2500  volumes,  and  takes  20  peri- 
odicals regularly.  It  is  open  on  school 
days  from  8  a.m.  to  4  p.m. 

Technical  High  School  Library. 
F.  H.  Sutton,  Prin.  Winifred  B.  Lin- 
derman,  Lib'n. 

Technical  High  School  Library  has  no 
librarian  this  year,  as  Miss  Linderman 
has  taken  a  year's  leave  of  absence, 
which  she  is  spending  in  New  York. 
Miss  Kusch,  art  teacher,  has  charge  of 
the  library.  About  100  volumes  were 
added  during   the  fall. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


33 


GLENN   COUNTY 

(Thirty-eighth  class) 
County  seat,  Willows. 
Area,  1460  sq.  mi.     Pop.  11,853. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,1.52,461    (tax- 
able for   county   $23,791,001). 

HUMBOLDT   COUNTY 

(Twentieth  class) 
County  seat,  Eureka. 
Area,  3507  sq.  mi.     Pop.  37,413. 
Assessed    valuation    $61,613,206    (tax- 
able  for   county    $56,540,672). 

Humboldt  Co.  Fkee  Libr-^ry,  Eueeka. 
Miss  Edna  D.  Davis,  Lib'n. 

South  Fork  Union  High  School  Branch 
was  established  October  7,  1929. 

Edna  D.  Davis,  Lib'n. 

IMPERIAL   COUNTY 

(Seventeenth  dass) 
County  seat,  El  Centro. 
Area,  4116  sq.  mi.     Pop.  43,383. 
Assessed    valuation    $55,723,639     (tax- 
able for  county  $45,798,417). 

Imperial  Co.  Free  Library,  El  Cen- 
tro.    Miss  Dorothy  Deming,  Lib'n. 

We  were  honored  by  a  visit  from  Mrs 
May  Dexter  Henshall,  State  Library 
Organizer,  October  8  to  10.  During  her 
visit  we  made  several  trips  about  the 
county  to  some  of  the  more  interesting 
branches,  and  included  a  sight  of  the 
wonderful  Imperial  Valley  sand  dunes, 
the  Colorado  River,  and  the  Mexican 
borderland. 

Miss  Pauline  Vaughn  of  Fresno  came 
to  us  December  1,  to  fill  the  position  of 
second  assistant,  in  charge  of  the  school 
department.  Miss  Vaughn  was  formerly 
with  the  Fresno  County  Free  Library. 

Our  Christmas  book  exhibit  this  year 
was  most  attractive  as  we  had  a  Christ- 
mas tree  and  a  great  many  lovely  new 
juveniles  to  offer  as  suggestive  gifts  to 
parents  and  teachers.  A  Santa  Clans 
with  a  sack  of  candy  on  his  back  added 
to  the  popularity  of  the  tree. 

Miss  Deming  visited  the  State  Library 
during  Christmas  week  and  returned 
filled  with  new  inspirations  for  our  work 
in  the  coming  year. 

Dorothy  Deming,  Lib'u. 

?. — 73  829 


IMPERIAL   CO.— Continued 
El   Centro 

El  Centro  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Agnes  F.  Ferris,  Lib'n. 

During  the  quarter  the  salary  of  Miss 
Ferris  was  increased  .$15  per  month,  and 
that  of  her  assistant  who  has  been  long- 
est in  the  library  $10  per  month. 

INYO    COUNTY 

(Forty-seventh   class) 
County  seat.   Independence. 
Area,  10,224  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7031. 
Assessed    valuation    $19,477,744    (tax- 
able for  county  $11,881,-591). 

KERN  COUNTY 

(Twelfth  class) 
County  seat,  Bakersfield. 
Area.  81-59  sq.  mi.     Pop.  54,843. 
Assessed  valuation   .$213,502,719    (tax- 
able for  county  $175,239,610). 

KINGS  COUNTY 

(Twenty-ninth  dass) 
County  seat,  Hanford. 
Area,  1373  sq.  mi.     Pop.  22,031. 
Assessed    valuation    $33,724,352    (tax- 
able for  county  .$28,308,420). 

Kings  Co.  Free  Library,  Hanford 
Miss  Marion  L.  Gregory,  Lib'n. 

During  Book  Week,  special  collections 
of  fine  juvenile  books  were  displayed  at 
each  of  the  six  larger  branches,  and  as 
a  special  feature  for  1929,  a  story  hour 
was  given  at  each  of  these  during  the 
week.  Miss  Helen  Arnold,  first  assistant, 
and  Miss  Gladys  Bowles  of  the  school 
department  had  charge  of  this  part  of 
the  Book  Week  program,  and  the  interest 
created  by  the  story  hours  seemed  well 
worth  the  additional  effort  entailed.  The 
custodians  at  the  branch  libraries  co- 
operate splendidly  with  our  Book  Week 
plans,  and  this  makes  the  work  much 
more  interesting,  and  also  much  more 
effective. 

On  INTovember  4,  Miss  Irene  Wickham 
was  appointed  custodian  of  Guernsey 
Branch  in  the  place  of  Mrs  L.  Thayer, 
who  had  resigned. 

On  December  16,  a  branch  at  Avenal 
was  ordered  established  by  the  Board  of 
Supervisors,  the  custodian  appoiiited  was 


34 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


KINGS  CO.— Continued 

George    Moore,    and    the    library    branch 
is  to  be  in  his  store  in  Avenal. 

At  the  same  meeting,  Miss  Marion  L. 
Gregory's  i-esignation  as  county  librarian 
was  accepted,  effective  February  1,  1930, 
and  Mrs  Harriet  S.  Davids,  at  present 
first  assistant  in  the  Monterey  County 
Free  Library,  was  appointed  to  succeed 
her. 

Makion  L.  Gregory,  Lib'n. 

Hanford 

Hanfokd  Free  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  Kings  Co.  Free  Library. 
Miss  Marion  L.  Gregory,  Lib'n. 

During  the  fall,  alterations  were  made 
in  the  ofiice,  including  the  installation  of 
a  sink,  gas  plate,  and  new  shelving,  and 
these  will  markedly  increase  the  efficiency 
of  the  equipment  of  the  library. 

On  November  18,  Miss  Edith  Lester 
took  up  her  work  as  junior  assistant  in 
the  library. 

For  Book  Week,  a  very  attractive  col- 
lection of  new  juvenile  books  was  ex- 
hibited, and  with  these  were  used  a  num- 
ber of  most  attractive  and  artistic  posters, 
the  work  of  the  art  classes  of  the  Han- 
ford Union  High  School.  There  was 
also  a  little  display  of  puppet  and 
marionette  figures  in  different  stages  of 
construction,  with  the  books  on  pup- 
petry which  the  library  had  in  its  col- 
lection. 

On  Saturday  afternoon,  November  21, 
as  the  special  Book  Week  program,  a 
piippet  show  was  given  by  Miss  Lois 
Hanscom  in  the  main  reading  room  of 
the  library,  with  about  60  in  attendance 
for  each  of  the  two  performances.  Miss 
Hanscom,  a  member  of  the  High  School 
faculty,  gave  two  original  puppet  plays 
to  the  great  delight  of  both  children  and 
older  people  who  attended.  The  interest 
and  attention  given  this  project  were 
most  gratifying  to  the  library  staff. 

On  December  12,  the  Board  of  Trustees 
accepted  Miss  Gregory's  resignation  from 
the  position  of  librarian,  effective  Feb- 
ruary 1,  1930,  and  appointed  Mrs  Temple 
S.  Robinson,  assistant  librarian,  as  her 
successor. 

Marion  L.  Gregory,  Lib'n. 


LAKE  COUNTY 

(Fifty-first  class) 
County  seat,  Lakeport. 
Area,  1332  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5402. 
Assessed    valuation    $10,329,420    (tax- 
able for  county  $10,229,625). 

LASSEN  COUNTY 

(Forty -fourth  class) 
County    seat,    Susanville. 
Area,  4750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  8507. 
Assessed    valuation    $18,987,857    (tax- 
able for  county  $14,356,692). 

Lassen  Co.  Free  Library,  Susan- 
ville.    Miss  Lenala  A.  Martin,  Lib'n. 

The  librarian  gave  a  talk  to  the  Las- 
sen County  section  of  the  Teachers'  Insti- 
tute held  at  Sacramento  in  October.  Her 
talk  was  of  the  service  to  schools  and 
what  the  teachers  would  find  available. 

The  Monticola  Club  has  taken  up  the 
study  of  foreign  countries,  its  first  one 
being  China.  The  librarian  leads  this 
study  club. 

Two  talks  were  given  by  the  librarian 
on  adult  new  books  at  Standish  and 
Johnstonville  Farm  Center  meetings. 

Talks  on  children's  books  for  Children's 
Book  Week  were  given  by  the  librarian 
at  the  Ravendale  Farm  Center  meeting, 
the  High  School  P.-T.  A.  meeting  and 
the  Milwood  P.-T.  A. 

Beginning  with  December  1,  the  county 
librarian  took  complete  charge  of  the 
Westwood  Library.  The  only  service 
now  given  to  the  people  of  Westwood 
is  through  the  branch  of  the  county 
library. 

Lenala  A.  Martin,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Martin  was  reappointed  for 
another  four-year  term  as  county  li- 
brarian, October  7,  1929. 

LOS  ANGELES  COUNTY 

(First  class) 
County  seat,  Los  Angeles. 
Area,  4100  sq.  mi.     Pop.  936,438. 
Assessed   valuation   $4,522,926,824 
(taxable  for  county  $4,202,950,310). 

Los  Angeles  Co.  Free  Library,  Los 
Angeles.   Miss  Helen  E.  Vogleson,  Lib'n. 

Beginning  with  Number  1,  Volume  IV, 
October,  1929,  of  "Books  and  Notes  of 
the  Los  Angeles  County  Free  Library," 
the  entry  for  each  book  listed  as  added 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


35 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

will  hereafter  include  the  name  of  the 
publisher.  This  is  done  in  response  to 
the  wish  made  by  several  librarians  who 
use  the  bulletin  as  a  check  list. 

Miss  Nolte,  Supervisor  of  Work  with 
Children,  talked  to  the  Rosemead  Wom- 
an's Club,  to  the  Cosmos  Club  of  San 
Fernando,  and  to  three  P.-T.  A.  groups, 
during-  the  quarter.  The  children's  de- 
partment has  undertaken  an  enlarged, 
supervised  service  to  the  children  held 
on  probation  at  Juvenile  Hall  and  is 
sending  an  assistant  trained  in  children's 
work  to  carry  on  book  talks  once  a  week. 
The  assistant  visits  the  children  in  the 
nursery  and  the  hospital  as  well  as  in 
the  schoolroom. 

On  December  4,  Miss  Vogleson  talked 
to  the  Lynwood  Woman's  Club  on  the 
"Use  of  Books." 

The  branch  known  as  the  Sherman 
Library  on  Clark  Street  was  moved  into 
handsome  new  quarters  at  903  West- 
bourne  Drive,  West  Hollywood,  October 
1.  The  building,  erected  by  Leafa  M. 
Fife,  has  a  very  attractive  Spanish  style 
front  and  the  interior  is  commodious 
and  pleasing.  The  new  location  will  be 
more  convenient  to  many  residents  in 
the  texTitory  now  called  West  Hollywood, 
Supervisor  Graves  attended  the  opening 
reception  held  November  19. 

On  October  17,  the  old  Stephenson 
Branch  was  reestablished  in  a  new  loca- 
tion at  830  South  Gage  Street  in  what 
is  known  as  the  Laguna  business  district. 
A  dedication  program  and  public  recep- 
tion were  held  November  1.  The  build- 
ing was  erected  by  Mr  and  Mrs  Broguiere 
and  it  is  practically  arranged  and  very 
attractive. 

The  building  occupied  by  the  branch 
in  Culver  City  has  undergone  extensive 
repairs  and  redecoration.  The  floor  space 
has  been  enlarged  about  one-third  in  area 
and  the  book  capacity  doubled. 

To  the  welcoming  notes  of  the  Gardena 
Valley  Post,  American  Legion  fife  and 
drum  corps,  the  Strawberry  Park  Branch 
celebrated  its  moving  from  Amestoy 
School  to  an  attractive  new  library  home 
on  the  evening  of  October  29.  Although 
it  was  not  built  as  a  community  enter- 
prise but  by  Mrs  J.  H.  Stupy,  the  branch 
librarian,  the  dedication  of  the  new  build- 
ing was  participated  in  by  various  com- 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

munity  organizations,  the  Lions  Club, 
American  Legion,  P.-T.  A.  and  some  fifty 
interested  patrons. 

The  Altadena  Branch,  which  has  long 
been  located  in  a  school  bungalow,  was 
moved  November  1  to  a  fine  large  room 
in  the  midst  of  the  business  and  market 
district  at  2724  North  Lake  Avenue. 
Helen  B.  Vogleson,  Lib'n. 

Architects  Jeffery  and  Schaefer  have 
completed  preliminary  plans  for  the  new 
library  building  to  be  erected  at  Monte- 
bello.  The  structure  will  be  of  Tudor 
Gothic  design,  two  stories  in  height  and 
of  brick  construction.  Electors  of  the 
city  on  June  11,  1929,  voted  $30,000 
for  the  project. — Los  Angeles  Journal  of 
Commerce,  N  8 

Alhambra 

Alhambba  [Free]  Public  Library, 
Miss  Marian  P.  Greene,  Lib'n. 

During  Thanksgiving  week  the  library 
tried  the  experiment  of  charging  no 
fines  on  books  long  overdue.  A  box  with 
a  slit  in  the  top,  painted  and  decorated 
to  look  as  attractive  as  possible  was 
placed  in  the  lobby.  Those  who  felt  some 
delicacy  about  turning  in  books  at  the 
desk  could  drop  them  in  the  box  and 
"no  questions  asked." 

More  than  forty  books  were  returned, 
some  of  them  obviously  stolen.  Several 
have  since  appeared  on  the  library 
shelves  and  tables ;  some  of  these  were 
missing  in  various  inventories  of  past 
years.  The  most  surprising  thing  about 
"no  fine  week"  was  the  publicity  given  it 
both  by  local  and  outside  papers.  The 
Los  Angeles  Times  had  a  well-worded 
article  and  closed  with  the  hope  that  "a 
large  number  of  volumes  which  have  been 
A.  W.  O.  L.  for  some  time"  might  be 
returned, 

A  reporter  from  the  local  paper  dubbed 
our  receptacle  the  "Conscience  Box,"  and 
this  name  seemed  to  stick,  although  the 
librarian  had  chosen  "Thanksgiving  Box" 
as  ofi^icial  title. 

For  the  third  time  this  library  followed 
Children's  Book  Week  with  an  exhibit 
for  grown-ups,  featuring  the  best  books 
of  the  year,  both  fiction  and  nonfiction, 
as  well  as  the  newest  in  travel,  biography 
and  general  literature.  The  books  were 
loaned,   as  in   former  years,   through  the 


36 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 
A I  h  a  m  b  r a — C  ontinued 
courtesy  of  A.  C.  Vromau  in  Pasadena. 
They  were,  of  course,  displayed  chiefly 
as  incentive  to  Christmas  book  buying, 
but  reserves  were  taken  on  nonfiction, 
and  the  library  thus  had  an  indication 
of  public  interest.  Volumes  on  which 
reserves  were  made  were  purchased,  if 
not  already  in  the  library. 

Two  comfortable  chairs,  placed  near 
the  tables  on  which  the  books  were  dis- 
played, invited  those  who  possess  the 
browsing  instinct,  and  for  nearly  three 
weeks  these  were  constantly  occupied  by 
interested   readers. 

Two  books  disappeared  from  the  ex- 
hibit and  have  not  yet  been  returned. 
The  purloiner  is  waiting,  perhaps,  for 
the  1930  conscience  box  to  appear. 

Maeian  p.  Geeene.  Lib'n. 

Arcadia 

Arcadia  Feee  Public  Libraey.  Mrs 
F.  W.  Treen,  Lib'n. 

The  new  building  of  the  Arcadia  City 
Library  is  about  completed  and  we  hope 
to  move  in  during  the  month  of  February. 

Following  are  items  in  connection  with 
the  project: 
Bond  issue  __-$45,000.00 

Premium 1,500.00 

Lots 10,100.00 

Building 24,500.00 

Architect    1,500.00 

Furniture 3,553.10 

Furnishings  —  1,000.00 
Floor  coverings  2,255.00 
Landscaping  —     1,500.00  approximately. 

The  building  is  of  Spanish  architecture 
and  was  designed  by  Marston  &  Maybury 
of  Pasadena. 

C.    F.    Bass, 
Secretary  of  Library  Board. 

Beverly    Hills 

Beverly  Hills  Public  Libeaey.  Miss 
Mary  Boynton,  Lib'n. 

Quarters  for  the  new  municipal  li- 
brary were  leased  this  week  in  the  Ernest 
J.  Krause  building,  corner  Canon  drive 
and  Brighton  way.  Confirmation  of  the 
lease  was  made  December  10  by  the 
city  council  after  it  had  been  drawn  up 
and  approved  by  the  library  commission. 
Approximately  2600  square  feet  of  floor 
space  will  be  made  available  under  the 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 
Beverly  Hills — Continued 
terms  of  the  lease  and  will  include  the 
entire  front  portion  of  the  building.  The 
Krause  building,  erected  about  two  years 
ago,  is  Spanish  in  type  and  one  of  the 
attractive  business  blocks  in  Beverly 
Hills.  The  lease  on  the  building  will 
run  for  two  years  during  which  time  it 
will  be  possible  for  the  commission  to 
make  arrangements  for  permanent  quar- 
ters. 

The  library  plans  to  take  possession  of 
its  new  quarters  by  about  January  1. — 
Beverly  Hills  Citizen,  D  12 

Miss  Mary  Boynton,  for  the  last  sev- 
eral years  librarian  of  Santa  Paula  Pub- 
lic Librai-y,  has  been  appointed  librarian 
of  the  new  library  at  Beverly  Hills. 

Downey 

Downey  Union  High  School  Li- 
beaey.    Frank  F.  Otto,  Prin. 

In  September,  1929,  the  Downey  Union 
High  School  District  added  a  new  junior 
high  school  building  to  its  educational 
plant.  It  might  be  interesting  to  note 
that  the  library  tables  in  the  new  build- 
ing are  patterned  after  those  designed 
and  used  by  Miss  Helen  Price  at  Uni- 
versity High  School  in  Oakland  and  are 
proving  very  satisfactory.  The  book 
collections,  though  not  large,  are  grad- 
ually being  increased  to  meet  the  demands 
of  the  school. 

Miss  Margaret  W.  Thompson,  Uni- 
versity of  California  Library  School,  1928, 
is  the  librarian. 

Margaeet  ^y.  Thompson,  Lib'n. 

Lancaster 

Antelope  Valley  Union  High 
School  Library  and  Branch,  Los 
Angeles  Co.  Free  Library.  Mrs  Eliza- 
beth Utt  Lorbeer,  Lib'n. 

We  have  a  Junior  College,  started  in 
September. 

This    year    we    are    having    a    library 
training    course.      Work    is    progressing 
nicely. 
Mrs  Elizabeth  Utt  Lorbeer,  Lib'n. 

Long    Beach 

Long  Beach  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt,  Lib'n. 

Misses  Frances  Crosby  and  Hazel 
Zimmerman  of  the  Public  Library  staff 
are  home  offer  a  five  months'  European 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


37 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 
Long  Beach — Continued 
trip.     They  spent  much  time  in  the  Scan- 
dinavian countries  and  also  toured  Hol- 
land,   Belgium,    Fi'ance   and    Germany. — 
Long  Beach  Press-Telegram,  O  24 

Los  Angeles 

$Los  Angeles  [Fkee]  Public  Li- 
brary.    Everett  R.  Perry,  Lib'n. 

A  telegram  was  received  from  Carl  H. 
Milam,  November  26,  saying  that  Los 
Angeles  had  been  chosen  for  the  next  A. 
L.  A.  meeting.  The  dates  are  June  23 
to  June  28. 

Construction  of  additional  garages  in 
the  library  yard  gives  space  for  more  cars. 

The  student  governing  body  of  Los 
Angeles  High  School  appropriated  the 
sum  of  $2,500  for  a  memorial  window 
to  be  placed  in  the  new  Memorial  Branch 
Library,  opposite  Los  Angeles  High 
School,  in  memory  of  the  students  who 
gave  their  lives  in  the  World  War. 

The  Herter  murals  have  been  removed 
from  the  walls  of  the  Hope  street  en- 
trance to  the  Public  Library  for  fear  of 
injury  from  dampness  and  will  be  rehung 
on  the  walls  of  the  History  Department. 

The  Hanson-Bennett  Magazine  Agency 
was  the  successful  bidder  for  the  period- 
ical list  for  1930  at  $9,015. 

Although  Miss  Gertrude  D  a  r  1  o  w 
handed  in  her  resignation  in  December, 
having  served  the  library  continuously 
since  1893,  the  Board  of  Commissioners 
were  reluctant  to  accept  it  and  extended 
her  leave  of  absence  another  year. 

Because  University  Branch  Library 
stands  in  the  way  of  the  major  traffic 
plan  for  the  city  of  Los  Angeles,  plans 
are  being  considered  for  its  removal  to 
allow  for  the  widening  and  straightening 
of  Hoover  Street. 

Helen  T.  Kennedy, 
Second  Asst.  Lib'n. 

Belmont  High  School  Libeaey.  A. 
L.  Benshimol,  Prin.  Marjorie  Van  Deu- 
sen,    Lib'n. 

Last  summer  Miss  Margaret  Mac- 
gowan,  after  three  years  at  Belmont, 
became  assistant  librarian  at  the  Los 
Angeles  Junior  College.  Her  place  was 
taken  by  Miss  Irma  Brink  who  has  had 
a  varied  experience  in  the  New  York 
Public  Library,  the  University  of  Michi- 
gan, and  the  American  Library  in  Paris. 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Los    Angeles — Continued 

She    came    to    Belmont    from    the    Long 

Beach    Public    Library    where    she    was 

head  of  the  Cataloging  Department. 

Our  library  adapts  itself  pleasantly  to 
social  affairs  and  this  year,  in  addition 
to  the  faculty  reception  to  Seniors  and 
the  Senior  tea  for  their  parents,  the 
Commercial  Teachers  Association  gave 
a  reception  in  November  for  Mr  Gregg 
and  the  Classical  Teachers  Association 
were  invite(J  in  January  to  a  tea. 

During  Institute  in  December,  the 
California  School  Library  Association, 
Southern  Section,  again  met  in  our  li- 
brary. The  program  included  book  re- 
views by  Mrs  Henderson  and  an  account 
of  her  Geneva  experiences  by  Miss  Brit- 
ton. 

Several  hundi'ed  pictures  have  been 
mounted  and  added  to  the  picture  col- 
lection since  last  summer.  The  chief 
sources  are  the  International  Studio, 
L'lllustration,  and  the  Illustrated  Lon- 
don News. 

Among  the  interesting  exhibits  this 
fall  have  been  airplane  models  made  by 
Belmont  students,  a  German  Bible  dated 
1631  with  quaint  illustrations  of  the 
deluge  and  of  royal  and  noble  patrons, 
Roman  antiquities  loaned  by  the  Classical 
Center,  toy  figures  from  England  of 
Christopher  Robin's  friends.  Pooh  Bear, 
Kanga  and  Roo,  Eeyore,  and  Piglet,  a 
pictorial  genealogy  of  the  House  of  Tudor, 
borrowed  "from  the  Public  Library. 

Cooperating  with  the  history  depart- 
ment, the  librarians  have  completed  lists 
of  historical  fiction  and  biography  for  the 
use  of  the  American  history  classes. 
The  lists  are  being  printed  in  the  Belmont 
Print  Shop. 

Maejoeie  Van  Deusen,  Lib'n. 

California  State  Fisheries  Labo- 
ratory Library.  Genevieve  Corwin, 
Lib'n. 

The  library  of  the  California  State 
Fisheries  Laboratory  continues  to  acquire 
exchanges  since  interest  in  fisheries  work 
is  increasing  all  over  the  world  and  new 
fisheries  research  stations  are  being 
opened.  Another  consignment  of  books 
has  just  been  sent  away  to  be  bound, 
which  marks  another  step  in  the  progress 
of  the  library. 


38 


NEWS   NOTES   OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Los    Angeles — Continued 

The  librarian  lias  just  completed  a 
Bibliography  of  the  Tunas,  which  is 
soon  to  appear  as  Fish  Bulletin  No.  22 
of  the  Dirision  of  Fish  and  Game  of 
California.  The  publication  lists  about 
S50  titles  bearing  on  questions  connected 
with  these  fishes.  Nearly  all  of  the 
titles  are  annotated  and  a  detailed  sub- 
ject index  provides  a  key  for  the  use  of 
the  research  worker.  The  periodicals 
cited  are  listed  with  their  places  of  pub- 
lication. The  librarian  has  done  a  con- 
siderable amount  of  work  on  a  similar 
bibliography  for  sardines  which  will  also 
appear  within  the  next  year  as  a  Fish 
Biilletin. 

Genevie%t:   Coewin,   Lib'n. 

liiMACtJLATE  Heart  College  Libeabt. 
Sister  M.  Wilhelmina,  Prin. 

During  the  months  of  September  and 
October  large  accessions  were  made  to 
the  Immaculate  Heart  College  Library. 
As  an  item  of  the  recent  building  fund 
campaign  a  memorial  bequest  of  $10,000 
was  made  to  the  library  fund.  The  new 
Administration  Building  on  Los  Feliz 
Boulevard  and  Western  Avenue  now 
houses  the  library,  which  is  open  daily 
from  8.30  a.m.  to  4.30  p.m.  Among  the 
many  new  accessions  made  to  the  li- 
brary are  the  following  parchment-bound 
volumes  with  sixteenth  and  seventeenth 
century  dates  of  publication :  Henrico 
de  Noris  "Historia  Pelagiana  et  Dis- 
sertatio'' ;  Claudio  La  Croix  "Theologia 
Moralis" ;  Joannis  Harduini  "Opera 
Selecta." 

]\Iaey  Caeyell,  Lib'n. 

*Maelboeough  School  Libraey.  Ada 
S.  Blake,  Prin. 

At  the  present  time  Ave  are  having 
all  our  magazines  bound  and  expect  in 
tills  way  to  materially  enlarge  the  useful- 
ness of  our  library. 

DoEOTHY  A.  Dibble,  Secretary. 

Southwest  Museum,  Libeaby  of  the 
Southwest.  Dr.  James  A.  B.  Scherer, 
Director.     Frances  E.  Watkins,  Lib'n. 

Ill  health  has  compelled  Miss  Meta 
Spaulding  to  retire  as  librarian  of  the 
Southwest  Museum,  and  Miss  Frances 
E.  Watkins  has  been  appointed  in  her 
place. 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 
Los    Angeles — Continued 

The  Munk  Library  of  Arizoniana  has 
received  in  the  form  of  a  bequest  from 
its  founder,  Dr.  J.  A.  Munk,  the  sum 
of  $10,000  for  the  purchase  of  additional 
volumes.  This  library  now  contains  much 
rare  and  valuable  research  material  on 
Arizona  and  the  Southwest,  of  a  type  not 
elsewhere  available. 

The  George  Wharton  James  Library 
of  Western  Americana  and  the  Grant 
Jackson  Library  of  Californiana  are  now 
available  for  research  purposes.  The 
Hector  Alliot  Library  of  Archeology  has 
recently  received  a  number  of  splendid 
new  books  on  American  and  European 
anthropology  and  ethnology. 

We  have  here  much  rare  and  unusual 
material,  from  original  sources,  on  Cali- 
foxmia  history,  and  the  history  of  the 
Southwest  in  its  relation  to  California. 
This  is  available  for  research  to  all  stu- 
dents who  come  to  the  museum. 

Frances  B.  Watkins,  Lib'n.- 

Pomona 

Pomona  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Sarah  M.  Jacobus,  Lib'n. 

Two  additional  gas-heated  steam  radi- 
ators add  to  indoor  comfort,  and  a  new 
garage  doubles  the  shelter  available  for 
staff  cars. 

We  are  binding  our  files  of  government 
bulletins  and  the  bulletins  of  various 
associations  and  societies.  Although 
binding  is  expensive,  some  space  will  be 
saved,  and  the  publications  will  be  better 
taken  care  of. 

Miss  May  L.  Bouton  of  the  staff  has 
devised  a  plan  for  making  the  book  num- 
bers of  the  works  indexed  in  Granger's 
Index  readily  accessible  without  writ- 
ing them  into  the  narrow  margins  of 
the  Key. 

Children's  books  for  the  first  three 
grades  are  now  stamped  "Easy  Book," 
to  facilitate  their  return  to  the  special 
shelves  where  they  are  collected. 

The  Pay  Collection  Fund  made  a  gift 
to  the  library  of  one  of  Pollak's  etchings 
in  color,  with  hand-made  frame  designed 
and  colored  to  suit. 

New  doUs  in  the  Doll  Collection  are 
a  Japanese  general  as  made  for  Japanese 
Boys'  Day  gifts,  a  Russian  peasant  and 
two  Hungarian  women,  the  latter  three 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


39 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Pomona — Continued 

having  been  made  in  Russia  and  Hungary 

and  dressed  in  fabrics  and  styles  of  their 

home  lands. 

Sakah  M.  Jacobus,  Lib'n. 

Redondo  Beach 

Redondo  [Fkee]  Public  Libraky. 
Miss  Emma  E.  Catey,  Lib'n. 

L.  B.  Pemberton,  local  architect,  has 
been  commissioned  by  the  Redondo  Beach 
City  Council  to  prepare  plans  for  the 
new  city  librai-y  for  which  a  $.50,000 
bond  issue  was  voted  some  time  ago. 
Active  building  operations  are  scheduled 
for  the  early  part  of  next  year. — Los 
Angeles  Times,  N  8 

Santa    Monica 

Santa  Monica  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Elfie  A.  INIosse,  Lib'n. 

In  October  we  began  the  short  system 
of  checking  books  at  the  desk.  It  has 
taken  some  time  to  install  the  system 
and  get  it  into  good  running  order,  as 
a  change  was  also  made  in  the  identifica- 
tion card  which  created  a  new  registra- 
tion for  the  borrower.  Our  people  seem 
to  approve  and  as  the  detail  work  is 
omitted  it  will  allow  of  more  help  given 
for  the  floor  work.  We  are  greatly 
indebted  in  making  this  change  to  the 
assistance  given  us  by  Mrs  Theodora  R. 
Brewitt  and  Mrs  Prances  B.  Linn.  In 
time  we  hope  to  pass  the  good  to  some 
other  library.  I  think  that  at  the  pres- 
ent time  in  southern  California  this  sys- 
tem is  used  in  Pasadena,  Long  Beach, 
Santa  Barbara,  San  Diego  and  Santa 
Monica. 

Our  gallery  has  on  exhibition  the 
pictures  of  the  Southern  California 
Water  Color  Society — numbering  79 
water  colors.  The  Painter's  and  Sculp- 
tor's Club  of  Southern  California  will 
exhibit  in  February  and  in  March  we 
will  have  the  schools,  two  weeks  for  the 
younger  art  students  and  two  weeks  for 
the  art  students  of  the  High  School. 
April  will  be  given  over  to  the  Art 
Association  of  Santa  Monica. 

In  December  we  had  two  interesting 
talks  given  in  our  gallery.  The  Writer's 
Club  sponsored  Mr  John  McGroarty, 
whose  subject  was  "Literature  as  a  life 
work,"  and  the  Santa  Monica  Historical 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 
Santa  Monica — Continued 
Society  sponsored  Dr.  Owen  C.  Coy  of 
the  California  State  Historical  Society. 
Dr.  Coy's  subject  was  the  Spanish  Land 
Grants  and  an  intimate  talk  on  the 
Malibu  Ranch. 

Miss  Anita  Williams,  a  graduate  of  the 
Library  School  of  the  Los  Angeles  Pub- 
lic Library  and  now  in  charge  of  our 
Boys'  and  Girls'  Room,  is  making  many 
friends.  Her  story  hour  is  well  attended 
and  she  is  pleasing  the  Parent-Teacher 
Association  by  her  friendly  little  talks 
at  their  meetings  when  attractive  books 
are  displayed  from  the  library.  Miss 
Morrison,  who  is  given  us  through  the 
kindness  of  the  State  Library,  has  been 
teaching  the  blind  to  read  the  Braille 
system  since  February,  1929.  The  meet- 
ings are  held  on  the  first  floor  in  our 
committee  room.  Miss  Morrison  has  been 
very  sucessful  with  the  class  and  the 
work  has  been  very  helpful.  Every  Mon- 
day and  Thursday  morning  a  reading 
is  given  for  the  blind  by  volunteer  read- 
ers. On  Monday  morning  the  newspapers 
are  reviewed  and  a  novel  is  taken  for 
reading  on  Thursday. 

Elfie  A.  Mosse,  Lib'n. 

South   Pasadena 

South  Pasadena  Free  Public  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  Nellie  E.  Keith,  Lib'n. 

Marsh,  Smith  and  Powell,  architects 
and  engineers  of  Los  Angeles,  have  been 
authorized  to  proceed  with  working 
drawings  for  alterations  and  additions 
to  the  South  Pasadena  Public  Library 
building.  Plans  call  for  the  addition  of 
a  reading  and  reference  room,  a  chil- 
dren's reading  room,  etc.  Alterations 
will  also  be  made.  The  cost  will  be  ap- 
proximately $50,000. — Los  Angeles  Jour- 
nal of  Commerce,  D  12 

MADERA  COUNTY 

(Thirty-seventh   class) 
County  seat,  Madera. 
Area,  2140  sq.  mi.    Pop.  12,203. 
Assessed    valuation    $30,682,805     (tax- 
able for  county  $25,290,151). 

Madera  Co.  Free  Library,  Madera. 
Miss  Blanche  Galloway,  Lib'n. 

During  Book  Week  every  child  in 
town    visited    the    library    for    a    special 


40 


NEWS  NOTES   OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


MADERA  CO.— Continued 
story  hour,  coming  by  classes  from  the 
schools.  Several  of  the  neighboring 
coitntry  schools  came  for  a  story  period 
and  to  look  over  the  display  of  new  books. 
A  boat  model  bearing  the  flags  of  all 
nations  displayed  the  cargo  of  new  books 
from  its  place  in  the  center  of  the  chil- 
dren's room,  while  collections  of  books 
placed  around  the  room  with  the  flags 
of  the  various  countries  added  color  and 
attracted  the  attention  of  our  foreign 
born  patrons. 

Blanche   Galloway,   Lib'n. 


MARIN   COUNTY 

(Twenty-fifth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Rafael. 
Area,  516  sq.  mi.     Pop.  27,342. 
Assessed    valuation    $37,723,600    (tax- 
able for  county  $33,532,655). 

Marin  Co.  Free  Library,  San  Rafael. 
Miss  Muriel  Wright,  Lib'n. 

A  new  distributing  branch  of  the 
Marin  County  Free  Library  has  been 
established  in  the  Lagunitas  School  and 
will  serve  patrons  from  Lagunitas,  Forest 
Knolls,  Woodacre,  Nicasio  and  sur- 
rounding territory.  The  bi'anch  occupies 
a  room  in  the  new  Lagunitas  School  and 
has  its  own  outside  entrance.  Five  hun- 
dred books,  including  some  in  Italian  and 
French,  have  been  placed  in  the  branch. 
— Fairfax  Gazette,  O  30 

The  Belvedere-Tiburon  Branch  will  be 
opened  November  19  in  the  American 
Trust  Building,  with  Mrs  A.  W.  Weldin 
in  charge.  These  quarters  are  on  the 
outskirts  of  Tiburon  and  very  close  to 
Belvedere.  Members  of  the  Belvedere- 
Tiburon  Chamber  of  Commerce  are  get- 
ting the  room  ready  for  the  installation 
of  the  branch,  the  furniture  for  which  is 
being  provided  by  the  county  library. 
The  branch  will  be  open  Tuesdays  and 
Fridays. — San   Rafael  Independent,   N  1 


MARIPOSA  COUNTY 

(Fifty- third  class) 
County  seat,  Mariposa. 
Area,  1580  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2775. 
Assessed  valuation  $6,123,001  (taxable 
for  county  $5,119,288). 


MENDOCINO  COUNTY 

(Twenty-eighth   class) 
County  seat,   Ukiah. 
Area,  3400  sq.  mi.    Pop.  24.116. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,945,875     (tax- 
able for  county  $24,982,310). 

MERCED  COUNTY 

( Twenty-seventh  class ) 
County  seat,  Merced. 
Area,  1750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  24,579. 
Assessed    valuation    $44,107,091     (tax- 
able for  county  $36,600,294). 

Merced  Co.  Free  Library,  Merced. 
Miss  Minette  L.  Stoddard,  Lib'n. 

More  than  40  branch  custodians,  em- 
ployees and  friends  of  the  Merced-Mari- 
posa County  Library  celebrated  the 
twentieth  year  of  library  service  here 
October  IS,  at  the  annual  meeting  of 
custodians  from  the  two  counties.  An 
all-day  program,  including  addresses  by 
Andrew  R.  Schottky,  local  attorney  and 
president  of  the  Merced  County  Cham- 
ber of  Commerce,  and  Bert  Harwell, 
naturalist  of  Yosemite  National  Park, 
was  presented  under  the  direction  of 
Miss  Minette  L.  Stoddard,  librarian  of 
the  two  counties.  Part  of  the  morning 
session  was  spent  in  an  informal  round- 
table  discussion  of  problems  of  library 
service  in  the  various  branches.  Lunch- 
eon was  served  at  the  Hotel  Tioga.—- 
Merced  Stm  Star,  O  18 

MODOC    COUNTY 

.  (Fifty-second  class) 
County  seat.  Alturas. 
Area,  4097  sq  mi.     Pop.  5425. 
Assessed    valuation    $10,537,116     (tax- 
able for   county   $9,655,826). 

MONO   COUNTY 

( Fifty-seventh   class ) 
County  seat,   Bridgeport. 
Area,  2796  sq.  mi.     Pop.   960. 
Assessed  valuation  $6,684,222   (taxable 
for  county  $3,294,090). 

MONTEREY   COUNTY 

(Twenty-fourth  class) 
County  seat,  Salinas. 
Area,  3450  sq.  mi.     Pop.  27,980. 
Assessed    valuation    $63,273,341    (tax- 
able for  county  $53,835,178). 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  , 


41 


MONTEREY    CO.— Continued 

Monterey  Co.  Free  Library,  Sali- 
nas.    Miss  Elleu  B.  Frink,  Lib'n. 

Most  of  the  staff  attended  the  District 
meeting  of  the  California  Library  Asso- 
ciation at  Asilomar  in  October,  and  found 
much  pleasure  in  meeting  other  library 
workers  as  well  as  in  the  well-planned 
program  itself. 

At  the  October  14  meeting  of  the  Board 
of.  Supervisors,  Miss  Anne  Hadden  filed 
her  resignation  as  librarian  and  reported 
on  almost  exactly  sixteen  years  of  work 
in  the  Monterey  County  Free  Library. 
Miss  Ellen  B.  Frink  was  appointed  li- 
brarian and  Mrs  Harriet  S.  Davids,  first 
assistant. 

On  December  21,  Miss  Wilma  McCol- 
limi  left  to  attend  the  San  Jose  State 
Teachers  College ;  her  place  is  filled  by 
Miss  Geraldine  Dimock. 

December  IG,  Mrs  Harriet  S.  Davids 
was  appointed  librarian  for  Kings  County 
and  plans  to  leave  January  15. 

The  librarian  and  Miss  Helen  Thurlby, 
in  charge  of  the  Juvenile  Department, 
attended  all  general  sessions  of  the  Cen- 
tral Coast  Counties  Teachers'  Institute 
at  Monterey ;  Mrs  Davids  accompanied 
them  one  day.  Miss  Thurlby  sang  at  a 
dinner  and  a  luncheon  and  both  Miss 
Frink  and  Miss  Thurlby  were  guests  at 
a  luncheon  and  a  tea  given  by  Rural 
School  Supervisors  of  two  sections  of 
the  county. 

Ellen  B.  Frink,  Lib'n. 

King  City 

King  City  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary.    H.  O.  Williams,  Prin. 

Just  before  Christmas  vacation  we  fin- 
ished putting  new  call  numbers  on  all 
of  our  books.  This  improves  the  looks 
of  our  shelves  very  much. 

Mrs  R.  E.  Warner,  Lib'n. 

Monterey 

Presidio  of  Monterey,  Post  Library. 
Edw.  L.  Branham,  Post  Lib'n. 

The  Presidio  of  Monterey  Library  in 
the  past  three  months  has  added  a  circu- 
lating library  section  which  furnishes  at 
a  rental  of  5  cents  a  week  the  books  of 
fiction  which  the  boys  like  to  read.  The 
money  derived  from  this  source  is  used 
to  purchase  more  books. 

More  men  are  using  the  library  lately 


MONTEREY   CO.— Continued 
M  onterey — Continued 
and,  with  access  to  a  small  monthly  in- 
come beginning  January   1,    1930,   added 
features  are  to  be  supplied. 

Edw.  L.  Branhaji,  Lib'n. 

Pacific   Grove 

Pacific  Grove  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.   Miss  Jessie  W.  Nichols,  Lib'n. 

Presentation  of  a  new  drinking  foun- 
tain to  the  Pacific  Grove  Library  by  Mrs 
E.  Cooke  Smith  was  anonunced  October 
7,  by  Miss  Jessie  W.  Nichols,  Librarian. 
Mrs  Smith's  gift  is  for  the  children's 
room  of  the  library.  The  donor  has  been 
a  member  of  the  library  board  of  trus- 
tees for  many  years. — Monterey  Heraldf 
O  7 

NAPA   COUNTY 

( Thirty-first    class ) 
County  seat,   Napa. 
Area,  800  sq.  mi.     Pop.  20,678. 
Assessed    valuation    .$2S,604,.53S     (tax- 
able for  county  $24,399,441). 

Napa 

Goodman  [Free  Public]  Library. 
Miss  Minnie  C.  Shreve,  Lib'n. 

The  Parent-Teacher  Associations  of 
the  Shearer  and  Lincoln  Schools  have 
arranged  for  a  story  teller  for  Goodman 
Library,  Mrs  C.  Wassum,  formerly  Miss 
Juhay,  a  teacher  in  the  Lincoln  School. 
Mrs  Wassum  conducts  a  story  hour  oil 
two  Saturdays  each  month  during  the 
school  term.  We  are  very  pleased  with 
her  work. 

M.  C.  Shreve,  Lib'n. 

Veterans'   Home 

Veterans'  Home  Library.  Colonel 
Nelson  M.  Holderman,  U.  S.  A.,  Com- 
mandant. Staif  Sergeant  Walter  W. 
Pollard,  Lib'n. 

The  Veterans'  Home  Library  now  con- 
tains 7366  volumes,  and  had  a  circulation 
the  past  year  of  24,793. 

The  library  is  at  present  far  too  small 
to  adequately  accommodate  the  demands 
made  upon  it  by  the  increased  population 
of  the  Home.  Outside  of  the  lack  of  suffi- 
cient room,  it  is  one  of  the  best  libraries 
conducted  by  any  veteran's  home  in  the 
United  States,  being  modern  and  up-to- 
date  in  equipment,  furniture  and  books. 
It  is  open  to  the  reading  public  thirteen 


42 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


NAPA    CO. — Continued 
Vet&rans'    Home — Continued 
hours   a   day,    Sundays    and   holidays   in- 
cluded. 

W.  W.  PoLLAED,  Lib'n. 

NEVADA  COUNTY 

( Thirty-ninth    class ) 
County   seat,  Nevada  City. 
Area.  982  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,850. 
Assessed    valuation    $10,129,164     (tax- 
able for  county  $7,116,025). 

Grass  Valley 

Grass  Y  alley  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Frances  Doom,  Lib'n. 

Extensive  repairs  on  the  Grass  Valley 
Public  Library,  a  Carnegie  building 
erected  here  fifteen  years  ago,  have  been  de- 
cided upon  by  the  recently  appointed  board 
of  trustees.  Both  exterior  and  interior 
improvements  are  to  be  made,  the  heating 
apparatus  modernized  and  a  general  re- 
arrangement carried  out.  It  will  be  the 
first  general  repair  program  since  the 
building  was  erected. 

The  board  also  voted  to  grant  Frances 
Doom,  veteran  teacher  and  librarian  of 
the  city,  a  month's  vacation,  starting 
October  7.  Her  vacations  heretofore 
have  been  limited  to  two  weeks. — Sacra- 
mento Bee,  O  5 

Opening  of  the  Grass  Valley  Public 
Library  has  been  postponed  one  day  to 
Saturday,  December  7,  when  the  refin- 
ished  interior  will  be  thrown  open  for 
public  scrutiny.  The  opening  will  end 
a  closure  of  the  institution  that  com- 
menced November  26. — Grass  Valley 
Union,   D  5 

December  7  was  a  day  of  records  at 
Grass  Valley  Public  Library  when  a 
total  of  248  books  were  issued  for  loan 
use,  almost  100  books  more  than  the 
previous  record  of  151  books.  The  at- 
tendance was  also  the  greatest  since  the 
opening  of  the  institution  about  fifteen 
years  ago. 

ORANGE  COUNTY 

(Tenth  class) 
County  seat,  Santa  Ana. 
Area,   780  sq.   mi.     Pop.   61,375. 
Assessed  valuation  $218,269,012    (tax- 
able for  county  $179,460,750). 


PLACER   COUNTY 

(Thirty-second   class) 
County  seat,  Auburn. 
Area,  1484  sq.  mi.     Pop.  18,584. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,606,588    (tax- 
able for  county  $20,241,185). 

Roseville 

Ro SEVILLE  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Georgiana  R.  Willits,  Lib'n. 

National  Book  Week,  November  18-23, 
was  observed  by  placing  numerous  new 
juvenile  books  in  circulation,  in  addition 
to  the  exhibit  of  Smithsonian  cuts  and 
descriptions  of  "How  Prints  are  Made," 
which  was  issued  to  us  for  this  purpose 
by  the  California  State  Library.  Tliis 
collection  of  24  pieces  quite  filled  a  shelf, 
which  extends  the  length  of  the  Chil- 
dren's Section,  about  25  feet,  and  this 
exhibit  gave  all  and  more  than  we  ex- 
pected of  both  pleasure  and  profit. 

The  Library  Board  granted  tlie  li- 
brarian, from  December  21  to  January  6, 
the  privilege  of  placing  the  recent  summer 
helper  as  an  assistant  librarian's  helper, 
while  the  librarian  took  this  same  time 
for  a  rest  and  holiday  visit  among  rela- 
tives and  friends  in  San  Bernardino, 
Pasadena  and  Los  Angeles.  Chrisfanas 
and  New  Year's  in  the  Southland  gave 
full  measure  in  return  for  the  seeking, 
and  the  librarian  returned  greatly  re- 
freshed and  quite  ready  for  a  full  win- 
ter's work. 

11,253  books  and  709  magazines  were 
circulated  during  the  last  three  months. 
Georgiana  R.  Willits.  Lib'n. 

PLUMAS  COUNTY 

(Fiftieth  class) 

County   seat,   Quincy. 
Area,  2361  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5681. 
Assessed    valuation   $20,786,182     (tax- 
able for  county  $12,144,719). 

Plumas  Co.  Free  Library,  Quincy. 
Miss  Katherine  R.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

A  trip  was  made  to  the  La  Porte 
Mines,  Inc.  Branch  and  inventory  taken 
before  the  roads  closed  for  the  winter. 
Mr  Will  Moriarity  was  appointed  li- 
brary  custodian. 

Mr  Leo  Dubinski  has  been  appointed 
library  custodian  at  Storrie. 

Although  the  children  and  young  peo- 
ple   have    been    tobogganing    and    skiing 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


43 


PLUMAS   CO.— Continued 

during  all  spare  hours,  circulation  of 
books  has  been  increasing  at  Quiney 
Branch. 

Katherine  R.  Woods.  Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE  COUNTY 

(Fifteenth   class) 
County   seat.   Riverside. 
Area.  7008  sq.  mi.     Pop.  .50,207. 
Assessed    valuation    $80,005,15.3     (tax- 
able for  county  $62,;^54,.540). 

Elsinore 

Elsinore  Free  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  Riverside  Co.  Free  Library. 
Miss  Beatrice  Clark,  Lib'n. 

The  library  is  the  proud  possessor  of 
a  new  tier  of  book  shelves,  the  gift  of 
Mr  H.  LincptafE  of  the  City  Council. 
These  shelves  were  indeed  needed  as 
book  space  is  crowded  to  the  limit. 

Through  gifts,  the  pay  shelf  and  regu- 
lar budget  new  books  to  the  number  of 
nearly  one  hundred  have  been  added  to 
the  library.  One  especially  fine  set  of 
Bailey's  "Cyclopedia  of  American  Horti- 
culture" was  given  by  Dr.  H.  Baer. 

The  regular  book  circulation  is  increas- 
ing every  month  and  the  reading  section 
is  used  extensively. 

Beatrice  Clark,   Lib'n. 

Riverside 

Riverside  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Chas.  F.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

The  library  recently  received  a  notable 
gift.  Dr  J.  S.  Waterman  of  Brooklyn, 
New  York,  gave  about  eighteen  hundred 
books  as  a  memorial  to  his  wife,  nee  Sara 
Clifford  Brown,  formerly  of  Riverside. 
While  most  of  these  books  are  nice  edi- 
tions, the  greater  part  will  go  into  the 
circulating  department  of  the  library. 

Riverside  Library  Service  School. 

The  year  course  of  the  Riverside  Li- 
brary Service  School  opened  Monday, 
December  30,  with  an  enrollment  of 
thirty  students  from  seven  states,  those 
represented  being  California,  Washing- 
tou,  Utah,  Wyoming,  Iowa,  Minnesota 
and  Ohio. 

Since  the  addition  of  four  rooms  for 
library  school  purposes  in  June,  the  en- 
tire first  floor  of  the  library  school  build- 
ing   has    been    renovated    and    a    highly 


RIVERSIDE    CO.— Continued 
Riverside — Continued 
embossed   linoleum   laid   in    all   rooms   of 
that  story. 

Chas.  F.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

SACRAMENTO  COUNTY 

(Seventh  class) 
County  seat,  Sacramento. 
Area,  988  sq.  mi.     Pop.  90,978. 
Assessed  valuation   $176,929,988    (tax- 
able for  county  $141,160,352). 

Sacramento  Co.  Free  Library,  Sac- 
ramento. Miss  Cornelia  D.  Provines, 
Lib'n. 

On  October  1st  the  Freeport  Branch 
was  discontinued  because  of  lack  of  use. 
It  is  expected  that  it  will  be  transferred 
to  Perkins,  where  the  need  is  greater. 

On  December  2d  Mrs  Ethel  Lauppe, 
who  has  been  custodian  of  the  Antelope 
Branch  for  so  many  years,  resigned  be- 
cause of  needed  attention  to  other  affairs, 
and  the  branch  was  moved  to  the  home 
of  Mrs  Mary  L.  Toombs,  who  will  act  as 
custodian. 

During  the  quarter,  the  county  libra- 
rian  made  the  following  addresses : 

October  12,  Sacramento  Branch, 
League  of  American  Pen  Women,  Book 
review  of  The  Prophet's  Wife  by  Richard 
Orton  Prowse  and  Ultima  Thule  by 
Henry  Handel  Richardson.  This  was 
repeated  upon  request  of  the  president, 
before  one  of  the  Sacramento  Branches  of 
the  P.  E.  O.  on  November  1st. 

November  16,  Sacramento  Branch, 
California  Writers'  Club,  Some  Recent 
Best  Sellers,  and  Why? 

November  30,  United  Granges  of  Sacra- 
mento County,  Why  Libraries?  With 
special  consideration  of  the  organiza- 
tion and  work  of  the  Sacramento  County 
Free  Library. 

December  13,  Sacramento  Chapter, 
Delphian  Club,  An  evaluation  of  some 
recent  books  covering  the  period  in 
French  History  from  Louis  XVI  to 
Napoleon  III. 

Cornelia  D.  Pkovines,  Lib'n. 

SAN    BENITO  COUNTY 

( Forty-third   class ) 
County  seat,  Hollister. 
Area,  1476  sq.  mi.     Pop.  8995. 


44 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFOENIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


SAN    BENITO    CO. — Continued 
Assessed    valuation    $17,346,182    (tax- 
able for  county  $15,877,345). 

Sa^^  Benito  Co.  Fbee  Libkaey,  Hol- 
LISTEE.  Mrs  Florence  W.  Townsend, 
Lib'n. 

Thfe  librarian  and  assistant,  Mrs  Har- 
riet Davids,  attended  the  Second  Dis- 
trict meeting  of  the  California  Library 
Association  held  at  Asilomar  in  October. 

On  November  fii-st  Mrs  Davids  re- 
signed to  accept  the  position  of  first 
assistant  in  the  Monterey  County  Free 
Library.  Miss  Helen  Bosse  of  Arroyo 
Grande  was  appointed  to  take  her  place. 

We  were  fortunate  to  have  with  us 
for  Book  Week  Mrs  Constance  Mitchell 
of  gather  Gate  Book  Shop.  Mrs  Mitchell 
gave  most  interesting  talks,  illustrated 
with  charming  children's  books,  before 
the  HoUister  and  Ausaymas  P.  T.  A. 
groups  and  one  evening  at  the  city  li- 
brary in  HoUister.  A  book  review  con- 
test was  sponsored  by  the  librarian  and 
rural  supervisor,  Miss  Gretchen  Wulfing. 
•  The  three  books  on  Pinocchio  were  to  be 
read  and  a  review  written  of  one  of  them. 
Twenty-seven  children  from  twelve 
schools  competed. 

Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcoek  made  us  a  short 
but  very  welcome  visit  in  December. 
Mrs  Florence  W.  Townsend,  Lib'n. 

San  Benito  Co.  Law  Librabt,  Hol- 
LiSTER.   Mildred  M.  Earle,  Sec.  and  Lib'n. 

This  library  now  contains  2654  vol- 
umes. 3  periodicals  are  received  regu- 
larly. 

Mildred  M.  Earle,  Lib'n. 


SAN  BERNARDINO  COUNTY 

(Ninth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Bernardino. 
Area,  20,055  sq.  mi.     Pop.  73,401. 
Assessed  valuation   $131,999,962    (tax- 
able for  county  $87,401,035). 

San  Bernardino  Co.  Free  Library, 
San  Bernardino.  Miss  Caroline  S. 
Waters,  Lib'n. 

A  visit  was  enjoyed,  October  11,  from 
Mrs  May  Dexter  Henshall,  County  Li- 
brary Organizer  from  the  State  Library, 
who,  in  company  with  the  County  Libra- 
rian, visited  the  institutional  branches 
of  the  county,  including  the  County  Jail, 
Coimty  Hospital,  Old-  Men's  Home, 
Monte  Vista  Home  for  Women,  and  the 


SAN     BERNARDINO     CO.— Continuecl 
Tubercular    Ward ;    also    the    community 
branches  of  Highland,  Chiuo,  Cucamonga, 
Fontana,  and  Rialto. 

On  October  19  and  November  2,  ex- 
hibits of  supplementary  text  books  were 
held  at  County  Library  headquarters 
for  the  benefit  of  the  elementary  teachers 
of  the  county  schools.  The  one  on  Sat- 
urday, October  19,  was  for  the  teachers 
of  the  primary  grades,  1st  to  4th,  and 
that  of  November  2,  for  grades  5  to 
8.  Not  only  samples  of  new  and  old 
adoptions  were  displayed,  by  subject,  but 
also,  correlating  material  with  each  sub- 
ject, as  pictures,  post  cards,  music 
records,  and  stereogi'aphs.  It  gave  the 
teachers  the  opportunity  to  see  and  look 
over  the  resources  of  the  library  in  the 
schools'  and  teachers'  departments  of  the 
library.  The  attendance  was  large  on 
both  days. 

Miss  Helen  Neighbors,  School  Assist- 
ant in  the  County  Free  Library,  spoke 
before  the  Fontana  P.-T.  A.  on  Novem- 
ber 13  during  Educational  Week,  on  the 
subject  of  "Children's  Books,"  and  took 
with  her  a  collection  of  new,  attractive 
children's  books  to  illustrate  her  talk, 
and  as  samples  of  some  of  the  best  books 
in  children's  literature. 

Special  exhibits  of  children's  books, 
posters,  and  pictures  were  made  during 
Children's  Book  Week,  November  17  to 
23,  at  all  the  larger  branches,  including 
Chino,  Fontana,  Rialto,  Highland,  Vic- 
torville,  Barstow,  Needles,  and  Yucaipa, 
and  attracted  many  visitors,  both  juvenile 
and  adult.  At  Chino,  all  the  school  chil- 
dren from  the  2d  grade  up,  visited  the 
Chino  Library  to  see  the  exhibit  and 
become  better  acquainted  with  the  li- 
brary. There  are  over  900  pupils  in  the 
Chino  schools,  so  the  weekly  library 
attendance  was  large. 

Bunit  Mill  Bi-anch  in  the  San  Bernar- 
dino Mountains  was  withdrawn  October 
1  and  consolidated  with  the  Lake  Arrow- 
head Branch,  which  is  now  kept  open 
daily  every  afternoon  except  Sunday. 
A  branch  was  established  at  Baker,  Octo- 
ber 22!  It  is  located  in  the  home  of  the 
custodian,  Mrs  Bessie  M.  Peacock,  and 
is  open  daily  except  Sunday  from  10  a.m. 
to  8  p.m.  Silver  Lake  is  the  post  office 
for  Baker.  Service  to  Highland  Junior 
High    School    and    Rialto    Junior    High 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


45 


SAN     BERNARDINO    CO.— Continued 

School  was  discontinued  during  the  quar- 
ter. 

Caroline  S.  Waters,  Lib'n. 

Ontario 

Chaffey  [High  School  and  Junior 
College]  Library.  Merton  E.  Hill,  Prin 
Mrs  Verna  Evans  Clapp,  Lib'n. 

250  new  books  were  added  to  the  li- 
brary during  the  month  of  October.  Most 
of  these  were  in  biograishy,  poetry, 
drama,   and  the  social  sciences. 

Mrs  Verna  Evans  Clapp,  Lib'n. 

Redlands 

A.  K.  Smiley  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Mabel  Inness,  Lib'n. 

On  November  23,  the  last  day  of  Chil- 
dren's Book  Week,  a  program  was  given 
in  the  Library  Park.  A  number  of  stu- 
dents from  the  Redlands'  Preparatory 
School  gave  the  pantomime  "Bluebeard." 
Children  dressed  in  the  costume  of  their 
favorite  book  character  stepped  through 
the  pages  of  a  large  book.  The  book 
chosen  was  the  "Trumpeter  of  Krakow" 
and  a  replica  of  the  book  jacket  was 
painted  on  the  book  by  one  of  the  art 
classes  of  the  High  School. 

Miss  Myx'tle  Danielson,  Assistant  Li- 
brarian and  a  member  of  the  A.  K. 
Smiley  staff  since  1918,  was  married 
October  16  to  Raymond  Curtis.  Mrs 
Curtis  is  continuing  her  work  at  the  li- 
brary. 

A  recent  gift  of  $100  from  Mr  J.  Mor- 
rison Colwell  for  the  Endowment  Fund 
has  been  received. 

Mabel  Inness,  Lib'n. 

University  of  Redlands  Library. 
Victor  L.  Duke,  Pres.  Eleanor  A.  Sym- 
mes,  Lib'n, 

The  University  of  Redlands  Library 
fund  will  receive  $50,000  of  the  $190,000 
estate  left  by  Spurgeon  V.  Riley  of 
Monrovia,  it  was  revealed  November  13 
in  the  filing  of  his  will  for  probate. — Los 
Angeles  Illustrated  Daily  News,  N  14 

SAN  DIEGO  COUNTY 

(Fifth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Diego. 
Area,  4377  sq.  mi.     Pop.  112,248. 
Assessed  valuation  $264,362,251    (tax- 
able for  county   $247,875,173). 


SAN   DIEGO  CO.— Continued 
San   Diego 

State  Teachers  College  Library. 
Edward  L.  Hardy,  Prin.  Mrs  Charlotte 
G.  Robinson,  Lib'n. 

The  Pettifer  and  Hunt  Construction 
Company  of  East  San  Diego  was  awarded 
the  general  contract  for  construction 
of  a  library  and  science  building  at  the 
new  San  Diego  State  College  site  by 
the  state  division  of  architecture,  Decem- 
ber 4.  The  successful  bid  was  $182,930, 
it  was  stated. 

Work  on  the  library  and  science  build- 
ing, which  is  the  second  unit  of  an  ex- 
tensive building  program,  was  started 
several  weeks  ago  by  the  construction 
company  soon  after  acceptance  of  its 
bid.  Dr.  E.  L.  Hardy,  president  of  the 
institution,  stated. 

Installation  of  electrical  equipment  in 
the  new  building  will  be  in  the  hands  of 
the  American  Electrical  Construction 
Company  of  Los  Angeles,  which  bid 
$13.498.— San  Diego  Tribune,  D  5 

SAN   FRANCISCO 

(Second  class) 
Citj'  and  county  coterminous. 
Area,  43  sq.  mi.     Pop.  506,676. 
Assessed  valuation  $1,585,101,520  (tax- 
able for  county  $1,196,384,989). 

The  Emporium  Library.  Miss 
Margaret  Hatch,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Margaret  Hatch,  formerly  libra- 
rian of  the  Standard  Oil  Company  Li- 
brary, is  now  in  charge  of  the  library  at 
the  Emporium. 

St.  Ignatius  College  Library.  Rev 
Edward  J.  Whelan,  S.J.,  Prin.  Rev 
Henry  A.  Gabriel,  S.J.,  Lib'n.  L.  C. 
Zachert,  Asst.  Lib'n. 

Thus  far  12,000  volumes  have  been 
recatalogued  and  made  available  for  the 
students.  By  very  careful  classification, 
according  to  the  Dewey  Decimal  System, 
all  books  dealing  with  any  pax'ticular 
subject  are  brought  together  on  the 
shelves  and  the  use  of  Cutter  numbers 
is  rendered  superfluous.  Visitors  ex- 
press both  surprise  and  satisfaction  at 
the  neat  appearance  of  the  library.  As 
this  is  chiefly  a  reference  library  for 
college  teachers  and  students,  fiction  is 
not  separated  from  the  rest  but  classi- 
fied under  literature. 

Henry  A.  Gabriel,  S.J.,  Lib'n. 


46 


NEWS   NOTES   OP   CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


:Jan.,  1930 


SAN    FRANCISCO— Continued 

*Standabd  Oil  Co.  Libkaey.  Miss 
Bonnie  Strong,  Lib'n. 

Tlie  names  of  the  staff  of  the  Standard 
Oil  Co.  Library  are  Miss  Bonnie  Strong, 
librarian,  and  Miss  Mary  Taylor  and 
Miss  Janice  Russell,  assistants. 

Miss  Hatch  left  the  libi*ary  Decem- 
ber 1. 

Bonnie  Strong,  Lib'n. 

SAN   JOAQUIN   COUNTY 

(Eighth  class) 
County  seat,  Stockton. 
Area,  1370  sq.  mi.    Pop.  79,905. 
Assessed  valuation  $143,092,341    (tax- 
able for  county  $123,494,240). 

San  Joaquin  Co.  Fkee  L  i  b  e  a  e  y, 
Stockton.     Miss  Ida  E.  Condit,   Lib'n. 

This  year  the  School  Department  in 
observance  of  Good  Book  Week  did  not 
send  out  collections  of  new  books  to  the 
various  schools  for  display  as  has  been 
our  custom  in  the  past,  but  made  the 
display  in  our  spacious  and  commodious 
quarters. 

The  brightly  colored  new  books  were 
grouped  on  tables  according  to  subject 
material.  Aviation  books  and  stories 
were  centered  witla  a  picture  of  Lind- 
bergh ;  nature  and  animal  life  with 
pictures  of  birds  and  animals.  A  Map 
of  the  World  of  Books  was  arranged  with 
a  collection  of  travel  books  and  several 
tables  featured  miscellaneous  collections. 

All  the  children  of  the  county  were 
invited  to  visit  the  department  during 
the  week  and  many  teachers  made  it  a 
"Library  Day,"  bringing  with  them  their 
classes  and  Parent-Teacher  Groups.  Be- 
tween 180  and  200  children  from  the 
rural  schools  visited  the  library  during 
the  week. 

Posters  and  lists  of  books  were  sent  to 
all  our  county  community  branches  dur- 
ing Book  Week. 

Programs,  unique  and  interesting,  and 
all  instructive  and  appropriate  to  Good 
Book  Week,  were  held  in  many  of  our 
county   community   and   school   branches. 

During  the  holiday  season,  the  library 
was  gayly  decorated,  both  inside  and  out, 
with  festoons  of  evergreens  and  wreaths, 
and  attractively  decorated  Christmas 
trees  adorned  the  main  reading  room, 
young    people's    department,    school    de- 


SAN    JOAQUIN    CO.— Continued 

partment,      and      the     Muncipal      Baths 
Branch. 

Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 

Lodi 

LoDi  [Feee]  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  San  Joaquin  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.     Miss    Amy    L.    Boynton,    Lib'n. 

From  October  31  to  December  19  an- 
other series  of  weekly  meetings  of  the 
"Modem  Book  Forum"  Avas  conducted  in 
cooperation  with  the  Adult  Education  De- 
partment of  the  Lodi  Union  High  School 
and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  The  aver- 
age attendance  was  about  thirty-five. 
About  thirty  books,  most  of  them  nonfic- 
tion,  were  reviewed  and  discussed  and  the 
libi'arian  contributed  various  items  of 
news  of  books  and  authors  at  each  meet- 
ing. The  immediate  effect  was  the  creating 
of  a  demand  for  certain  new  books  of 
nonfiction  which  are  very  much  worth- 
while yet  not  on  the  "Best-seller"  list. 
The  newspaper  publicity  and  the  very 
fact  that  the  books  were  known  to  have 
been  reviewed  probably  interested  as 
many  people  as  were  reached  by  direct 
contact  at  the  meetings. 

Book  Week  was  observed  by  display- 
ing on  card  tables  in  the  future  children's 
room  a  number  of  childi^en's  books, 
grouped  according  to  interest  under  the 
following  headings :  Picture  Books  for 
Nursery  Time;  Just  a  Little  Older; 
Nature  and  Animal  Tales ;  Rhymes  and 
Poems ;  Folk  and  Fairy  Tales ;  Reading 
to  Find  Out;  Tales  of  Other  Lands; 
Romance  and  Adventure ;  Old  Tales  Re- 
dressed ;  Books  of  Beauty ;  History  and 
Biography ;  Sports,  Pleasures  and  Pas- 
times ;  For  Older  Boys  and  Girls ;  and, 
Books  Inexpensive  but  not  Cheap.  A 
book  title  guessing  contest  was  carried 
out  by  posting  pictures  of  twenty-six 
well-known  book  characters,  the  boys 
and  girls  to  make  a  list  of  the  books  from 
which  they  were  taken.  This  created  a 
great  deal  of  interest  as  some  of  the 
pictures  were  very  attractive  and  helped 
to  renew  interest  in  some  of  the  classics. 

Miss  Helen  C.  Bullock,  former  libra- 
rian, who  is  now  in  the  library  of  the 
State  Teachers  College  at  San  Jose, 
visited  the  library  during  Thanksgiving 
week    and    was    much    pleased    with    the 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


47 


SAN    JOAQUIN    CO.— Continued 
Lod  i — Continued 
changes    brought    about    in    the    recent 
remodeling  of  the  library  building. 

Dr.  B.  G.  Williams,  who  has  the  un- 
usual record  of  having  served  as  Secre- 
tary of  the  Board  of  Library  Trustees  for 
twenty-four  years,  moved  to  Colfax  and 
resigned  from  the  library  board  Novem- 
ber 1.  Dr.  W.  J.  Coffield  has  been  ap- 
pointed to  take  his  place. 

Amy  L.  Boynton,  Lib'n. 

LoDi  Union  High  School  Libkaky. 
V.  A.  Rohrer,  Prin.  Miss  Margaret  B. 
Davis,  Lib'n. 

Children's  Book  Week  was  particularly 
successful  this  year  due  to  the  splendid 
cooperation  of  the  English  teachers.  Every 
English  class  in  the  school  visited  the 
library,  which  was  closed  part  of  the 
time  in  order  to  accommodate  all  of  the 
visitors.  The  librarian  outlined  the 
Dewey  decimal  classification  scheme  to 
the  freshmen  and  introduced  them  to 
some  of  the  most  useful  reference  books 
and  guides,  such  as  the  Reader's  Guide. 
For  the  older  students,  collections  of 
books  suitable  for  home  reading  were 
arranged.  Some  of  these  were  briefly 
reviewed.  Questions  were  invited  and 
answered.  Lists  of  books  were  distrib- 
uted. 

Also  during  Children's  Book  Week  a 
number  of  the  library  student  assistants 
accompanied  the  librarian  to  Stockton, 
where  all  were  cordially  received  by  Miss 
Condit;  County  Librarian.  The  several 
departments  of  the  Stockton  Public  Li- 
brary and  the  County  Library  were  duly 
inspected.  Much  interest  was  manifested 
in  the  delightful  exhibit  of  books  ar- 
ranged by  the  librarian  in  charge  of 
the  school  department.  The  students  also 
had  the  pleasure  of  visiting  the  Chil- 
dren's Room  for  a  story  hour. 

Earlier  in  the  season  the  librarian 
reviewed  a  book  for  the  "Book  Forum" 
which  was  held  last  fall,  partially  under 
the  auspices  of  the  Lodi  Public  Library. 
During  the  Christmas  season  she  told  a 
Christmas  story  before  a  group  of  foreign- 
ers at  an  entertainment  given  for  them 
at  the  Lodi  Community  House  by  Mrs 
Heindl,  the  Americanization  teacher  here. 
Mabgaret  B.  Davis,  Lib'n. 


SAN    JOAQUIN    CO.— Continued 
Stockton 

$  Stockton  Free  Public  Libraey. 
Miss  Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 

Our  activities  during  the  quarter  in- 
cluded the  Good  Book  Week  programs 
throughout  the  county. 

In  the  Young  People's  Department  sev- 
eral contests  were  held.  Prizes  were 
offered  for  the  most  appropriate  book- 
plate for  the  Children's  Department  of 
the  library,  and  also  to  the  individual 
pupil,  group  of  three,  or  class,  producing 
the  most  original  way  of  interesting  other 
children  in  good  books.  The  second  part 
of  the  contest  was  known  as  the  "Come 
Alive"  contest.  This  included  cut-outs 
of  characters  of  books  on  display  by 
arranging  them  so  that  they  seemed  to  be 
stepping  out  of  the  pages  of  the  book. 
The  winners  of  the  above  contests  were 
awarded  books  and  pictures. 

Many  lists  of  the  books  on  display  were 
turned  out  on  paper  of  different  colors. 
These  were  distributed  to  all  who  at- 
tended the  Good  Book  Week  activities. 
The  usual  display  of  new  books  was 
attractively  arranged  on  the  tables  in 
the  Young  People's  Department. 

A  motion  picture  story  hour  was  given, 
with  the  following  pictures :  "Queen  of 
the  Waves"  and  "The  Boy  Who  Cried 
Wolf."  These  were  shown  in  the  Young 
People's  Department  of  the  main  library 
and  also  in  the  branch  library  at  the 
Municipal  Baths. 

Story  hours  appropriate  for  the  oc- 
casion were  given  at  Hallowe'en,  Thanks- 
giving and  Christmas  in  the  Children's 
Department   and   our   branches. 

Miss  Rosamay  Ryland,  for  many  years 
a  member  of  our  staff  in  charge  of  the 
Young  People's  Department,  passed 
away  October  11,  1929,  after  a  brief 
illness.  We  feel  that  we  sustained  a 
great  loss  in  the  passing  of  Miss  Ryland, 
who  had  endeared  herself  to  all  with 
whom  she  came  in  contact. 

During  the  quarter  Miss  Genevieve 
Green  was  appointed  as  an  assistant  in 
the  Circulation  Department. 

The  library  staff  held  its  annual 
Christmas  Jinks  on  the  morning  of  De- 
cember 24  at  the  library.  Joke  gifts  were 
given  to  each  member  of  the  staff.  After 
the  fun  had  subsided  the  gifts  were  col- 
lected and  sent  to  the  Children's  Home. 


48 


NEWS  NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


Jan.,  1930 


SAN    JOAQUIN    CO.— Continued 
S  to  c  kto  n — Continued 
Coffee     and     doughnuts     concluded     the 
party. 

Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 

SAN    LUIS  OBISPO  COUNTY 

(Thirtieth   class) 
County    seat,    San   Luis    Obispo. 
Area,  3500  sq.  mi.     Pop.  21,893. 
Assessed    valuation    $42,692,344    (tax- 
able for  county  $36,954,240). 

San  Luis  Obispo  Co.  Feee  Libraby, 
San  Luis  Obispo.  Miss  Lilian  Sabin, 
Lib'n. 

A  new  branch  was  established  in  Oc- 
tober in  the  Bee  Rock  district,  a  small 
remote  community.  The  branch  is  in 
charge  of  Mrs  Lena  Barrett  a*,  the  Bar- 
rett home,  an  old  adobe  of  the  early  days. 

For  Book  Week,  special  exhibits  of 
fine  children's  books  were  arranged  by 
the  County  Librarian  at  the  two  largest 
branches.  Arroyo  Grande  and  Atascadero. 
Copies  of  the  Bookshelf  for  Boys  and 
Girls  were  sent  to  all  of  the  branches 
and  also  the  printed  list,  Books  About 
Boys"  and  Girls'  Reading.  Posters  and 
leaflets  of  suggestions  were  given  to  the 
teachers. 

A  special  effort  has  been  made  during 
the  past  few  months  to  interest  the 
people  of  the  various  communities  in  their 
own  branches  and  to  bring  to  their  notice 
books  of  interest  and  value  added  to  the 
general  county  collection.  As  the  staff 
of  the  library  is  too  inadequate  to  get 
out  a  bulletin,  the  librarian,  with  the 
assistance  of  members  of  the  staff,  has 
compiled  annotated  lists  of  books  and 
sent  them  to  all  of  the  papers  published 
in  the  county.  Before  Christmas  the 
list  was  made  up  of  suggestions  for 
C'hristmas  books  for  children.  The  local 
papers  have  been  notified  also  of  the 
visits  of  the  librarian  to  the  community 
branches  and  books  of  interest  in  the 
new  shipments. 

To  give  readers  a  broader  view  of 
American  fiction,  and  the  custodians  a 
definite  list  to  refer  to,  the  Gold  Star 
List  of  American  Stories  compiled  by 
the  Syracuse  Public  Library  was  checked 
for  titles  in  the  county  collection  and 
sent  to  the  larger  branches.  The  quar- 
terly list  of  additions  to  the  State  Library 


SAN     LUIS    OBISPO    CO.— Continued 

was  sent  to  a  few  of  the  branches.  This 
list  was  also  checked  for  titles  in  the 
county  collection. 

Lilian  Sabi.v,  Lib'n. 

SAN   MATEO  COUNTY 

(Twenty-first  class) 
County  seat.  Redwood  City. 
Area,  470  sq.  mi.     Pop.  36,781. 
Assessed    valuation    $68,341,40!     (tax- 
able for  county  $63,302,300). 

San  Mateo  Co.  Free  Library,  Red- 
wood City.    Mrs  Edna  H.  Yelland,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Edna  Holroyd,  librarian  of  San 
Mateo  County  Free  Library  for  the  past 
nine  years  was  married  December  23  to 
Mr  Raymond  Yelland  of  Berkeley. 

SANTA   BARBARA  COUNTY 

(Eighteenth  class) 
County  seat,    Santa  Barbara. 
Area,  2450  sq.  mi.     Pop.  41,097. 
Assessed   valuation  $138,405,531    (tax- 
able  for    county    $126,374,938). 

SANTA  CLARA  COUNTY 

(Sixth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Jose. 
Area,  1355  sq.  mi.     Pop.  100,588. 
Assessed  valuation  $139,700,872    (tax- 
able for  county  $128,427,500). 

Palo  Alto 

Palo  Alto  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Anne  Hadden,  Lib'n. 

On  November  26,  1929,  Anne  Hadden 
returned  to  the  Palo  Alto  Public  Library 
after  a  number  of  years  as  County  Li- 
brarian in  Monterey  County,  succeeding 
Frances  D.  Patterson,  who  had  been  li- 
brarian for  fifteen  years  and  whose  death 
occurred  on  June  18,  1929. 

Anne  Hadden  spent  the  week  preced- 
ing November  26  visiting  libraries  in 
southern  California. 

Since  March,  1929,  w-heu  Miss  Pat- 
terson went  to  a  Santa  Barbara  hospital 
for  treatment,  Miss  Ethel  Gale  and  Miss 
Ethel  Walker  have  been  in  charge  and 
did  a  very  effective  piece  of  work  under 
somewhat  difficult  conditions. 

Book  Week  was  observed  both  at  the 
Main  Library  and  at  the  Mayfield  Branch. 
At  the  Palo  Alto  Library  original  illus- 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


49 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued 
Palo  Alto — Continued 
trations  for  Howard  Pease's  Shanghai 
Passage  were  on  exhibition.  Mr  Pease 
is  a  resident  of  Palo  Alto.  Story  hours 
for  small  children  were  conducted  at  the 
Mayfield  Branch  and  at  the  Mayfield 
School  by  Miss  Dorothy  Hamilton  of 
the  library   staff. 

Beginning  November  27,  in  the  Library 
Exhibition  Gallery,  the  Palo  Alto  Art 
Club  opened  a  two  weeks'  exhibition  of 
arts  and  crafts,  the  work  of  members. 
Under  the  auspices  of  the  Art  Club,  a 
lecture  on  Old  Masters  by  Mr  F.  H. 
Marshall  was  given  in  the  gallery  on 
December  13,  and  Professor  C.  B.  Wing 
spoke  on  the  California  State  Parks  for 
the  Garden  Club  December  3,  also  in 
the  librai'y  gallery. 

Mrs  Grace  R.  Helliwell  of  the  1929 
class  of  the  University  of  California 
School  of  Librarianship,  has  been  a  mem- 
ber of  the  library  staff  since  August  15, 
1929,  taking  the  place  of  Miss  Harriet 
Warner,  who  is  on  leave  of  absence  at- 
tending the  University  of  California 
School  of  Librarianship  in  Berkeley. 
Anne  Hadden,  Lib'n. 

San  Jose 

San  Jose  Free  Public  Libeary.  Mrs 
Edith  Daley,  Lib'n. 

The  past  year  brought  to  the  library 
several  changes — notably  the  resignations 
of  three  members  of  the  staff.  Owing  to 
ill  health,  Clarisse  Friant,  for  years  the 
institution's  splendid  cataloger,  was 
forced  to  resign,  her  place  being  taken 
by  the  assistant  cataloger,  Grace  M.  Cox. 
Dorothy  Donovan  left  library  work  to 
take  up  the  profession  of  nursing,  and 
Mrs  Bertha  Phillips,  juvenile  librarian, 
moved  to  Burlingame,  where  the  Phil- 
lips' home  is  now  established.  Her  posi- 
tion is  now  filled  by  Edna  K.  Bell. 

Book  Week,  with  hundreds  of  lovely 
books  and  the  Christmas  motif  for  decora- 
tion, resulted  in  more  than  three  thousand 
visitors  and  scores  of  new  jvivenile  appli- 
cations. The  "hidden  title  contest," 
featuring  a  fairy  story  containing  121 
book  titles  (written  by  the  librarian), 
attracted  many  children.  Prizes  were 
beautiful  books. 

4 — 7.3829 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued 

San  Jose — Continued 
During  the  two  weeks  preceding  Book 
Week  the  entire  main  floor  of  the  build- 
ing was  redecorated,  library  service  dur- 
ing this  period  of  stress,  being  given  in 
the  juvenile  department  downstairs.  With 
cleanliness  and  the  cream  tint  of  walls 
and  ceiling,  the  main  reading  room  now 
seems  to  have  gained,  not  only  in  com- 
fort, but  in  spaciousness.  The  report  for 
the  fiscal  year,  which  closed  Nosrember 
.30,  1929,  showed  an  increase  over  the 
previous  year  of  21,907,  the  total  circu- 
lation being  250,399. 

Mrs  Edith  Daley,  Lib'n. 

Stanford   University 

JLeland  Stanford  Junior  Univer- 
sity Library.  Dr.  Ray  Lyman  Wilbur, 
Pres.  (on  leave  of  absence).  Robert  E. 
Swain,  Acting  Pres.  Nathan  Van  Pat- 
ten, Director  of  the  University  Libraries. 

The  first  meeting  of  the  year  of  the 
Stanford  Library  Professional  Club  was 
held  Tuesday,  October  8.  Mr  George  T. 
Clark,  Director  of  the  Libraries,  Emeri- 
tus, spoke  on  The  Unfulfilled  Promise, 
giving  some  incidents  recently  discovered 
by  him  in  his  research  on  the  life  of 
Senator  Stanford.  These  meetings  will 
be  held  twice  a  month. 

Ethel  E.  Emerson, 
Sec.  of  Stanford  Library  Club. 

SANTA   CRUZ  COUNTY 

( Twenty -sixth   class) 
County  seat,  Santa  Cruz. 
Area,  425  sq.  mi.     Pop.  26,269. 
Assessed    valuation    $30,237,372     (tax- 
able for  county  .$26,027,869). 

SHASTA  COUNTY 

(Thirty-fifth  class) 
County  seat.  Redding. 
Area,  4050  sq.  mi.     Pop.  13,311. 
Assessed    valuation    $25,611,878    (tax- 
able for  county  $15,081,270). 

SIERRA  COUNTY 

(Fifty-sixth  class) 
County   seat,   Downieville. 
Area,  957  sq.  mi.     Pop.  1783. 
Assessed  valuation  $3,206,857   (taxable 
for  county  $2,802,355). 


50 


XEWS  NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


:Jan.,  1930 


SIERRA     CO. — Continued 

Sierra  Co.  Free  Library.  Miss  Kath- 
eriue  R.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

A  brancli  library  was  established  at 
Lincoln's  Potosi  Mining  Co.  Twenty- 
five  men  at  this  mine  are  snowed  in  for 
the  winter  and  appreciate  library  books. 
H.  R.  Fowler  is  custodian. 

Katherine  R.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

SISKIYOU  COUNTY 

(Thirty-third   class) 
County  seat,   Yreka. 
Area,  6079  sq.  mi.    Pop.  18,545. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,832,171     (tax- 
able for  county  $21,754,500). 

SOLANO   COUNTY 

( Nineteenth    class ) 
County  seat,  Fairfield. 
Area,  911  sq.  mi.     Pop.  40,602. 
Assessed    valuation    $41,301,897     (tax- 
able for  county  $33,942,910). 

Solano  Co.  Free  Library,  Fairfield. 
Miss  Clara  B.  DiUs,  Lib'n. 

The  Solano  County  Free  Library  re- 
ports a  busy  three  months,  with  Chil- 
dren's Book  Week  specially  stressed.  All 
of  the  Parent-Teacher  organizations  in 
Vallejo  requested  talks  about  children's 
reading,  and  these  visits  to  them  have 
made  for  more  reading  and  finer  coopera- 
tion with  the  county  library.  Displays 
in  all  of  the  libraries  made  the  Book 
Week  celebration  very  widespread. 

On  December  Sth,  the  headquarters  of 
the  library  were  partially  destroyed  by 
fire,  which  started  in  the  upper  part  of 
Armijo  High  School  and  spread  to  the 
wing  where  the  library  was  located.  The 
office  where  the  records  were  kept  was 
the  room  that  suffered  most  from  fire, 
and  later  water  added  to  the  damage. 
The  work  of  rescuing  the  books  was 
started  at  once  and  the  necessity  of  a 
location  into  which  the  remaining  books 
could  be  moved  was  solved  by  the  Suisun 
American  Legion.  The  men  of  this  post 
at  once  offered  their  building  for  tem- 
porary quarters  and  now  the  reconstruc- 
tion work  has  commenced.  The  insurance 
adjustment  has  not  been  made  as  yet 
but  will  be  as  soon  as  it  is  possible  to 
estimate  the  loss  and  ascertain  the  num- 
ber of  books  destroyed. 

Clara  B.  Dills,  Lib'n. 


SONOMA  COUNTY 

(Fourteenth  class) 
County  seat,  Santa  Rosa. 
Area,  1540  sq.  mi.     Pop.  51,990. 
Assessed    valuation    $.55,733,14:)    (tax- 
able for  county  $47,345,797). 

STANISLAUS  COUNTY 

(Sixteenth  class) 
County  seat,  Modesto. 
Area,  1486  sq.  mi.     Pop.  43,557. 
Assessed    valuation    $66,186,191     (tax- 
able for  county  $57,240,460). 

Stanislaus  Co.  Free  Library',  Mo- 
desto.   Miss  Bessie  B.  Silverthorn,  Lib'n. 

The  county  librarian  gave  a  talk  before 
the  Lincoln  School  P.-T.  A.  November 
5,  on  books  of  interest  to  parents  and 
teachers,  and  described  Book  Week  and 
its  purpose. 

November  17  to  23  was  devoted  to  Book 
Week  activities.  At  the  main  library 
there  was  a  display  of  children's  books 
and  booklists  were  distributed  to  parents. 
An  "Earn  a  book— own  a  book''  campaign 
was  carried  out  with  the  cooperation  of 
the  schools  and  the  book  stores.  The 
library  compiled  graded  lists  of  desirable 
books,  the  schools  distributed  them  as 
well  as  the  librax-y,  and  the  book  stores 
stocked  the  books  listed.  The  schools 
supervised  the  essays  written  by  their 
pupils  on  "How  I  earned  the  book  I 
bought  and  why  I  chose  the  book  I  did," 
and  the  best  ones  were  posted  at  the 
library  and  decorated  with  blue,  red  and 
white  ribbon  awards.  In  addition  the 
library  pasted  a  special  bookplate  in  each 
book  bought  when  brought  to  the  library 
by  the  child  for  that  purpose. 

In  the  c-ounty  the  schools  sent  in  the 
best  book  i-eviews  from  their  pupils, 
and  these  were  posted  in  the  school  de- 
partment and  given  first,  second  and  third 
awards  of  blue,  red  and  white  ribbon. 
Book  plays  from  "Child  Life"  were  dis- 
tributed to  each  school,  and  suggestions 
sent  also  for  various  activities  suitable 
to  the  different  grades  for  the  week. 

The  two  Modesto  book  stores  gave  two 
books  each  for  the  best  book  reviews 
from  the  upper  classes  of  the  high  school 
and  junior  college  of  Modesto,  respec- 
tively. The  county  librarian  acted  as 
final     judge    of     these     essays     and     at 


1 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


51 


STANISLAUS  CO.— Continued 

the  school  and  college  assemblies  pre- 
sented the  book  orders  to  the  winners. 

November  16,  the  main  library  had  a 
display  of  pictures  of  sculpture  in  the 
assemblj^  room,  seventeen  of  them  being 
reproductions  of  the  most  outstanding 
pieces  from  the  exhibition  at  the  San 
Francisco  Palace  of  the  Legion  of  Honor. 
The  American  Association  of  University 
Women  held  their  November  meeting  at 
the  library  that  day,  with  Mrs  Rose  V. 
S.  Berry,  as  the  speaker  on  ''Modern 
American  Sculpture."  She  used  the  pic- 
tures around  the  room  as  illustrations  for 
her  address  and  was  enthusiastic  over 
the  good  examples  selected,  which  were 
from  the  county  library  picture  collection. 

During  December  the  children's  room 
at  main  library  was  entirely  rearranged 
with  low  shelving,  which  it  got  from 
exchange  with  the  school  department ; 
while  the  school  department  also  changed 
its  appearance  with  high  shelving  and 
an  additional  long  table  from  the  chil- 
dren's room.  One  of  the  special  hits 
made  with  the  children  recently  has  been 
the  recovering  of  the  stereograph  boxes 
in  rainbow  tints  by  Foster  &  Futernick. 
The  lovely  bright  colors  are  much  more 
attractive  than  the  former  blacks  and 
grays,  and  the  circulation  of  the  stereo- 
graphs is  brisker  than  ever  before. 

Mr  Sol  Sheridan,  author  of  "The  Little 
Spotted  Seal,"  recently  published  by  Har- 
per's, talked  to  the  children  of  the  story 
hour  group  and  their  friends  and  parents, 
in  December.  He  told  of  his  adventures 
in  many  parts  of  the  world  and  of  how 
he  came  to  write  his  latest  story. 

Two  of  the  county  branches  have 
changed  their  quarters  for  the  better. 
In  November,  Denair  Branch  moved  into 
a  large,  light  room  in  the  new  post  office 
building,  and  has  more  shelving  and  is 
centrally  located.  The  Valley  Home 
Branch,  which  occupied  a  rented  building 
for  many  years,  bought  the  building  and 
marched  up  the  highway  several  hundred 
yards  with  it,  placing  it  on  a  concrete 
foundation  on  a  lot  given  the  county  for 
the  library.  The  custodian,  Mrs  Alice 
Smylie,  is  happy  over  plans  for  repaint- 
ing, refurnishing  and  planting  shrubs  and 
lawn. 

The  county  librarian  was  complimented 


STANISLAUS  CO.— Continued 
with  a  delightful  surprise  on  her  last 
visit  to  the  Knights  Ferry  Branch,  when 
the  custodian,  Mrs  Anna  Winkler,  in- 
vited in  the  ladies  of  the  vicinity  to  meet 
her.  After  gay  general  conversation  and 
"visiting,"  the  ladies  asked  to  hear  about 
the  county  librarian's  A'isit  to  Alaska, 
which  she  enjoyed  some  years  ago  with 
Miss  Cornelia  D.  Pro  vines.  On  the  ar- 
rival of  the  teachers  from  the  Knights 
Ferry  School,  Mrs  Winkler  served  very 
delicious  refreshments. 

Mrs  Royal  Ballard,  custodian  of  the 
Waterford  Branch,  recently  returned 
from  a  visit  to  her  old  home  in  New 
England. 

Mrs  George  Pfarr,  custodian,  Empire 
Branch,  is  enjoying  a  visit  to  eastern 
cities  with  her  husband,  who  will  attend 
a  meeting  of  the  Federal  Farm  Board, 
in  Washington,  D.  C. 

Bessie  B.  Silverthoen,  Lib'n. 

SUTTER  COUNTY 

(Forty-first  class) 
County  seat,  Yuba  City. 
Area,  611  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,115. 
Assessed    valuation    $23,511,685    (tax- 
able for  county  $18,542,232). 

TEHAMA  COUNTY 

(Thirty-sixth   class) 
County  seat,  Red  Bluff. 
Area,  3200  sq.  mi.    Pop.  12,882. 
Assessed    valuation    $23,208,869    (tax- 
able for  county  $19,134,190). 

Tehama  Co.  Feee  Library,  Red 
Bluff.     Miss  Anne   Bell   Bailey,   Lib'n. 

The  quarter  opened  auspiciously  from 
the  librarian's  point  of  view  with  her 
appointment  for  another  term  of  four 
years. 

The  librarian  has  visited  most  of  the 
branches  and  schools,  looking  over  the 
libraries  and  talking  to  the  children  about 
books. 

In  several  of  the  schools  the  children 
have  formed  library  clubs  and  are  con- 
ducting the  business  of  the  library  with 
the  teacher  acting  as  adviser.  In  one 
school  a  librarian  is  elected  by  the  pupils 
every  three  months  and  there  is  a  lively 
spirit  of  competition  between  the  li- 
brarians to  turn  in  the  largest  report  of 


52 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


TEHAMA  CO.— Continued 

circulation.  Let  me  add  here  that  this 
school  has  been  most  remiss  heretofore 
in  turning  in  the  monthly  report  of  circu- 
lation. The  condition  of  the  library 
shelves  also  enters  into  the  contest.  At 
the  end  of  the  year,  that  school  showing 
the  best  kept  library  shelves  and  the  best 
circulation  will  have  some  special  recog- 
nition from  the  County  Library. 

Tehama  County  Library  serves  but 
four  large  schools.  Gerber  Union  School, 
one  of  the  largest  schools  in  the  county, 
has  struggled  with  its  library  problem 
for  several  years  without  much  success, 
but  finally  has  realized  the  necessity  of 
centralizing  its  collection.  This  year  the 
librarian  receives  a  small  remuneration 
for  the  extra  work  and  time  and  the 
results  are  more  than  satisfactory.  All 
orders  come  through  the  librarian  and 
all  teachers  visiting  the  main  office  must 
have  their  orders  O.  K.'d  by  the  librarian 
before  books  are  withdrawn.  Although 
there  is  a  branch  library  in  Gerber,  the 
school  issues  miscellaneous  books  to  the 
children  because,  being  a  union  school, 
there  are  many  pupils  coming  from  a 
distance  who  are  conveyed  by  the  bus 
and  are  prevented  from  visiting  the  town 
branch. 

In  Los  Molinos  School,  all  books  of 
miscellaneous  character  are  provided  by 
the  branch.  Teachers  may  withdraw  any 
number  desired  for  a  limited  period  to  be 
used  in  class,  but  no  books  are  issued 
from  the  classroom  for  home  use.  The 
custodian  of  the  branch  has  special  graded 
shelves  of  books  "that  may  be  read  for 
credit"  (and  so  marked).  The  books' 
are  withdrawn  by  the  children  and  re- 
ported in  class  to  the  teachers  to  earn 
their  certificates  at  the  end  of  the  school 
year. 

Corning  Grammar  School  is  served  by 
the  library,  but  the  town  is  not  a  part 
of  the  county  library  system,  so  books 
for  home  reading  are  issued  from  the 
school.  Here  is  also  a  librarian  for  the 
school,  but  because  of  lack  of  room  there 
is  no  central  library.  While  the  scheme 
is  working  as  well  as  can  be  expected 
under  the  conditions,  the  Gerber  plan 
is  far  more  satisfactory. 

Vina,  the  other  large  school  of  the 
county,  is  served  by  a  teacher-librarian 
who  holds  library  hour  after  school  hours. 


TEHAMA  CO.— Continued 

No  juvenile  literature  is  sent  to  the  Vina 
Branch. 

Paskenta  Branch  reopened  October  17 
in  the  general  store  with  Mrs  Leo  Mor- 
rell  in  charge.  Paynes  Creek  lost  its 
enthusiastic  custodian,  Mrs  R.  H.  Ren- 
wick,  in  December,  but  the  library  was 
moved  to  the  home  of  Mrs  Joe  C.  Schnur, 
who  seems  to  be  carrying  on  with  equal 
zeal.  Red  Bank  Branch  suspended  in 
December,  because  of  the  removal  to  town 
of  Mrs  C.  S.  Bell,  who  has  been  the 
custodian  since  the  establishment  of  the 
branch  in  1917.  Vina  Branch  reopened 
in  October  in  Pritchett's  store  with  Miss 
Laura  O'Brien  in  charge.  Business  is 
humming  there,  due  largely  to  the  per- 
sonality of  Miss  O'Brien.  Plans  had 
been  made  to  open  the  branch  in  a  sepa- 
rate building,  but  as  the  majority  of  bor- 
rowers are  at  leisure  only  in  the  evening 
and  the  store  is  open  every  evening,  it 
seemed  best  to  place  the  books  there. 

Children's  Book  Week  was  without  any 
highlights  of  originality,  but  displays  were 
made  in  the  main  office  and  in  the  at- 
tractive windows  of  the  Los  Molinos 
Branch.  The  custodian  of  this  branch 
takes  great  pride  in  her  attractive  win- 
dow displays  which  she  keeps  going 
throughout  the  year.  Gerber  Branch  was 
unable  to  make  a  display  due  to  cramped 
quarters. 

The  librarian  spoke  on  Children's 
Books  at  the  November  meetings  of  the 
Red  Bluff  P.-T.  A.  and  the  Woman's 
Club  of  Antelope  Valley. 

At  a  teachers'  meeting  held  at  the  Red 
Bluff  High  School  in  December,  upon  the 
request  of  the  superintendent  of  schools, 
the  library  displayed  a  collection  of  books 
of  professional  interest  to  teachers.  The 
superintendent  of  schools  has  asked  the 
teachers  to  read  at  least  three  profes- 
sional books  during  the  year. 

The  county  librarian  has  been  requested 
to  sit  with  the  County  Board  of  Educa- 
tion at  their  regular  meetings  beginning 
with  the  January  meeting.  It  promises 
a  greater  understanding  of  conditions  and 
problems  confronting  both  the  Board  of 
Education  and  the  library. 

The  librarian  attended  the  annual 
meeting  at  Chico  of  the  Conference  of 
Rural  Schools  for  the  Northern  District 
in    December.      She    enjoyed    the   oppor- 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


53 


TEHAMA  CO.— Continued 
tunity  to  talk  about  the  library  at  a 
"Churchnite"  dinner  of  the  Red  Bluff 
Methodist  Church  October  16.  She  ap- 
peared before  the  Boys'  League  at  the 
high  school  in  some  humorous  readings 
October  29. 

Anne  Bell  Bailey,  Lib'n. 

Corning 

Corning  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary.    Arthur  L.   ShuU,  Prin. 

During  the  past  summer  we  moved  our 
high  school  library  into  a  larger  room. 
We  can  now  seat  three  to  four  times 
the  number  of  pupils  at  one  time  that 
we  could  in  the  smaller  room. 

We  have  found   this   a   great   help   in 
our  library  and  also  our  school  work. 
Arthur  L.  Shull,  Prin. 

Red  Bluff 

Herbert  Kraft  Free  [Public]  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Neva  M.  Reno,  Lib'n. 

A  contribution  to  the  Kraft  Library 
has  just  been  made  by  Mrs  S.  M.  Black 
of  this  city,  who  has  turned  over  64  vol- 
umes to  the  institution.  The  books  in- 
clude some  valuable  historical  works  and 
considerable  fiction. — Red  Bluff  News, 
02 

TRINITY  COUNTY 

(Fifty-fifth  class) 
County  seat,  Weaverville. 
Area,  3276  sq.  mi.    Pop.  2551. 
Assessed    valuation    $3,781,373     (tax- 
able for  county  $3,328,125). 

TULARE  COUNTY 

(Eleventh,  class) 
County  seat,  Visalia. 
Area,  4863  sq.  mi.    Pop.  59,031. 
Assessed    valuation    $97,250,548    (tax- 
able for  county  $72,716,340). 

Tulare  Co.  Free  Library,  Visalia. 
Miss  Gretchen  Flower,  Lib'n. 

Ellen  MacGregor  was  appointed  cata- 
loger  at  a  salary  of  $150.  the  appoint- 
ment to  be  effective  October  15,  1929. 
Edith  R.  Morse  was  appointed  children's 
librarian  at  the  same  salary,  her  appoint- 
ment effective  November  1. 

Hot  Springs  School  District  Branch 
was  established  October  11,  at  California 
Hot  Springs. 

GEErrcHEN  Flower,  Lib'n. 


TULARE  CO.— Continued 
Mrs   C.   Morey   Cramer,   formerly   and 
for  a  long  time  custodian  of  Strathmore 
Branch,   passed  away  November  20. 


TUOLUMNE  COUNTY 

(Forty-sixth   class) 
County  seat,   Sonora. 
Area,  2292  sq.  mi     Pop.  7768. 
Assessed    valuation    $12,436,752    (tax- 
able for  county  $8,543,027). 

TuoLOMNE  Co.  Free  Library,  Sonoba. 
Mrs  Helen  R.  Dambacher.  Lib'n. 

Twain  Harte  School  District  joined 
the  Tuolumne  County  Library  in  July, 
1929.  Soulsbyville  School  District  is 
joining  in  January,  1930.  This  leaves 
but  one  school  district  out  of  the  County 
Library  system. 

Mrs  Helen  R.  Dambacher,  Lib'n. 


VENTURA  COUNTY 

(Twenty-third    class) 
County  seat,  Ventura. 
Area,  1850  sq.  m.     Pop.  28,724. 
Assessed  valuation  $119,364,140    (tax- 
able for  county  $107,300,580). 

Ventura  Co.  Free  Library,  Ven- 
tura.   Miss  Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n, 

Branches  were  established  at  Oak  View 
Gardens  and  Santa  Paula  Union  High 
School  December  16.  Stauffer  Branch 
was  also  reestablished  that  day. 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 

Santa  Paula 

Dean  Hobbs  Blanchabd  Memorial 
[Free  Public]  Library.  Mrs  Helen 
Field  Webster,  Acting  Lib'n. 

Miss  Mary  Boynton,  librarian  of  Dean 
Hobbs  Blanchard  Memorial  Librai'y  for 
the  past  nine  years,  will  leave  Santa 
Paula  about  December  8.  Miss  Boynton 
goes  to  take  charge  of  the  new  Beverly 
Hills  Library. — Santa  Paula  Review, 
N29 

Mrs  Helen  Field  Webster,  who  has 
been  an  employee  of  the  Dean  Hobbs 
Blanchard  Memorial  Library  for  several 
years,  will  act  as  librarian  pro  tem.  until 
a  selection  of  applicants  is  made  by  the 
board  of  trustees. — Santa  Paula  Chron- 
icle, D  6 


54 


NEWS  NOTES  OP   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


YOLO  COUNTY 

( Thirty-fourth   class ) 
County  seat,  Woodland. 
Area,  1017  sq.  mi.  Pop.  17,105. 
Assessed    valuation    $35,609,763    (tax- 
able for  county  $28,557,544). 


Woodland 

Woodland  Feee  [Public]  Llbbaby 
AND  Beanch,  Yolo  Co.  Feee  Libraey. 
Mrs  Irma  C.  Bruton,  Lib'n. 

The   librarian   gave    a    talk    on    "Chil- 


YOLO  CO.— Continued 

Woodland — Continued 

dren's  books  for  Christmas  purchase"  at 

the  Town  and  Country  Club  December  9. 

Mes  Iema  C.  Betjton,  Lib'n. 

YUBA  COUNTY 

( Fortieth    dass ) 
County  seat,  Marysville. 
Area,  625  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,375. 
Assessed    valuation    $21,978,516    (tax- 
able for  county  $17,593,995). 


vol.  25,  no.  1]  DIRECTORY  FOE  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES 


OO 


DIRECTORY  FOR  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES  AND  OTHER  ITEMS 
OF  GENERAL  INTEREST 


The  following  directory  is  based  on 
recommendations  received  from  the  libra- 
ries of  California.  New  recommendations 
and  corrections  will  be  welcomed  at  any 
time. 

SUPPLIES 
A.  L.  A. 
Headquarters. 

520  North  Michigan  ave.,  Chicago,  111. 

All  A.  L.  A.  publications  sold  from 
headquarters  except  1904  Catalog  which 
can  be  purchased  for  $1  from  Superin- 
tendent of  Documents,  Washington,  D.  C. 

Binding   and    Mending 
Binding. 

Cooperative  Binding  Co.,  330  Jackson 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Foster  &  Futernick  Co.,  444  Bryant  St., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Herring  &  Robinson,  1927  Howard  St., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Hicks-Judd  Co.,  1045  Sansome  st.,  San 

Francisco,  Calif. 
Pacific    Library    Binding    Co.,    770    E. 

Washington  st.,   Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Sacramento    Bookbindery,    309    J    St., 

Sacramento,  Calif. 
Silvius  and   Schoenbackler,  423  J   st., 

Sacramento,  Calif. 
Universal  West  Coast  Bindery,  164  N. 

Hill  ave.,  Pasadena,  Calif. 

Materials. 

Gaylord    Bros.,    44   N.    Stanislaus   St., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Blind 

Embossed   books,   etc.     Addresses   will 
be  furnished  by  the  State  Library. 

Book  Cases  and  Shelving 
Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Book   Packing    Bags 
Hoegee  Co.,  138-142  S.  Main  st.,  Los 
Angeles,  Calif. 


Book  Packing  Boxes 
Pacific  Box  Factory,  2600  Taylor  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Corrugated  Paper  Cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific     Glass    Co.,    15th    and 

Folsom  sts.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Richardson-Case      Paper      Co.,      1021 

Front  St.,  Sacramento,  Calif. 

Book  Plates 
Manhattan  Photogravure  Co.,  142  West 

27th  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Times-Mirror    Printing    and    Binding 

House,      118      S.      Broadway,      Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Western    Lithograph    Co.    600-610    E. 

Second  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Book  Pockets 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Hicks-Judd  Co.,  1045  Sansome  St.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave. 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

The  Zellerbach  Paper  Co.,  534  Battery 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Book    Stacks,    Metal    Furniture,    Etc. 

Art  Metal  Construction  Co.,  James- 
town, N.  Y. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

J.  Niederer  Co.,  3409  S.  Main  st.,  Los 
Angeles,  Calif. 

Van  Dorn  Iron  Works  Co.,  Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Book  Supports,  Bracket  and  Pedal  for 
Perforating  Stamp  and  Other  Me- 
chanical Appliances 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 
Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  St., 
Stockton,  Calif. 


56 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Book  Supports,   Etc. — Continued 

Librai-y  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion. Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Moiee-Klinkner  Co.,  365-369  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Book  Varnish 
Pacific    Library    Binding   Co.,    770   E. 
Washington   st.,   Los  Angeles,   Calif. 

Books 
Baker  &  Taylor  Co.,  55  5th  ave..  New 

York  City. 
Chivers  Book  Binding  Co.,  126  Nassau 

St.,  Brooklyn,  N.  T. 

For  books  In  Chivers  binding. 

Paul  Elder  &  Co.,  289  Post  st.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Emporium,  835-865  Market  st.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Himebaugh  &  Browne,  471  Fifth  ave.. 
New  York,  N.  Y. 

Holmes  Book  Co.,  274  14th  st.,  Oak- 
land, and  152  Kearny  st.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

H.  R.  Huntting  Co.,  Springfield,  Mass. 

Levinson's,  The  Book  Store,  1012  K  st., 
Sacramento,  Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Library  Depart- 
ment, 333  E.  Ontario  st.,  Chicago,  111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  st.. 
New  York  City. 

Newbegin's,  358  Post  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's  Book  Store  (C.  C.  Parker), 
520  W.  6th  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather  Gate  Bookshop,  2235  Telegraph 
ave.,  Berkeley,  Calif. 

Chas.  Scribner's  Sons,  597  5th  ave.. 
New  York,  N.  Y. 

G.  E.  Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33  E.  10th 
St.,  New  York.  N.  Y. 

Technical  Book  Co.,  525  Market  St., 
San  Frnncisco,  Calif. 

Technical  Publishing  Co.,  124  W.  4th 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

UniKlles   only    technical   books. 

T'nion  Library  Association,  118-120  E. 
25th  St.,  New  York  City. 


Books — Continued 

Vroman's  Book  Store,  329  E.  Colorado 

St.,  Pasadena. 
Harr    Wagner,    609    Mission    st.,    San 

Francisco,  Calif. 

Especially  western  books  by  western  authors. 

White  House,  Sutter  st.,  bet.  Grant 
ave.  and  Kearny  st,,  San  Francisco, 

Calif. 

English  Books  and  Publications. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33   E.   10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   F.   Stevens   &  Brown,  4  Trafalgar 
Square,  London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 

Foreign    Books   and   Publications    in 

Various  Languages. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33   E.  10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
E.  Steiger  &  Co.,  49  Murray  st..  New 

York,  N.  Y. 
B.  Westermann  Co.,  Inc.,  19  W.  46th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Fretich. 

French  Book  Store,  Alfred  Blanc  &  J. 
Delabriandais,  324  Stockton  st.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 
J.    Terquem,    19    Rue     Scribe,     Paris, 
France. 

Italian. 

A.  Cavalli  &  Co.,  255  Columbus  ave., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Spa7nsh. 

Victoriano  Suarez,  Madrid,  Spain. 

Law  Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney    Co.,   200  McAllister 

St.,  San  Francisco.  Calif. 
Matthew  Bender  &  Co.,  109  State  St., 

Albany,  N.  Y. 

School  Books. 

Milton  Bradley  Co.,  554  Mission  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

California  School  Book  Depository,  149 
New  Montgomery  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

Ginn  &  Co.,  45  Second  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co..  Library  Depart- 
ment. 333  E.  Ontario  st.,  Chicago,  111. 

Owen  Publishing  Co.,  554  Mission  st.^ 
San  Francisco.  Calif. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


DIRECTORY  FOR  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES 


57 


Books — Continued 
Sec!ON0-Hand  Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  st., 

New  York  C5ity. 
Mudie's    Select    Library,    30-34    New 

Oxford  St.,  London,  Bng. 
Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 

St..  I>os  Angeles,  Calif. 
Henry    Sotheran    &    Co.,    140    Strand, 

London,  W.  C.  2,  Bng. 
G.   B.   Stechert  &   Co.,  31-83   E.   10th 

at..  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   F.   Stevens  &  Brown,  4  Trafalgar 

Square,  London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 
A.  R.  Womrath,  21  W.  45th  st..  New 

York,  N.  Y. 

For  used  fiction. 

Especially  Californiana. 

Dawson's  Book  Shop,  627  S.  Grand 
ave.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

F.  M.  De  Witt,  620  14th  st.,  Oakland, 
Calif. 

Holmes  Book  Co.,  274  14th  st.,  Oak- 
land, and  1.52  Kearny  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

John  Howell,  328  Post  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets 

See  Furniture  and  Supplies. 

Catalog  Cards 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Sei-vice,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawraan  &  Erbe  Manufacturing  Co., 
132-140  Sutter  st.,  San  Francisco, 
and  727  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts 

H.  S.  Crocker  Co.,  565-571  Market  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
A.  J.  Nystrom  &  Co.,  Chicago,  111.,  Pub- 
lishers. (Local  Agent  M.  H.  B.  Beck- 
ley,   90    Second   st.,    San   Francisco, 
Calif.) 


Clippings 

Allen's  Press  Clipping  Bureau,  255 
Commercial  St.,  San  Francisco,  and 
626  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

County  Free  Library  Sticl<ers 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Cutter  Tables,  Size  Rulers,  Etc. 
Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  St.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Duplicating  Appliances 

Dandy  Duplicator. 

Dodge  &  Dent,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Edison  Rotary  Mimeograph. 

H.  S.  Crocker  Co.  (Agents),  565-571 
Market  st.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Filing  Cases 

See  Furniture  and  Supplies. 

Films 

For  Rent. 

American  Red  Cross  Films,  distributed 

by  University  of  California  Library, 

Berkeley,  Calif. 
Fox  Film  Corporation,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
National   Producers   Film   Service,   111 

Golden    Gate    ave.,    San    Francisco, 

Calif. 
Pathe   Exchange,   Inc.,   Non-Theatrical 

Dept.,    985    Market    st.,    San    Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
United    States    Forest    Service,    Ferry 

bldg.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
University     of     California,     Extension 

Division,  Berkeley,  Calif. 

Fine  Computer  and  Circulating  Library 
Calculator 

H.  S.  Hirshberg,  c/o  Western  Reserve 
University,  School  of  Library  Sci- 
ence, Cleveland,  Ohio. 

Furniture  and  Supplies 
Grimes-Stassforth  Stationery  Co.,  737- 
739  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave.. 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 


58 


NEWS   NOTES  OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Furniture    and    Supplies — Continued 
Purnell  Stationery  Ck).,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 
Rucker-Fuller   Desk   Co.,    677   Mission 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Tawman    &    Erbe    Manufacturing    Co., 
132-140    Sutter    st.,    San    Francisco, 
and  727  S.   Spring  st.,   Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing  Cases  for  Music. 

Los  Angeles  Desk  Co.,  848  S.  HUl  St., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Globes 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  5235-7  Ravens- 
wood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
agent :  A.  B.  Maine,  Box  635,  Arcade 
Station,  Los  Angeles,  Calif.) 

A.  J.  Nystrom  &  Co.,  Chicago,  111.,  Pub- 
lishers. (Local  Agent  M.  H.  E.  Beck- 
ley,  90  Second  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif.) 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento,  Calif. 

Rand-McNaUy  Co.,  125  E.  Sixth  st., 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  St., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

C.  P.  Weber  &  Co.,  985  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Magazine    Binders 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Elbe  File  and  Binder  Co.,  215-217 
Greene  st..  New  York,  N.  T. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  St., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Gem  Binder  Co.,  65  W.  Broadway, 
New  York. 

Wm.  G.  Johnston  &  Co.,  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Ser\ice,  Ina,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Magazines 
See  Periodicals. 

Maps 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  5235-7  Ravens- 
wood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
agent :  A.  B.  Maine,  Box  635,  Arcade 
Station,   Los  Angeles,   Calif.) 

A.  J.  Nystrom  &  Co.,  Chicago,  111.,  Pub- 
lishers. (Local  Agent  M.  H.  E.  Beck- 
ley,  90  Second  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif.) 


Maps — Continued 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento,  Calif. 

Rand-McNally  Co.,  125  E.  Sixth  st., 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

C.  F.  Weber  &  Co.,  985  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Music 

Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  Kearny  and  Sut- 
ter sts.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

G.  Schirmer,  3  E.  43d  st..  New  York, 
N.  Y. 

Pamphlet    and    Multi-Binders,    and 
Pamphlet   Boxes 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  St., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Paste 

Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus   st., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Paciiic    Library    Binding    Co.,    770    E. 

Washington   st.,   Los   Angeles,   Calif. 

Pasting    Machines 

A.  G.  Prior,  136  Liberty  st..  New 
York,  N.  Y. 

Perforating  Stamps 

B.  F.  Cummins  Co.,  Chicago,  111. 
Moise-Klinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Periodicals 
Back  Volumes  and  Numbees. 

F.  W.  Faxon  Co.,  83-91  Francis  st., 
Back  Bay,  Boston,  Mass. 

F.  M.  De  Witt,  620  14th  st.,  Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific  Library  Binding  Co.,  770  E. 
Washington   st.,   Los  Angeles,   Calif. 

Universal  Library  Service,  2189  Wool- 
worth  bldg..  New  York  City. 

H.  W.  Wilson  Co.,  958-64  University 
ave..  New  York  City. 


SuBSCKiPTiON  Agencies. 

John    A.    Clow,    2925 
Pasadfeia,  Calif. 


N.    Lake    ave. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


DIRECTORY  FOR  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES 


59 


Periodicals — Continued 
F.   W.   Faxon   Co.,   83-91   Francis   st., 

Back  Bay,  Boston,  Mass. 
Franklin      Square     Agency,     Franklin 

Square,  New  York  City. 
Moore-Cottrell    Subscription    Agencies, 

North  Cohocton,  N.  Y. 
Mutual  Subscription  Agency,  602  Cro- 

zer  Bldg.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Pacific  News  Bureau,  643  S.  Olive  st., 

Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 
San  Fralicisco  News  Co.,  657  Howard 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
O.   E.   Stechert   &  Co.,  31-33   E.   10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

For  foreign  periodicals  only. 

Sunset  Subscription  Agency,  631 
South  West  Bldg.,  130  S.  Broadway, 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Pictures 
Braun  &  Co.,  Dornach,  Alsace,  France. 
Curtis    &    Cameron,     Copley     Square, 
Boston,  Mass. 

Especially  for  reproduction   of  American  art. 

Toni  Landau  Photo  Co.,  1  E.  45th  st., 

New  Y'ork,  N.  Y. 

(Formerly  Berlin  Photographic  Oo.) 
Perry  Pictures  Co.,  Maiden,  Mass. 
Vickery,  Atkins  &  Torrey.  550   Sutter 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Rubber   Stamps  and   Type 

Chipron  Stamp  Co.,  224  West  First 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Los  Angeles  Rubber  Stamp  Co.,  131  S. 
Spring  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif, 

Moise-Klinkner  Co.,  365-369  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Sleeper  Stamp  Co.,  528  J  st.,  Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales 
Fairbanks-Monse    &    Co.,     Spear    and 
Harrison  sts.,   San  Francisco,   Calif. 

Shelf  Label-Holders 
Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis, 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus    St., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Librai-y  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 


Signs 
Sam  H.  Harris,  631  S.  Spring  st.,  Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Tablet  &  Ticket  Co.,   004  Mission   st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Slides 

Geo.  Kanzee,  12  Geary  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Movie  Slides. 

Victor  Animatograph  Co.,  Davenport. 
Iowa. 

Stamp  Affixers 
Multipost  Co.,  Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Steel  Stacks 

See  Book  Stacks. 

Stereoscopic  Views 
Keystone  View  Co.,  Meadville,  Pa. 
W.  O.  Wright   (Agent  Keystone  View 

Co.),  832  Indian  Rock  ave.,  Berkeley, 

Calif. 
George  E.  Stone,  Carmel,  Calif. 

For  California  wild  flowers,  marine  life,   historic 

views. 

Typewriter   Ribbons 

L.  &  M.  Alexander,  444  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Remington  Typewriter  Co.,  240  Bush 
St.,  San  Francisco,  420  S.  Spring  St., 
Los  Angeles,  and  913  8th  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter  Inspection  Co.,  426  S. 
Spring  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Underwood  Typewriter  Co.,  531  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  430  S.  Broad- 
way, Los  Angeles,  and  611  J  st., 
Sacrajnento,  Calif. 

CALIFORNIA     LIBRARY    SCHOOLS 

Los  Angeles  Library  School.  For  full 
information,  write  to  Librarian,  Public 
Library,  Los  Angeles,  California. 

Riverside  Library  Service  School. 
For  full  information  write  to  Librarian, 
Public  iiibrary.  Riverside.  Calif. 

See,  also,  this  publication,  p.  43. 

University  of  California  School  of  Li- 
brarianship.  For  full  information  write 
to  Chairman,  School  of  Librarianship, 
University  of  California,  Berkeley,  Calif. 


60 


NEWS  NOTES   OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


AMERICAN  LIBRARY  ASSOCIA- 
TION 

Officers  for  1929-30  are: 

President,  Andrew  Keogh,  Librarian, 
Yale  University  Library,  New  Haven, 
Conn. 

1st  Yice  President,  Everett  R.  Perry, 
Librarian,  Public  Library,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

2d  Vice  President,  Jennie  M.  Flexner, 
Public  Library,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Secretary,  Carl  H.  Milam.  Chicago,  111. 

Treasurer,  Matthew  S.  Dudgeon,  Li- 
brarian, Public  Librai-y,  Milwaukee,  Wis. 

AMERICAN   ASSOCIATION   OF   LAW 
LIBRARIES 

Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 

President,  Frederick  W.  Schenk,  Law 
Librarian,  University  of  Chicago,  Chicago, 
111. 

1st  Yice  President,  S.  D.  Klapp,  Li- 
brarian, Minneapolis  Bar  Assoc,  Minne- 
apolis. Minn. 

2d  Vice  President,  Helen  S.  Moylan, 
University  of  Iowa  Law  Library,  Iowa 
City,  Iowa. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Arthur  S.  Mc- 
Daniel,  Asst.  Ln.  Association  of  the  Bar 
Library,  42  W.  44th  st..  New  York  City. 

CALIFORNIA  SCHOOL  LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 

Northern  Section — Polly  R.  Hatch, 
Polytechnic  High  School,  San  Francisco, 
President. 

Helen  Price,  University  High  School, 
Oakland,  Vice  President. 

Lillian  Morehouse,  Palo  Alto  Union 
High  School,  Palo  Alto,  Secretary. 

Mrs  Nell  B.  Fuller,  Modesto  Junior 
College,  Modesto,  Treasurer. 

Southern  Section — Rosa  B.  Cage,  Riv- 
erside Polytechnic  High  School,  River- 
side, President. 

Marjorie  Fullwood,  Franklin  Junior 
High  School,  Long  Beach,  Vice  President. 

Clara  E.  Purdum,  Mt.  Vernon  Junior 
High  School,  Los  Angeles,  Secretary. 

Lillian  Dickson,  Santa  Ana  High 
School  and  Junior  College,  Santa  Ana, 
Treasurer. 

LEAGUE  OF  LIBRARY  COMMIS- 
SIONS 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 

President,  Mrs  Lillian  B.  Griggs,  Sec- 


i  retary  and  Director,  North  Carolina  Li- 
brary Commission,  Raleigh,  N.  C. 

1st  Vice  President,  Malcolm  G.  Wyer, 
Librarian,  Denver  Public  Library,  Den- 
ver, Colo. 

I      2d  Vice  President,  Fannie  C.  Rawson, 
Secretary    and    Director,    State    Library 

j  Commission,  Frankfort,  Ky. 

I       Secretary-Treasurer,  Jane  Morey,  Sec- 

!  retary,     Missouri     Library     Commission, 

!  Jefferson  City,  Mo. 

j         NATIONAL  ASSOCIATION  OF 
I  STATE  LIBRARIES 

i      Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 
I      President,   Louis   J.    Bailey,    Director, 
Indiana  State  Library,  Indianapolis,  Ind. 
1st     Vice    President,     Mrs    Clare    E. 
Ausherman,    Librarian,    Wyoming    State 
Library,  Cheyenne,  Wyo. 

2d  Vice  President,  Carrie  L.  Brough- 
ton.  Librarian,  North  Carolina  State  Li- 
brary, Raleigh,  N.  C. 

Secretary- Treasurer,  Irma  A.  Watts, 
Reference  Librarian,  Pennsylvania  Legis- 
lative Reference  Bureau,  Harrisburg,  Pa. 

PACIFIC   NORTHWEST  LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1929-30  are: 

President,  Ellen  Garfield  Smith,  Li- 
brarian, Public  Library,  Walla  Walla, 
Wash. 

1st  Yice  President,  Sarah  Virginia 
Lewis,  Public  Library,  Seattle,  Wash. 

2d  Vice  President,  John  Hosie,  Libra- 
rian, Provincial  Library,  Victoi'ia,  B.  C. 

Secretary,  Mirpah  G.  Blair,  State  Li- 
brary, Salem,  Ore. 

Treasurer,  Ora  L.  Maxwell,  Public 
Library,  Spokane,  Wash. 

SPECIAL     LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 

President,  William  Alcott,  Librarian, 
Boston  Gloie,  Boston,  Mass. 

1st  Vice  President,  Florence  Bradley, 
Librarian,  Metropolitan  Life  Insurance 
Co.,  New  York  City. 

2d  Vice  President,  Margaret  Reynolds, 
Librarian,  First  Wisconsin  National 
Bank,  Milwaukee,  Wis. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Mary  H.  Brigham,  11 
Nisbet  St.,  Providence,  R.  I. 


' 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


DIRECTORY  FOR  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES 


61 


Treasurer,  Elizabeth  O.  CuUen,  Refer- 
ence Librarian,  Bureau  of  Railway  Eco- 
nomics. Washington,  D.  C. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CHAPTER,  NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL  LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1930  are: 

President,  Thomas  Cowles,  California 
Academy  of  Sciences. 

Vice  President,  Mrs  Amy  M.  Caya, 
California   State  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

Secretary,  Margaret  Miller,  Standard 
Oil  Co.  of  California,  Dept.  of  Economics. 

SOUTHERN  CALIFORNIA  CHAP- 
TER, NATIONAL  SPECIAL 
LIBRARIES  ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1929-19.30  are: 

President,  Ralph  M.  Whiting,  Munici- 
pal Reference  Department,  Los  Angeles 
Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Vice  President,  Anna  F.  Frey,  Western 
Precipitation  Co.,  Los  Angeles. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Helen  L.  Allen,  956 
North  Brand  blvd.,   San  Fernando. 

Treasurer,  Margaret  E.  Addison, 
Security-First  National  Bank. 

PASADENA  LIBRARY  CLUB 

Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 
President,  Willard  O.  Waters. 
Secretary- Treasurer,       Mrs       Patricia 
Duteher,  Pasadena  Public  Library. 

ORANGE  COUNTY   LIBRARY  CLUB 

Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 

President,  Mary  Campbell,  FuUerton 
Public   Library. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Olive  M.  Potter, 
Anaheim  Public  Library. 

SAN  ANTONIO  LIBRARY  CLUB 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 

President,  Bessie  Sheppard,  Pomona 
Public  Library. 

Secretary,  Alberta  Schaefer,  Ontario 
Public  Library. 

CONFERENCE  OF  COLLEGE  AND 
UNIVERSITY  LIBRARIANS  OF 
SOUTHERN  CALIFORNIA 

Officers  for  1929-30  are: 

President,  Mrs  Ethelene  M.  Kitching, 
Librarian.  Fullerton  Union  High  School 
and  Junior  College. 


Secretary,  Dr  Marcus  Skarstedt,  Li- 
brarian, Whittier  College. 

EAST   BAY    LIBRARY   COUNCIL 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 

Chairman,  Susan  T.  Smith,  Librarian, 
Berkeley  Public  Library. 

Secretary,  Jean  D.  Baird,  Alameda 
County  Free  Library. 

ALUMNAE  ASSOCIATION  OF  THE 
UNIVERSITY  OF  CALIFORNIA 
AND   STATE    LIBRARY   SCHOOLS 

Officers  for  1928-29  are: 

President,  Mrs  Dorotha  D.  Elliott, 
Fresno  High  School,  Fresno. 

Vice  President,  Ruth  Steinmetz,  Stan- 
ford  University. 

Secretary,  Mary  Dornin,  University  of 
California,  Berkeley. 

Treasurer,  Margaret  Girdner,  Galileo 
High  School,  San  Francisco. 

EMPLOYMENT    BUREAU 

The  State  Library  registers  all 
library  workers  in  California  who  are 
looking  for  positions  and  all  from  outside 
the  state  who  wish  to  come  here.  Also 
it  will  be  glad  to  know  of  libraries  that 
want  head  librarians  or  assistants  in  any 
branch  of  their  work.  In  writing  for 
recommendations,  libraries  are  urged  to 
be  as  specific  as  possible,  especially  in 
regard  to  time  position  must  be  filled  and 
salary  offered.  A  librarian  who  wishes 
to  be  dropped  from  the  Employment 
Bureau  list  and  a  library  that  fills  a  posi- 
tion for  which  it  has  asked  a  recom- 
mendation will  help  the  work  greatly  by 
notifying  the  State  Library  at  once.  For 
further  information,  write  to  the  State 
Library,  Sacramento,  California. 

A   USEFUL   LIST 

A  recent  Special  Libraries  Association 
publication  is  "Descriptive  list  for  use  in 
acquiring  and  discarding  United  States 
government  periodical  mimeographed 
statements,"  in  which  business  librarians, 
and  also  statisticians  and  research 
workers,  will  be  interested.  It  shows  just 
what  current  industrial,  commercial  and 
financial  releases  of  a  statistical  nature 
are  being  issued  by  the  various  govern- 
ment bureaus.  Lists  of  the  more  for- 
mal printed  publications  of  the  govern- 
ment   have    always    been    available,    but 


62 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


never  of  the  informal  mimeographed  re- 
ports. The  bibliography  also  indicates 
what  information  becomes  out-dated,  and 
when  and  how.  It  may  be  obtained  from 
the  headquarters  of  the  Special  Libraries 
Association  at  11  Nisbet  street,  Provi- 
dence, R.  I. ;  the  price  is  $1.75. 

FELLOWSHIP    GRANTS    FOR 
LIBRARIANSHIP 

Fellowship  grants  for  study  and  re- 
search in  library  problems  will  be  avail- 
able to  a  limited  number  of  librarians 
through  a  fund  set  aside  by  the  Carnegie 
Corporation  of  New  York. 

The  purpose  of  the  grant  is  to  enable 
persons  who  have  shown  promise  of 
capacity  to  contribute  to  the  advancement 
of  the  library  profession,  to  pursue  a  year 
of  study  in  connection  with  an  educa- 
tional institution  approved  by  the  Ad- 
visory Group  on  Librai*y  Grants. 

In  general,  candidates  should  be  gradu- 
ates of  approved  colleges  or  universities 
and  should  have  had  one  year's  work  in 
a  library  school,  but  these  requirements 
may  be  waived  in  exceptional  cases. 

The  stipend  will  be  $1,500  or  more  and 
will  vai'y  according  to  the  requirements 
of  individual  students.  When  warranted, 
the  stipend  may  be  renewed  for  a  second 
year. 

Application  for  fellowship  grants  for 
the  school  year  1930-31  should  be  filed 
before  March  1,  1930,  with  the  Advisory 
Group  on  Library  Fellowship  Grants, 
Carnegie  Corporation,  522  Fifth  Avenue, 
New  York.  Applications  will  be  acted 
upon  before  May  1.  and  applicants  will  be 
notified  as  soon  as  possible. 

BOOKSELLERS'  CONVENTION 

Librarians,  booksellers  and  publishers 
are  all  interested  in  the  same  thing : 
books.  Publishers  Avant  to  secure  as 
many  good  manuscripts  as  the  public 
will  take  in  printed  form.  Booksellers 
are  anxious  for  the  printing  presses  to 
grind  steadily,  so  long  as  they  turn  out 
volumes  which  show  no  tendencies  of 
wanting  to  take  up  permanent  residence 
on  the  shelves  of  their  shops.  And  li- 
brarians have  never  yet  had  money 
enough    to    satisfy    the   pi;blic's    appetite 


for  books  of  several  kinds.  These  three 
groups  should  have  much  in  common.  The 
booksellers  seem  to  find  library  conven- 
tions worth  while.  Now  the  booksellers 
are  reciprocating :  they  hold  their  West- 
ern Division  Conference  in  Los  Angeles 
on  April  23-26;  and  are  inviting  li- 
brarians   to    mingle   with  them. 

The  Publicity  Committee,  of  which 
Mr  Ernest  Dawson  of  Los  Angeles  is 
chairman,  has  just  sent  out  the  follow- 
ing announcement : 

"Will  Rogers  has  consented  to  act  as 
toastmaster !  You  know  the  important 
feature  of  a  banquet  is  the  toastmaster ; 
he  can  make  or  break  the  evening. 

"This  banquet  we  are  talking  about  is 
just  one  of  the  many  interesting  features 
of  the  Second  Annual  Western  Conven- 
tion of  the  American  Booksellers  Asso- 
ciation. 

"Now  that  the  strenuous  holiday  sea- 
son is  over  you  have  something  to  look 
forward  to  :  during  the  week  of  April  20, 
1930  (to  be  exact,  April  23  to  26),  you're 
going  to  enjoy  the  contact  with  other 
congenial  booksellers  and  book-lovers ; 
you're  going  to  have  the  opportunity  of 
listening  to  short,  snappy,  authoritative 
talks  on  many  important  problems  eon- 
fronting  you ;  you're  going  to  'sit  in' 
on  round  table  discussions  of  those  prob- 
lems ;  you're  going  to  enjoy  the  best 
talent,  the  best  entertainers  and  the 
best  good-fellowship  that  the  book  trade 
of  Los  Angeles,  ably  assisted  by  the 
publishers  and  their  travelers,  can  as- 
semble. 

"Headquarters  will  be  located  in  the 
Biltmore  Hotel.  There  will  center  the 
activities  of  the  convention  in  so  far  as 
meetings,  meals  and  entertainment  are 
concerned ;  all  out-of-doors  will  be  at 
your  command  for  pleasure  trips  between 
sessions  and  during  those  evenings  not 
devoted  to  the  banquet  and  the  dinner 
dance. 

"All  signs  point  to  a  good  attendance 
from  the  entire  coast,  with  leading  East- 
erners on  hand  to  make  this  an  even 
more  successful  and  worthwhile  gather- 
ing from  your  standpoint  than  the  first 
venture  last  year  at  San  Francisco. 

"Don't  miss  it !" 


vol.  25.  no.  1]  CALIFORNIA  LIBRAEY   ASSOCIATION 


63 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION 


OFFICERS 

President,  Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock,  Kern 
County  Free  Library,  Bakersfield. 

Vice  President,  John  B.  Kaiser,  Free 
Library,  Oakland. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Hazel  G.  Gibson, 
P.  O.  Box  189,   Sacramento. 

Trustees  Section 

President,  Mrs  J,  Wells  Smith,  Trus- 
tee Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Secretary,  Miss  B.  Kate  Rea,  Trustee 
Public  Library,  Anaheim. 

Municipal    Libraries   Section 
President,  Gertrude  E.  DeGelder,  Pub- 
lic Library,  FuUerton. 

Secretary,  Ruth  Ellis,  Public  Library, 
Whittier. 

Special  Libraries  Section 

President,  Anna  P.  Kennedy,  Alameda 
County  Medical  Society  Library,  Oak- 
land. 

Secretary,  Thomas  Cowles,  California 
Academy  of  Sciences  Library,  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

COMMITTEES 

Executive  Committee — The  President, 
Vice  President,  Secretary-Treasurer  and 
Mabel  R.  Gillis,  Sarah  E.  McCardle, 
Everett  R.  Perry,  Robert  Rea,  Mrs  Alice 
G.  Whitbeck,  Charles  F.  Woods. 

Auditing — Mrs  Alma  J.  Danford,  Pub- 
lic Library  Glendale,  chairman ;  Mrs 
Florence  E.  Robinson. 

Nominating — The  Constitution  provides 
for  a  "Nominating  Committee  consisting 
of  representatives  selected  by  the  respec- 
tive districts  at  their  district  meetings." 

Second  District,  Mrs  Alice  G.  Whit- 
beck; Eighth  District,  Katherine  R. 
Woods. 

Publications— Mrs  Faith  Holmes 
Hyers,  Public  Library,  Los  Angeles, 
chairman ;  Jeanne  F.  Johnson ;  Mrs 
Katherine  Wahrenbrock. 

■Resolutions — Stella  Himtington,  1254 
Taylor  st.,  San  Francisco,  chairman; 
Ellen  B.  Frink ;  Mrs  R.  A.  McNally. 

Certification — Mabel  R.  Gillis,  State 
Library    Sacramento,    chairman    (1930)  ; 


Susan  T.  Smith  (1931),  Eleanor  Hitt 
(1932),  Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt 
(1933),  Mary  Barmby   (1934). 

J.  L.  Gillis  Memorial — Milton  J.  Fer- 
guson, State  Library,  Sacramento,  chair- 
man ;  Mary  Barmby,  Eleanor  Hitt. 

Historical — George  T.  Clark,  Univer- 
sity Library,  Stanford  University,  chair- 
man ;  Sarah  E.  Bedinger,  Robert  E. 
Cowan,  Francis  B.  Graves,  Charles  S. 
Greene,  Alice  J.  Haines,  Joseph  C. 
Rowell. 

Legislative — Charles  F.  Woods,  Public 
Library,  Riverside,  chairman ;  Gretchen 
Flower,  Mrs  Frances  Bums  Linn,  Sarah 
E.  McCardle,  Althea  Warren. 

Library  Schools — Edith  M.  Coulter, 
University  of  California  Library,  chair- 
man ;  Helen  Evans,  Faith  E.  Smith. 

Membership — Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck, 
Contra  Costa  County  Free  Library,  Mar- 
tinez, chairman ;  1st  District,  Pauline 
Roy ;  2d  District,  Aimee  M.  Peters ;  3d 
District,  Clara  B.  Dills;  4th  District, 
Anne  Margrave ;  5th  District,  Nancy  C. 
Laugenour;  6th  District,  Mrs  Theodora 
R.  Brewitt;  7th  District,  Henry  A. 
Kendal ;  8th  District,  Katherine  R. 
Woods ;  9th  District,  Ida  M.  Reagan. 

Salaries — Blanche  GaUoway,  Madera 
County  Free  Library,  Madera,  chairman ; 
Mabel  Inness ;  Minette  L,  Stoddard. 

DISTRICT  OFFICERS  AND 
DISTRICTS 

First  District 

President,  Susan  T.  Smith,  Public  Li- 
brary, Berkeley. 

Secretary,  Jane  Isabel  Curtis,  Public 
Library,   Alameda. 

The  first  district  consists  of  the  follow- 
ing cities :  San  Francisco,  Alameda, 
Berkeley,  Oakland ;  and  the  following 
libraries :  Leland  Stanford  Junior  Uni- 
versity Library  and  Margaret  Carnegie 
Library,  MUls  College. 

Second  District 
President,     Mary     Barmby,     Alameda 
County  Free  Library,  Oakland. 


64 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Secretary,  Anne  Hadden,  Public  Li- 
brary,   Palo   Alto. 

The  second  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Alameda  (excepting  Ala- 
naeda,  Berkeley,  and  Oakland),  Contra 
Costa,  Monterey,  San  Benito,  San  Mateo, 
Santa  Clara  (excepting  Stanford  Univer- 
sity), Santa  Cruz. 

Third   District 

President,  Margaret  A.  Bamett,  Pub- 
lic Library  Santa  Rosa. 

Secretary,  Ruth  Hall,  Public  Library, 
Santa  Rosa. 

The  third  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Lake,  Marin,  Mendo- 
cino, Napa,  Solano,  Sonoma. 

Fourth  District 

President,  Bessie  B,  Silverthom, 
Stanislaus  County  Free  Library, 
Modesto. 

Secretary,  Alma  F.  Rossel,  McHenry 
Public  Library,  Modesto. 

The  fourth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Fresno,  Inyo,  Kem, 
Kings,  Madera,  Mariposa,  Merced,  Stanis- 
laus, Tulare,  Tuolumne. 

Fifth   District 

President,  Ida  E.  Condit,  Public  Li- 
brary, Stockton. 

Secretary,  Angeline  Orr,  Public  Li- 
brary,  Stockton. 

The  fifth  district  consists  of  the  follow- 
ing counties :  Alpine,  Amador,  Calaveras, 
El'  Dorado,  Mono,  Nevada,  Placer,  Sacra- 
mento, San  Joaquin,  Yolo. 

Sixth   District 

President,  Eleanor  Hitt,  San  Diego 
County  Free  Library,  San  Diego. 

Secretary,  Cornelia  D.  Plaister,  Public 
Library,  San  Diego. 

The  sixth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Imperial,  Los  Angeles, 
Orange,  Riverside,  San  Bernardino,  San 
Diego,  San  Luis  Obispo,  Santa  Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh  District 

President,  C.  E.  Graves,  Humboldt 
State  Teachers  College  Library,  Areata. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Virginia  Todd  Smith, 
Public  Library,  Areata. 

The  seventh  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Del  Norte,  Humboldt. 


Eighth   District 

President,  Lenala  A.  Martin,  Lassen 
County  Free  Library,  Susanville. 

Secretary,  Katherine  R.  Woods, 
Plumas  County  Free  Library,  Quincy. 

The  eighth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Lassen,  Modoc,  Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth   District 

President,  Mrs  Faye  K.  Russell,  Glenn 
County  Free  Library,  Willows. 

Secretary,  Elizabeth  Eubank,  Public 
Library,  Willows. 

The  ninth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Butte,  Colusa,  Glenn, 
Shasta,  Siskiyou,  Sutter,  Tehama,  Trinity, 
Yuba. 

ANNUAL  IVIEETING 

The  Annual  Meeting  will  be  held  at 
Los  Angeles,  June  23-28,  1930,  in  -con- 
junction with  the  American  Library 
Association  Conference.  A  special  time 
during  that  week  will  be  announced  later 
for  a  business  meeting  of  the  California 
Library  Association.  Otherwise  the  mem- 
bers will  participate  in  the  A.  L.  A. 
programs.  Headquarters  will  be  at  the 
Hotel    Biltmore. 

DISTRICT   MEETINGS 

Second  District  iVieeting 
A  meeting  of  the  Second  District  of  the 
California  Library  Association  was  held 
at  Asilomar,  on  the  Monterey  County 
coast,  from  October  11-13,  1929.  About 
sixty  library  workers  were  in  attendance. 
More  than  half  the  districts  of  the  C.  L.' 
A.  were  represented,  members  being  pre- 
sent from  the  First,  Second,  Third, 
Fourth  and  Fifth  districts.  There  was 
one  welcome  guest  from  afar,  Miss  Mary 
C.  Gardner  of  the  Rosenberg  Library, 
Galveston,   Texas. 

Mrs  C.  E.  Striening  of  the  Salinas  Pub- 
lic Library,  Miss  Etta  Eckhardt  of  the 
Monterey  Public  Library  and  Miss  Hor- 
tense  Berry,  Librarian  at  Carmel,  com- 
posed the  reception  committee. 

Arrivals  began  on  Friday  afternoon. 
Nothing  being  scheduled  for  Friday  even- 
ing, the  early  comers  had  opportunity  for 
informal  chats  in  front  of  the  open  fire 
in  Scripps  House,  and  a  walk  along  the 
beach  upon  which  the  surf  was  unusually 
high. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY    ASSOCIATION 


65 


Saturday  morning's  session  opened  at 
ten  o'clock  in  the  attractive  fireplace 
room  in  Merrill  Hall,  which  houses  the 
big  new  auditorium.  Easy  chairs,  sup- 
plemented by  straight  backed  ones,  were 
drawn  up  in  front  of  the  fireplace  beside 
which  the  speaker  stood. 

Miss  Edith  N.  Stanton,  manager  of 
Asilomar,  described  the  conference 
gronnds  and  welcomed  the  delegates. 
Asilomar  is  one  of  the  National  Confer- 
ence grounds  of  the  Y.  W.  C.  A.  and  is 
open  all  the  year  for  conferences  and 
individual  guests. 

An  interesting  paper  was  read  by  Miss 
Anna  P.  Kennedy,  Librarian  of  the  Ala- 
meda County  Medical  Library  on  Library 
Work  in  Institutions.  This  was  followed 
by  an  informal  discussion  of  the  service 
to  institutions  given  by  the  libraries 
represented  at  the  meeting. 

Miss  Susan  T.  Smith  spoke  on  Re- 
quired reading  for  the  library  assistant 
and  what  the  present  policy  is,  bringing 
out  the  facts  that  in  most  large  libraries 
professional  reading  is  required  and  the 
assistant  may  be  allowed  definite  time  at 
slack  periods  for  the  reading  of  book  re- 
views. "For  the  new  books  it  is  becoming 
more  and  more  the  practice  to  furnish  a 
staff  collection  from  library  funds,  the 
books  to  be  placed  in  the  duplicate  pay 
or  branch  collection  later.  They  are 
charged  in  the  usual  way,  counted  in  the 
general  circulation  and  fines  levied  if 
books  are  kept  overtime.  Book  discus- 
sion should  be  brought  into  what  may  be 
called  the  community  life  of  the  library 
worker  and  if  the  assistant  is  allowed  the 
use  of  new  books  when  they  are  new,  an 
irresistible  and  spontaneous  comparison 
of  books  is  bound  to  occur  among  the 
members  of  the  staff." 

Mrs  Julia  B.  Babcock,  President  of  the 
California  Library  Association,  spoke  on 
the  findings  of  the  C.  L.  A.  Salary  Com- 
mittee, discussing  the  tabulated  compari- 
son of  salaries  of  library  people  and  those 
of  other  workers. 

Mrs  Babcock's  talk  was  followed  by  a 
business  session  at  which  Mrs  Alice  G. 
Whitbeck  of  the  Contra  Costa  County 
Free  Library  was  elected  nominator  of 
the  Second  District  with  Miss  Etta  Eck- 
hardt  of  the  Monterey  Public  Library, 
alternate. 


A  greeting  from  the  convention  was 
ordered  telegraphed  to  Miss  Stella 
Huntington  who  is  at  present  traveling 
in  New  England. 

In  the  absence  of  Miss  Aimee  M. 
Peters,  Chairman  of  the  Membership 
Committee  for  the  Second  District,  her 
carefully  prepared  report  was  read  by 
the  secretary.  Some  discussion  followed 
both  at  this  time  and  at  the  afternoon 
session  when  a  resolution  prompted  by 
the  report  was  presented  to  the  meeting. 

A  roll  call  was  taken  on  types  of  li- 
braries, the  school  library  and  the  public 
library  people  ai-ranging  for  special  group 
luncheons. 

The  afternoon  session  was  called  at 
1.30  o'clock.  William  P.  SUva  an  artist 
of  distinction  from  Carmel,  gave  a  most 
entertaining  talk  illustrated  on  the  Kelp- 
oboe  and  the  Kelp-hobo,  musical  instru- 
ments of  his  own  construction  from  kelp 
picked  up  on  the  beach  at  Carmel. 

This  was  followed  by  an  interesting  and 
colorful  talk  on  Seaports  of  Africa  by  Mr 
Ferguson.  He  presented  vivid  pictures 
of  the  various  seaports  he  had  visited, 
from  the  picturesque  harbor  at  Cape 
Town  to  Zanzibar  of  spice  and  silk  and 
ivory  fame. 

After  Mr  Ferguson's  talk  the  conven- 
tion adjourned  to  the  piano  in  the 
Assembly  Hall  for  music  arranged  by  a 
committee  consisting  of  Miss  Helen  Thurl- 
by  and  Miss  Jessie  Nichols.  Several 
delightful  whistling  solos  were  given  by 
Miss  Eleanor  King  of  Pacific  Grove,  ac- 
companied by  Mrs  Turner  of  the  same 
place. 

On  return  to  the  fireplace  room  Mrs 
Babcock  spoke  on  the  coming  conference 
of  the  American  Library  Association 
which  is  to  be  held  next  year  in  Cali- 
fornia (the  place  to  be  shortly  decided 
upon)  and  the  C.  L.  A.'s  opportunity  to 
extend  hospitality. 

Mrs  Whitbeck  described  the  caravan 
trip  led  by  the  State  Librarian  which  was 
taken  in  September  by  a  group  of  li- 
brarians to  visit  the  isolated  county  li- 
braries in  the  northern  part  of  Cali- 
fornia. 

The  following  resolutions  were  passed : 
1.  Resolved  that  the  Second  District  of 
the  California  Library  Association  recom- 
mends  to   the   Executive   Committee   the 


5 — 73829 


66 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


method  of  a  special  levy  upon  the  mem- 
bers list  of  the  Association  for  the  em- 
ployment of  a  publicity  expert  to  secure 
and  to  tabulate  information  regarding  li- 
brary salaries  and  to  present  these  facts 
to  the  public,  to  library  boards,  and  to 
tax-levying  bodies. 

2.  Resolved  that  the  Second  District  of 
the  California  Library  Association  recom- 
mends to  the  Executive  Committee  that 
the  California  Library  Association  be- 
come a  sustaining  member  of  the  Ameri- 
can Library  Association  paying  $100  per 
year. 

During  the  late  afternoon  the  visitors 
scattered  to  explore  the  Monterey  Penin- 
sula, some  visiting  near-by  libraries,  others 
vievs^ing  historical  places,  or  taking  the 
seventeen-mile  drive. 

In  the  evening  the  guests  were  delight- 
fully entertained  with  music  by  Levs^is 
Malone  a  pianist  of  Salinas  and  Carmel, 
and  Miss  Helen  Thurlby  of  the  Monterey 
County  Free  Library,  vocalist.  The 
music  was  followed  by  a  most  entertain- 


ing drama  composed  and  read  by  Mrs 
Lota  Mitcheltree  of  the  Alameda  County 
Free  Library  and  acted  by  members  of 
the  Alameda  County  Library  staff.  This 
provoked  humorous  criticism  and  discus- 
sion from  the  audience,  Susan  T.  Smith 
and  Margaret  Girdner  taking  exception 
to  its  morals  and  Mr  Ferguson  making  a 
staunch  defense. 

Mrs  Mitcheltree  read  a  ballad  on 
Columbus  in  honor  of  October  12,  Miss 
Irmagarde  Richards  gave  briefly,  as  a  re- 
search worker,  her  impression  of  libraries, 
and  the  conference  closed  for  the  evening. 

After  breakfast  on  Sunday  out  on  the 
terrace  in  the  sunshine,  Anne  Hadden  in- 
formally told  something  about  Monterey 
County. 

This  meeting  of  the  Second  District 
was  a  most  delightful,  informal  and  rest- 
ful gathering,  and  those  who  were  present 
would  like  to  make  a  meeting  at  AsUomar 
an  annual  part  of  the  Second  District's 
activities. 

Anne  Hadden,  Secretary. 


vol.  25,  no.  1" 


CALIFORNIA    COUNTY   LIBRARIANS 


67 


CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS 


Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Ex  officio  Chair- 
man. 

Advisory  Committee 

Stella  Huntington,  1254  Taylor  Street,. 
San  Francisco,  Chairman. 

Clara  B.  Dills,  Solano  County. 

Margaret  E.  Livingston,  Orange  County. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County. 

Cornelia  D.  Provines,  Sacramento 
County,  Treasurer. 

Committee  on  Cooperation  With  Insti- 
tutional Relations  Committee,  Cali- 
fornia      Federation      of      Women's 
Clubs 
Cornelia     D.      Provines,      Sacramento 
County,  Chairman. 

Mary  Barmby,  Alameda  County. 
Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County. 
See  report  belov?. 

County     Librarians    Section,    A.    L.    A. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County, 
President. 

J.  Elizabeth  Olson,  Umatilla  County 
Library,  Pendleton,  Oregon,  Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

ORANGE  COUNTY  HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY   CARAVAN 

On  October  19  I  vs^ent  on  a  rather 
interesting  trip  planned  by  members  of 
the  Orange  County  Historical  Society. 
We  left  Santa  Ana  about  8  o'clock  in 
the  morning  and  the  first  stop  was  at 
San  Juan  Capistrano,  where  we  were 
I  joined  by  a  party  from   Orange,   includ- 

•;  among  others  Mr  and  Mrs  Pleasants 
who    live    near    Modjeska's    Home.      Mr 


Pleasants  is  a  very  old  man,  a  true 
pioneer,  who  has  always  been  alive  to 
the  things  going  on  about  him,  with  a 
very  excellent  memory  for  historical 
detail.  There  were  seven  cars  in  the 
caravan  that  proceeded  on   the  way. 

At  a  point  near  the  San  Diego  County 
line,  a  few  miles  beyond  San  Clemente, 
T.  E.  Stevenson  pointed  out  the  way  to 
what  is  probably  the  site  of  the  first 
baptism  by  one  of  the  Mission  Fathers. 
Next  was  visited  the  Bosicrucian  Colony, 
a  few  miles  from  Oceanside.  It  is  well 
worth  a  visit  for  the  view  from  the  hill 
on  which  their  church  or  chapel  is  built. 
Then  some  time  was  spent  at  Mission  San 
Luis  Rey.  While  it  lacks  the  picturesque 
garden  of  San  Juan  Capistrano,  the 
building  itself  is  more  interesting  in  some 
ways. 

After  lunch  at  Escondido  we  proceeded 
to  the  valley  where  the  battle  of  San 
Pasqual  took  place.  Here  the  state  has 
erected  a  monument.  At  this  point  the 
caravan  disbanded. 

Margaret  Livingston, 
Orange  County  Lib'n. 

A  COUNTY  AND  CITY   PROJECT 

The  San  Diego  County  Free  Library 
compiled  a  list  of  "Books  to  buy  for  the 
children"  for  Children's  Book  Week.  The 
list  was  intended  for  the  use  of  parents 
and  teachers.  It  includes  lists  of  books 
to  read  aloud,  books  for  little  children, 
books  for  boys,  books  for  girls,  and  old 
favorites.  The  list  was  prepared  for  and 
recommended  by  The  Recreational  Read- 
ing Committee  of  San  Diego  City  and 
County. 


68 


NEWS   NOTES   OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [Jan.,  1930 


LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC 


Under  this  heading  will  be  given  ac- 
counts of  meetings  of  the  various  library 
clubs  and  similar  organizations  throughout 
the  state.  News  items  of  the  various  clubs 
are  solicited. 

PASADENA  LIBRARY  CLUB 

The  first  meeting  of  the  Pasadena  Li- 
brary Club  was  an  informal  buffet  sup- 
per held  in  the  lecture  hall  of  the  Pasa- 
dena Public  Library.  Eighty  members 
assembled  to  do  honor  to  Dr  George  Wat- 
son Cole,  librarian  emeritus  of  the  Henry 
E.  Huntington  Library,  who  as  chief 
speaker  of  the  evening  told  in  an  informal 
and  charming  manner  of  his  trip  as 
official  delegate  to  the  world's  Congress 
of  Librarians  and  Bibliographers  which 
was  held  in  Italy  June  14-20,  1929.  He 
illustrated  his  lecture  with  pictures  of  the 
many  interesting  places  he  visited. 

In  addition  to  a  musical  program  and 
preceding  the  regular  business  of  the 
club,  a  committee  was  appointed  which 
drew  up  a  resolution  protesting  the  recent 
action  of  the  City  Directors  in  curtailing 
iie  vacation  period  of  the  Pasadena  City 
fibrarians.  President  Willard  O.  Waters 
appointed  as  chairman  of  the  committee 
Willis  H.  Kerr,  Librarian  of  Pomona  Col- 
lege Library  and  Director  of  Libraries  of 
Claremont  Colleges.  Mrs  Theodora  R. 
Brewitt  of  Long  Beach  Library  and  Miss 
Elizabeth  Connor,  Librarian  of  Mt.  Wil- 
son Observatory,  completed  the  com- 
mittee. 

The  Club  expressed  its  appreciation  of 
the  splendid  and  unselfish  work  which 
has  been  accomplished  in  the  library  field 
by  Miss  Jeannette  M.  Drake,  Librarian 
of  the  Pasadena  Public  Library. 

Mrs  Patricia  O.  Dutcher, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

SAN  ANTONIO  LIBRARY  CLUB 

A  meeting  of  the  San  Antonio  Library 
Club  was  held  October  19,  1929  at  the 


Upland  Firemen's  Cabin  in  San  Antonio 
Canyon  as  guests  of  Mrs  F.  H.  Manker 
of  the  Upland  Public  Library. 

After  a  brief  business  meeting  Miss 
Ewing  of  Pomona  College  told  of  her  trip 
to  Europe,  as  did  also  Mrs  T.  C.  Hardy 
who  was  a  member  of  the  Temple  Tour. 

A  delightful  luncheon  was  served  by  the 
hostess  and  her  staff  after  which  an  in- 
formal afternoon  was  spent. 

Alberta  Schaefee,  Secretary. 

SOUTHERN  CALIFORNIA  CHAP- 
TER, NATIONAL  SPECIAL  LI- 
BRARIES  ASSOCIATION 

The  December  meeting  was  held 
December  17,  1929  in  the  library  of  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce  of  Los  Angeles. 
The  members  were  received  by  Guy  E. 
Marion,  manager  of  the  Research  Depart- 
ment of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  who 
was  the  host  of  the  evening.  Dinner  was 
served  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  room 
adjoining  the  library. 

Thirty-six  members  of  the  chapter  were 
present.  After  a  brief  business  session, 
the  meeting  was  turned  over  to  Mr 
Marion  who  explained  the  function  of  the 
Research  Department.  The  members 
were  then  escorted  to  the  projection  room 
of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  where  two 
interesting  motion  picture  films  of  Los 
Angeles  and  vicinity,  made  for  the  Los 
Angeles  Chamber  of  Commerce,  were 
shown. 

Mrs  Helen  L.  Allen,  Secretary. 

EAST   BAY   LIBRARY   COUNCIL 

The  Council  meets  at  luncheon  on  the 
second  Wednesday  of  each  month,  unless 
that  day  is  a  holiday  when  it  is  post- 
poned to  the  third  Wednesday.  The 
luncheon  is  given  at  the  Business  and 
Professional  Women's  Club  House  and 
any  visiting  librarian  is  cordially  in- 
vited to  attend. 

II 


vol.  25,  no.  1]      BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS,  CALIFORNIA 


69 


BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS,  CALIFORNIA 


MEMBERS   OF  THE   BOARD 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert  Rea,  Librarian,  San  Francisco 
Public  Library,   Secretary. 

Everett  R.  Perry,  Librarian,  Los  An- 
geles Public  Library. 

Sections  6  and  7  of  the  County  free 
library  law  (Chap.  68,  Cal.  Statutes 
1911)   read  as  follows: 

Sec.  6.  A  commission  is  hereby  cre- 
ated to  be  known  as  the  board  of  library 
examiners,  consisting  of  the  state  libra- 
rian, who  shall  be  ex  officio  chairman  of 
said  board,  the  librarian  of  the  public 
library  of  the  city  and  county  of  San 
Francisco,  and  the  librarian  of  the  Los 
Angeles  pulillc  librarj\ 

Sec.  7.  Upon  the  establishment  of  a 
county  free  lil^rary,  the  board  of  super- 
visors shall  appoint  a  county  librarian, 
who  shall  hold  office  for  the  term  of  four 
years,  subject  to  prior  removal  for  cause, 
after  a  hearing  by  said  board.  No  per- 
son shall  be  eligible  to  the  office  of 
county  librarian  unless,  prior  to  his 
appointment,  he  has  received  from  the 
board  of  library  examiners  a  certificate 
of  qualification  for  the  office.  At  the 
time  of  his  appointment,  the  county 
librarian  need  not  be  a  resident  of  the 
county  nor  a  citizen  of  the  State  of 
California. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHAIRMAN 

There  has  been  no  meeting  of  the  Board 
this  quarter. 

CERTIFICATE   HOLDERS 

Adams,    Mrs    Lila    (Dobell),    Ln.    Trinity 

County  Free  Library,  Weaverville. 
Anderson,    Mrs    Rachel     (Rhoads),    Asst. 

Public  Library,  Kansas  City,  Mo.      (On 

leave  of  absence.) 
Babcocl?:,   Mrs  Julia  G.,  Ln.  Kern  County 

FVee  Library,  Bakersfield.    (Life  certifi- 
cate.) 
Bailey,    Anne    Bell,    Ln.    Tehama    County 

Free  Library,  Red  Bluff. 
Barmby,  Mary,  Ln.  Alameda  County  Free 

Library,  Oakland.  (Life  certificate.) 
Beardsley,  Mrs  Arline  Davis,  Asst.  Orange 

CoTinty  Free  Library,  Santa  Ana. 
Burket,    Frances    M..    Ln.    Sutter    County 

Free  Library,  Tuba  City. 
Culver,    Essae    M.,    Exec.    Sec.    Louisiana 

Library  Commission,  Baton  Rouge,  La. 
Dambacher,    Mrs    Helen     (Rowland),    Mrs 

Oustav       Dambacher,       Ln.       Tuolumne 

County  Free  Library,  Sonora. 
Davids,  Mrs  Harriet  Snyder,  Asst.  Monte- 
rey County  Free  Library,   Salinas. 
Davis,    Edna    D.,    Ln.    Humboldt    County 

Free  Library,   Eureka. 
De  Ford,  Estella,  Ln.  Napa  County  Free 

Library,   Napa.      (Life  certificate.) 
Deming,    Dorothy,    Ln.    Imperial    County 

Free  Library,  El  Centro. 


Dills,  Clara  B.,  Ln.  Solano  County  Free 
Library,  Fairfield.      (Life  certificate.) 

Eudey,  Mrs  Henrietta  G.,  Mrs  Fred  Eudey, 
Ln.  Amador  County  Free  Library, 
Jackson. 

Ferguson,  Milton  J.,  Ln.  State  Library, 
Sacramento. 

Flower,  Gretchen  L.,  Ln.  Tulare  County 
Free  Library,  Visalia.  (Life  certifi- 
cate.) 

Frink.  Ellen  B.,  Ln.  Monterey  County 
Free  Library,   Salinas. 

Galloway,  Blanche,  Ln.  Madera  County 
Free  Library,  Madera. 

Gibson,  Hazel  G.,  Asst.  Sacramento  County 
Free  Library,   Sacramento. 

Gleason,  Celia,  Ln.  Siskiyou  County  Free 
Library,  Yreka. 

Greene,  Charles  S.,  Ln.  Emeritus  Free 
Library,   Oakland. 

Greene,  Margaret,  Asst.  Contra  Costa 
County  Free  Library,  Martinez. 

Gregory,  Marion  L.,  Ln.  Hanford  Public 
Library  and  Kings  County  Free  Library, 
Hanford. 

Hadden,  Anne,  Ln.  Public  Library,  Palo 
Alto.      (Life  certificate.) 

Harris,  Mary  W.,  Ln.  Webster  Parish  Li- 
brary,  Minden,  La. 

Herrman,  Mrs  Jennie  (Herrman),  Mrs 
James  White  Herrman,  Asst.  San  Diego 
Public  Library.      (Life  certificate.) 

Hill,  Grace,  Asst.  Public  Library,  Kansas 
City,  Mo. 

Hitt,  Eleanor,  Ln.  San  Diego  County  Free 
Library,  San  Diego. 

Hooker,  D.  Ashley,  Technology  Ln.  Pub- 
lic  Library,   Birmingham,  Ala. 

Jackson,  Joy  Belle,  Asst.  State  Teachers 
College  Library,   San  Jose. 

Jones,  Louise  E.,  Asst.  Public  Library, 
Los   Angeles. 

Kennedy,  Helen  T.,  2d  Asst.  Ln.  Public 
Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Kobler,  Marjorie  H.,  Asst.  San  Diego 
County  Free  Library,  San  Diego. 

Kyle,  Eleanore,  Ln.  San  Bernardino  Poly- 
technic High  School  Library,  San  Ber- 
nardino. 

Laugenour,  Nancy  C,  Ln.  Yolo  County 
Free  Library,  Woodland. 

Linn,  Mrs  Frances  Burns,  Ln.  Santa  Bar- 
oara  Free  Public  Library  and  Santa 
Barbara  County  Free  Library,  Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston,  Margaret  E.,  Ln.  Orange 
County  Free  Library,  Santa  Ana.  (Life 
certificate.) 

Long,  Mary  O.,  Asst.  Kern  County  Free 
Litararv,   Bakersfield. 

McCardle,  Sarah  E.,  Ln.  Fresno  County 
Free  Library,  Fresno.  (Life  certifi- 
cate.) 

McCright,  Edith  C,  Asst.  Public  Library, 
E'  Paso,   Texas. 

Margrave,  Anne,  Ln.  Inyo  County  Free 
Library,  Independence. 

Martin,  Lenala  A.,  Ln.  Lassen  County 
Free   Library,  Susanville.      (Life  certifl- 

Miller,'  Mabel  V.,  Assoc.  Ln.  High  School 

Library.    Huntington    Park. 
Morse,     Mrs     Ella     (Packer),     Mrs     Guy 

Morse,  Ln.  Colusa  County  Free  Library, 

Colusa. 
Morse.     Marion,     Ln.    Honolulu    Academy 

of  Art.s,  Honolulu,  T.  H. 


70 


NEWS   NOTES  OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Mumm,   Beulah,   Reference   Ln.    State  Li- 
brary,  Sacramento. 
Nourse,     Louis    M.,    Asst.    Kern    County 

Free  Library,  Bakersfield. 
Parkinson,    H.    C,    Asst.    Public    Library, 

New    York. 
Perry,  Everett  R.,  Ln.  Public  Library,  Los 

Angeles. 
Provines,    Cornelia    D.,    Ln.     Sacramento 

County      Free      Library,       Sacramento. 

(Life    certificate.) 
Rea,    Robert,    Ln.    Public    Library,     San 

Francisco. 
Reagan,   Ida   M.,   Ln.    Butte   County  Free 

Library,  Oroville.      (Life   certificate.) 
Russell,  Mrs  Faye  (Kneeshaw),  Mrs  Ralph 

H.     Russell,     Ln.     Glenn    County    Free 

Library,  Willows. 
Sabin,  Lilian,  Ln.  San  Luis  Obispo  County 

Free  Library,  San  Luis  Obispo. 
Silverthorn,  Bessie  B.,  Ln.  McHenry  Pub- 
lic Library  and  Stanislaus  County  Free 

Library,  Modesto.     (Life  certificate.) 
Singletary,  Mrs  Elizabeth   (Stevens),  Mrs 

Harry   H.    Singletary,   Ln.    Santa   Clara 

County  Free  Library,  San  Jose. 
Smith,     Susan     T.,     Ln.     Public    Library, 

Berkeley. 
Stephens,  Eleanor  S.,  Asst.  Ln.  Los  Angeles 

County  Free  Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Stoddard,  Minette  L.,  Ln.  Merced  County 

Free  Library,  Merced. 
Taylor,    Bertha    S.,    Head    Prints    Dept., 

State    Library,    Sacramento. 
Topping,  Elizabeth  R.,  Ln.  Ventura  Public 

Library   and  Ventura   County  Free   Li- 
brary, Ventura. 
Townsend,  Mrs  Florence   (Wheaton),  Mrs 

R.  L.  Townsend,  Ln.  San  Benito  (bounty 

Free  Library,  Hollister. 
Vogleson,     Helen     B.,     Ln.     Los    Angeles 

County  Free  Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Warren,  Althea  H.,  First  Asst.  Ln.  Public 

Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Waterman,    Minerva   H.,   Ln.    Santa   Cruz 

Public  Library  and  Santa  Cruz  County 

Free  Library,  Santa  Cruz. 
Waters,   Caroline   S.,   Ln.   San  Bernardino 

County  Free   Library,    San   Bernardino. 
Whitbeck,  Mrs  Alice  G.,  Ln.  Contra  Costa 

County  Free  Library,  Martinez.      (Life 

certificate. ) 
Williams,    Anna    L.,    Ln.    Modoc    County 

Free  Library,  Alturas. 
Woods,  Katherine  R.,  Ln.  Plumas  County 

Free   Library,    Quincy. 
Wright,    Muriel,    Ln.    Marin    County    Free 

Library,   San   Rafael. 
Yates,   Mrs  Bess    (Ranton),   Mrs  John  D. 

Yates,   Asst.   Los   Angeles   County  Free 

Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Yelland,   Mrs  Edna    (Holroyd),   Mrs  Ray- 
mond  Ye'land,    Ln.    San    Mateo    County 

Free     Library,     Redwood     City.        (Life 

certificate,; 


At  Present  Out  of  Library  Work 

Dalton,  Mrs  Blanche   (Harris),  Mrs  John 

E.  Dalton. 
Duff,  Marcella  Carmelita. 
Dyer,    Mrs    Flo     (Gantz),    Mrs    Maurice 

Foster  Dyer. 
Gantt,   Edith. 
Hatfield,  Mrs  Margaret  (Smith),  Mrs  John 

Glover  Hatfield. 
Heffner,    Mrs    Martha    June     (Coleman) 

Mrs  Harold  V.  Heffner. 
Helm,    Mrs    Prances    ( Stockebrand) ,    Mrs 

Herbert  G.  Helm. 
Huntington,   Stella.      (Life  certificate.) 
Price,  Mrs  Melba  (Burden),  Mrs  Louis  B. 

Price. 
Westerfield,    Mrs    Evalyn    (Boman),    Mrs 

Michael  J.  Westerfield. 
Wheeler,    Mrs    Blanche     (Chalfant),    Mrs 

De  Forest  N.   Wheeler. 

COUNTY  FREE   LIBRARY  LAW 

The  "California  county  free  library 
law  and  circular  of  information  for 
applicants  for  certificates  of  qualification 
to  hold  office  of  county  librarian  in  Cali- 
fornia" was  published  in  A-'ews  Notes  of 
California  Libraries,  April,  1911,  and 
later  reprinted  in  pamphlet  form.  The 
edition  being  exhausted,  a  revised  edition 
of  the  circular  was  printed  in  News  Notes 
of  California  'Lihrai-ies,  January,  1914. 
This  has  been  reprinted  as  a  pamphlet. 
The  fifth  edition  was  issued  December, 
1921.  (Circular  of  information  only.) 
The  fifth  edition  of  the  County  free 
library  law  was  issued  in  September, 
1925.  Copies  of  both  of  above  pamphlets 
will  be  furnished  on  request. 

NEXT  EXAMINATION 

No  date  has  been  set  for  the  next 
examination. 

APPLICATION   BLANKS 

All  who  wish  to  take  the  examination 
should  file  applications  with  the  Chairman 
of  the  Board.  For  application  blanks  or 
further  information  address  the  CHiairman 
of  the  Board,  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State 
Librarian,  Sacramento,  California. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


71 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY 


The  bill  establishing  the  California 
State  Library  was  signed  by  Governor 
Peter  H.  Burnett,  January  24,  1850. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
established  by  resolution  adopted  Sep- 
tember 4,  1913. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
discontinued  by  motion  adopted  May  22, 
1920. 

Biennial  income  for  1929-31,  $325,700. 

Total  accessions  292,558  (less  3803  lost 
and  withdrawn =288,755)  exclusive  of 
24,686  accessions  in  Books  for  Blind  De- 
partment and  94,950  volumes  in  the  Sutro 
Branch  in  San  Francisco. 

STAFF 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian. 

Mabel  R.  Gillis,  Assistant  Librarian 
and  Head  of  Books  for  the  Blind  Depart- 
ment. 

_  Herbert  V.  Clayton,  Law  and  Legisla- 
tive  Reference  Librarian. 

Eudora  Garoutte.  Head  of  California 
Department. 

Alice  J.  Haines.  Head  of  Documents 
Department. 

Mrs  May  Dexter  Henshall,  County 
Library  Organizer. 

Dora  M.  Himmelsbacb,  in  charge  of 
Periodicals  and  Binding. 

Wm.  H.  Lugg,  Head  of  Shipping,  Re- 
pairs, etc.,  Department. 

Beulah  Mumm,  Reference  Librarian. 

Ida  G.  Munson,  Head  of  Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle  Ruhl.  in  charge  of  Order 
Department. 

Bertha  S.  Taylor,  in  charge  of  Prints 
Department. 

Margaret  Bennett,  Typist. 

Helen  Braddock,  Assistant. 

Helen  M.  Bruner,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch.   San  Francisco. 

Sarab  Carder,  Assistant. 

Helen  Clayton,  Assistant. 

Evelyn  Cooper,  Assistant. 

Helen  Cornell,  Assistant. 

Mi-B  Marjorie  M.  Degner,  Assistant. 

Margaret  Dennison,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch.  San  Francisco. 

Mrs  Marguerite  Walker  Duggins,  Ste- 
nographer. 

Kate  M.  Foley,  Home  Teacher  of  the 
Blind,  146  McAllister  st,  San  Francisco. 

Minnie  L.  Gee,  Typist. 

Zilla  Grant.  Assistant. 

Ena  Harmon,  Assistant. 

Lyndall  Harmon,  Assistant. 

Dorothy  Hill.  Assistant. 

Mrs  Alicia  Manning  Hook,  Assistant. 

Florence  Lamb.  Bookkeeper. 

Rachel  Look,  Assistant. 

Helen  M.  Maughmer,  Assistant. 

Helen  Marden.  Assistant. 
.    D.  Florence  Montfort.  Assistant. 


Catharine  J.  Morrison.  Home  Teacher 
of  the  Blind,  951  S.  Kenmore  ave.,  Los 
Angeles. 

Vera  Palermo,  Assistant. 

Wyman  Pease,  Shelf  Curator. 

Irene  E.  Ryan.  Assistant. 

Lilian  Sargent,  Assistant. 

Irma  M.  Schoepflin,  Assistant. 

Elyse  Schultz,  Assistant. 

Blanche  L.  Shadle,  Assistant. 

Mrs   Frances   L.    Smith,   Stenographer. 

Lily  M.  Tilden.  Assistant. 

Mrs  Bessie  Herrman  Twaddle,  Indexer. 

Mrs  Julia  M.  Waldron,  Assistant. 

Caroline  Wenzel,  Assistant. 

Margaret  Cox,  Book  Repairer. 

Helen  Dobson,  Book  Repairer. 

Mrs  Mae  Hoskin,  Book  Repairer. 

Mrs  Gladys  N.  Richards,  Book  Re- 
pairer. 

Wm.  Crowe,  Assistant  Shipping  Clerk. 

Wm.  G.  Lyons,  Assistant  Shipping 
Clerk. 

Harlo  Whipple,  Assistant  Shipping 
Clerk. 

Nancy  Anderson,  Messenger. 

John   Heinrich,   Messenger. 

Elmer  Laine,  Messenger. 

George  J.  Miller,  Messenger. 

Wm.  T.  Simmons,  Messenger. 

Walter   Stevens,   Messenger. 

Arthur  Valine,  Messenger. 

John  B.  Byrne,  Janitor. 

J.  L.  Foss,  Janitor. 

Wm.  Jones,  Janitor   (temporary). 

G.  A.  Klees,  Janitor. 

Dominick  Meo,  Janitor. 

Jacob   Misfelt,   Janitor. 

Harry  A.  Simons,  Elevator  Operator. 

STAFF  NEWS  ITEMS 

Mr  Ferguson  attended  the  meeting  of 
the  directors  of  the  California  Association 
for  Adult  Education  in  Los  Angeles 
October  1,  when  Dr  Keppel  of  the  Car- 
negie Corporation  was  the  guest  of  honor. 
On  October  3  Mr  Ferguson  spoke  in  the 
morning  at  the  meeting  of  County,  City 
and  District  Superintendents  of  Schools, 
at  Pasadena,  his  subject  being  "Librarian- 
ship  as  a  profession"  ;  in  the  afternoon 
he  spoke  at  the  Los  Angeles  County  Li- 
brary staff  meeting.  At  the  meeting  of 
the  Second  District  of  the  California 
Library  Association  at  Asilomar  October 
12,  Mr  Ferguson's  talk  was  on  the  ports 
of  Africa  as  compared  with  the  ports  of 
California.  Mr  Ferguson  was  also  one 
of  the  speakers  at  the  meeting  of  the 
New  Mexico  Library  Association  which 
was  held  in  Albuquerque,   New   Mexico, 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


October  31  to  November  2 ;  his  subject 
was  "Library  Extension  Methods."  In 
addition  he  spoke  before  the  California 
Society  of  Etchers  in  San  Francisco 
December  3,  and  at  the  joint  meeting  of 
the  Northern  Section  of  the  California 
School  Library  Association  and  the  Li- 
brary Section  of  the  California  Teachers 
Association,  Bay  Section,  on  December 
18  in  Oakland. 

Miss  Gillis  also  was  present  at  the 
meeting  of  the  Second  District  of  the 
California  Library  Association  at  Asilo- 
mar  October  12.  Mrs  Henshall  attended 
the  County,  City  and  District  Superin- 
tendents of  Schools  Convention  at  Pasa- 
dena the  first  week  of  October,  and  de- 
voted the  next  week  to  visiting  some  of 
the  libraries  in  southern  California.  On 
November  19  Mrs  Henshall  spoke  at  the 
luncheon  of  the  Sonoma  Kiwanis  Club. 

Mrs  Lenore  W.  Davidson  resigned 
October  31  to  be  at  home.  Her  place  in 
the  Periodicals  Department  is  being  taken 
by  Elyse  Schultz,  who  has  been  head 
messenger  for  some  time.  Mrs  June 
McCaffery  resigned  Deecmber  14.  Miss 
Minnie  L.  Gee  succeeded  Mrs  McCaffery, 
beginning  work  December  12. 

Miss  Helen  M.  Maughmer  a  Sacra- 
mento girl  who  graduated  from  the  School 
of  Librarianship,  Un3.versity  of  Cali- 
fornia, 1929,  began  work  in  our  Refer- 
ence Department  October  15.  She  had 
been  a  member  of  the  Sacramento  City 
Library  staff  since  July  1,  working  in 
the  Reference  Department  there  while 
Miss  Grace  Taylor  was  in  Europe.  Miss 
Ruth  Ferguson  was  a  temporary  member 
of  the  staff  from  November  18  to  Novem- 
ber 30,  to  be  in  charge  of  the  Art  Gallery 
where  a  special  exhibit  was  being  held. 
Walter  Stevens  began  work  as  messenger 
October  21. 

Mrs  Mae  Moore  of  our  Book  Repair 
Department  was  married  October  12  to 
Thomas  Hoskin ;  she  is  continuing  with 
her  work  at  the  State  Library. 

Mr  and  Mrs  Wyman  Pease  have  a 
daughter,  Helen  Joyce,  born  December  5. 

Miss  Annie  Lowry,  until  three  years 
ago  head  of  the  Periodicals  Department 
in  the  State  Library,  was  honored  by  a 
luncheon  given  by  friends  among  the  staff 
members,  in  the  Library  dining  room 
November  19.  About  twenty-five  were 
present.     Among  them  were  two  former 


staff  members,  Mrs  Blanchard  once  our 
shelf  lister,  and  Mrs  Gerna  Dickson,  who 
is  now  one  of  the  Sacramento  County  Li- 
brary force. 

QUARTERLY    NOTES 

In  the  drive  for  the  Sacramento  Com- 
munity Chest  in  October,  the  State  Li- 
brary employees  gave  a  gratifying  re- 
sponse. 

A  staff  meeting  was  held  November  20 
at  4  p.m.  Plans  for  a  closer  staff  organi- 
zation were  considered  and  there  was  dis- 
cussion of  recent  happenings  in  the  li- 
brary world. 

The  annual  staff  Christmas  party  took 
place  December  19,  from  5  to  7  p.m. 
Dinner  was  served  at  5  o'clock  in  the  staff 
room,  where  the  Christmas  tree  was  set 
up.  Afterwards  everyone  went  upstairs 
to  our  Auditorium  on  the  fifth  floor.  Mr 
Ferguson  told  something  of  a  Christmas 
spent  in  Africa.  Then  a  humorous  one 
act  Christmas  play  was  presented  by 
Miss  Maughmer,  Mr  Clayton,  Miss  Nancy 
Anderson  and  Elmer  Laine. 

An  exhibit  of  paintings  and  etchings 
by  Mrs  Marion  Holden  Pope  was  on  dis- 
play in  the  Art  Gallery  on  the  fifth  floor 
evei'y  afternoon  from  November  18  to 
November  30,  inclusive. 

LIBRARY  HOURS 

Week  days 9  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

Legislative  session  : 

Week  days 9  a.m.  to  9  p.m. 

Sundays    1  p.m.  to  5  p.m. 

The  library  closes  at  noon  on  Satur- 
days during  July  and  August. 

LAW    AND    LEGISLATIVE    REFER- 
ENCE  DEPARTMENT 

Herbert  V.  Clatton,  in  charge. 

The  Law  and  Legislative  Reference 
Department  is  fully  equipped  with  the 
latest  reports,  digests,  encyclopedias  and 
textbooks,  the  statutes  of  other  states, 
the  United  States,  Great  Britain,  Can- 
ada, Australia  and  certain  other  foreign 
countries,  and  briefs  of  counsel  in  eases 
decided  in  the  California  Supreme  and 
Appellate  courts.  State  officers  are  en- 
titled to  borrow  books,  and  private  indi- 
viduals are  accorded  the  same  privilege 
upon  presentation  of  a  request  signed  by 
a  Supreme,  Appellate  or  Superior  Judge, 
or  other  state  officer.  Books  may  be  kept 
three  weeks,  and  will  be  once  renewed 
for  two  weeks.  All  books  are  subject  to 
recall,  if  required  by  a  state  officer,  or  if. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


73 


in  the  opinion  of  the  Librarian,  a  recall 
is  fair  and  expedient. 

In  addition  to  special  service  to  mem- 
bers of  the  Legislature,  information  on 
the  laws  of  California  and  other  states 
and  countries  is  given  on  inquiry  from 
libraries  or  individuals. 

Recent  accessions  to  the  department 
will  be  found  listed  under  the  heading 
"Law"  in  the  section  on  "Recent  Acces- 
sions." 

DOCUMENTS  DEPARTMENT 

Alice  J.  Haines,  in  charge. 

The  Documents  Department  aims  to 
coUecl:,  arrange  and  make  available  gov- 
ernment publications,  federal,  state,  city 
and  foreign. 

Recent  accessions  of  California  State 
and  City  publications  vrill  be  found  on 
See  pp.  119  and  125. 

Copies  of  45  California  State  publica- 
tions have  been  received  for  distribution 
to  libraries  during  October,  November  and 
December,  1929. 

Adjutant  General.  Provisions  of  Con- 
stitution and  statutes  relating  to  militia 
and  national  guard.     1929. 

Special  regulations,  no.  1. 

Agriculture  Department.  Agricultural 
statutes,  1929,  pts.  1,  9,  10. 

Monthly  bulletin,  vol.  IS,  nos. 

7-10. 

•  Cork   oak,    a   forest   tree   with 

possibilities  for  Cal.    1929. 
Banks,  Supt.     Annual  report,  1929. 

Bulletin,  vol.  3,  nos.  10-12. 

Building  and  Loan  Comm.    Report,  1929. 
Controller.     Inheritance  tax  act.     1929. 
Dental  Examiners  Bd.     Report,  1929. 
Disabled  American  Veterans.     Report  of 

annual  convention,  1929. 
Finance  Dept.     State  Lands  Div.     Lavt^s 

governing  the  sale  of  school  lands  and 

the  leasing  of  lands.     1929. 
Harbor  Comm,  San  Francisco.     Biennial 

report,  1929. 
Industrial    Relations    Dept.      Industrial 

Accident     Comm.       California     safety 

news,  vol.  13,  no.  4. 

Workmen's  compensation,  in- 
surance and  safety  laws.    1929. 

Labor  Statistics  and  Law  En- 


forcement   Div.      Private    employment 

agency  law.    1929. 
Institutions  Dept.     Biennial  report,  1928. 
Insurance   Commr.      Annual    report,   vol. 

1,  1928. 
Investment    Dept.       List    of     insurance 

brokers,  Aug.  31,  1929. 
Legislature.      Constitution    of    California 

and  of  the  United  States.     1929. 
Medical  Examiners   Bd.      Supplement  to 

directory  bulletin,  Oct.,  1929. 
Natural  Resources  Dept.     Fish  &  Game 

Div.      California    fish    and    game,    vol. 

15,  nos.  8-4. 

Fish  bulletin,  nos.  17-19. 

Professional    and    Vocational    Standards 


Dept.    Architectural  Examiners  Board. 
Report   of   California    State   Board   of 
Architecture,  1929. 
Public  Works  Dept.    California  highways 
and  public  works,  vol.  7;  nos.  10-12. 

Highways      Div.        Important 


statutes.    1929. 

Water  resources  Div.    Bulletin, 


nos.  18,  22,  vol.  1. 
Railroad  Comm.     Letter  of  transmittal. 
1929. 

Public  utilities  act.     1929. 


Real    Estate    Dept.      Directory    bulletin, 

vol.  10,  no.  2. 
Social  Welfare  Dept.     Laws.    1929. 
Teachers    College,    San    Jose.      Bulletin, 

vol.  8,  no.  4. 
Veterans  Home.    Annual  report,  1929. 

REFERENCE    DEPARTMENT 

Beuiah  Mumm,  in  charge. 

The  Reference  Department  furnishes 
information  to  any  inquirer.  It  furnishes 
books  to  public  libraries  on  request  of 
the  librarian,  and  to  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  on  request  of  its  official 
head  or  its  librarian;  to  individuals 
through  the  signature  of  a  state  ofBcer, 
of  the  Librarian  of  the  local  library  or 
of  the  official  head  of  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  or  on  receipt  of  a  $5.00 
deposit;  to  a  club  on  request  of  its  presi- 
dent, secretary  or  librarian.  In  counties 
having  county  free  libraries,  ail  requests 
must  be  made  through  the  county  free 
library. 

ORDER  AND  ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT 

Myrtle  Ruhl,  in  charge. 

During  October,  November  and  Decem- 
ber, 2897  books,  70  prints,  1  daguerro- 
type  and  1  map  were  accessioned. 

CATALOG  DEPARTMENT 

Ida  G.  MuNSOiST,  in  charge. 

During  October,  November  and  Decem- 
ber, 1619  books  were  cataloged  and  12,508 
cards  were  added  to  the  file.  31,378  cards 
were  filed  in  the  Union  Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA    DEPARTMENT 

EuDOKA  Gaeoutte,  in  charge. 

The  California  Department  aims  to 
have  a  thoroughly  good  collection  of 
books  on  the  history  and  description, 
resources  and  industries  of  the  State,  as 
well  as  the  works  of  California  authors 
in  all  departments  of  literature.  These 
are  made  accessible  by  means  of  a  card 
catalog.  Full  names  and  biographical 
sketches  of  California  authors,  artists, 
musicians,  pioneers  and  early  settlers  are 
being  secured,  together  with  their  photo- 
graphs. The  collection  of  bound  peri- 
odicals is  quite  large.  The  Department 
also  contains  about  12,000  bound  volumes 


74 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


of  newspapery,  a  file  of  which  is  being 
indexed  with  reference  to  the  history  of 
the  State.  Students  will  be  assisted  in 
their  work. 

Pioneers  and  Early  Settlers 

A  most  interesting  card  has  been  filled 
out  for  Ephraim  Kirby  Chamberlain  by 
his  granddaughter  Mrs  Charles  B. 
McLean  of  Pittsburgh,  Pa.  Dr  Cham- 
berlain was  appointed  physician  to  the 
Boundary  Commission  and  arrived  with 
the  Commission  in  San  Diego,  June  1, 
1849.  He  was  President  Pro  Tem  of  the 
first  legislature  and  San  Diego's  first 
state  senator.  He  was  of  the  highest  type 
of  pioneer  and  one  that  could  illy  be 
spared.  He  died  of  Panama  fever  near 
Acapulco  Dec.  28,  1852  and  was  buried 
at  sea. 

Another  interesting  card  is  that  of 
Major  General  Philip  Kearny,  a  nephew 
of  General  Stephen  W.  Kearny  who  was 
Governor  of  California  under  military 
rule  in  1847.  Philip  Kearny  was 
stationed  at  Sonoma  and  several  other 
military  posts  in  California.  He  fought 
Indians  and  participated  in  a  number  of 
other  stirring  events.  He  was  killed  dur- 
ing the  Civil  War  and  his  memory  has 
been  greatly  honored  by  monuments  and 
towns  bearing  his  name. 

Other  cards  received  are  as  follows : 
Levi  Carter  Adams,  Alexander  Cicero 
Baine,  William  Harlow  Chapin,  William 
Cleveland,  Leonard  Henry  Gallup,  Gil- 
bert Livingston  Mead,  Charles  Edward 
Pancoast. 

California  Authors 

The  following  author  cards  have  been 
received  since  the  last  issue  of  News 
Notes  of  California  Libraries: 

Garrott,  Hal 

George,  Mrs  Elizabeth   (Young) 

Mrs  Clarence  A.   George 
Holmes,  LlewUyn  Perry 
*Morrison,  Mrs  Lucile  (Phillips) 

Mrs  Wayland  A.  Morrison 
Shear,  Sherwood  William 
*Snow,  Charles  Horace 
Stewart,  George  Rippey,  Jr. 
Taggart,  Mrs  Kathriue  Eugenia 

(Payne) 

Mrs  James  William  Taggart 
White,  John  Roberts 

California  Artists 

The  following  artist  cards   have   been 


*  Native   Californians. 


received   since    the    last   issue   of   News 
Notes  of  California  Libraries: 

Baldwin,  Clifford  Park 
Baxley,  Mrs  Ellen   (Cooper) 

Mrs  Isaac  Rieman  Baxley 
Beckman,  Jessie  Mary 
Burton,  Mrs  Elizabeth   (Eaton) 

Mrs  William  W.  Burton 
Bryson,  Mrs  Hope  (Mercereau) 

Mrs  Lyman  Bryson 
Campbell-Shield,  Albert  Beckworth 
Comfort,  Tom  Tyrone 
Currier,  Walter  Barron 
Danner,  Mrs  Sara  Kolb 

Mrs  William  Mason  Danner 
Everett,  Mrs  Mary  (Orwig) 

Mrs  Henry  George  Everett 
Herkomer,  Herman  G. 
Hills,  Mrs  Metta  (Strough) 

Mrs  Elijah  Clarence  Hills 
Hospidor,  Stephen  de 
Howard,  Robert  Boardman 
Hudson,  Charles  Bradford 
Johnson,  Arthur  Monrad 
Johnson,  Ida  A. 
Krauth,  Charles  Philip 
Mex'win,  Antoinette  de  Forest  (Inger- 
soll) 

Mrs  Timothy  Dwight  Merwin 
Mitchell,  Alfred  R. 
Morgan,  Barbara  (Johnson) 

Mrs  Willard  D.  Morgan 
Nugent,  Frances  Roberts 
*01dfield,  Otis 
*Osgood,  Virginia  M. 
*Owens,  Charles  Hamilton 
*Paget-Fredericks,  Joseph 
Patterson,  Martha 
Reimers,  Mrs  Marie   (Arentz) 

Mrs  Johannes  Reimers 
Ripley,  Thomas  Emerson 
*RoUin,  Gerome  de 
Rowland,  Earl 
Smith,  Mrs  Beryl    (Kirk) 

Mrs  Carl  Walter  Smith 
Troccoli,  Giovanni  Battista 
Tufts,  Mrs  Florence  (Ingalsbe) 

Mrs  John  Burnside  Tufts 
Van  Zandt,  Hilda 

Mrs  Jerome  G.  Van  Zandt 
Weinberg,  Mrs  Emilie  (Sievert) 

Mrs  J.  G.  Weinberg 

Newspaper   Index 

The  index  covers  the  period  from 
August  15,  1846,  to  date. 

Catalog 

709  cards  have  been  added  to  the  Cali- 
fornia catalog  during  the  last  quarter. 

PRINTS    DEPARTMENT 

Bektha  S.  Tatlok,  in  charge. 

The  Prints  Department  has  been  estab- 
lished only  since  the  new  State  Library 
building  has  been  occupied.  In  it  are 
kept    the    prints    acquired    by    the    State 


i 


♦Native   Californians. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


75 


Library  for  several  years  past  and  now 
for  the  first  time  suitably  housed  and  dis- 
played. In  display  cases  can  be  shown 
about  fifty  prints  at  a  time  and  exhibits 
are  constantly  maintained.  Visitors  are 
invited. 

Two  thousand  twenty  prints  have  now 
been  cataloged.  During  the  quarter  603 
persons  visited  the  Prints  Room. 

Two  new  exhibits  were  hung  in  the  dis- 
play cases  during  the  quarter.  The  an- 
nual exhibit  of  the  California  Society  of 
Etchers  was  shown  during  the  month  of 
November.  Part  of  the  collection  was 
shown  in  the  corridor  cases  on  the  third 
floor,  as  there  were  too  many  for  the 
Prints  Room  space.  During  December 
the  annual  exhibit  of  the  Print  Makers 
of  California  was  on  display. 

BOOKS  FOR  THE  BLIND 
DEPARTMENT 

Mabel  R.  Gillis,  in  charge. 

Embossed  books  in  the  various  types 
are  sent  to  any  blind  resident  in  Cali- 
fornia upon  application.  Circular  and 
finding  list,  with  Call  slip  postal,  will  be 
sent  on  request.  Writing  appliances  and 
games  for  the  blind  are  loaned  as  samples 
to  those  wishing  to  buy  such  articles,  so 
that  the  diffei'ent  kinds  can  be  tried  before 
they  are  ordered.  Addresses  of  firms  sup- 
plying all  articles  loaned  will  be  furnished 
on  request. 

Books  sent  to  individuals  from  an  in- 
stitution distributing  embossed  literature 
are  carried  free  through  the  mails. 

Embossed  catalogs  of  the  earlier  mate- 
rial in  American  Braille,  Moon,  and  New 
York  point  are  available.  They  will  be 
loaned  to  borrowers  wishing  them  for  use 
in  book  selection. 

A  catalog  of  all  books  in  Moon  type  in 
the  Library  up  to  October  1,  1926,  and 
one  including  all  books  in  Braille  up  to 
April  1,  1927,  will  be  sent  to  anyone 
requesting  it. 

The  State  Library  will  be  glad  to  have 
borrowers  who  care  to  do  so  write  any 
letters,  or  requests  for  books  to  the  Li- 
brary in  Braille  or  New  York  Point. 

The  first  book  was  loaned  June  13, 
1905.  There  are  now  2926  blind  bor- 
rowers, 41  borrowers  having  been  added 
during  October,  November  and  December. 
Total  accessions  are  24,686,  as  follows : 
New  York  point  books  2779 ;  New  York 
point  music  187 ;  American  Braille  books 
3148 ;  American  Braille  music  1289  ;  Eu- 
ropean Braille  books  3871 ;  European 
Braille  music  269 ;  Esperanto  Braille 
books  3 ;  Moon  books  5984 ;  Moon  music 
5 ;  Revised  Braille  books  6072 ;   Revised 


Braille  music  156 ;  Standard  dot  books 
14  ;  Line  books  193  ;  Line  music  21 ;  Ink 
Print  books  525  ;  *  Appliances  84 ;  *  Games 
54 ;  Maps  32. 

During  October,  November  and  Decem- 
ber, 8074  books,  etc.  were  loaned  as  fol- 
lows :    New    York    point    84 ;    American 
Braille  46  ;  European  Braille  641 ;  Moon 
3013  ;  Revised  Braille  4283  ;  Line  1 ;  Ink 
Print  1 ;  Appliances  5 ;   Games  0 ;  Maps 
0.     The  loans  were  divided  by   class   as 
follows :    Philosophy    and    religion    482 
sociology  19  ;   language  22 ;   primers  57 
science  31 ;   useful  arts  12 ;  fine  arts  0 
amusements  4  ;  music  23  ;  literature  118 
fiction  6012  ;  travel  and  history  271 ;  biog- 
raphy 141 ;   periodicals  882. 

Copies  of  magazines  have  been  donated 
during  the  last  three  months  by  F.  B. 
Beans,  Mrs  C.  W.  Brett,  Mrs  H.  W. 
Bruning,  Max  E.  Cohen,  Anna  Cour- 
tois,  Ruby  Holtz,  Bessie  Long,  Mrs  Rose 
McComb,  W.  A.  Miller,  Mrs  A.  M.  Moser, 
Hattie  B.  Newman,  Edward  C.  Robbins, 
Frank  E.  Sanders,  Mrs  L.  Sargent, 
George  W.  Shoemaker,  Mrs  F.  M.  Thomp- 
son, J.  B.  Walker,  Donald  Wheaton, 
American  Braille  Press  for  War  and 
Civilian  Blind,  Inc.,  Board  of  Missions 
for  Deaf  and  Blind  of  the  Lutheran 
Synod  of  Missouri,  Ohio  and  other  states, 
Board  of  Missions  to  Deaf  Mutes  of  the 
Evangelical  Lutheran  Synod  of  Missouri, 
Ohio  and  other  states,  Canadian  National 
Institute  for  the  Blind,  Christian  Record 
Publishing  Company,  Christian  Science 
Publishing  Company,  Department  of  Mis- 
sions of  Protestant  Episcopal  Church, 
Gospel  Trumpet  Company,  National  In- 
stitute for  the  Blind,  Society  for  Aid  of 
the  Sightless,  Theosophical  Book  Associa- 
tion for  the  Blind,  Western  Pennsylvania 
School  for  Blind,  Xavier  BraiUe  Publish- 
ing Company,  Ziegler  Publishing  Com- 
pany and  a  friend. 

Other  gifts  are  indicated  in  the  list  of 
books,  etc.,  which  have  been  added  to  the 
library  during  the  last  three  months. 
See  p.  126. 

Home   Teaching 

Kate   M.   Foley,   home   teacher   of   the 

blind,  is  at  the  Ai-gyle  Apartments,  146 

McAllister   street,    San   Francisco,   every 

Thursday    from   9    a.m.    to   5    p.m.      Her 

*  Appliances  and  games  are  loaned  as 
samples  to  anyone  wishing  to  try  them. 


76 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


telephone  number  is  Market  0690.  She 
gives  lessons  regularly  in  the  bay  region 
and  the  Santa  Clara  Valley,  with  occa- 
sional trips  to  other  parts  of  the  state. 
Catharine  J.  Morrison,  home  teacher  of 
the  blind,  is  at  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Free  Library,  Broadway  Annex,  Hall  of 
Records,  every  Wednesday.  Her  home 
address  is  951  S.  Kenmore  ave.,  Los 
Angeles.  Her  telephone  number  is 
Drexel  5339.  She  gives  lessons  regularly 
in  Los  Angeles  and  vicinity  and  makes 
occasional  trips  to  San  Diego. 

From  October  1  to  December  31,  the 
home  teachers  gave  530  lessons  in  the 
homes  of  the  blind  and  47  lessons  in  li- 
braries. They  made  230  visits  and  calls  in 
connection  with  the  work  for  purposes 
other  than  giving  lessons,  and  have  re- 
ceived 74  visits  in  connection  Avith  the 
work. 

During  the  quarter  Miss  Foley  and 
Miss  Morrison  spent  329  hours  on  corre- 
spondence and  preparing  lessons.  They 
wrote  414  letters  and  188  postals  and 
received  306  letters  and  25  postals.  They 
also  answered  and  made  589  telephone 
calls.  They  made  6  addi*esses.  Miss 
Foley  teaches  regularly  in  Oakland,  in 
Alameda  and  in  San  Francisco  classes  of 
seeing  people  to  write  Braille.  She  spent 
17  hours  in  proofreading  hand-copied 
books.  The  various  other  activities  in 
connection  with  the  work  of  the  home 
teachers  can  not  be  easily  tabulated. 

SUTRO   BRANCH 

The  Sutro  Branch  occupies  space  in  the 
Public  Library,  Civic  Center,  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  is  open  every  day,  except  Bun- 
day,  from  9  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

CALIFORNIA     STATE     LIBRARY 
SCHOOL  GRADUATES 

Esther  M.  Bomgardner,  '15 

Ln.  Luther  Burbank  Junior  High  Scliool 

L.,  Los  Angeles. 
Thelma  Brackett,  '20 

Ln.  Newark  Museum,  Newark,  N.  J 
Helen  V.  Briggs,  '14 

46  Pairview  ave.,  Los  Gatos 
Agnes  El.  Brown,  '15 

Asst.    San   Mateo   High    School    L.,    San 

Mateo 
Helen  M.  Bruner,  '14 

Asst.  in  charge,  Sutro  Branch,  State  L., 

San  Francisco 
Mrs   Lueile    Huff   Buchan    (Mrs   Dean   W. 
Buohan),  '20 

1631   Cowper  St.,  Palo  Alto 
Mrs    Virginia    Clowe    Bullis    (Mrs    James 
S.  Bullis),  '17 

1314  Alameda  Padre  Serra,  Santa  Bar- 
bara 


Ruth  E.  Bullock,  '15 

Ln.    Belvedere    Junior   High    School    L., 

Los  Angeles 
Elta  L.  Camper,  '17 

Asst.  P.  L.,  Berkeley. 
Marguerite  Chatfleld,  '20 

Asst.  P.  L.,  Pasadena 
Nellie   B.   Christensen,  '19 

Ln.  Selma  High  School  L.,  Selma 
Mabel  Coulter,  '14 

Ln.    Lange    Library    of    Education, 

Berkeley- 
Helen  Esther  Crawford,  '20 

Galileo  High  School  L.,   San  Francisco. 
Tillie  de  Bernardi,  '18 

234  E.  79th  St.,  New  York  City 
Estella  De  Ford,  '15 

Ln.  Napa  Co.  F.  L.,  Napa 
Margaret  Dennison,  '17 

Asst.  Sutro  Branch.  State  L.,  San  Fran- 
cisco 
Abbie  Doughty,  '20 

Ln.  Garfield  High  School  L.,  Los  Angeles 
Mrs  Vivian  Gregory  Douglas   (Mrs  James 
R.  Douglas),  '14 

2804  Fleur  drive,  San  Marino 
Mrs  Flo  Gantz  Dyer  (Mrs  Maurice  Foster 
Dyer),  '20 

810  S.  Main  st.,  Salinas 
Mrs  Dorotha  Davis  Elliott    (Mrs  William 
Foster  Elliott),  '17 

Ln.  Fresno  High  School  L.,  Fresno 
Ellen  B.  Frink,  '19 

Ln.   Monterey  Co.  F.  L.,   Salinas 
Hazel  G.  Gibson,  '19 

Asst.  Sacramento  Co.  F.  L.,  Sacramento 
Margaret  V.  Girdner,  '17 

Ln.  Galileo  High  School  L.,   San  Fran- 
Mary  E.  Glock,  '15 

Died,  March   6,   1922 
Mrs    Jennie    Rumsey    Gould     (Mrs    J.    A. 
Gould),    '14 

Asst.   Yolo   Co.  P.   L.,   Woodland. 
Mrs  Mildred  Kellogg  Hargis  (Mrs  William 
H.  Hargis),  '18 

336  Front  St.,  Salinas 
Mrs  Louise   JammS  Harriss    (Mrs  Frank 
U.    Harriss),   '15 

414  E.  12th  St.,  North,  Portland,  Ore. 
Margaret  Hatch,  '15 

Ln.    The    Emporium    L.,    San    Francisco 
Mrs   Hazel   Meddaugh   Heffner    (Mrs  Roy 
.1.   Heffner),  .'18 

178   Mills   St.,   Morristown,   N.    J. 
Cecilia  Henderson,  '14 

Santa   Paula 
Mrs    Helen    Hopwood    Judd    (Mrs    Wilber 
Judd),    '20 

Care  Navy  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  Shanghai,  China 
Mrs    Winona     McConnell     Kennedy     (Mrs 
John  Elmer  Kennedy),  '15 

1320   39th  St.,   Sacramento 
Mrs    Marguerite    Ryan    Kirschman     (Mrs 
Orton   A.  Kirschman).   '19 

723   Colusa  ave.,   Berkeley 
Mrs   Algeline    Marlow    Lawson    (Mrs   Iver 
N.    Lawson,   Jr.),   '18 

3231  Front  st.,  San  Diego  . 
Marjorie  C.  Learned,  '20 

Asst.  P.  L.,  New  York  City 
Mrs  M.  Ruth  McLaughlin  Lockwood   (Mrs 
Ralnh    L.    LockM^ood).   '17 

1627  Mendocino  st,  Pasadena. 
Amy  G.  Luke,  '15 

Tulare 
Mrs    Bessie    Heath    McCrea    (Mrs    Robert 
W.   McCrea).   '19 

4941  8th  ave.,  Sacramento 
N.  RTith  McCullough,  '17 

2210  Allerton  House,  Chicago,  111. 
Mrs  Ruth   Beard   McDowell    (Mrs  Roy  F. 
McDowell).  '14 

Asst.  McHenry  P.  L.,  Modesto. 


I 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


77 


Mrs    Everett    McCullough    McMillin     (Mrs 
James  M.   McMillin),   '19 
4412  Harrison,  Washington.  D.  C 
Anne  Margrave,  '14 

Ln.  Inyo  Co.  F.  L.,  Independence 
Lenala  Martin,  '14 

Ln.  Lassen  Co.  F.  L.,  Susanville 
Mrs    Georgia    Pearl    Seeker    Meyers    (Mrs 
Robert  K.   Meyers),   '19 
Ln.  Tulare  Joint  Union  High  School  L., 
Tulare 
Vera  V.  Mitchell,  '19 

Ln.  Biggs  High  School  L.,  Biggs 
Marion  Morse,  '17 

Ln.   Honolulu  Academy  of  Arts,   Hono- 
lulu, T.  H. 
Mrs   Alice   Moore   Patton    (Mrs   James    L. 
Patton),  'IS 
416  S.  Hoover  st.,  Xios  Angeles 
Mrs    Helen     Katherine    Kellogg    Peabody 
(Mrs  Roger  Peabody),  '19 
6   Sound  View  drive,  Larchmont,   N.  T. 
Mrs    Marion    Schumacher    Percival     (Mrs 
H.  Frederic  Percival).  '15 
1633  38th  St.,  Sacramento 
Mrs  Miriam  Colcord  Post,  '14 

Ln.    Brawley   High    School    and    Junior 
College  L.,  Brawley 
Margaret  L.  Potter,  '16 

Asst.  Lane  Medical  L.,  San  Francisco 
Mrs    Eunice    Steele    Price     (Mrs    Jay    H. 
Price),  '16 
1054  Cragmont  ave.,  Berkeley 
Mrs   Essie   White   Primrose    (Mrs   George 
Primrose),    '19 
Ln.    Sacramento    High    School   K,    Sac- 
ramento 
Mrs   Beatrice  Brasefleld  Rakestraw    (Mrs 
Norris  W.  Rakestraw),  '18 
Asst.  Rhode  Island  School  of  Design  L., 
Providence,  R.  I. 
Esther  L.  Ramont,  '20 

414   Johnson  st.,   Modesto 
Mrs  Frances  Haub  Raymond  (Mrs  George 
J.  Raymond),  '20 
724  Santa  Tnez  Way,  Sacramento 
Anna  Belle  Robinson,  '18 

Died,  June  22,  1920 
Myrtle  Ruhl,  '14 

Head   of   Order  Dept.,    State   L.,    Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth  Seymour,  '18 

Ln.    Tamalpais   Union    High    School    L., 
Sausalito 
Blanche  L.   Shadle,  '17 

Asst.   State  L.,   Sacramento 
Mrs  Bernice  Goff   Simpson    (Mrs  John  R. 
Simpson),  '14 
Asst.  John  Crerar  L.,  Chicago 
Mrs  Edith  Bdinburg  Smalley    (Mrs  Carl 
J.  Smalley),  '18 
Died,  July  27,   1929. 
Mrs    Edna    Bell    Smith    (Mrs    William   A. 
Smith).  '17 
1225   42d  St.,  Sacramento 
Mrs  Elizabeth  Snyder  Smith   (Mrs  Joseph 
K.   Smith),  '20 
3100  19th  St.,  Bakersfleld 
Mrs   Beatrice    Gawne    Todd    (Mrs    Bwart 
Burns  Todd),  '17 
1860  Green  st.,  San  Francisco 
Mrs  Rosamond  Bradbury  Waithman   (Mrs 
Joseph  de  L.  Wiaithman),  '18 
1685  San  Lorenzo  ave.,  Berkeley 
Caroline  Wenzel,  '14 

Asst.  State  L.,  Sacramento 
Mrs   Blanche   Chalfant  WTieeler    (Mrs  De 
Forest  Nathaniel  Wheeler),  '14 
Box  865,  San  Jose 
Josephine  L.   Whitbeck,   '16 

Acting  Ln.  P.  L.,  Richmond 
Mrs  Katharine  Cahoon  Wilson  (Mrs  Lloyd 
R.  Wilson),  '17 
1125  Grand  ave.,  Seattle,  Wash. 


Aldine  Winham,  '20 

Asst.    San    Bernardino    Co.    F.    L.,    San 

Bernardino 
Mrs  Dorothy  Clarke  Worden,  '15 

Mrs  Bess  Ranton  Yates   (Mrs  John  DeWitt 
Yates).  '18 
Asst.   Los   Angeles   Co.   F.   L.,   Los   An- 
geles. 
Mrs  Edna  Holroyd  Yelland  (Mrs  Raymond 
Yelland),   '15 
Ln.  San  Mateo  Co.  F.  L.,  Redwood  City 

News    Items 

Miss  Ellen  B.  Frink,  '19,  became  li- 
brarian of  Monterey  County  Free  Library 
November  18,  1929,  succeeding  Miss  Anne 
Hadden,  who  returned  to  Palo  Alto  Pub- 
lic Library  as  head  of  the  institution. 

Miss  Margaret  Hatch,  '15,  left  the 
Standard  Oil  Library  in  San  Francisco 
December  1,  to  become  librarian  for  The 
Emporium. 

Mrs  Hazel  Meddaugh  Heffner,  '18,  has 
moved  to  Morristown,  N.  J.,  with  her 
family.  Mr  Heffner  commutes  to  New 
York  daily. 

Miss  Josephine  L.  Whitbeck,  '16,  is 
acting  librai'ian  of  Richmond  Public  Li- 
brary in  the  absence  of  Miss  McNeill. 
Miss  McNeill  is  on  a  nine  months  Euro- 
pean trip. 

Mrs  Dorothy  Clarke  Worden,  '15, 
passed  away  in  Sacramento  January  8, 
1930,  after  a  short  illness.  She  leaves  a 
little  ten  year  old  son,  Charles  John 
Worden,  Jr. 

Miss  Edna  Holroyd,  '15,  was  married 
to  Mr  Raymond  Yelland  in  St.  James 
Church,  Monterey,  December  23.  Mrs 
Yelland  plans  to  proceed  with  her  work 
as  librarian  of  San  Mateo  County  Free 
Library  for  the  present. 

RECENT  ACCESSIONS 

Additions  to  the  Library  During  Octo- 
ber, November  and  December,  1929 
The  last  number  of  the  Quarterly 
Bulletin  of  the  California  State  Library 
which  was  issued  was  no.  4  of  vol.  4, 
covering  the  accessions  for  September- 
December,  1905.  The  Bulletin  has  been 
discontinued  and  the  matter  contained  in 
it  is  now  appearing  in  News  Notes  of 
California  Libraries. 

GENERAL  WORKS 

Abbott,  Wilbur  Cortez. 

A    bibliography    cf    Oliver    Cromwell. 
1929.  r012  C94 


78 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Andeeson,  Alfhild  Helen. 

The  school-built  annual.     cl928. 

q070  A5 

Aet  metal  construction  company. 

Art  metal  in  the  Free  library  of  Phila- 
delphia.    1927.  qx022  A7ar 

Baulaed,  Harlan  Hoge. 

Adventures  of  a  librarian.     1929. 

X020.4   B18 

Bakwick,  George  Frederick. 

The  reading  room  of  the  British  mu- 
seum.     [1929]  X027.5  B29 

Cannox,  Carl  Leslie. 

Publicity  for  small  libraries.  1929. 
(Manual  of  library  economy) 

X021.7  C22 
CossE,  Margaret  Victoria. 

The  suburban  weekly.     1928.     070  C83 

The  Encyclopaedia  britannica.     14th  ed. 
cl929.    24  V.  rq032  E5a3 

English,  Thomas  H.,  d  Pope,  Willard  B. 
What  to  read.     1929.  028  E58 

FoSTEE,  Bemice  M. 

Michigan  novelists.   1928.     r016.81   F75 

Hay,  Oliver  Perry. 

Second   bibliography   and   catalogue   of 
the  fossil  VeHehrata  of  North  Amer- 
ica.    1929.    V.  1.     (Carnegie  institu- 
tion   of    Washington.      Publication) 
r016.566  H4 
Latimee,  Louise  Payson. 

Illustrators.  1929.  (Useful  reference 
series)  r016.74  L35a 

LiBBAEY  bureau. 

Planning  the  library  building. 

qx022  L6 
Mellee,  Carl  G. 

High-school  reporting  and  editing. 
1929.  (McGraw-Hill  vocational 
texts)  070  IV164 

NiELD,  Jonathan. 

A  guide  to  the  best  historical  novels 
and  tales.      [5th  ed.]   1929. 

r016.8  N66 
OSLEE,  Sir  William,  lart. 

Bibliotheca  Osleriana.     1929. 

rq016.61   08 

Peschke,  Mrs  Melitta  Diez. 

The  German  immigrant  and  his  read- 
ing. 1929.  (Library  work  with  the 
foreign  bom)  x021   P47 


Redman,  Amabel,  comp. 

Classified  catalogue  of  text  books  in 
the  social  studies  for  elementary  and 
secondary  schools.  1927.  (Publica- 
tion of  the  National  council  for  the 
social  studies)  016.3  R31 

RosENLOF,  George  Walter. 

Library  facilities  of  teacher-training 
institutions.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  university.  Contri- 
butions to  education)  x026  R81 

Sanfoed,  Anne  P.,  &  SchaufHer,  Robert 
Haven,  eds. 
The    magic    of    books.      1929.       (Our 
American  holidays)  028  S22 

Shaabee,  Matthias  Adam. 

Some  forerunners  of  the  newspaper  in 
England,  1476-1G22.   1929.    072  S52 

SoETE,  Pierre  de. 
The  Louvain  library  controversy.   1929. 

x027  S68 
Stevenson,  John  Alford. 

Salesmanship.  1929.  (Reading  with 
a  purpose)  028  S847 

Van  Patten,  Nathan. 

Cooperative  cataloging  of  chemical  lit- 
erature.    [1928]  qx025.3  V2 


Herbert   Hoover   and   his   library 

relations.     [1929]  x027.7  V27 

WiLLAED,  James  Field. 

Progress  of  medieval  studies  in  the 
United  States  of  America.  Bulletin 
ao.  5-6.    1927-28.        rOI 6.9401  W69 

Wise,  Thomas  James. 

A  Byron  library,  a  catalogue  of  printed 
books,  manuscripts  and  autograph 
letters.     1928.  rq012  B9w 


Weinn,  Mary  J.  J. 

Elements  of  journalism.    1929. 

070  W95 

PHILOSOPHY  AND   ETHICS 

Bkadley,  Francis  Herbert. 

Essays  on  truth  and  reality.    1914. 

192  881 
Cabot,  Mrs  Ella   (Lyman). 

Temptations  to  rightdoing.     1929. 

170  cut 
Claeke,  Edwin  Leavitt. 

The  art  of  straight  thinking.     1929. 

153  C59 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


79 


Clemenceau,  Georges  Eugene  Benjamin. 

In  the  evening  of  my  thought.     1929. 

2  V.  194  C62a 

Council  of  Christian  associations.    Com- 
mission on  relations   between  college 
men  and  women. 
The  sex  life  of  youth.    1929.  176  C855 

Doer,  Mrs  Rheta  Louise  (Childe). 
Drink  :  coercion  or  control  ?     1929. 

178  D71 

Hamilton,   Gilbert  Van  Tassel,  &  Mac- 
gowan,   Kenneth. 
What  is  wrong  with  ■  marriage.     1929. 

173  H218 
Hekrick,  Charles  Judson. 

The  thinking  machine.     cl929. 

153  H56 
Hocking,  William  Ernest. 

The  self,  its  body  and  freedom.  1928. 
(The  Terry  lectures)  126  H68 

Types  of  philosophy.     cl929. 

102  H68 
Lewis,  Clarence  Irving. 

Mind  and  the -world-order ;  outline  of 
a  theory  of  knowledge.     cl929. 

121   L67 
LiPPMANN,  Walter. 

A  preface  to  morals.     1929.       170  L76 

LoKlMER,  Frank. 

The  growth  of  reason.  1929.  (Inter- 
national library  of  psychology,  phi- 
losophy and  scientific  method) 

153  L87 

MacWilliam,  John  Alexander. 

Criticism  of  the  philosophy  of  Bergson. 
1928.  194  B49zm 

Manuel,  Herschel  Thurman, 

Master  of  my  fate ;  a  discussion  of 
personality  &  behavior.     cl929. 

170  IVI29 
MuKBAY,  Gilbert. 

The  ordeal  of  this  generation.    1929. 

172.4  M98o 
Phelps,  William  Lyon. 

Memory.      cl929.  154  P54 

RiGGS,  Austen  Fox. 

Intelligent  living.     1929.  170  R56 

Smith,  Fred  B. 
Must  we  have  war?  1929.    172.4  S64m 

Stapledon,  W.  Olaf. 
A  modem  theory  of  ethics.     [1929] 

170  S79 


Stilling,  Jakob. 

Stillings  pseudo-isochromatische  tafeln 
ziir  priifung  des  farbensinnes.    1929. 

152  S85 
Text  in  English. 

Stoddard,  Theodore  Lothrop. 

Luck,  your  silent  partner.     1929. 

174  S86 
Thilly,  Frank. 

A  history  of  philosophy.     1914. 

109  T44 
Whitehead,  Alfred  North. 

Process   and  reality,   an   essay  in  cos- 
mology.    1929.  113  W59 

Wright,  William  Kelley. 

General  introduction  to   ethics.     1929. 

170  W95 
Young,  Norwood. 

Fortuna  ;  or,  Chance  and  design.    1928. 
[Today   and  tomorrow]  175  Y74 

MIND  AND  BODY 

MozuMDAE,  Akhar  Kumar. 

Mozumdar's  message.    1924.   c131   M93 

Rees,  John  Rawlings. 

The  health  of  the  mind.     [1929] 

131   R32 
Thomas,  John  F. 

Case    studies    bearing    upon    survival. 
1929.  133.9  T45 


Wehner,  George  B. 
A  curious  life.    1929. 


133.9  W41 


CHILD  STUDY.     MENTAL  TESTS 

Brooks,  Fowler  Dell. 
The  psychology  of  adolescence.     cl929. 
(Riverside    textbooks   in   education) 
136.7  B87p 
Crum,  Grace  E. 

The  preschool  child.     1929.     136.7  C95 

Gibbons,  Alice  Newman. 

Tests  in  the  social  studies.  [1929] 
(Publications  of  the  National  coun- 
cil for  the  social  studies)     136.7  G44 

Johnson,  Mrs  Marietta  Louise  (Pierce). 
Youth  in  a  world  of  men.     1929. 

136.7  J68 
Maller,  Julius  Bernard. 

Cooperation  and  competition.  1929. 
(Teachers  college,  Columbia  univer- 
sity.    Contributions  to  education) 

136.7  M25 


80 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Maeine,  Edith  Lucile. 

The  effect  of  familiarity  with  the 
examiner  upon  Stanford-Binet  test 
performance.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  university.  Contri- 
butions to  education)  136.7  M33 


Mateer,  Florence. 
Just  normal  children. 


1929. 


136.7  IV142J 


O'Shea,  Michael  Vincent. 

Newer  ways  with  children.     cl929 

136.7  082n 

Schwab,  Sidney  Isaac. 

The  adolescent,  his  conflicts  and 
escapes.     1929.  136.7  S39 

TiLSON,  Marie  Agnes. 

Problems  of  preschool  children ;  a  basis 
for  parental  education.  1929. 
(Teachers  college,  Columbia  univer- 
sity.    Contributions  to  education) 

136.7  T581 

Van  Alstyne,  Dorothy. 

The  environment  of  three-year-old 
children.  1929.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  136.7  V21 

PSYCHOLOGY 

KtiNKEL,  Fritz. 

Let's  be  normal !     1929.  150  K964 

MacCubdt,  John  Thompson. 

Common  principles  in  psychology  & 
physiology.  1928.  (The  Cambridge 
psychological  library)  150  Ml 33 


McDougall,  William. 
Modern     materialism 
evolution.     [1929] 


and     emergent 
150  M13m 


Radosavljevich,  Paul  Rankov. 
The  educational  significance  of  Schneer- 
sohn's      psycho-expedition      method. 
1929.  150  R13 

Titchener,  Edward  Bradford. 

Systematic    psychology :    prolegomena. 
1929.  150  T61s 

Wexberg,  Erwin. 

Individual  psychology,   1929.    150  W54 

WooDWORTH,  Robert  Sessions. 
Psychology.     Rev.  ed.     cl929. 

150  W91p1 


RELIGION 

Ainslie,  Peter. 

The  message  of  the  Disciples  for  the 
union  of  the  church,  including  their 
origin  and  history.    cl913.     289  A29 

Bernard,  John  Henry. 

A  critical  and  exegetical  commentary 
on  the  Gospels  according  to  St.  John. 

1928.  2  V.  (International  critical 
commentary  on  the  Holy  Scriptures 
of  the  Old  and  New  Testaments) 

226.5  B51 
Bolton,  Dorothy  G. 
•  Old  songs  hymnal.     cl929.       245  B69 

Bowie,  Walter  Russell. 

The   Master ;    a   life   of   Jesus   Christ. 

1929.  232  B78 

Cadoux,  Cecil  John. 

Catholicism  and  Christianity,  a  vindi- 
cation of  progressive  Protestantism. 
1929.  284  012 

Charles,  Robert  Henry. 

A  critical  and  exegetical  commentary 
on  the  Revelation  of  St.  John.  1920. 
(The  international  critical  com- 
mentary) 228  047 


Civis  romanus,  pseud. 
The  pope  is  king.     1929. 


282  058 


Darrow,  Clarence  Seward,  &  Rice,  Wal- 
lace de  Groot  Cecil. 
Infidels  and  heretics.     cl929.    211   D22 

Davis,  Jerome,  ed. 

Labor    speaks    for    itself    on    religion. 
1929.  261   D26I 

Dorland,  Arthur  Garratt. 

A   history   of   the    Society   of   Friends 
(Quakers)    in   Canada.     1927. 

289.6  D71 
Douglass,  Harlan  Paul. 

Church    comity.      1929.  260  D73ch 

Eddington,  Arthur  Stanley. 

Science  and  the  unseen  world.     1929. 
(Swarthmore  lecture,  1929) 

215  E212 

FuERBRlNGER,    Ludwig   Ernst,    d    others, 
eds. 
The   Concordia  cyclopedia.     1927. 

r203  F95 
Gkaebner,  Theodore  Conrad. 

The  story  of  the  catechism.     1928. 

238  G73 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


81 


Hallidat,  James  F. 

Robbing  youth  of  its  religion,     1929. 

239  H18 
Hasluck,  Frederick  William. 

Christianity  and  Islam  under  the  sul- 
tans.    1929.     2  V.  297  H35 

Hearlet,  John. 

Pope  or  Mussolini.     cl929.       282  H43 

Howe,      George,      &      Hari-er,      Gustave 
Adolphus. 
A     handbok     of     classical     mythology. 
1929.  292  H85 

If  I  could  preach  just  once  [by]  Hon 
Bertrand  Russell,  Dr  Joseph  Collins, 
John  Drinkwater  [and  others].  1929. 

252  123 
King,  Basil. 

Adventures  in  religion.    1929.    204  K52 

Lammens,  Henri. 

Islam  :  beliefs  and  institutions.   [1929] 

297  L23 
McCabe,   Joseph. 

The  story  of  religious  controversy. 
cl929.  209   IV112 

Mackenzie,  William  Douglas. 

Man's     consciousness     of    immortality. 
1929.      (The  Ingersoll  lecture,  1929) 
218  M15 
Mitchell,  William   Samuel. 

A  seven-day  church  at  vs^ork.     1929. 

260  IVI68 
MOEHLMAN,  Conrad  Henry. 

The  Catholic-Protestant  mind.     1929. 

282  M69 
MuERY,  John  Middleton. 

God.     1929.  231   M  98 

NiEBUHR,  Reinhold. 

Leaves  from  the  notebook  of  a  tamed 
cynic.     1929.  250  N66 

Norwood,  Robert  Winkworth. 

The  man  who  dared  to  be  God,  a  story 
of  Jesus.     1929.  232  N89 

Perry,  William  James. 

Gods  and  men,  the  attainment  of 
immortality.  [1927]  (The  begin- 
ning of  things)  290  P46g 

Philo  Judaeus. 

Philo,  with  an  English  translation  by 
F.  H.  Colson  ...  and  the  Rev  G.  H. 
Whitaker.  1929.  (The  Loeb  classi- 
cal library)  208  P56c 
6 — 73829 


Potter,  Charles  Francis. 

The  story  of  religion  as  told  in  the  lives 
of  its  leaders.     1929.  209  P86 

Protestant  Episcopal  church  in  the  U. 

S.  A.    Church   congress,  Providence. 

Forthright  opinions  within  the  church. 

1928.  283  P96cf 

Richard,  Paul. 

The  scourge  of  Christ,  translated  from 
the  French  by  Linda  Richard.    1929. 
242  R51 
ScHiLPP,  Paul  Arthur. 

Do  we  need  a  new  religion?     cl929. 

201   S33 
Sohrab,  Ahmad. 

Abdul  Baha  in  Egypt.     cl929. 

299  S68 
Speery,  Willard  Learoyd. 

Signs  of  these  times ;  the  Ayer  lectures 
of  the  Colgate-Rochester  divinity 
school  for  1929.     1929.  230  S75 

Streeter,  Burnett  Hillman. 

The  primitive  church,  studied  with 
special  reference  to  the  origins  of  the 
Christian  ministry.     1929.       270  S91 

Thompson,  Richard  Lowe. 

The  history  of  the  devil,  the  horned  god 
of  the  West.    1929.  291.216  T47 

Ward,  James. 

Naturalism  and  agnosticism.  211   W25a 

Worcester,  Elwood. 

The  allies  of  religion.     cl929. 

252  W91al 
Zwemer,  Samuel  Marinus. 

Across  the  world  of  Islam.    cl929. 

297  Z97 
JEWS 
American  Jewish  committee. 

Annual  report.     19th-22d,   1926-1929. 

296  A51 
Bloch,  Josef  Samuel. 

Israel   and   the   nations.     1927. 

Qift  296  B6514 

Booth,  Henry  Kendall. 

The  bridge  between  the  Testaments. 
1929.  296  B72 

Cohen,  Israel. 

Jewish  life  in  modern  times.  2d  ed. 
[1929]  296  C67a 


Fleg,  Edmond. 

Why  I  am  a  Jew.     1929. 


296  F59 


82 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Holmes,  John  Haynes. 

Palestine  to-day  and  to-morrow.    1929. 

296  H75 

KOHTJT,  Mrs  Rebekah   (Bettelheim). 
As  I  know  them ;  some  Jews  and  a  few 
Gentiles.    1929.  296  K797 

Samuel,  Maurice. 
What  happened  in  Palestine ;  the  events 
of  August,  1929.    cl929.    296  S193w 

SOCIOLOGY:    GENERAL 

Casson,  Herbert  Newton. 

Creative  thinkers,  the  eflBcient  few  who 

cause  progress  and  prosperity.  el929. 

301   034 

Davis,  Jerome,  d  Barnes,  Harry  Elmer, 
eds. 
Readings  in  sociology.    cl927.     (Social 
relations  series)  301   D262r 

Dawson,     Carl     Addington,    d     Gettys, 
Warner  Ensign. 
An  introduction  to  sociology.    cl929. 

301   D27 
Gee,  Wilson,  ed. 

Research  in  the  social  sciences.     1929. 

301   G29 
Heetzlek,  Joyce  Oramel. 

Social  institutions.  1929.  (McGraw- 
Hill  publications  in  sociology) 

301    H57s 

Lxjndberg,    George    Andrew    [<£-    others'] 
eds. 
Trends   in  American   sociology.     1929. 
(Harper's  social  science  series) 

301   L96 
Ogbukn,  William  Fielding,  ed. 

Recent  social  changes  in  the  United 
States  since  the  war  and  particularly 
in  1927.  cl929.  (The  University  of 
Chicago  sociological  series) 

309.1   034 
RuEFF,  Jacques. 

From  the  physical  to  the  social  sciences. 
1929.  301   R91 

SoEOKiN,  Pitirim  Aleksandrovich,  d  Zim- 
merman, Carle  Clark. 
Principles     of     rural-urban     sociology. 
cl929.        (American     social     science 
series)  301  S71p 

U.   S.  President. 

The  inaugural  addresses  of  the  presi- 
dents.    1929.  308  U58i 


Wells,  George  Ross. 

Individuality  and  social  restraint.  1929. 
301   W454 
Young,  Kimball. 

Source  book  for  social  psychology.  1928. 

301   Y73 

STATISTICS.    POLITICAL  SCIENCE 

Bell,  Kenneth  Norman,  ed. 

Select  documents  on  British  colonial 
policy,  1830-1860.     1928. 

325.342.  B433 

Child,  Richard  Washburn. 

The  writing  on  the  wall ;  who  shall 
govern  us  nest?    cl929.        320.4  C53 

CoNOVEB,  Milton. 

Working  manual  of  original  sources  in 
American  government.  Rev.  and  enl. 
ed.     1928.  320.73  075 

Duff,  Arnold  Mackay. 

Freedmen  in  the  early  Roman  empire. 
1928.  326.937  D85 

Hughes,  Charles  Evans. 

Pan  American  peace  plans.     1929. 

327.73  H89p 

LoviTT,    William    Vernon    d    Holtzclaw, 
Henry  Fuller. 
Statistics.     1929.  310  L91 

ODUiyc,  Howard  Washington. 

Wings  on  my  feet ;  black  Ulysses  at 
the  wars.     cl929.  325.26  027w 

Petrie,  Sir  Charles  Alexander,  iart. 
The  history  of  government.     [1929] 

320.9  P49 
Webee,  Elizabeth  Anne. 

The  Duk-Duks ;  primitive  and  historic 
types  of  citizenship.  [1929]  ( Studies 
in  the  making  of  citizens) 

320.1   W37 
WooLF,  Leonard  Sidney. 

Imperialism  and  civilization.     1928. 

321   W91 

Weight,  Benjamin  Fletcher,  ed. 

A  source  book  of  American  political 
theory.     1929.  320.73  W94 

Weiston,  Henry  Merritt. 

Executive  agents  in  American  foreign 

relations.     1929.     (The  Albert  Shaw 

lectures  on  diplomatic  history,  1923) 

327  W95 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


83 


ECONOMICS 

Angell,  James  Waterhouse. 

The  recovery  of  Germany.  1929.  (Pub- 
lications of  the  Council  on  foreign 
relations)  330.943  A58 

Bewham,  Frederic  Charles. 

The  prosperity  of  Australia.    1928. 

330.994  B46 

Chesteeton,  Gilbert  Keith,  d  others. 
Do  we  agree?      [1928]  330  C52 

The  cooperative  movement  in  Russia  dur- 
ing the  war.  1929.  (Carnegie  en- 
dowment for  international  peace. 
Division  of  economics  and  history. 
Economic  and  social  history  of  the 
world  war.    Russian  series) 

330.947  C77 
Deiblee,  Frederick  Shipp. 

Principles  of  economics.     1929. 

330  D32 
Donaldson,  John. 

International  economic  relations ;  a 
treatise  on  world  economy  and  world 
politics.      1928.  330  D67 

The  effect  of  the  world  v/ar  upon  the 
commerce  and  industry  of  Japan. 
1929.  [Carnegie  endowment  for  in- 
ternational peace.  Division  of  eco- 
nomics and  history.  Economic  and 
social  history  of  the  world  war. 
Japanese  series]  330.952  E27 

FLiJGEL,  Felix,  &  Faulkner,   Harold  Un- 
derwood, eds. 
Readings   in    the    economic    and   social 
history  of  the  United  States.     1929. 
(Harper's    historical   series) 

330.973  F64 
HOBSON,  John  Atkinson. 
Economics  and  ethics ;  a  study  in  social 
values.     cl929.     (Health  social  rela- 
tions series)  330  H68e 

Tavits,  Benjamin  A.,  d  Wood,  Charles 
Wesley. 

Make  everybody  rich,  industry's  new 
goal.    cl929.  330.973  J  41 

ELso,  Robert  Wilson. 
Poverty.       1929.       (Longmans'     social 
science  series)  339  K292p 

Anight,  Bruce  Winton,  &  Smith,  Nelson 
Lee. 
Economics.       cl929.        (Industries     of 
America)  330  K69 


LiPPiNCOTT,  Isaac. 

Economic  resources   and   industries   of 
the  world.     1929.  330.9  L76 


Maex,  Karl. 

Capital.     [1928] 


331    M39a 


Matsushita,  Masatoshi. 

Japan  in  the  league  of  nations.  1929. 
(Studies  in  history,  economics,  and 
public  law,  ed.  by  the  faculty  of 
political  science  of  Columbia  uni- 
versity) 330.5  C72 


MooEE,  Henry  Ludwell. 
Synthetic  economics.    1929. 


330.1    M82 


Motherwell,  Hiram. 

The  imperial  dollar.     cl929. 

330.973  M91 

Patterson,  Samuel  Howard. 

Social  aspects  of  industry ;  a  survey  of 
labor  problems  and  causes  of  indus- 
trial unrest.     1920.  330.973  P31 

Senior,  Nassau  William. 
Industrial  efficiency  and  social  economy. 
cl928.  330  S47i 

Sheewell,   Guillermo  Butler. 

Mexico's    capacity   to   pay ;    a    general 

analysis  of  the  present  international 

economic  position  of  Mexico.     1929. 

330.972  S55 

LABOR 

Barrows,  Esther  G. 

Neighbors  all,  a  settlement  notebook. 
1929.  331.85  B27  - 

DoBB,  Maurice  Herbert. 

Wages.  [1928]  (Cambridge  economic 
handbooks)  331.2  D63 

Donovan,  Mrs  Frances  R. 

The   saleslady.     cl929.      (The    Univer- 
sity  of   Chicago   sociological   series) 
331.4  D68 
Man,  Henri  de. 

Joy  in  work.     [1929]  331.8  M26 

MuLLEE,  Helen  Marie,  comp. 

Government  fund  for  unemployment. 
1929.      (The  reference   shelf) 

331.8   M958 

Neff,  Mrs  Wanda   (Fraiken). 
Victorian  working  women.     1929. 

331.4  N38 


Si 


NEWS   NOTES   OJP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Selekman,  Ben  MoiTis,  d  Selekman,  jMrs 
Sylvia    (Kopald). 
British  industry  today.     1929. 

331.8  S46 

BANKING.      FINANCE 
American  institute  of  banking. 

Trust  functions.     cl927.        332.1   A51t 

Angell,   Norman. 

The  story  of  money.     1929.     332.4  A58 

Blaisdell,  Donald  Christy. 

European  financial  control  in  the  Otto- 
man empire.     1929.  336.496  B63 

Henkels,  Stanislaus  Vincent. 

Andrew  Jackson  and  the  Bank  of  the 
United  States.    1928.         v332.1   H51 

The  International  investor.     1928-29. 

q332.605   161 

"  Madden,  John  Thomas,  <&  Nadler,  Marcus. 
Foreign  securities.     cl929.     332.6  M17 

MOTTEAM,  Ralph  Hale. 

A  history  of  financial  speculation.  1929. 
332.6  M92 

National  industrial  conference  board. 
General    sales    or    turnover    taxation. 
1929.  336.2  N277g 

Rogers,  James  Harvey,  d  others. 

The  process  of  inflation  in  France, 
1914-1927.  1929.  (Social  and  eco- 
nomic studies  of  postwar  France,  pre- 
pared under  the  auspices  of  the  Co- 
lumbia university,  Council  for  re- 
search  in   the  social   sciences) 

332.1   R727 
Steineib,  William  Howard. 

Investment  trusts :  American  experi- 
ence.    cl929.  332.6  S82 

Warshow,  Robert  Irving. 

The  story  of  Wall  street.     cl929. 

332.6  W29 

Willis,   Henry   Parker,   d   Bogen,   Jules 
Irwin. 
Investment  banking.    1929.   332.1   W73i 

COOPERATION.     SOCIALISM 

Durst,  Charles  Elmer. 

How  to  manage  a  cooperative  fruit  and 
vegetable  marketing  association. 
cl924.  (Marketing  fruits  and  vege- 
tables) 334.6  D96 


How    to    organize    a    cooperative 

fruit  and  vegetable  marketing  asso- 
ciation. cl924.  (Marketing  fi-uits 
and  vegetables)  334.6  D96h 

Laidler,    Harry    Wellington,   d   Thomas 
Norman  Mattoon,  eds. 
The  socialism  of  our  times.     cl929. 

335  L18s 

Workers  (communist)  party  of  America. 

National  election  campaign  committee. 

The    platform    of    the    class    struggle. 

1928.  335  W926 

PRODUCTION  AND  MARKETING 

Arnold,  Schuyler. 

Wayside  marketing.    1929.      338.1   A75 

Becknee,  Earl  R. 

A  history  of  labor  legislation  in  Illi- 
nois. cl929.  ( Social  science  studies, 
directed  by  the  Local  community 
research  committee  of  the  University 
of  Chicago)  338.9  B39 

CoMiSH,  Newel  Howland. 

Cooperative  marketing  of  agricultural 
products.     1929.  338.1   C73 

Erdman,  Heni-y  Ernest. 

American  produce  markets.  el928. 
(Agricultural  commerce  and  adminis- 
tration series)  338.1    E66am 

KiLLOUGH,  Hugh  Baxter,  d  Killough,  Mrs 
Lucy  (W.). 
Raw  materials  of  industrialism. 

338  K48 

National  industiial  conference  board. 
The  cost  of  living  in  the  United  States 
in  1928.     1929.  338  N2772a2 

Payne,  Henry  Mace. 

Natural  resources  and  national  prob- 
lems.   1928.  338  P34 

Rhoades,  Elmer  Lamont,  ed. 

Merchandising  packinghouse  products. 
[1929]  (The  Institute  of  meat  pack- 
ing studies)  338.1   R47 

Seager,  Henry  Rogers,  d  Gulick,  Charles 
Adams. 
Trust  and  corporation  problems.    1929. 

338.8  S43 
Sears,  John  Harold. 

The  new  place  of  the  stockholder.  1929. 

338.7  843 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


80 


Sherman,  Wells  Alvord. 
Merchandising    fruits    and    vegetables. 
192S.  338.1   S55 

LAW.     ADMINISTRATION 

Br^u)way,  John  Saeger. 

Law  and  social  work.  cl929.  (Social 
service  monographs)  347  B81 

Buck,  Arthur  Eugene. 

Public  budgeting.     1929.       351.7  B92p 

DiLNOT,  George. 

Great  detectives  and  their  methods. 
[1927]  352.2  D57g 

Gretton,  Richard  Henry. 

The  king's  government.     1913. 

354.42  G83 

Harris,  Joseph  Pratt. 

Registration  of  voters  in  the  United 
States.  1929.  (Institute  for  govern- 
ment research.  ^Studies  in  adminis- 
tration) 353.8  H31 

Heffernan,  James  William. 
New  York  Fire  department  examination 
questions.     1929.     2  v.       q351.3   H46 

Holt,  William  StuU. 

The  Bureau  of  the  census ;  its  history, 
activities  and  organization.  1929. 
(Institute  for  government  research. 
Service  monographs  of  the  United 
States  government)  353.8  H75c 

Nathan,  Manfred. 

Empire  government.     [1928] 

354.42  N27 

National  electric  light  association. 

Government  (political)  ownership  and 
operation  and  the  electric  light  and 
power  industry.     cl928.     352  N277a 

Ogg,  Frederic  Austin. 

English  government  and  politics.     1929. 
342.42  034 

Potter,  Pitman  Benjamin. 

This  world  of  nations,  foundations, 
institutions,  practices.     1929. 

341   P86t 

ScHMECKEBiEE,  Laurence  Frederick. 
The  Bureau  of  prohibition,  its  history, 
activities  and  organization.  1929. 
(Institute  for  government  research. 
Service  monographs  of  the  United 
States  government)  353.8  S34bp 


ScHMECKEBiER,  Laurence  Frederick,  & 
Willoughby,  William  Franklin. 
The  government  and  administration  of 
the  District  of  Columbia.  1929. 
(Institute  for  government  research. 
Studies  in  administration) 

353.8  S34dl 
White,  Leonard  Dupee. 

The  prestige  value  of  public  employ- 
ment in  Chicago.  cl929.  (Social 
science  studies,  directed  by  the  Local 
community  research  committee  of  the 
University  of  Chicago)        352  W.58p 

ASSOCIATIONS.     INSTITUTIONS 

Babham,  Richard  Harris. 

The  Garrick  club;  notices  of  one  hun- 
dred and  thirty-five  of  its  former 
members.     1896.  367  B25 

Boas,  Ernst  Philip,  &  Michelsohn,  Nikolai. 

The  challenge  of  chronic  diseases.   1929. 

362.1  B66 
Booth,  Ernest. 

Stealing  through  life.     1929.     364  872 

Breckinridge,  Sophonisba  Preston,  comp. 
Public    welfare    administration    in    the 
United    States.      cl927.      (The   Uni- 
versity    of     Chicago     social     service 
series)  361   B829 

Clarke,  Donald  Henderson. 

In  the  reign  of  Rothstein.    1929. 

364  C59 
Franklin,  Allan. 

The  trail  of  the  tiger,  being  an  account 
of  Tammany  from  1789.    1928. 

353  F83 
JoHNSEN,  Julia  E.,  comp. 

The  Baumes  law.  1929.  (The  refer- 
ence shelf)  364  J 65 

Lou,  Herbert  Hsiohsi. 

Juvenile  courts  in  the  United  States. 
1927.  (The  University  of  North 
Carolina.     Social  study  series) 

364.1  L88 
Warren,  Winslow. 

The  society  of  the  Cincinnati.    1929. 

369.131  C57w 

INSURANCE 

Brown,  Lela  T. 

Insurance  underwriting;  a  study  of  the 
business  in  its  relation  to  blind 
agents.  1928.  (American  foundation 
for  the  blind.  Vocational  research 
series)  368  887 


86 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


LoNGNECKEE,  John  W. 

Selling  insurance  by  cooperative  adver- 
tising.    1929.  368  L85 

Macklall,  Luther  E. 

The  principles  of  surety  underwriting. 
4th  ed.,  entirely  rewritten  and  enl. 
cl929.  368  Ml 5 

RiEGEL,  Robert,  d  Loman,  Harry  James. 

Insurance,     principles     and     practices. 

Rev.  ed.     1929.  368  R36a 

Todd,  Frank  Morton. 

A  romance  of  insurance.    cl929. 

c368  T633 

EDUCATION 

Alexander,  Uhlman  Seymour. 

Special  legislation  aJfecting  public 
schools.  1929.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  379.1  A378 

Ameeican  association  of  junior  colleges. 
Annual  meeting,  6th-8th.    1926-28. 

378.06  A51 
Baldwin,  James  WiUis. 

The  social  studies  laboratory.  1929. 
(Teachers  college,  Columbia  univer- 
sity.    Contributions  to  education) 

371.3  B18 
Barnaed,  Henry. 

NoiTnal  schools,  and  other  institutions, 
agencies,  and  means  designed  for  the 
professional  education  of  teachers. 
[1929]  (Colorado  state  teachers 
college.     Education  series) 

370.73  B25 
Barb,  Arvil  Sylvester. 

Characteristic  differences  in  the  teach- 
ing  performance   of   good    and   poor 
teachers  of  the  social  studies.    cl929. 
371   B268 
Beechel,  Edith  Emma. 

A  citizenship  program  for  elementary 
schools.  1929.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  375.17  B41 

Blake,  Mabelle  Babcock  Id  others']. 
Education   of  the  modem   girl.     1929. 

376  B63e 
Bode,  Boyd  Henry. 

Conflicting  psychologies  of  learning. 
cl929.  370.1   B66c 

Bowden,  Aberdeen  Orlando. 

Consumers   uses  of   arithmetic.     1929. 


(Teachers  college,   Columbia  univer- 
sity.    Contributions  to  education) 

372.7  878 
Bkevstee,  John  Marks. 

Cases  in  the  administration  of  guidance. 

1929.  (McGraw-HiU  vocational  texts) 

370.01   B84 

Beouillette,  Joseph  Walter,  d  others. 
A  comparative  study  of  the  school  prog- 
ress of  foreign-speaking  and  English- 
speaking  children.    cl928.    371.9  B87 

Bryce,  James  Bryce,  viscount. 

The  worth  of  ancient  literature  to  the 
modern  world.  1917.  (Publications 
of  the  General  education  board. 
Occasional  papers)  375  B91 

Caetee,  Edward  Clark,  ed. 

China  and  Japan  in  our  university  cur- 
ricula.    1929.  375  C32 

Caswell,  HoUis  Leland. 

City  school  surveys,  an  interpretation 
and  appraisal.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  university.  Contribu- 
tions to  education)  379.7  C35 

Cloitsee,  Lucy  Weller,  d  Millikan,  Chloe 
Ethel. 
Kindergarten-primary    activities    based 
on  community  life.    1929.    372.2  C64 

Cocks,  A.  W. 

The  pedagogical  value  of  the  true-false 
examination.  1929.  (University  re- 
search monographs)  371.2  C66 

CoE,  George  Albert, 

What  is  Christian  education?    1929. 

377  C67w 
COTTEELL,  Donald  Peery. 

Instruction   and  instructional  facilities 
in  the  colleges  of  the  United  Lutheran  1 
church  in  America.     1929.      (Teach- 
ers    college,      Columbia     univei'sity. 
Contributions  to  education) 

377.8  C85  I 

Cox,  Philip  Westcott  Lawrence. 

The  junior  high  school  and  its  curricu 
lum.     cl929.  379.17  C87 

Dewey,  John. 

The  sources  of  a  science  of  education. 
1929.  (The  Kappa  delta  pi  lecture 
series)  370.1   D51s 

Eliot,  Charles  William. 

Latin    and    the   A.    B.    degree.      1917. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


87 


(Publications  of  the  General  educa- 
tion board.     Occasional  papers) 
Gift.  375  E42 

Ellis,  Robert  Sidney. 

Standardizing  teachers'  examinations 
and  the  distribution  of  class  marks. 
el927.  371.2  E47 

Fakley,  Belmont  Mercer. 

What  to  tell  the  people  about  the  pub- 
lic schools.  1929.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  371.2  F23 

Feench,  Robert  Dudley. 

The  memorial  quadrangle,  a  book  about 
Yale.     1929.  378.746  YEf 

Galvin,    Eileen    H.,    &    Walker,    Mary 
Eugenia. 
Assemblies  for  junior  and  senior  high 
schools.     cl929.^  371.8  G17 

Gaerison,   Sidney  Clarence,  d  Garrison, 
Karl  C. 
The    psychology    of    elementai-y    school 
subjects.      cl929.      (Johnson    educa- 
tion series)  370.1   G24 

Gray,  Mason  DeWitt. 

The    teaching     of     Latin.      cl929. 
(Appleton  series  in  special  methods) 
375  G78 
Hawkes,  Ernest  William. 

Orientation  for  college  freshmen.    cl929. 
371.3  H392 
HiTES,  Laird  Thomas. 

The  effective  Christian  college.     1929. 

377  H675 
Jones,  Lance  George  Edvrard. 

Negro   schools  in   the  southern   states. 
[         1928.  371.9  J77 

Jordan,  David  Starr. 

The  trend  of  the  American  university. 
1929.  c378  J82t 

KiMMEL,  William  Glenn. 

The  management  of  the  reading  pro- 
gram in  the  social  studies.  cl929. 
(Publications  of  the  National  coun- 
cil for  the  social  studies)    371.3  K49 

Knight,  Edgar  Wallace. 

Education  in  the  United  States.   cl929. 

370.9  K69 
Le  Sourd,  Howard  Marion. 

The  university  vfovk  of  the  United 
Lutheran  church  in  America.     1929. 


(Teachers  college,   Columbia  univer- 
sity.    Contributions  to  education) 

377.8  L63 
LiMBERT,  Paul  Moyer. 

Denominational  policies  in  the  support 
and  supervision  of  higher  education. 
1929.  (Teachers  college,  Columbia 
university.  Contributions  to  educa- 
tion) 377.8  L73 

Lloyd- Jones,   Mrs   Esther    (McDonald). 
Student     personnel     work     at     North- 
western university.     1929.     378  L79 

IjUbbock,  Percy. 

Shades  of  Eton.    [1929]     378.42  EElu 

McGregor,  Anne  Laura. 

The  junior  high  school  teacher.  1929. 
379.17  M14 
Martin,  Everett  Dean. 

A  liberal  education.     1929.     370.1    M37 


Mearns,  Hughes. 
Creative  power. 


1929. 


375.8  M48 


Melvin,  Arthur  Gordon. 

Progressive  teaching.    cl929.    371   IVI53 

Minor,  Ruby. 

Pupil     activities  in     the     elementary 

grades.     cl929.  (Lippincott's  school 

project  series)  371.3  M66p 

Mobsman,  Lois  Coffey. 

Principles  of  teaching  and  learning  in 
the  elementary  school.  cl929.  ( River- 
side textbooks  in  education) 

370.1   M91 
Muse,  Maude  Blanche. 

An  introduction  to  efficient  study  hab- 
its according  to  the  laws  and  princi- 
ples governing  economical  learning. 
1929.  371.3  M98 

Newkirk,  Louis  Vest. 

The  general  shop.     cl929.     371.4  N54 

Palmer,  Anthony  Ray. 

Pi'ogressive  practices  in  directing  learn- 
ing.    1929.  371.3  P17 

Park,  Maxwell  Gerald. 

A  problem-outline  in  fundamental  prin- 
ciples of  teaching  and  learning. 
cl928.  (The  Century  education 
series)  q371   P2 

A  problem-outline  in  introduction 

to  teaching.     cl928.      (The  Century 
education  series)  q371   P2p 


88 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Pitkin,  Walter  Boughton. 

The  art  of  rapid  reading.     1929. 

372.4  P68 

Rammelkamp,  Charles  Henry. 

Illinois   college ;    a   centennial   history, 
1829-1929.     1928.  q378.773  llEr 

Eeedeb,  Edwin  Hewett. 

Simplifying  teaching.    cl929.    371   R32 

RoEMER,  Joseph,   &  Allen,   Charles  For- 
rest. 
Readings  in  extra-curricular  activities. 
cl929.     (Johnson's  education  series) 
371.8    R71r 
RuCH,  Giles  Murrel. 

The  objective  or  new-type  examination. 
cl929.  371.2  R89 

Sandwick,  Richard  Lanning. 

Study  and  personality  ;  a  textbook  in 
educational  guidance.     cl929. 

371.3  S221 
ScHOTT,  Carl  Peter. 

Physical  education  in  the  colleges  of 
the  United  Lutheran  church  in 
America.  1929.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  371.7  S37 

Smith,  Walter  Robinson. 
An  introduction  to  educational  sociol- 
ogy.    Rev.  and  enl.  ed.     cl929. 

370.1   S663a 

Struck,  Ferdinand  Theodore. 

Methods  and  teaching  problems  in  in- 
dustrial education.    1929.     371.4  S92 

Thorndike,   Edward  Lee,   &  Gates,   Ar- 
thur Irving. 
Elementary     principles     of     education. 
1929.  370.1  T49el 

Thwing,  Charles  Franklin. 

Education  and  religion  ;  the  Bedell  lec- 
tures for  1926-27.    1929.    370.4  T54 

Van  Wagenen,  Mrs  Beulah  (Clark). 
Extra-curricular  activities  in  the  col- 
leges of  the  United  Lutheran  church 
in  America.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  university.  Contribu- 
tions to  education)  371.8  V28 

Van  Wagenen,  Marvin  James. 

A  teachers'  manual  in  the  use  of  the 
educational  scales.     cl928. 

371.2  V28t 


Wheat,  Harry  Grove. 

The  relative  merits  of  conventional  and 
imaginative  types  of  problems  in 
arithmetic.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  university.  Contri- 
butions to  education)        372.7     W55 

WniTEHE.ya,  Alfred  North. 

The  aims  of  education  &  other  essays. 
1929.  370.4  W592 

COMMUNICATION.  COMMERCE 

American  automobile  association.   Motor 
bus  division. 
Bus  facts.     1928.  388  A51 

Clowes,  Ernest  Seabury. 

Shipways  to  the  sea ;  our  inland  and 
coastal   waterways.   1929.   656.9  C64 

EsKEW,  Garnett  Laidlaw. 

The  pageant  of  the  packets.     cl929. 

656.9  E75 

National  electric  light  association. 
Cooperation    with    educational   institu- 
tions committee.     Public  utilities  ;  a 
sux'vey  of  the  extent  of  instruction  in  . 
the   field   of  public   utilities   in    col- 
leges and  universities.    cl929. 

q382  N2 

Rhodes,  Frederick  Leland. 

Beginnings  of  telephony.     1929. 

654.6  R47 

Russell,  Charles  Edward.  i 

From  Sandy  Hook  to  62°.     cl929. 

656.8  R96 

Stiles,  Kent  B. 

Stamps,  an  outline  of  philately.     1929. 

383  S85 

Tribolet,  Leslie  Bennett. 

The  international  aspects  of  electrical 
communications  in  the  Pacific  area. 
1929.  (Johns  Hopkins  university 
studies  in  historical  and  political 
science.   Extra  volumes.   New  series) 

384  T82 
WiLTSEE,  Ernest. 

When  the  pack  mule  express  was  the 
United  States  mail.     1929. 

qc385.1   W7 

CUSTOMS.  COSTUMES 
FOLK  LORE 

Benkard,  Ernst. 

Undying  faces.     1929.  q393   B4 


vol.  25,  no.  1 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


BiKKLEY,  Robert  Cedric,  (£-  Binkley,  Mrs 
Frances  Williams. 
What  is  right  with  maiTiage.     1929. 

392.5  B61 

Bryant,  Mrs  Lorinda   (Munson). 

The  children's  book  of  celebrated  leg- 
ends.    cl929.  398  B9153 

Field,  Rachel  Lyman. 

American  folk  and  fairy  tales.     1929. 

398  F45 
KoHLEE,  Karl. 

A  history  of  costume.      [1928] 

391   K79 
Pedersen,  Victor  Cox. 

The  man  a  woman  marries.     1929. 

392  P37m 
Summers,  Montague 
The  vampire  in  Europe.     1929. 

398.4  S95v 
Thompson,  Stith,  ed. 

Tales  of  the  North  American  Indians. 
1929.  398  T476 

Warwick,  Edward,  &  Pitz,  Henry  C. 
Early  American  costume.  cl929.   (Cen- 
tury library  of  American   antiques) 
391    W29 
Wright,  Harold  Bell. 

Long  ago  told.     1929.  398.2  W94 

WOMEN 

International  federation  of  university 
women. 
Report    of   the   12th   council   meeting. 
1928.  396.01   1613 

Wieth-Knudsen,  Knud  Asbjom. 
Understanding  women.     [1929?] 

396  W65 

Women  of  today.    1928/29.    cl928. 

r396  W87o 

LAW 

Allen,  Eleanor  Wyllys. 

The   position   of   foreign  states   before 
French  courts.     1929. 

"The  Aeg.us"  law  reports,  v.  1-33.  1895- 
1927. 

BiDWELL,  George. 

The  Bank  of  England  forgery.     1929. 
(Famous  trials  series.) 

California.  Laws,  statutes,  etc. 

The  school  code  of  the  state  of  Cali- 
fornia.   1929. 


Chudleigh,  Elizabeth,  countess  of  Bris- 
tol, callinff  herself  Duchess  of  King- 
ston, defendant. 
Trial  of  the  Duchess  of  Kingston.  1927. 
(Notable  British  trials) 

Farmer,  Edward  Lewis. 

Land  titles ;  first-  course  of  lectures  on 
land-titles.     cl929. 

Green,  Edmund  Samson,  ed. 
Law  students  handbook.    cl929. 

Hew  art,  Gordon  Hewart,  haron. 
The  new  despotism.    1929. 

Landru,  Henri  Desire,  defendant. 

Landru.    1928.     (Famous  trials  series) 

Lectures  on  legal  topics,  1925-1926. 

London  school  of  economics  and  political 
science. 
Annual  survey  of   English  law,   1928. 
1929. 

Lust,  Herbert  Canfield. 

Practice  and  e^ddence  before  the  Inter- 
state commerce  commission  in  rail- 
road rate  cases.    cl929. 

Mattern,  Johannes. 
Principles  of  the  constitutional  juris- 
prudence of  the  German  national  re- 
public. 1928.  (Semicentennial  pub- 
lications of  the  Johns  Hopkins  uni- 
versity ) 

Merrett,   John  Donald,  defendant. 
Trial  of  John  Donald  Merrett.  [1929] 
(Notable  British  trials)  * 

MoLEY,  Raymond. 

Politics  and  criminal  prosecution.  1929. 

MoLiNEUx,  Roland  Burnham,  defendant. 
The  Molineux  case.    1929.     (American 
trials) 


Port,  Frederick  John. 
Administrative  law. 


1929. 


Rapaxje,   Stewart. 

A  ti-eatise  on  criminal  procedure.    1889. 

Rydqe,  Norman  Bede. 

Employers'  endowment  tax.    1927. 

St.  Lucia.  Latos,  statutes,  etc. 

The    Commercial    code    of    St.    Lucia. 
[1916] 


90 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


The     revised     rules     and 

orders  of  Saint  Lucia,  1916. 

Saliees,  Earl  Adolphus. 

The  handbook  of  coi*porate  manage- 
ment and  procedure.    1929. 

The  State  bar  journal.    1920-1928. 

Tasmania.    Laws,  statutes,  etc. 

Index  to  the  statutes  of  Tasmania  in 
force  on  July  1, 1928,  from  8  Geo.  IV 
to  18  Geo.  V,  1827-1927.     1928. 

Vaqtjier,  Jean  Pierre,  defendant. 

Tx'ial  of  Jean  Pierre  Vaquier.  [1929] 
(Notable  British  trials) 

LANGUAGE 

Andersen,  Johannes  Carl. 

The  laws  of  verse.     1928.         426  A54 

Baxassa,  Jozsef. 

English  grammar.  [1924]  (Uniform 
grammar   series)  428  B17 

Baelow,  Joseph  W. 

Fundamentals  of  Spanish.     1929. 

465   B25 
Beeson,  Charles  Henry. 
A  primer  of  medieval  Latin  ;  an  anthol- 
ogy of  prose  and  poeti-y.  cl92o.  (The 
Lake  classical  series)  479  B41 

Cheydleue,  Frederic  Daniel. 

French  idiom  list.  1929.  (Publications 
of  the  American  and  Canadian  com- 
mittees on  modern  languages) 

443  C53 
Coleman,  Algernon. 

The  teaching  of  modem  foreign  lan- 
guages in  the  United  States.  1929. 
(Publications  of  the  American  and 
Canadian  committees  on  modern  lan- 
guages) 407  C69 

Floees,  Ninfa  C. 

Practical  English  for  Spanish-speaking 
adults.     1929.  428  F63 

Gaemonsvpay,  George  Norman,  ed. 
An  Early  Norse  reader.  1928.  439.6  G23 

Geeig,  John  Young  Thomson. 

Breaking  Priscian's  head ;  or,  English 
as  she  will  be  spoke  and  wrote. 
[1928]      (To-day  and  to-morrow) 

422  G82 

Indian  studies  in  honor  of  Charles  Rock- 
well Lanman.     1929.  q491    13 


Keapp,    George  Philip,    d   Kennedy,   Ar- 
thur Garfield. 
An  Anglo-Saxon  reader.     cl929. 

429    K89 
Lawlee,  Lillian  Beatrice. 

Easy  Latin  plays.  1929.  (Macmillan 
classical  series)  478  L41 

Modern  foreign  language  study. 

Enrollment  in  the  foreign  languages  in 
secondary  schools  and  colleges  of  the 
United  States.  1928.  (Publications 
of  the  American  and  Canadian  com- 
mittees on  modern  languages) 

407  IVI68 

Ransmeiee,  John  Christian. 

A  Spanish  recognition  grammar.  cl929. 

(The   University   of   Chicago   junior 

college  series)  465  R21 

[Russell,  Henry  Thompson] 
The  brighter  French  word  book.    1929. 

448  R96 

Saintsbtjey,  George  Edward  Bateman. 
A    history    of    English    prose    rhythm. 
1922.  426  S15h 

Waed,  Ida  Caroline. 

The  phonetics  of  EngUsh.     1929. 

421  W25 

NATURAL  SCIENCE:  GENERAL 

Ceook,  Alja  Robinson. 

Needless  regulations  in  museums.  1913. 

507  C94 
Gibson,  Robert  John  Harvey. 

Two  thousand  years  of  science.     1929. 

509  G449 

GuNTHEE,  Robert  William  Theodore. 
Early  science  in  Oxford.   1923-29.   5  v. 

509  G97 
Kellogg,  Charles. 

Charles  Kellogg,  the  nature  singer,  his 
book.     1929.  c504  K29 

McFee,  Mrs  Inez  NeUie  (Canfield). 
The  wonderful  story  of  science.    cl929. 

500  M14 

MATHEMATICS 

Ball,  Walter  William  Rouse. 

Mathematical  recreations  and  essays. 
10th  ed.    1928.  510.4  81 8a 

Smith,  David  Eugene. 

History  of  mathematics,    v.  1.     cl923. 
510.9  S64h 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


91 


Smith,  Thomas. 

Euclid,  his  life  and  system.  1902.    (The 
world's  epoch-makers)  513  S66 

ASTRONOMY.     SURVEYING 

Deimel,  Richard  Francis. 

Mechanics  of  the  gyroscope.  1929.  (En- 
gineering science  series)     523.2     D32 

Jeans,  Sir  James  Hopwood. 

Eos.   1929.    (To-day  and  to-morrow) 

520  J43 

The  universe  around  us.     1929. 

521     J43 
JoHNSEN,  Julia  E.,  comp. 

Thirteen-month  calendar.     1929.     (The 
reference  shelf)  529.3  J 65 

Marshall,  WiUiam  Louis. 

Notes  on  Talcott's  method  of  determin- 
ing terrestrial  latitudes.     [1929] 


Gift. 


526.6  M36 


National  committee  on  calendar  simplifi- 
cation for  the  United  States. 
Report.    1929.  529  N27 

Olcott,  William  Tyler,  d  Putnam,   Ed- 
mund Whitman. 
Field  book  of  the  skies.     1929. 

520  043 

Paeson,  George. 

Discovery  of  the  earth.     1929. 

523.1   P26 

Petebs,  William  Edwards. 

Land  areas ;  or,  How  to  calculate  and 
verify  contents  of  tracts  of  land.  2d 
ed.     1927.  526.9  P48 

PHYSICS.     CHEMISTRY 

Aerington,   Edward  E. 

History  of  optometry.     cl929. 

535.7  A77 

CONROY,  Ellen. 

The  symbolism  of  colour.     [1928] 

535.6  075 

Davis,   Alfred  Horace,   &  Kaye,   George 
William  Clarkson. 
The  acoustics  of  buildings.     1927. 

534  D26 
Flint,  Henry  Thomas. 

Wave  mechanics ;  being  one  aspect  of 

the   new   quantum   theory.       [1929] 

;         (Methuen's  monographs  on  physical 

subjects)  530  F62 


HiLLEBBAND,    William   Francis,    d    Lun- 
dell,  Gustav  Ernst  Frederick. 
Applied    inorganic    analysis.     1929. 

543  H65 
Wagneb,  Albert  Frederic. 

Experimental  optics.     1929.     535  W13 

AERONAUTICS 

DiCHMAN,   Ernest  Wykeham. 
This  aviation  business.     1929. 

629.13  D54 
Ellsworth,  Lincoln. 

Air  pioneering  in  the  Arctic.     1929. 

q629.13   E4 

Geosvenor,     Lord    Edward    Arthur,     d 
Bridgman,   Leonard. 
International    aircraft    markings;    na- 
val-military and  civil.     1929. 

629.14  G87 
Hill,  Roderic  Maxwell. 

The  Baghdad  air  mail.     1929. 

629.13   H64 
Maitland,  Lester  J. 

Knights  of  the  air.     1929.     533.6  M23 

Manly,   Gardener  Burnell. 

Aviation  from  the  ground  up.  cl929. 
533.6  M27 
Page,  Victor  Wilfred. 

Modern  aviation  engines.       629.16  P13 

S  AS  SOON,  Sir  Philip,  lart. 

The  third  route.     1929.         629.13  S25 

Yancey,  Lewis  Alonzo. 

Aerial     navigation     and     meterology ; 
2d  rev.   ed.     1929.  629.145  Y21 

GEOLOGY.     PALEONTOLOGY 

Bebry,  Edward  Wilber. 

Paleontology.     1929.  560  B53 

BowEN,  Norman  Levi. 

The    evolution    of    the    igneous    rocks. 

1928.  552.1   B78 

Farrington,  Oliver  Cummings. 
Famous  diamonds.     1929.      (Field  mu- 
seum   of    natural    history,    Chicago. 
Geology  leaflet)  553.8  F24f 

Hill,  Robert  Thomas. 

Southern   California   geology   and   Los 
Angeles  earthquakes.     1928. 

c550  H64 
PiRSSON,  Louis  Valentine. 

A  textbook  of  geology.     3d  rev.  ed.     v.  1. 

1929.  550  P67a 


92 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Van  Cleef,  Eugene. 

The  story  of  the  weather.     cl929. 

551.5  V22 
Willis,  Bailey. 

Studies  in  comparatiTe  seismology ; 
earthquake  conditions  in  Chile.  1929. 
(Carnegie  institution  of  Washington. 
Publication)  q551.22  W7 


BIOLOGY 

Alliee,  Raoul  Scipion  Philippe. 
The  mind  of  the  savage. 


572  A43 


Baitsell,     George    Alfred     [c6     others^, 
eds. 
The  evolution  of  earth  and  man.    1929. 

575  B16e 
Congee,  George  Pei-rigo. 

New  views  of  evolution.  1929.  (Philoso- 
phy for  the  layman  series)      575  C74 

Ceawley,  Alfred  Ernest. 

Studies  of  savages  and  sex.     [1929] 

572  C91 
CZAPLiCKA,  Marie  Antoinette. 

Aboriginal  Siberia,  a  study  in  social 
anthropology.     1914.  572     C99 

Davenpoet,  Charles  Benedict,  d   others. 
Race  crossing  in  Jamaica.  1929.    (Car- 
negie    institution     of     Washington 
Publication)  q573  D2 

FosTEE,  Thomas  Sutcliffe. 

Travels  and  settlements  of  early  man. 
[1929]  q572.3  F7 

Havemeyeb,  Loomis. 

Ethnography.     cl929.  572  H38 

Heney,  Sir  Edward  Richard,  hart. 
Classification  and  uses  of  finger  prints. 
(6th  ed.)      1928.  573.6  H52a 

JOCHELSON,  Vladimir  11'  ich. 

Peoples  of  Asiatic  Russia.    1928. 

q572  J6 
Malinowski,  Bronislaw. 

The  sexual  life  of  savages  in  north- 
western Melanesia.     cl929.     2  v. 

572  M25s 
PoPENOE,  Paul  Bowman. 

The  chUd's  heredity.     1929.    575.1   P82 

Putnam  anniversary  volume ;   anthropo- 
logical   essays.      1909.  q572  P9 

Renard,  Georges  Francois. 

Life  and  work  in  prehistoric  times. 
1929.  (The  history  of  civilization. 
[Pre-history  and  antiquity]  )  573  R39 


SCHMTJCKEE,  Samuel  Christian. 
Heredity  and  parenthood.     1929. 

575.1  S35 
ScHUTTE,  Gudmuud. 

Our  forefathers,  the  Gothonic  nations. 
1929.  572  S39 

Stewart,  George  W. 

Prehistoric  rock  basins  in  the  Sierra 
Nevada  of  California.     1929. 

qc571   S8 

Thomson,  David  Landsborough. 

The  life  of  the  cell.  [1928]  (The 
Home  university  library  of  modern 
knowledge)  576  T48 

BOTANY 

Aethue,     Joseph     Charles     [d     others']. 
The    plant    rusts    (Uredinales)      1929. 

581.2  A78 

Cockayne,  Leonard. 

The  vegetation  of  New  Zealand.  1928. 
( Sammlung  pflanzengeographischer 
monographien,  herausg.  von  A.  Eng- 
ler  und  O.  Drude)  581.9931   C66 

Robertson,  Charles. 

Flowers  and  insects.  1928.    581.16  R64 

Seymour,  Arthur  Bliss. 

Host  index  of  the  Fungi  of  North 
America.     1929.  rq589.2  S5 

SiNNOTT,  Edmund  Ware. 

Botany ;  principles  and  problems.  2d 
ed.  1929.  (McGraw-Hill  publications 
in  the  agricultural  and  botanical  sci- 
ences) 580  S61 

Weaver,  John  Ernest. 

Plant  ecology.  1929.  (McGraw-Hill 
publications  in  the  agricultural  and 
botanical  sciences)  581  W36p 

ZOOLOGY 

Blair,  William  Reid. 

In  the  zoo.     1929.  590  B63 

EiPPEE,  Paul. 

Animals  looking  at  you.     1929. 

591.5  E35 

JOEDAN,  David  Starr. 

Manual  of  the  vertebrate  animals  of  the 

northeastern  United  States  inclusive 

of  marine  species.  1929.    c596  J82m1 

Schmidt,  Karl  Patterson. 
The   frogs    and    toads   of   the   Chicago 
area.     1929.     (Field  museum  of  nat- 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


93 


ural  histoi-y,  Chicago.     Zoology  leaf- 
let) 597  S35 


The    truth    about    snake    stories. 

1929.      (Field    museum    of    natural 
history,  Chicago.     Zoology  leaflet) 

598.1   S35 
Seton,  Ernest  Thompson. 
Lives  of  game  animals.     192-5-29     8  v. 

q599  S4 

Yerkes,  Robert  Mearns  &   Yerkes,   Mrs 
Ada    ( Watterson ) . 
The  great  apes.    1929.  q599.8  Y4 

USEFUL  ARTS:    MEDICINE 
AND    HYGIENE 

Adlee,  Alfred. 

The  science  of  living.  cl929.  616.8  A23s 

Ameeican  child  health  association. 

Five  years  of  the  American  child  health 
association,  a  bird's-eye  view.     1927. 
614  A512f 
BiLiK,  Samuel  Ernest. 

Healthful    living ;    the    why    and    how. 
1929.  613  B595 

Buck,  Albert  Henry. 

The  growth  of  medicine  from  the  earli- 
est times  to  about  1800.     1917. 

610.9   B92g 
Gallichan,  Walter  M. 

The  poison  of  prudery ;  an  historical 
survey.     cl929.  612.6  G16p 

Youthful   old   age ;    how   to   keep 

young.     1929.  613  G16 

Hippocrates. 

The  genuine  works  of  Hippocrates. 
1929.  610.8  H55ad 

Hough,   Theodore  &    Sedgwick,   William 
Thompson. 
The    human    mechanism.      2d    rev.    ed. 
cl929.  612  H83a1 

Jacobson,  Edmund. 

Progressive  relaxation.  cl929.  (The 
University  of  Chicago  monographs  in 
medicine)  612.766  J17 

LiEB,  Clarence  William. 

Eat,  drink  and  be  slender.     [1929] 

613.2  L716 
MiLLAB,  Ronald. 

Sunrays  and  health.   1929.     615.83   M64 

Myers,  Alonzo  Franklin,  &  Bird,  Ossian 
Clinton. 


Health  and  physical  education.     1929. 
613.7  1V199 

Oaks,  Louis  Weston,  &  Merrill,  Horace 

G. 

Your    nose,    throat    and    ears.      1929. 

(Appleton     popular     health     series) 

616.2  Oil 

Fabkes,    Louis     Coltman,    &,     Kenwood, 
Henry  Richard. 
Hygiene  and  public  health.     1929. 

614  P24 
Prince,  Morton. 

Clinical  and  experimental  studies  in 
personality.    1929.  616.84  P95c 

Rank,  Otto. 

The  trauma  of  birth.  1929.  ( Interna- 
tional library  of  psychology,  philoso- 
phy and  scientific  method)    616.8  R19 

Russell  Sage  Foundation,  'Neio  York. 
Dept.  of  recreation. 
Directory  of  training  courses  for  recre- 
ation leaders.  1928.  (Russell  Sage 
foundation.  New  York  Dept.  of  recre- 
ation.    Pamphlets)  613.7  R95 

SOHROEDER,  Ernest  Gustav. 

Handbook  of  physical  education.     1929. 

613.7  838 

Smiley,  Dean  Franklin,  d  Gould,  Adrian 
Gordon. 
Community  hygiene.     1929.       614  S64 

Tenenbaum,  Joseph. 

The  riddle  of  sex ;  the  medical  and 
social  aspects  of  sex,  love  and  mar- 
riage.    cl929.  612.6  T29 

Terry,  Robert  James. 

An  introduction  to  the  study  of  human 
anatomy.    1929.  611  T32 

TOBEY,  James  Alner. 

A  manual  of  tuberculosis  legislation. 
1928.  (National  tuberculosis  asso- 
ciation.     Technical   series) 

616.99  T62 
Veddeb,   Edward  Bright. 

Medicine ;  its  contribution  to  civiliza- 
tion.    1929.  610  V41 

Walsh,  James  Joseph. 

The  history  of  nursing.     cl929. 

610.73  W22 
Wiley,  Harvey  Washington. 

The  history  of  a  crime  against  the  food 
law.     c1929.  614.31   W67h 


94 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Win  SLOW,  Ken  elm. 

The  prevention  of  disease  in  the  in- 
dividual. 3d  ed.,  thoroughly  rev. 
1929.  613  W77a 

ENGINEERING 

Bennett,  Jesse  Merle. 

Roadside  development.  1929.  (Land 
economics  series)  625.7  B47 

Blanchaed,  Arthur  Horace. 

Elements  of  highway  engineering.  1928. 
625.7  B63a 

BuTTERFiELD,  Thomas  Edward. 

Steam    and    gas     engineering.       1929. 

621.1   B98 

Feigidaibe  corporation,  Dayton.,  0. 

Food  preservation  in  our  daily  life. 
01929.  621.5  F91 

Gift. 

Hull,  Harry  Blair. 

Household  refrigeration.  3d  ed.,  rev. 
and  enl.     cl927.  621.5  H91a 

James,  Edwin  Warley. 

Highway  construction.     [1929] 

625.7  J27 

Kunerth,  William. 

A    textbook   of   illumination.      1929. 

621.32  K96 
Liddell,  William  Andrew. 

Stream  gaging.     1927.  627.1   L71 

McCullough,   Conde  Balcom. 

Economics  of  highway  bridge  types. 
1929.  624  MISS 

Mead,  Daniel  Webster. 

Hydrology ;  the  fundamental  basis  of 
hydraulic  engineering.     1919. 

627  M47h 

Middle  West  utilities  company. 
America's  new  frontier.     1929. 

621.31   M62 

Moulton,  Harold  Glen  [d  others]. 
The     St.     Lawrence     navigation     and 
power  project.     1929.  627  IV192 

Pag£;,  Victor  Wilfred. 

The  Ford  model  A  car ;  construction — 
operation — repair.     1929.       625.6  P13f 

Skene,  Norman  Locke. 

Elements  of  yacht  design.     cl927. 

623.8  S62 


Smith,  George  A.,  comp. 

The  outboard  motor  boat  manual.  1928 
ed.     1928.  623.8  S64 

SwiNSON,  E.  Thomas. 

The  sanitation  of  buildings.     1928. 

628  S97 
Teacy,  John  Clayton. 

Stresses    statically    determined.      1929. 

620.1  T76 
Teautwine,  John  Cresson. 

The  civil  engineer's  reference-book 
(formerly   "pocket-book")      1929. 

r620.2  T77c4 

Williams,  Morgan  David. 

Practical  machine  mining.     1928. 

622  W725 

Yates,  Raymond  Francis. 

A  B  C  of  television.    1929.    621.38  Y33 

AGRICULTURE 

McMiLLEN,  Wheeler. 

Too  many  farmers ;  the  story  of  what 
is  here  and  ahead  in  agriculture. 
1929.  630  M1674t 

Minns,  Susan. 

Book  of  the  silkworm ;  a  plea  for  the 
cultivation  of  silk  and  the  silkworm 
in  the  United  States.     1929. 

638.1   M66 
Noedsteom,  Evert  F. 

Dairy  processes.  cl929.  (American 
industrial  instrument  manuals) 

637  N83 
Remington,  John  Stewart. 

Seed  testing.     1928.  631.52  R38 

Smith,  Harris  Pearson. 

Farm  machinery  and  equipment.  1929. 
(McGraw-Hill  publications  in  agri- 
cultural engineering)  630  S64 

Stapledon,  Reginald  George. 

A  tour  in  Australia  and  New  Zealand ; 
grass  land  and  other  studies.     1928. 
633  S79 
Vance,  Rupert  Bayles. 

Human  factors  in  cotton  culture.  1929. 
(The  University  of  North  Carolina. 
Social  study  series)  633  V22 

Wilkinson,  Albert  Edmund. 

Practical  vegetable  culture.     1929. 

635  W58p 

Winkenweedee,  Hugo  August. 

Forestry  in  the  Pacific  Northwest.  1928. 
634.9  W77f 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


95 


DOMESTIC  ANIMALS 

Baeton,  Frank  Townend. 

The  kennel  encyclopaedia.    r636.7  B29k 

California  poultry  blue  book.     1929. 

qc636.5  C1 

GiLFiLLAN,  Archer  Butler. 

Sheep.     1929.  636.3  G47 

Simpson,  Eugene  Milton. 

Pheasant  farming.     1927.        636.6  S61 

Waite,  Roy  Harrison. 

Poultry    science    and    practice.      1929. 

(McGraw-Hill    publications    in    the 

agricultural  and  ^)otanical  sciences) 

636.5  W14 

DOMESTIC   ECONOMY 

Adams,  Mrs  Pearl   (Humphry). 

Kitchen  ranging.     cl929.         641  A195 

AxLEVi,  Baptistin. 

The  Savarin  cook  book,  scientific  cook- 
ing for  profit.     1929.  641  A43 

Baldwin,  William  Henry. 

The  shopping  book.     1929.         640  B18 

Branegan,  Gladys  Alee. 

Home  economics  teacher  training  under 
the  Smith-Hughes  act,  1917  to  1927. 
1929.  (Teachers  college,  Columbia 
university.  Contributions  to  educa- 
tion) 640.7  B82 

Delineator  home  institute. 

Delineator  cook  book.     cl928.   641   D35 

Judy,  Helen  Elizabeth. 

Trends  and  needs  in  home  management. 
1929.  (Teachers  college,  Columbia 
university.  Contributions  to  edu- 
cation) 640.7  J  93 

Justin,    Margaret    M.,    d    Rust,    Lucile 
Osborn. 
Problems  in  home  living.   cl929.     (Lip- 
pincott's  home  economics  texts) 

640  J96 

Todd,  Dorothy,  d  Mortimer,  Raymond. 
The  new  interior  decoration.    [1929] 

q645  T6 

PRINTING.     BOOKSELLING 

DeVinne,  Theodore  Low. 

The  Plantin-Moretvs  mvsevm.    1929. 

C655.1   D49 


McMuETEiE,  Douglas  Crawford. 

The  first  printing  in  New  Mexico.  1929. 
v65o.1    M16f 

Ludlow    composition    for    the    en- 


velope manufacturer.     1929. 

655.2  M16I 

Smith,  George,  d  Benger,  Frank. 

The  oldest  London  bookshop,  a  history 
of  two  hundred  years.     1928. 

q655.4  S6 

United  typothetae  of  America.     DepL  of 
education. 
The   standard   book   on    estimating   for 
printers.      1929.      (Typothetae   man- 
agement series)  q655.3  U5 

BUSINESS   METHODS 

Buett,  Harold  Ernest. 

Psychology    and    industrial    efficiency. 
1929.  658  B974 

CoYLE,  Grace  L. 

Present  trends  in  the  clerical   occupa- 
tions.    cl928.  651  C881 

Darby,  William  Dermot. 

Story  of  the  chain  store.     1928. 

658  D21 
Deeby,  Willis  O. 

Store  management  for  profit.     1929. 

658  D42 

Gaum,  Carl  Gilbert,  d  Graves,  Harold  F. 
Report  writing.     1929.  658.7  G27 

GooDE,  Kenneth  Mackarness. 

How  to  turn  people  into  gold.     1929. 

658  G64 
Geisell,  Thomas  Olen. 

Budgetary  control  of  distribution.  1929. 

658  G869 
Kimball,  Dexter  Simpson. 

Industrial  economics.   1929.    (McGraw- 
Hill   industrial    management    series) 
658  K49i 
Meaes,  Charles  Willard. 

Salesmanship  for  the  new   era.      1929. 
658.3   M48 

Taintoe,  Sarah  Augusta,  d  Monro,  Kate 
M. 
The   secretary's   handbook.      1929. 

651   T13s 

Tead,  Ordway. 

Human  nature  and  management.    1929. 

658.5  T25 


96 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBEARIBS 


[Jan.,  1930 


ADVERTISING.     ACCOUNTING 

ECKAEDT,  Hugo  William. 

Accounting    in    the    lumber    industry. 
1929.  657  E19 


Jackson,  Jacob  Hugh. 

Auditing  problems.     cl929. 


657  J13au 


Keeler,  Floyd  Yates. 

The  advertising  agency,  procedure  and 
practice.     1927.  659   K26 

Outdoor  advertising  association  of  Amer- 
ica, inc. 
Outdoor  advertising — the  modern  mar- 
keting force.     1928.  659  094 

Gift. 

Public    utilities    advertising   association. 

Five     hundred     representative     public 

utility  advertisements,   1928  edition. 

1928.  f659  P9 

Saxders,  Thomas  Henry. 

Industrial  accounting.     1929.     657  S25 

Strain,  Myron  M. 

Industrial  balance  sheets ;  a  study  in 
business  analysis.     1929.         657  S89 

Walker,  Ross  Graham. 

Problems  in  accounting  principles. 
cl929.  657  W183 

CHEMICAL  TECHNOLOGY 

American  petroleum  institute. 

Petroleum  facts  and  figures.     cl928. 

665.5  A51 

Barrett  company,  New  York. 

The  production  of  sulphate  of  ammonia 
in   1924-1927.  661   B27 

Fltlton,   Charles  Herman,   <£•   Sharwood, 
William  John. 
A    manual     of    fire     assaying.       1929. 
(Metallurgical  texts)  669  F97 

Garve,  Treumund  Walter. 

Factory     design     and     equipment     and 

manufacture   of   clay   wares.     cl929. 

666.4  G24 

Hayward,  Carle  Reed. 

An    outline    of    metallurgical    practice. 

1929.  669  H42 

HiLDiTCH,  Thomas  Percy. 

Catalytic  processes  in  applied  chemistry. 
1929.  (A  series  of  monographs  on 
applied  chemistry)  660  H64 


aiouLTON,   Charles  Robert. 

Meat  through  the  microscope.  1929. 
(The  Institute  of  meat  packing 
studies)  664.9  M92 

Reeseb,   Edwin  Isherwood. 

Oil  royalties  (a  handbook  on  petroleum 
for  the  layman)      1929.     665.5   R329 

Seable,  Alfred  Broadhead. 

Refractory  materials ;  their  manu- 
facture and  uses.     1917.      669.8  S43 


Smith,  Paul  I. 

Glue  and  gelatine.     1929. 


658.3  S65 


MANUFACTURES 

MECHANIC  TRADES 

Baker,  Clyde. 

Modern  gunsmithing.     cl928.     683  B16 

Bray,  Helen  Agnes. 

Textile  fibers,  yarns,  and  fabrics.  cl929. 
(The  Century  vocational  series) 

677  B827 
Darby,  William  Dermot. 

Rayon,  and  other  synthetic  fibers.  1929. 

677  D21r 
Geerlings,  Gerald  Kenneth. 

Metal  crafts  in  architecture.     1929. 

q671   G2 


Wrought    iron     in     architecture ; 

wrought   iron   craftsmanship.      1929. 
q671   G2w 
Grober,  Karl. 

Children's  toys  of  bygone  days.    [1928] 

q680  G8 
Langman,  H.  R.,  d  Ball,  A. 

Electrical     horology.       1927.        (Lock- 
wood's  technical  manuals)      681    L28 

Palmer,  Reginald  Heber. 

Foundry   practice.    4th   ed.,   partly  re- 
written and  enl.     1929.         671   P17 

Reath,  Nancy  Andrews. 

The  weaves  of  hand-loom  fabrics.   1927. 

q577   R2 

U.  S.  National  committee  on  wood  utili- 
sation. 
Wood  construction.     1929.       674  U584 

FINE  ARTS:     GENERAL 

Art   and   education,   by   John   Dewey   d 
others.  707  A78 

Brenner,  Anita. 

Idols  behind  altars.    1929.    709.72  B83 


I 


i 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY. 


97 


Neaxe,  Oscar  W. 

Picture  study  in  the  grades.     cl927. 

707  N34 
Ntquist,  Fredrik  Vickstrom. 

Art  education  in  elementary  schools. 
1929.  (University  research  mono- 
graphs) 707  N99 

Oprescu,  George. 

Peasant    art   in    Roumania.      1929. 

q709.498  07 

Pkaxl,  David  Wight. 

Esthetic  judgment.     cl929.       701    P89 

Whitfoed,   William   Garrison. 

An  introduction  to  art  education. 
cl929.  (Appleton  series  in  special 
methods)  707  W59 

GARDENS 
CITY  PLANNING 

GOTHEIN,  Frau  Marie  Luise  (Schroeter). 
A  history  of  garden  art.      [1928] 

q710  G6 

HuBBAED,    Henry    Vincent,    &    Kimball, 
Theodora. 
An  introduction  to  the  study  of  land- 
scape design.     Rev.  ed.  1929. 

q710  H8a 
NoLEN,  John,  ed. 

City  planning.  2d  ed.  1929.  (National 
municipal  league   series)      710  N79a 

Quackenbush,  Mrs  Alice  T.  A. 
Perennials  of  flowerland.     1929. 

716  Q1 

ARCHITECTURE 

The  Architectural  press,  London. 

Modern   architectural  details.      [1928] 

q729  A6 
Chambeelaik,  Samuel. 

Tudor   homes    of    England,    with    some 

examples  from  later  periods.    cl929. 

f728  C44 

Chase  national  bank  of  the  city  of  New 
York. 
The    Chase    architrave.      [1927] 

Gift.  q729  C4 

Cltjte,  Eugene. 

The  practical  requirements  of  modern 
buildings.     1928.  q724  C6 

Cram,  Ralph  Adams,  ed. 

American  church  building  of  today,  a 
selection  of  photographs  of  exteriors, 

7 — 73829 


interiors,    details    and    plans    of 
churches  recently  erected.     cl929. 

q726  C88 

DoSTAi,  Eugen,  &  sima,  Josef. 

Baroque  architecture  of  Prague.    1927. 
q720.9431    D7 
Green,  Edmund  Tyrrell. 

French  church  architecture.     1928. 

726  G79 
Hunt,  Edward  Francis. 

The  architecture  of  Mont-St.-Michel. 
(1203-1228)      1928.  q726  H9 

McGrew,  Charles  Babcock. 

Italian  doorways,  measured  drawings 
and  photographs.     1929.     f721.8  M1 

Peatt,  Sir  Roger. 

The  architecture  of  Sir  Roger  Pratt. 
1928.  q724  P9 

RoBEETSON,  Donald   Struan. 

A  handbook  of  Greek  &  Roman  archi- 
tecture.   1929.  722.8  R64 

Sexton,  Randolph  Williams. 

The  logic  of  modern  architecture. 
cl929.  q724  S51 

Staats,  Henry  Philip,  ed. 

Califomian  architecture  in  Santa  Bar- 
bara.    1929.  qc728  S7 

Wendehack,  Clifford  Charles. 

Golf  &  covntry  clvbs ;  a  svrvey  of  the 
reqvirements  of  planning  constrvc- 
tion  and  eqvipment.     1929. 

q728.4  W4 

SCULPTURE.      POTTERY 

Beenard,  Joseph. 

Joseph  Bernard.     1928.  q735  B5c 

DuGAS,  Charles, 

Greek  pottery,  translated  from  the 
French  by  W.  A.  Thorpe.    1926. 

738  D86 

Gatjtier,  Louis. 
English  Delft. 


q738  G2 


Pope-Hen  NESS  Y,  Mrs  Una   (Birch). 
Early  Chinese  jades.     1923.     q736  P8 

Read,  Herbert. 

Staffordshire  pottery  figures.     1929. 

q738   R28 

RiNDGE,  Agnes  MUlicent. 

Sculpture.     1929.  730  R57 


98 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBEARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


DRAWING.     DESIGN 

Beaun,  Adolphe  Armand,  ed. 

The  human  form  in  art.      [1926] 

q743  B8h 

Drage,  Mrs  Dorothy  (Greaves). 

Rug  making.  1929.  (Pitman's  craft 
for  all  series)  745  D75 

Flemming,  Ernst  Richard. 

An  encyclopaedia  of  textiles.     1927. 

q745  F59 
LuTZ,  Edwin  George. 

Practical  art  lettering;  a  treatise  on 
the  construction  of  the  symbols  of 
the  alphabet.     1929.  745  L97 

Matthews,  Eric  Christian. 

Modern  illustration,  a  practical  art 
course.  cl929.  q741   M43m 

Smith,  F.  R. 

Design  as  applied  to  arts  and  crafts. 
1929.     (Pitman's  craft  for  all  series) 
745  S647 
Williams,  Gluyas. 

The  Gluyas  Williams  book.     1929. 

q741   W7 

FURNITURE 

Bles,  Arthur  de. 

Genuine  antique  furniture. 


C1929. 
749  B64 


Oescinsky,   Herbert,   d   Hunter,   George 
Leland. 
English  and  American  furniture.   1929. 

749  C42 
Kahle,  Katharine  Morrison. 

An  outline  of  period  furniture.     1929. 

749  K12 
LocKWOOD,  Luke  Vincent. 

Colonial  furniture  in  America.  3d  ed. 
1926.    2v.  q749   L8a 

PAINTERS  AND   PAINTING 

Arnold,  Sir  Thomas  Walker. 

Painting  in  Islam,  a  study  of  the  place 
of  pictorial  art  in  Muslim  culture. 
1928.  q759.9  A75 

Gsell,  Paul. 

Millet,  translated  by  J.  Lewis  May. 
1928.     (Masters  of  modern  art) 

759.4  M65g 

Hart,  George  Overbury. 

George  O.  'Pop'  Hart :  twenty-four 
selections  from  his  work,  edited  with 


an    introduction    by    Holger    Cahill. 
1928.  759.1   H32 

Holmes,  Sir  Charles  John. 

Notes  on  the  art  of  Rembrandt.     1911. 
759.9   RSSho 
Lee,  Cuthbert. 

Contemporary  American  portrait 
painters.      1929.  rq757  L4 

Mellaart,  J.  H.  J. 

Dutch  drawings  of  the  seventeenth  cen- 
tury. 1926.  (Drawings  of  the  great 
masters)  q759.9  M5 


NOGUCHI,  Yone. 
Hokusai.     1928. 


q759.92   H72n 


Pennell,  Mrs  Elizabeth   (Robins). 
The  life  and  letters  of  Joseph  Pennell. 
1929.     2  V.  759.1   P41p 

Pope,  Arthur. 

An    introduction    to    the    language    of 

drawing  and  painting,     v.  1.     1929. 

751   P82i 

ETCHERS   AND    ETCHINGS 

Gaunt,  William. 

Etchings  of  today.      [1929]      q767  G2 

Hutty,  Alfred. 

Alfred  Huttj',  with  an  introduction  by 
Duncan  Phillips.  Compiled  by  the 
Crafton  collection.  cl929.  (Amer- 
ican etchers)  q767  H9 

Pope,  Marion  Holden,  illus. 

Los  Angeles  from  the  Sierras  to  the 
sea.     cl916.  c767  P82 

Roth,  Ernest  David. 

Ernest  D.  Roth,  N.  A.,  with  an  in- 
troduction by  Elizabeth  Whitmore. 
cl929.    (American  etchers)    q767  R8 

Sparrow,  Walter  Shaw. 

A  book  of  British  etching,  from  Fran- 
cis Barlow  to  Francis  Seymour 
Haden.      [1926]  q767  S7 

PHOTOGRAPHY 
MOVING    PICTURES 

Franklin,  Harold  Brooks. 

Sound  motion  pictures,  from  the  labo- 
ratory  to  their  presentation.      1929. 
778  F832 
Gleason,  Marion  Norris. 

Scenario  writing  and  producing  for  the 
amateur.     1929.  778  G55 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


99 


O'Caixaghan,  John  P. 

Amateur  enlarging.     1928.         770  015 

SiN'TDEK,    Henry    Eossiter,    d    Barleben, 
Karl  August. 
Cash  from  your  camera.     1929. 

770  S675 
Wall,  Edward  John. 

Photographic   emulsions.      1929. 

770  W18ph 

MUSIC 

Alexakdee,  Ian,  ed. 

Anthems,  old  and  new.     cl929. 

q783.4  A3 
Berg,  David  Eric. 

The  art  of  listening.     cl927.      (Funda- 
mentals of  musical  art.  v.  5) 

780.8  F98 


—  Choral  music  and  the  oratorio. 
cl927.  (Fundamentals  of  musica.1 
art.    V.  6)  780.8  F98 


•  Early   and   classic   symphonies  & 

the  functions  of  a  conductor.  cl927. 
(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.  v. 
12)  780.8  F98 

Introduction    to    music.       cl926. 

(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.   v.  1) 
780.8  F98 

The  music  of  the  church.    cl927. 

(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.   v.  7) 
780.8  F98 


The  organ,  composers  and  litera- 
ture. cl927.  (Fundamentals  of 
musical  art.     v.  9)  780.8  F98 

Berlioz,  Hector. 

Evenings  in  the  orchestra.  1929. 
(Borzoi  musical  series)      780.4  B51e 


Bos,  Coenraad  V.,  comp. 
Dutch    folk-song.      1917. 


q784.4  B74 


pHOPiN,   Fryderyk  Franciszek. 

Frederic  Chopin  at  home.  cl929. 
(The  Appleton  master-composer 
series)  q786.4  C5 

I 

IjOWard,  Henry. 

Choral  technique  and  interpretation. 
,  [1914]  (Handbooks  for  musicians) 
I  784,9  C87 

tJuLP,  Julia,  comp. 

My  favorite  songs.  1916.  (Favorite 
songs  of  famous  singers)     q784.8  C9 


Day,  J/rs  Lillian. 

Paganini  of  Genoa.     1929.     780.2  P12cl 

DiCKixsoN,  George  Sherman. 

The  growth  and  use  of  harmony. 
cl927.  (Fundamentals  of  musical 
art.     V.  4)  780.8  F98 

DiTSON,  firm,  music  puhlishe^'s. 

Encore  songs.     1910.  q784.8  D61 

DoLPH,  Edward  Arthur,  ed. 

"Sound  off !"  Soldiers  songs  from 
Yankee  Doodle  to  Parley  voo ;  music 
arranged  by  Philip  Egner.     1929. 

q784.8  D6 
ELSOiSr,  Louis  Charles,  ed. 

Folk   songs   of  many  nations.      [1905] 

q784.4  E4 
Farear,  Geraldine,  comp. 

My  favorite  songs.  1916.  (Favorite 
songs  of  famous  singers)    q784.8  F24 

Gabriel,  Gilbert  Wolf. 

Great  pianists  and  composers.     el927. 
(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.    v.  8) 
780.8  F98 
Gltjck,  Alma,  comp. 

My  favorite  songs.  1917.  (Favorite 
songs  of  famous  singers)     q784.8  G5 

GoETSCHius,  Percy. 

Masters  of  the  symphony.     cl929. 

785  G599 

Hopkins,  Charles  A.  K.,  comp. 

Aloha    collection    of    Hawaiian    songs. 

1928.  q784.4  H79 

JoHKS,  Clayton. 

The  essentials  of  pianoforte  playing. 
cl927.  q786.3  J6 

Johnson,  Guy  Benton. 

John   Henry ;    tracking   down   a   negro 

legend.      1929.      (The   University   of 

North  Carolina.    Social  study  series) 

784.7  J  67 

KiMMiNS,  Mrs  Grace  Thyrza  (Hannam). 
Songs  from  the  plays  of  William  Shake- 
speare.    1911.  q784.8   K4 

Maezo,  Eduardo. 

Fifty  Christmas  carols  of  all  nations. 
1923.  q783.6  M3 

Nlles,    John    Jacob,    &    Moore,    Douglas 
Stuart,  eds. 
The  songs  my  mother  never  taught  me. 

1929.  784.8  N69s 


100 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Holland,  Romain. 

Beethoven  the  creator,    y.  1.     1929. 

780.2  B41r1 
RosEivFELD,  Paul. 

Modern  tendencies  in  music.  cl927. 
(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.  v. 
18)  780.8  F98 

Ross,  Gertrude. 

Art  songs  of  Japan.    1917.    q784.4  R82 

SCHATJFFLEE,   Robert  Haven.    &    Spaeth, 

Sigmund  Gottfried. 

Music   as    a    social   force    in    America. 

cl927.       (Fundamentals    of    musical 

art.     V.  19)  780.8  F98 

ScHOLES,  Percy  Alfred. 

The  third  hook  of  the  great  musicians. 
4th  ed.    1928.  780.4  S36b2 

Sebedy,  Julius  S.,  comp. 

Carl  Fischer  analytical  orchestra 
guide.     cl929.  q785  S4 

Shay,  Frank,  comp. 

Drawn  from  the  wood.     1929. 

784.4  S53d 
Skilton,   Charles   Sanford. 
Modern    symphonic    forms.      cl927. 
(Fundamentals    of    musical    art.      v. 

14)  780.8  F98 

Stoeving,  Paul. 

The  violin,  'cello  and  string  quartet. 
cl927.  (Fundamentals  of  musical 
art.     V.  10)  780.8  F98 

Stuegis,   M.    H.,    &   Blake,   Wniiam   P., 
comps. 
Songs  of  the  Pyrenees.     1918. 

q784.4  S9 
Thoex,  Alice  Green. 

Music  for  young  children.  cl929. 
(Series  on  childhood  education) 

780.7  T49 

Waite,  Henry  Randall,  comp. 

College  songs,  a  collection  of  the  most 

popular    songs    of    the    colleges    of 

America.     [New  and  enl.  ed.]    cl906. 

q784.6  W1co 

Waldo,  Fullerton  Leonard. 

Early  Italian  &  French  opera.  cl927. 
(Fundamentals   of   musical   art.      v. 

15)  780.8  F98 


—  German  and  Russian  opera. 
cl926.  (Fundamentals  of  musical 
art.     V.  17)  780.8  F98 


Modem  French  and  Italian  opera, 

cl927.       (Fundamentals    of    musical 
art.     V.  16)  780.8  F98 

Walkeb,  Conway. 

The  art  song  and  its  composers.   cl926. 

(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.   v.  3) 

780.8  F98 

— The  folk  song  and  dance  &  The 

voice  as  a  solo  instrument.     cl926. 

(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.   v.  2) 

780.8  F98 

Who's  who  In  the  orchestra.  1927. 
(Fundamentals  of  musical  art.  v. 
11)  780.8  F98 

WiEE,  Albert  E.,  comp. 

Songs  the  whole  world  sings.     cl915. 
(Whole  world  series)         784.8  W64 

THEATRE 
AMATEUR  THEATRICALS 

AcKLEY,  Mrs  Edith  Flack. 

Marionettes.     Easy  to  make !     Fun  to 
use"    1929.  q792  A1 

The  Amateur  dramatic  year  book  and 
community  theatre  handbook.  1st 
issue;  1928-29.     1928.  r792  A48 


Anderson,  John. 
Box  office.     1929. 


792  A547 


Brown,  Corinne.  •• 

Creative    drama   in    the   lower    school. 
cl929.  793  B877 

Cheney,  Sheldon. 

The  theatre ;    three  thousand  years  of  I 

drama,  acting  and  stagecraft.     1929.- 

792   C51t  I 

Eaton,  Walter  Prichard. 

The  Theatre  guild,  the  first  ten  yeare, 
1929.  792  E14t  i 


Hakding,  AKred. 

The  revolt  of  the  actors. 


1929. 


792  H26 


Htjghes,  Glenn. 

None  too  good  for  Dodo,  a  comedy  of 
bad  manners.  1929.  (Appleton  short 
plays)  793  H892no 

Hume,  Samuel  James,  &  Fuerst,  Walter 
Rene. 
XXth  centui-y  stage  decoration.     1929. 
2v.  792  H9 


\ 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


101 


Joseph,  Mrs  Heleu  (Haiman) 

A  book  of  marionettes.     2d  ed.     1929. 

792  J 83a 
Macgowan,  Kenneth. 

Footlights  across  America,  towards  a 
national  theatre.     el929.     792  M14f 

Mackay,  Constance  D'Arcy. 

Youth's  highway,  and  other  plays  for 
young  i)eople.    cl929. 

793.2      M153y 

McPharlin,  Paul  L.,  -comp.  &  trans. 
A  repertory  of  marionette  plays.    1929. 

q792  M17 
NUNGEZER,  Edwin.- 

A  dictionary  of  actors  and  of  other 
persons  associated  with  the  public 
representation  of  plays  in  England 
before  1642.  1929.  (Cornell  studies 
in  English)  792  N97 

Sanford,  a.  p.,  comp. 
Pageants  of  our  nation.    1929. 

792.7  S22 

Sanford,  Anne  P.,  d   Schauffler,  Robert 
Haven,  eds. 
Little  plays  for  little  people.     1929. 

793.2  S22 
Stanton,  Sanford  E. 

Theatre  management.  1929.  (The 
American  theatre  manuals,  pub.  in 
cooperation  with  the  Drama  league 
of  America)  792  S79 

!  Umfleet,  Kenneth  Reynold. 

School  operettas  and  their  production. 
cl929.      (The  Laurel  library) 

793  U51 

AMUSEMENTS.       RECREATION 

Bent,  Newell. 

American  polo.    1929.  797  B47 

BoYDEN,     Elizabeth    Clark,     d     WaiTen, 
Emily,  "Mrs  Prescott  Warren." 
Contract  bridge  of  1930.    cl929. 

795   B78 
Clark,  Ellery  Harding. 

Track  athletics  up  to  date.     1929. 

796.4  C59a 

DiMOCK,     Hedley     Seldou,     d     Hendry, 
Charles  E. 
Camping  and  character.    1929. 

796.54  D58 
Dowsett,  Joseph  Morewood. 
Big  game  and  big  life.     1925. 

799  D75 


Frazer,  William  David. 

American  pistol  shooting.    cl929. 

799  F84 
Hughes,  John  Scott. 

Famous  yachts.     1928.  797     H89 

Lackey,  Bertram  D. 

Outwitting  trout  with  a  fly.     cl929. 

c799.1    L14 

Lenz,  Sidney  Samuel,  d  Rendel,  Robert. 
How's  your  bridge?    1929.      795    L57h 

Whitehead,  Wilbur  Cherrier. 

Championship  bridge  hands  <what  the 
experts  did  with  them  !  >     1929. 

795  W59ch 
Whitlatoh,  Marshall. 

Golf  for  beginners — and  others.     [Rev. 
ed.]    1929.  796.35  W61a 

Who's   who  in  American  sports.     1928. 

rq790  W6 

LITERATURE 

Ashton,  Winifi-ed. 

Tradition  and  Hugh  Walpole,  by  Clem- 
ence  Dane   [pseud.].     1929. 

823.01   A82 
Beach,  Stewart. 

Short-story  technique.     cl929. 

808.3  B36 

Bell,    Florence   Eveleen    Eleanor e     (Ol- 
liffe),  lady. 
Landmarks.      [1929]  824  B433 

Benjamin,  Lewis  S.,  d  Hargreaves,  Regi- 
nald. 
Great  German  short  stories.     1929. 

833    B46 
Bragdon,  Claude  Fayette. 

Merely  players.     1929.        814     B813m 

Buchanan,  Scott  Milross. 

Poetry  and  mathematics.     cl929. 

808.1    B91 
Carre,  .Jean  Marie. 

Goethe,  translated  from  the  French  by 
Eleanor  Hard.     1929.  832.62  Be 

Carus,  Paul. 

Goethe,    with   special   consideration   of 
his  philosophy.     1915.       832.62  Bca 

Cazamian,  Louis  Frangois. 

Criticism  iu  the  making.     1929. 

801   C38 

Chapin,  Elsa,  d  Thomas,  Russell  Brown. 
A  new  approach  to  poetry.     cl929. 

808.1   C46 


102 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Clark,  Barrett  Harper,  ed. 

European  theories  of  the  drama.     Rev. 
ed.    1929.  809.2     C59a 

Grafton,  Allen,  cG  Royer,  Jessica. 

Self    expression    through    the    spoken 
word.     cl928.  808.5  C885 


Croisset,  Francis  de. 
Our  puppet  show.    1929. 


844  C94 


CuppY,  William  Jacob. 

How  to  be  a  hermit ;  or,  A  bachelor 
keeps  house.     1929.  817  C974 

Dickson,  Arthur. 

Valentine  and  Orson ;  a  study  in  late 
medieval  romance.    1929.    809.3  D55 

DuNBAE,  Helen  Flanders. 

Symbolism  in  medieval  thought  and  its 
consummation  in  the  Divine  comedy. 
1929.  851.15  Qd 

Elliott,  George  Roy. 

The  cycle  of  modern  poetry.    1929. 

821.09   E46 

BSENWEiN,  Joseph  Berg. 

Writing  the  short-story.  Rev.  ed.  cl928. 
808.3  E75w2 

The  Fred  Newton  Scott  anniversary 
papers,  contributed  by  former  stu- 
dents and  colleagues  of  Professor 
Scott.     cl929.  814  F85 


Frye,  Prosser  Hall. 

Visions  and  chimeras.     1929. 


804  F94v 


Gallishaw,  John. 

Twenty  problems  of  the  fiction  writer. 
1929.  808.3   G17t 

Goodman,  Henry,  ed. 

Creating  the  short  story.    cl929. 

808.3  G65 

Grandgent,  Charles  Hall. 

The  new  word.    1929.  814  G75n 

Green,  Mrs  Elizabeth  Atkinson  (Lay). 
The  negro  in  contemporary  American 
literature.  1928.  (North  Carolina. 
University  extension  division.  Uni- 
versity of  North  Carolina  extension 
bulletin)  r810.9  G79 

Hapgood,  Norman. 

Why    Janet    should    read    Shakespere. 
cl929.  822.33     Dhap 


I 


Harper,  Henry  Howard. 

The  story  of  a  manuscript.    1914. 

814  H294 
Haktwell,  Kathleen  Ellen. 
Lactantius  and  Milton.    1929. 

821.47  Fh 

Hellems,  Fred  Burton  Ranney. 

The   king's   market   and   other  studies. 

1929.  814  H47 

Gift. 

Huxley,  Aldous  Leonard. 

Do  what  you  will.     1929.     824  H9861d 

Jameson,  Storm. 

The  Georgian  novel  and  Mr.  Robinson. 
1929.  823.01  J  31 

KuNiTZ,  Joshua. 

Russian  literature  and  the  Jew.    1929. 
891.7  K963 
LemaItre,  Jules. 

On  the  margins  of  old  books.    1929. 

844  L54o 

Lewis,  Dominic  Bevan  Wyndham. 
On  straw  and  other  conceits.     1927. 

828  L67 
LuMMTS,  Charles  Fletcher. 

Flowers  of  our  lost  romance.     1929. 

c814     L95 

Manly,  John  Matthews,  d  Rickert,  Edith.    - 
Contemporary      American      literatui'e.  '"'^ 
cl929.  r810.9  M27a 

MiRRiELEES,  Edith  Ronald,  ed.  ■-* 

Significant  contemporary  stories.  1929.   '^ 

823  M67 
MuNSON,  Gorham  Bert. 

Style    and    form    in    American    prose. 
1929.  810.9  M969s 


Nathan,  George  Jean. 

Monks  are  monks  ;  a  diagnostic  scherzo, 
1929.  814  N27m 

Newton,  Alfred  Edward. 

Thomas  Hardy,  novelist  or  poet?  1929. 

vq828  N5 
Nicholson,  Meredith. 

Old  familiar  faces.     cl929.     814  N52o 

Payne,  Leonidas  Warren. 

A  survey  of  Texas  literature.    cl928. 

810.9  P346s 
Petronius  Arbiter. 

The  Satyricon  of  Petronius  Arbiter. 
1929.  (The  modern  library  of  the 
world's  best  books)  877  P49s. 


I 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


103 


PoE,  Edg-ar  Allan. 

The  book  of  Poe ;  tales,  criticism,  poems, 
edited  with  introductions  by  Addison 
Hibbard.     1929.  818  P74b 


Doing  of  Grotham. 


1929. 

vq818  P7 


QuiNX,  Arthur  Hobson,  d:  others,  eds. 
The  literature  of  Amei-ica.  cl929.  v.  1, 
From  the  beginning  to  the  civil  war. 
810.8  Q7 
Read,  Herbert  Edward. 

English  prose  style.    cl928.      808  R28 

The  Review  of  English  studies,     v.  1-4, 
1925-1928.  820.5  R45 


Roberts,  Morris. 

Henry  James'  criticism. 


1929. 

824  J27zr 


Rose,  William,  d  Isaacs,  Jacob,  eds. 
Contemporary  movements  in  European 
literature.     1928.  809  R79 

Royal  society  of  literature  of  the  United 
Kingdom,  London. 
The  eighteen-seventies.     1929. 

820.9  R88 

SaiS-dees,  Gerald  De  Witt,  ed. 
Chief   modern    poets   of    England    and 
America.     1929.  808.81   S21 

Saurat,  Denis. 

Blake  and  modern  thought.    1929. 

821   B63zsa1 
SOHALIT,  Leon. 

John  Galsworthy,  a  survey.     1929. 

822  G17zs 
Sei  Shonagon. 

The  pillow-book  of  Sei  Shonagon.   1928. 

895  S45 

Squire,  John  Collings,  camp. 

Apes  and  parrots ;  an  anthology  of 
parodies.     1929.  827  S77ap 

Sykes,  Henry  Dugdale. 

Sidelights  on  Elizabethan  drama.  1924. 
822.09  S983 
Taft,  Hsni-y  Waters. 

Kindred  arts ;  conversation  and  public 
speaking.     1929.  808.5  T12 

Theophrastus. 

The  Characters  of  Theophrastus,  newly 
edited  and  translated  by  J.  M.  Ed- 
monds. 1929.  (The  Loeb  classical 
library.    Greek  authors)       888  T38e 


Tilley,  Arthur  Augustus. 

The  decline  of  the  age  of  Louis  XIV; 
or,  French  literature  1687-1715. 
1929.  840.9  T57d 

Wagenknecht,  Edward  Charles. 
A  guide  to  Bernard  Shaw.     1929. 

822  S53zw 
Weekes,  Blanche  Ethel. 

The  influence  of  meaning  on  children's 
choices  of  poetry.  1929.  (Teachers 
college,  Columbia  university.  Con- 
tributions to  education)     808.1  W39 

Wilde,  Oscar  Fingall  O'Flahertie  Wills. 

The  birthday  of  the  infanta.    1929. 

v823  W67 
WiNTEEiCH,  John  Tracy. 

Books  and  the  man.    1929.    820.9  W78 

Wolfe,  Humbert. 

Notes  on  English  verse  satire.  cl929. 
(Hogarth  lectures  on  literature) 

821.09  W85 

WooDBEiDGE,  Frederick  James  Edward. 
The  son   of  Apollo ;   themes  of   Plato. 
1929.  888  P71zw 

Teats,  WiUiam  Butler. 

The  death  of  Synge.     1928.     v824  Y41 

POETRY 

Angney,  Lydia  F. 

Gleanings  by  the  wayside.    1900. 

Gift.  ^=2^^   A5 

Barry,  Phillips,  &  others. 

British  ballads  from  Maine.    1929. 

821.08  B28 
Blake,  WUliam. 

The  book  of  Urizen.     [1929] 

q821   B6b 
Blanden,  Charles  Granger. 

Lyrics,   by   Laura  Blackburn    [pseud.~\ 

1920.      (The  little  bookfellow  series) 

811    B642 

BoARDMAN,  Ruby. 
Poems.     [1929] 


c811    B66 


Boccaccio,  Giovanni. 

The  Filostrato  of  Giovanni  Boccaccio. 
1929.  851   B66 

BoGAN,  Louise. 

Dark  summer,  poems.     1929.     811   B67 

Branch,  Anna  Hempstead. 

Sonnets    from    a    lock    box    and    other 
poems.     1929.  811   B81so 


104 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Bynner,  Witter. 
Indian  earth.     1929. 


811   B99 


CuLLEN,  Countee. 

The  black  Christ  &  other  poems.    1920. 

811  C96b 
Damox,  Samuel  Foster. 

Titled  moons.     1929.  811   D16t 

Dodge,  Henry  Nehemiah. 

Christus  victor,  a  student's  reverie. 
1926.  811   D644 

Fehjchtwangee,  Lion. 

Pep ;  J.  L.  Wetcheek's  American  song 
book ;  English  version  by  Dorothy 
Thompson ;  drawings  by  Constautin 
Aladjalov.     1929.  831   F42 

Flannee,  Hildegarde. 
Time's  profile.     1929. 

Fleishman,  Leon. 
■Refractions.     1929. 

Feitcbey,  Alfred  James. 
Enfranchised  (a  poem), 


c811    F58 


811    F59 


[1929] 

c811    F91e 
GoBBON,  Monk. 

For  daws  to  peck  at.     1929.      821   G43 

Gould,  Gerald. 

The  collected  poems  of  Gerald  Gould. 
[1929]  821   G69c 

Griffith,  William. 

Greek  gestures.     cl929.  811   G85g 

Harro'svee,  ]\IolIy. 

Plain  Jane.     1929.  821   H32 

Hebel,  John  William,  ed. 

Poetry     of     the     English     renaissance, 
1509-1660.     1929.  821.08  H44 


Heeedia,  Jose-Maria  de. 
The  trophies.    1929. 


841    H54t1 


HOMEEUS. 

The  Odyssey  of  Homer,  translated  by 
George  Herbert  Palmer  with  illustra- 
tions by  N.  C.  Wyeth.     1929. 

q883  H7op 
HoRAN,  Mrs  Kenneth,  comp. 
Parnassus  en  route.     1929. 

821.08  H81 
Japm. 

The  first  Japm  anthology.     cl929. 

811.08  .J35 
Larsson,  Raymond  Ellsworth. 

O  city,  cities!     1929.  811   L33 


LA^VRENCE,  David  Herbert. 
Pansies.     [1929] 


821   L419p 


Lindsay,  Nicholas  Vachel. 

Every  soul  is  a  circus.   1929.   811   L74e 


McGovEEN,  Margaret. 
The  lost  year.     1929. 


811   IV1146 


MiLLAY,  Edna  St.  Vincent. 

Edna     St.     Vincent     Millay's     poems 
selected  for  young  people.     1929. 

811    IV16452e 
MooEE,  Mei-rill. 

The  noise  that  time  makes.     cl929. 

811   IV18234 

MoRLEY,  Christopher  Darlington. 

Poems.     1929.  811   M86po 

MoERis,  Harrison  Smith. 

Martial  notes  of  the  old  war  and  the 
new.     1929.  811   M876 

NicOLSON,   Mrs  Adela  Florence    (Cory). 

Last  poems ;  translations  from  the  book 

of   Indian   love,   by   Laurence   Hope 


[pseud.]     1905 

O'Nell,  George. 

God-beguiled.     1929. 

The  Pepys  ballads.     1929.    2 


Romanes,  Alva. 

The  golden  years.     1928. 

Ross,  Patience. 

Black  bread.     1929. 


821   N65 
811    0582g 

V. 

821.08  P42 
c811    R75g 

821    R825 


SEiFiTEKT,  Marjorie  Allen. 

The  king  with  three  faces,   and  other 
poems.     1929.  811   S459 


SiTWELL,  Edith. 

Gold  Coast  customs. 


[1929] 

821   S6232g 


Taggart,  Mrs  Kathrine  Eugenia  Payne. 
Bacon.     1929.  c811  T125b 

The  craiiy  quilt.     cl927. 


c811   T125 

TiETJENS,  Mrs  Eunice   (Hammond). 

Leaves  in  windy  weather.     1929. 

811   T56I 
Welles,  Winifred. 

This  delicate  love.     1929.         811   W44 


Wilson,  Edmund. 
Poets,  farewell ! 


1929. 


811   W747 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


105 


WiSTER,  Isabel. 

The  shining  road.     el928.     c811   W817 

DRAMA 

AsHTON,  Winifred. 

Adam's   opera,   the   text   of  a   play  by 
Clemence  Dane  [pseud.1      [1928] 

822  A82ad 

Baldekston,  John  Lloyd,  d  Squire,  John 
Collings. 
Berkeley  square,  a  play  in  three  acts. 
1929.  812  B17b 

BOTTOMLEY,  Gordon. 

Scenes  and  plays.     1929.         822  B75s 

DoNNAY,  Maurice  Charles. 

Lysistrata.      1929.       (The    theatre    of 
today)  842  D68 

Ehlert,  Mrs  Fay. 

The  undercurrent ;  a  one  act  play.  1929. 

812  E334 
Frank,  Leonhard. 

Karl  and  Anna,  a  drama  in  three  acts 
translated  by  Ruth  Langner.     1929. 
832  F828 
Frank,  Waldo  David. 
New  Tear's  eve,  a  play 


1929. 

812  F8284 


Gantellon,  Simon. 
Maya.     1928. 

Job,  Thomas. 

Giants  in  the  earth. 


1929. 


842  G211 


812  J62 


Kenyon,   Doris  Margaret. 

Doris  Kenyon's  monologues.     cl929. 

812  K37d 
Lonsdale,  Frederick. 

The  last  of  Mrs  Cheyney,  a  comedy  in 
three  acts.  cl929.  (French's  stand- 
ard library  edition)  822  L86I 


Martinez  Sierra,  Gregorio. 
Holy  night.     [1928] 


862   M38h 


Masei'ield,  John. 

Easter ;  a  play  for  singers.      [1929] 

822  M39ea 
Mayer,  Edwin  Justus. 

Children  of  darkness,  an  original  tragi- 
comedy.    1929.  812  IVI46C 

Moody,  William  Vaughn. 

The  poems  and  plays,  1910-12.    2  v. 

812  M81p 
O'Neill,  Eugene  Gladstone. 

Dynamo.     1929.  812  058dy 


QuiNN,  Arthur  Hobson,  ed. 

Representative  American  plays,  from 
1767  to  the  present  day.  4th  ed., 
rev.  and  enl.     cl928.  812.08  Q7a 

ROLLAND,  Romain. 

Les  leonides,  translated  from  the 
French  by  Eugene  Lohrke.     cl929. 

842  R74le 
Smith,  Robert  Metcalf,  ed. 

Types  of  social  comedy.  1928.  (World 
drama  series)  808.2  S65ts 

Types    of   world    tragedy.      1928. 


(World  drama  series)      808.2  S65tw 

Tucker,  Samuel  Marion,  ed. 

Modern  -continental  plays.     1929. 

808.2  T89 
Williams,  Jesse  Lynch. 

"Why   not?"   a   comedy  in   three   acts. 
1924.  812  W72w 

CALIFORNIA  FICTION 

Atherton,      Mrs      Gertrude      Franklin 
(Horn). 
Dido,  queen  of  hearts.     1929.     cA868di 

GiusTi,  Arndt. 

An  artist  passes.     1929.  cG538 

Knox,  Ann. 

Vallejo    Kitty.      cl929.  cK742 

Mavity,  Nancy  Barr. 

The  body  on  the  floor.     1929.     cM461b 


Morrison,  Lucile. 

The   attic-child.      1929. 


cM879 


Morrison,  Lucile  Phillips,  ed. 

Doll  dreams,  1927.     1927.  cD665 


OuBSLER,  Fulton. 

The  world's  delight.     1929. 


c093 


Sheridan,  Solomon  Neill. 

The  little  spotted  seal.     1929.       cS552l 


Snow,  Charles  H. 

The  fighting  sheriff.     1929. 


cS674 


Winlow,  3Irs  Clara   (Vostrovsky) 
The  kitten  that  grew  too  fat.    cl929. 
Gift.  OW775 

ARCHAEOLOGY 

Childe,  Vere  Gordon. 

The  most  ancient  East ;  the  oriental 
prelude  to  European  prehistory. 
1928.  913.35  C53 


106 


NEWS  NOTES   OP   CALIFORNIA  LIBRAEIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Evans,  Sir  Arthur  John. 

Scripta  Minoa,  the  written  documents 
of  IMinoan  Crete,     v.  1.     1909. 

q913.32  E9 

Joi>rT  expedition  of  the  British  museum 
and  of  the  Museum  of  the  University 
of  Pennsylvania  to  Mesopotamia. 
Ur  excavations ;    texts.     1928. 

q913.58  J7b 

Mead,  Charles  Williams. 

Old  civilizations  of  Inca  land.  1924. 
(American  museum  of  natural  his- 
tory.   Handbook  series)     913.85  M47 

Randaxl-MacIver,    David. 

Italy  before  the  Romans.     1928. 

913.37  R189 
Selikovitsch,  George. 

The  dawn  of  Egyptian  civilization. 
1887.  913.32  S465 

Yale  university. 
The  excavations  at  Dura-Europos.  1929. 
q913.39  Y1 

GENEALOGY.      HERALDRY 

Brecht,  Samuel  Kriebel,  ed. 
The  genealogical  record  of  the  Schwenk- 
felder  families.     1923.         q929.2  S4 

Beookxine,  Mass. 

Vital  records  of  Brookline,  Massachu- 
setts, to  the  end  of  the  year  1849. 
1929.  (Essex  institute,  Salem,  Mass. 
Vital  records  of  the  towns  of  Massa- 
chusetts) 929.3  B872 

London.     St.  Mary  Mounthaw  (Parish). 

The   register   of   St.   Mary   Mounthaw, 

London,    1568-1849.      1928.       (The 

publications  of  the  Harleian  society. 

[Registers])  q929.3   H2 

Paueson,  Mrs  Ann  Eliza   (Branch). 
History    of    the    descendants    of   Peter 
Branch,  1638-1914.      [1914] 
Gift.  929.2  B816p 

Scott-Giles,  C.  Wilfrid. 

The  romance  of  heraldry.     [1929] 

929.6  S42 

Taunton,  Mass. 

Vital  records  of  Taunton,  Massachuetts, 
to  the  year  1850.  1928-29.  3 v.  (New 
England  historic  genealogical  society. 
Vital  records  of  the  towns  of  Massa- 
chusetts) 929.3  T22 


BIOGRAPHY:     COLLECTIVE 

ABDiir.LAH,  Achmed,  d  Pakenham,  Thomas 
Compton. 
Dreamers  of  empire.     1929.     923.2  A13. 

Benjamin,  Lewis  S. 

Stage  favourites  of  the  eighteenth] 
century,  by  Lewis  Melville  Ipseud.]. 
1929.  927.92  B46i 

BOLITHO,  William. 

Twelve  against  the  gods.     1929. 

920  B68 

Dark,  Sidney. 

Twelve  royal  ladies.    cl929.   923.1   D21 

Geldern,  Otto  von. 

Reminiscences  of  the  pioneer  engineers 
of  California.     1929.  c926  G31 

Hagberg,  Knut  Hjalmar. 

Kings,  Churchills  and  statesmen. 
[1929]  920.042  H14 

Hopper,  James  Marie. 

Medals  of  honor.     cl929.        923.5  H79 

Kelly,  Howard  Atwood. 

Some  American  medical  botanists.  1929. 

925  K29 

Lambert,  Samuel  Waldron. 

Medical  leaders  from  Hippocrates  to 
Osier.     cl929.  926.1   L22 

Latour,  Thergse  Louis. 

Princesses,  ladies  &  salonuieres  of  the 
reign  of  Louis  XV.  1927.   920.7  L35p 

Thompson,  James  Matthew. 
Leaders  of  the  French  revolution.   1929. 
920.044  T47 
Wilson,  Grove. 

The  human  side  of  science.     1929. 

925  W74 

BIOGRAPHY:     INDIVIDUAL 

Allen.     Pell,  John. 

Ethan  Allen.    1929.  B  A425p 

Auduhon.     Muschamp,  Edward  A. 
Audacious    Audubon,    the    story    of    a 
great    pioneer,    artist,    naturalist    & 
man.     cl929.  B  A916m 

Barrie.     Hammerton,   John  Alexander. 
Barrie,  the  story  of  a  genius.     [1929] 
B   B2755h1 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


107 


Beaconsfield.      Beaconsfield,    Benjamin 
Disraeli,  1st  earl  of. 
The  letters  of  Disraeli  to  Lady  Chester- 
field and  Lady  Bradford.    1929.    2  v. 
B  B365z 

Beaumarchais.     DALs:fiME,   Rene. 

Beaiimarchais,     1732-1799,     translated 
by  Hannaford  Bennett.     1929. 

B  B378d 

Benjamin.     Benjamin,  Lewis  S. 

Not  all  the  truth,   by  Lewis  Melville. 
192S.  B   B468 

Biggs.     Winslow,  Charles  Edward  Am- 
ory. 
The  life  of  Hermann  M.  Biggs.     1929. 
B  B5927W 

Bolivar.     Ybarra,  Thomas  Russell. 
Bolivar,  the  passionate  warrior.    1929. 

B   B689y 

Booth.     Nelson,  William  Hamilton. 
Blood  &  fire :  General  William  Booth. 
cl929.  B  B7257n 

Borgia.     Henschke,  Alfred. 
The  incredible  Borgias.     1929. 

B  B7331h 

Brandeis.     De  Haas,  Jacob. 

Louis     D.     Brandeis,     a     biographical 
sketch.     1929.  B  B8173d 

Bronte.     Langbridge,    Rosamond    Grant. 
Charlotte  Bronte.  B  B869la 

Brown.     Warken,  Robert  Penn. 

John  Brown ;  the  making  of  a  martyr. 
1929.  B  B878wa 

Bryan.     Hibben,  Paxton. 

The  peerless  leader,  William  Jennings 
Bryan.     cl929.  B  B915hi 

Buchanan.     Buchanan,  Meriel. 

Diplomacy  and  foreign  courts.     [1928] 

B   B9182b 

Burns.     Finger,  Charles  Joseph. 

A  man  for  a'  that ;  the  story  of  Robert 
Burns.    cl929.  B  B967f 

Byrne.     Macatiley,  Thurston. 

Donn  Byrne,  bard  of  Armagh.      [1929] 
B  B9956m 

Byron.     Mayne,  Ethel  Colburu. 

The  life  and  letters  of  Anne  Isabella, 
lady  Noel  Byron.     1929.     B   B9962m 


Carleton.     Carleton,  George. 

Memoirs    of   Captain    Carleton.      1929. 
(The  background  of  history) 

B  C2813 


Beion,  Marcel. 
Bartolome  de  las  Casas,  "Father  of  the 
Indians."  Translated  from  the  French 
by  Coley  B.  Taylor.     cl929. 

B  C3354b 

Clermont-Tonnerre.  Clermont-Tonnerre, 
Elisabeth  (de  Gramont)  duchesse  de. 
Pomp  and  circumstance.   Translated  by 
Brian  W.  Downs.     [1929] 

B  C633 

Coleridge.     Charpentier,  John. 

Coleridge,  the  sublime  somnambulist. 
1929.  B  C693ch 

Collins.     Spring,  Agnes  Wright. 

Caspar  Collins;  the  life  and  exploits 
of  an  Indian  fighter  of  the  sixties. 
1927.  B  C7125S 

C 07-day  d'Armont.    [Scherr,  Marie]. 
Charlotte  Corday  and  certain  men   of 
the  revolutionary  torment,  by  Marie 
Cher    [pseud.'\.     1929.  B  C794s 


Cyrano  de  Bergerac. 
Cyrano.    1929. 


Rogers,  Cameron. 
B  C997r 


Darley.     Abbott,  Claude  Colleer. 

The  life  and  letters  of  George  Darley, 
poet  and  critic.     1928. 

B  D221a 

Davis.     Tate,  Allen. 

Jeiferson  Davis ;  his  rise  and  fall.  1929. 

B   D262t 

Davis.     Davis,  Robert  Hobart. 
Bob  Davis  abroad  !     1929. 

B   D2634bo 

Defoe.     Dottin,  Paul. 

The  life  and  strange  and  surprising 
adventures  of  Daniel  De  Foe,  trans- 
lated from  the  French  by  Louise 
Ragan.     cl929.  B  D314d 

Du   Deffand  de  La  Lande.     De  Koven, 

Anna  (Farwell),  "Mrs  Reginald  De 

Koven." 

Horace     Walpole     and     Madame     du 

Deffand.     1929.  B   D845d 

Dumas.    Gorman,  Herbert  Sherman. 
The  incredible  marquis,  Alexandre  Du- 
mas.    1929.  B   D886g 


108 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Spuer.  Harry  A. 

The  life  and  writings  of  Alexandre  Du- 
mas (1802-1870).    1929.      B   D886s 

Edison.     Dyer,  Frank  Lewis,  c6  ^Martin, 
Thomas   Commerford. 
Edison,  his  life  and  inyenlions.     1929. 

B    E23d1 

Edioard  Albert,  prince  of  Wales.    Town- 
send,  W. 
The  biography  of  H.  R.  H.  the  Prince 
of  Wales.     1929.  B  E256t 

Emerson.     Russell,  Phillips. 

Emerson,  the  wisest  American.     1929. 

B   E53r 

Focli.    Recouly,  Raymond. 

Foch ;  my  conversations  with  the  mar- 
shal, translated  by  Joyce  Davis.  1929. 
B   F652r1 

Ford.     SiMMONDS,  William  A. 

Heni-y  Ford,  motor  genius.     1929. 

B  F699s 

Forrest.    MosES,  Montx'ose  Jonas. 

The  fabulous  Forrest ;  the  record  of  an 
American   actor.     1929.        B   F728m 

Franklin.     SiiYXHE,  John  Henry,  ed. 
The  amazing  Benjamin  Franklin.  1929. 
B   F831sm 

Giierin.    GufiBiN,  Georges  Maurice  de. 
From    centaur    to    cross ;    unpublished 
correspondence.    1929.  B  G9324b 


Hanna.     Beer,  Thomas. 
Hauna.     1929. 


B   H243b 


Harvey.    Johnson,  Willis  Fletcher. 

George  Hai-vey,  'a  passionate  patriot.' 
1929.  B   H3414J 

Haicthorne.    Ajrvin,  Newton. 

Hawthorne.     1929.  B   H399ar1 

Hayes.     Hayes,  Benjamin  Ignatius. 
Pioneer  notes  from  the  diaries  of  Judge 
Benjamin  Hayes,   1849-1875.     1929. 
cB     H4173 

Hearst.    Bonfels,  Winifred  Black. 

The  life  and  personality  of  Phoebe  Ap- 
person  Hearst.     1928.       qcB   H436b 

Horn.     Horn,  Alfred  Aloysius,  pseud. 
The   waters    of   Africa ;    being   volume 
three  of  the  life  and  works  of  Trader 
Horn.     1929.  B   H8132 


Hiifjel.    HtJGEL,  Friedrich,  freiherr  von. 
Letters     from     Baron     Friedrich    von 
Hiigel  to  a  niece.     [1929]     B   H891g 

Hunt.    Hunt,  Nancy  A. 

By  ox-team  to  California.     [1929] 

cB     H942 
Ihsen.     Zucker,  Adolf  Eduard. 
Ibsen,  the  master  builder.     cl929. 

B     I14z 
Jackson.    Nicolay,  Helen. 

Andrew  Jackson,  the  fighting  president. 
cl929.  B  J12n 

Jefferson.    Chinaud,  Gilbert. 

Thomas  Jefferson,  the  apostle  of  Ameri- 
canism.    1929.  B  J45c 

Johnson.     Smith,  David  Nichol,  d  others. 
Johnson  &.  Boswell  revised.     1928. 

B  J69sm 

Johnston.     Johnston,  Mrs  Annie    (Fel- 
lows) . 
The  land  of  the  Little  Colonel.     cl929. 

B     J  664 
Josephine.    Nezelof,  Pierre. 

Josephine,    the  gi-eat  lover,   translated 
by  Sylvia  Stuart.     cl929.       B  J83n 

Keller.     Keller,  Helen  Adams. 
]Midstream  ;  my  later  life.    1929. 

B  K29mi 
Knox.    Muir,  Edwin. 

John    Knox :    portrait   of    a    Calvinist. 
1929.  B  K743mu 


Lafayette.    Whitlock,  Brand. 

La  Fayette.     1929.     2  v.  BL161w       '" 


I; 

I 


Levin.    Levin,  Schmarya. 
ChUdhood  in  exile.    cl929. 


B   L665 


Leicisohn.     Leavisohn,  Ludwig. 

Mid-channel ;    an    American    chronicle. 
1929.  B  L677m 

Lincoln.     Holden,  Raymond. 

Abraham    Lincoln ;    the  politician    and 
the  man.     1929.  B   L736hol 


I 

I 


Nicolay,  Helen. 

Personal    traits    of    Abraham    Lincoln. 
1919.  B   L736nic 

Townsend,  William  Henry. 

Lincoln    and    his    wife's    home    town. 

cl929.  B  L736to2 

Lindbergh.     Miller,   Francis  Trevelyan. 
Lindbergh ;  his  story  in  pictures.   Anni- 
versary ed.     1929.  B  L742m 


Mi 


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CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


109 


MacJiiavelli.    Feeraba,  Orestes. 

The  private  correspondence  of  Nicolo 
Machiavelli.     1929.  B   lVl1498f 

Maine.    Birrell,  Francis. 

La  Duchesse  du  Maine.  [1929]  (Rep- 
resentative women)  B   M225b 

Meynell.      Meynell,    Viola     {2Irs    John 
Dallyn). 
Alice  Meynell.     1929.  B   M614m 

Miraheau.     Jotjvenel,  Henry  de. 

The  stormy  life  of  Mirabeau,  translated 
from  the  French  of  Henry  de  Jouve- 
nel.     1929.  B   M671j 

Muldoon.     Van  Evert,  Edward. 

Muldoon,  the  solid  man  of  sport.     1929. 

B   M954v 
Mussolini.    Bond,  John. 

Mussolini,  the  wild  man  of  Europe. 
1929.  B  M9894bo 

Napoleon  I.    Geer,  "Walter. 

Napoleon  and  his  family ;  the  story  of 
a  Corsican  clan.  v.  3.  Moscow- 
Saint  Helena,  1813-1821.    1929. 

B   N216ge2 

Napoleon  I,  emperor  of  the 

French. 
Memoirs  of  Napoleon  I,  compiled  from 
his  own  writings.     1929.     B   N216ki 

Newcome.    Newoome,  Louis  A. 

Lincoln's  boy  spy.    1929.  B  N541 

Oliver.     Oliver,  John  Rathbone. 

Foursquare ;  the  stoi-y  of  a  fourfold 
life.     1929.  B  048 

Ousdma.     Usamah  ibn  Murshid   (Mu'- 
aiyid  al-Daulah)    called  Ibn  Munkid. 
The  autobiography  of  Ousama,   trans- 
lated    by     George     Richard     Potter. 
1929.     (Broadway  medieval  library) 

B   U84 
Patrick.    Patrick,  Mary  Mills. 

Under   five   sultans.      cl929.      B   P3143 

Perry.    Perry,  Thomas  Sergeant. 

Selections  from  the  letters  of  Thomas 
Sergeant  Perry.    1929.  B   P465r 

Pwter.    TuRNBULL,  Archibald  Douglas. 
Commodore   David   Porter,.  1780-1843. 
cl929.  B  P8442t 

Balelais.    Putnam,  Samuel. 

Frangois  Rabelais ;  man  of  the  renais- 
sance,    cl929.  B  R114p 


Reese.    Reese,  Lizette  Woodworth. 

A   Victorian   village,   reminiscences   of 
other  days.     1929.  B   R329 

Roosevelt.     Roosevei.t,  Theodore. 

All  in  the  family.     1929.  B   R7812 

Rosenlerg-Orsini.      Brunexli    Bonetti, 
Bruno. 
Casanova  loved  her.     1929.     B   R8134b 

Rossetti.     Rossetti,  Dante  Gabriel. 
The  letters  of  Dante  Gabriel  Rossetti 
to  his  publisher.     1928.       B   R8293d 

Sermoneta.      Sebmoneta,    Vittoria    (Co- 
lonna)   Caetani,  duchessa  di. 
Things  past,  by  Vittoria  Colonna,  duch- 
ess of  Sermoneta.    1929.  B  S486 

Sherman.      Zeitlln,     Jacob,     d     Wood- 
bridge,  Homer  Edwards. 
Life  and  letters  of  Stuart  P.  Sherman. 
cl929.  B  S5534z 

Sidney.     Wallace,  Malcolm  William. 
The  life  of  Sir  Philip  Sidney.    1915. 

B   S569w 

Smith.     Smith,  Alfred  Emanuel. 

Up  to  now.     1929.  B  S642u 

Soiithioell.     Morton,  Sister  Rose  Anita. 

An  appreciation  of  Robert  Southwell. 

1929.  B  S7283m 

Stariuck.    Starbuck,  Mary  Eliza. 

My  house  and  I ;  a  chronicle  of  Nan- 
tucket.    1929.  B  S7953 

Steinmetz.     Leonard,  Jonathan  Norton. 
Loki ;  the  life  of  Charles  Proteus  Stein- 
metz.    1929.  B  S823I 

Sterne.    Curtis,  Lewis  Perry. 

The  politicks  of  Laurence  Sterne.  1929. 

B  S839cu 

Van  Buren.    Lyncu,  Denis  Tilden. 

An    epoch    and    a    man,    Martin    Van 
Buren  and  his  times.    1929. 

B  V221I 
Voltaire:    Lewis,  Joseph. 

Voltaire,      the      incomparable     infidel. 
cl929.  B  V935I 

Warwick.      Warwick,    Frances    Evelyn 
(Maynard)   Greville,  countess  of. 
Life's  ebb  &  flow.    1929.       ■     B  W299 

Washington.     Little,  Shelby. 

George  Washington.     1929.     B  W318li 


110 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Webster.     Bekson,  Allan  Louis. 

Daniel    Webster.      1929.        B  W378be 

White.     White,  Owen  Payne. 

A  frontier  mother.     1929.        B  W583w 

Woodfill.     WooDFU-L,  Samuel. 
Woodffll  of  the  regulars.     1929. 

B  W8873t 

DESCRIPTION  AND  TRAVEL: 
GENERAL 

England,  George  Allan. 

Isles  of  romance.     cl929.  910  E58 

Muhammad  ibn  'Abd  Allah,  called  Ibn 
Batutah. 
Travels  in  Asia  and  Africa,  1325-1354. 
1929.     (The  Argonaut  series) 

910  M95 

Rand,  McNally  &  company. 

Rand  McNally  auto  road  atlas  of  the 
United  States  and  eastern  Canada. 
cl928.  q912.7  R1 

[United  States  merchant  marine.    Social 
service  hureati~\ 
Seaman's    handbook    for    shore    leave. 
1928.  910  U58 

Gift. 

EUROPE 

[Ajsdenne   de   Tizac,   Andree   Frangoise 
Caroline  d'] 
A  girl  in  soviet  Russia.     1929. 

914.7  A76 
BuETON,  Elizabeth  Eaton. 

Paris  vignettes.     1928.  914.43  B97 

Oalthrop,  Dion  Clayton. 

"I  will  be  good!"     [1929]     914.2  016 

Durham,  Mary  Edith. 

Some  tribal  origins,  laws  and  customs 
of  the  Balkans.    [1928]    914.97  D96s 

Giles,  Dorothy. 

The  road  through  Spain.     cl929. 

914.6  G47 

Ha  WARD,  Winifred  Ida. 

ViUage  life  in  the  fifteenth  century. 
[1928]      (Texts  for  students) 

914.2  H38 

Hueffee,  Oliver  Madox. 

French  France.     1929.  914.4  H887 

Jackson,  Sir  Thomas  Graham,  iart. 
Memories  of  travel.     1923.         914  J 14 


Juan  de  Persia. 

Don  Juan  of  Persia,  a  Shi" ah  Catholic, 
1560-1604.  [1926]  (The  Broad- 
way travellers)  914  J91 

London,  Geo. 

Red  Russia  after  ten  years.  [1928] 
914.7  L847 
Maxwell,  Gordon  Stanley. 

The  road  to  France.   1928.   914.2  M46r 

Montaigne,  Michel  Eyquem  de. 

The  diary  of  Montaigne's  journey  to 
Italy  in  1580  and  1581,  translated 
by  E.  J.  Trechmann.   1929.    914  IV176 

Peck,  Anne  Merriman. 

A  vagabond's  Provence.     1929. 

914.49  P36 
Prince,  Han-y. 

Half-hours  in  old  London.    1928. 

914.21   P95 
Robinson,  Ralph  M. 

The  Penn  country  and  the  Chilterns. 
[1929]  q914.2   R66 

RoBSON,  Edgar  Iliff. 

A  wayfarer  in  French  vineyards. 
[1928]  914.4  R66 

Van  Cleef,  Eugene. 

Finland — the  republic  farthest  north. 
1929.  914.71  V22 

Wilson,  Barbara  (Lister),  lady. 
The  house  of  memories.     1929. 

914.4  W74 
Young,  Arthur. 

Travels  in  France  during  the  years 
1787,  1788  &  1789.    1929.   914.4  Y68 

ASIA 

Bell,  Sir  Charles  Alfred. 
The  people  of  Tibet.    1928.    915.15  B43 

Dee  Ling,  princess. 
Kowtow.     cl929. 


I 


915.1   D42    > 


Easton,  John. 

An  unfrequented  highway  through 
Sikkim  and  Tibet  to  Chumolaori. 
1928.  q915.15  E1 

Field,  Harry  Hubert. 

After  Mother  India.     cl929.   915.4  F45 

General    committee    of    the   Near    East 
survey. 
The  Near  East  and  American  philan- 
thropy.    1929.  915.6  G32 


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CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


111 


GiLMOEE,  Albert  Field. 

East  and  west  of  Jordan.     cl929. 

915.69  G48 
Hamilton,   Norah  Rowan. 
Both  sides  of  the  Jordan,     [1928] 

915.69  H21 
Hunter,  Allan  A. 

Facing  the  Pacific.     1929.     915.1   H94 

KoRNEETJP,  Ebbe. 

Friendly  Siam.     [1928]         915.93  K84 

Legendee,  Aime  Frangois. 

Modei'n    Chinese    civilization.      [1928] 

915.1   L51 
Macdonald,  David. 

The  land  of  the  Lama.     [1926] 

915.15  M13 

Roosevelt,  Theodore,  &  Roosevelt,  Ker- 
mit. 
Trailing  the  giant  panda.     1929. 

915.1   R78 
RuTTER,  Eldon. 
The  holy  cities  of  Arabia.     [1928]     2  v. 

915.3  R98 
Stein,  Sir  Mark  Aurel. 

On  Alexander's  track  to  the  Indus ; 
personal  narrative  of  explorations  on 
the  North-west  frontier  of  India. 
1929.  915.4  S819 

Strong,  Anna  Louise. 
Red  star  in  Samarkand.     1929. 

915.8  S92 

AFRICA.     SOUTH  AMERICA 

Akelet,  Mrs  Mary  L.   (Jobe). 

Carl  Akeley's  Africa.   1929.    916.7  A31 

Anderson,  Mrs  Isabel  Weld    (Perkins). 
Circling  Africa.     1929.  916  A54 

OouPLAND,   Reginald. 

Kirk  on  the  Zambesi,  a  chapter  of 
African   history.     1928.     916.79  C85 

Dickey,   Herbert    Spencer,    &    Daniel, 
Hawthorne. 
The  misadventures  of  a  tropical  medico. 
1929.  918  D55 

Humphrey,  Seth  King. 

Loafing  through  Africa.     cl929. 

916  H92 
Khun  de  Proeok,  Byron. 

Mysterious  Sahara,  the  land  of  gold, 
of  sand,  and  of  ruin.     cl929. 

916.61   K45 


Londres,  Albert. 

A  very  naked  people.   cl929.   916.6  L84 

Rhodesian  publicity  association. 

Southern  Rhodesia.  Bulawayo  and 
district.  Visitor's  handbook,  1925- 
1926.  916.89  R47 


Wells,  Carveth. 

In  coldest  Africa.    1929. 


916.7  W45 


NORTH   AMERICA 

Anbueey,  Thomas. 

Travels  through   the   interior  parts   of 
America.     1923.     2  v.       917.3  A53al 

Beckwith,  Martha  Warren. 

Black  roadways ;  a  study  of  Jamaican 
folk  life.     1929.  917.292  B39 

Burlingame  chamber  of  commerce. 
Burlingame,  California.     1927. 

C917.9469  B96c 

Cooper,  Courtney  Ryley. 

Go  north,  young  man !  1929.   917.1   C77 

Dana,  Arnold  G. 

Porto  Rico's  case.     1928.     917.295  D16 

Dickson,  Albert  Jerome. 

Covered  wagon  days.    1929.    917.8  D55 

Eddy,  Clyde. 

Down     the     world's     most     dangerous 
river.     1929.  917.9  E21 

Enamorado-Cuesta,  Jose. 
Porto  Rico,  past  and  present,  the  island 
after  thirty  years  of  American  rule. 
[1929]  917.295   E56 

Fairbanks,  Harold  Wellman. 

Southern  California,   the  land  and  its 
people.    cl929.  c917.949  F16 

Farquhar,  Francis  P. 

The  story  of  Mount  Whitney.  1929. 
C917.94  F238 
Fleming,  Ethel. 

New  York.    1929.  q91 7.471   F5 

Haldeman-Julius,  Emanuel. 

The  big  American  parade.     cl929. 

917.3  H15 

Hill,  Frank  E.,  d  Hill,  Florence  W. 
The  acquisition  of  California  redwood 
park.     1927.  c917.9471   H64 


112 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Jones,     Llewellyn     Rodwell,     d     Bryan, 

Patrick  Walter. 

North  America  ;  an  historial,  economic 

and  regional  geography.     2d  ed.,  rev. 

and    enl.      1929.  917.3  J77a 

Keysekling.    Hermann    Alexander,    graf 
von. 
America  set  free.     1929.  917.3  K44 

liOOMis,  Leander  Vaness. 

A  journal  of  the  Birmingham  emigrat- 
ing company.     1928.  c917.8  L86 

MiMS,  Edwin. 

Adventurous  America.     1929. 

917.3  M662 
Moore,  Charles. 

Washing-ton,  past  and  present.     cl929. 
917.53  M82 

Nei^son,  Mrs  Beatrice  M.    (Ward). 
State   recreation.      1928.         917.3  N42 

Pbiestlet,  Herbert  Ingram. 

The  coming  of  the  white  man,  1492- 
1848.  1929.  (A  history  of  American 
life.     vol.  I)  917.3   H67 

ROSEJS'BEEGER,  Jesse  Leonard. 
In  Pennsylvania-German  land,  1928-29. 
[1929]  917.48  R81 

Gift. 

Rotheby,  Agnes  Edwards. 

Central  America  and  the  Spanish  Main. 
1929.  917.28  R84 

TiELOTSON,    Miner   Raymond,    <&    Taylor, 
Frank  J. 
Grand  Canyon  country.     1929. 

917.9  T57 
Walkinshaw,  Robert. 

On  Puget  Sound ;  drawings  by  Jeanie 
Walter  Walkinshaw.     1929. 

917.97  W18 
Whiting,  Edward  Elwell. 

Changing  New  England.     cl929. 

917.4  W598 

WiLSTACH,   Paul. 

Tidewater  Virginia.  el929.  917.55  W75 

OCEANICA.     POLAR  REGIONS 

Cole,  M^-s  Mabel  (Cook). 

Savage  gentlemen.     cl929.     919.14  C68 

Fdsth:,  Raymond  William. 

Primitive  economics  of  the  New  Zea- 
land Maori.     1929.  919.31   F52 


Feisbie,  Robert  Dean. 

The  book  of  Puka-puka.      [1929] 

919.64  F91 
Pabijanine,  Maurice. 

The  Krassin ;  translated  by  Lawrence 
Brown.     cl929.  919.8  P23 

Scott,  Ernest,  ed.  ■ 

Australian  discovery,     v.  1.     [1929] 

919.4  S42 
Spencee,  Sir  Baldwin. 

Wanderings  in   wild  Australia.     1928. 
2  V.  919.4  S74 

Streeteb,  Daniel  Willard. 
An  Arctic  rodeo.     1929.  919.8  S91 

HISTORY:    GENERAL 

Beakd,  Charles  Austin,  ed. 

Whither     mankind ;     a     panorama     of 
modern  civilisation.     1928.     901    B36 

Dawson,  Christopher  Henry. 

Progress    and    religion,    an    historical 
enquiry.     1929.  901    D27 

Heard,  Gerald. 

The  ascent  of  humanity.     cl929. 

901    H435 

LowiE,  Robert  Harry. 

Are  we  civilized?     Human   culture  in 
perspective.     cl929.  901   L918 

Otto,  ip.  of  Freising. 

The   two    cities.      1928.      (Records    of 
civilization,    sources   and    studies) 

909  091 


Robinson,  James  Harvey. 
Civilization.     cl929. 


q901    R6 


Salmon,  Lucy  Maynard. 

Why  is  history  rewritten?     1929. 

907  S17 

Scott,  Ernest. 

History  and  historical  problems.     1925. 

907  S42 

HISTORY:     ANCIENT 

Gadd,  Cyril  John. 

History  and  monuments  of  Ur.     1929. 

935.4  G12 

ROGEES,  Robert  William. 

A  history  of  ancient  Persia.     1929. 

935  R72h 

WoOLLEY,  Charles  Leonard. 

The  Sumerians.     1929.  935.8  W91 


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EUROPE 

Anthokt,  Katharine  Susan. 

Queen  Elizabeth.     1929.         942.05  A62 

Abmstkong,  Hamilton  Fish. 
Where  the  East  begins.     1929. 

949.7  A73w 
Batsell,  Walter  Russell. 

Soviet  rule  in  Russia.     1929. 

947.08  B33 
Bbown,  Beatrice  Curtis. 

Alas,  Queen  Anne ;  a  reading  of  her 
life.     cl929.  942.06  B877 

Beuut^,  Geoifrey. 

The  enlightened  despots.  cl929.  (The 
Berkshire  studies  in  European  his- 
tory) 940.7  B89 

Champion,  Pierre  Honore  Jean  Baptiste. 
Louis   XI ;   translated  and   adapted   by 
Winifred  Stephens  Whale. 

944.02  C452 

D'AuvEKGNE,  Edmund  Basil  Francis. 

Napoleon  the  Third,  a  biography.  1929. 
944.07  D24 
DuEUY,  Victor. 

A  history  of  France.   cl929.  944  D96h2 

Geaham,  Stephen. 

Peter  the  Great.     1929.  947  G74 

Hat.evy,  Elie. 

A  history  of  the  English  people.  Epi- 
logue.   V.  1.     [1926]  942  H16e 

Hassall,  Arthur. 

Louis  XIV  and  the  zenith  of  the  French 
monarchy.  [1928]  (Heroes  of  the 
nations)  944.03  H35 


Hegemann,  Werner. 
Frederick  the  Great. 


1929.    943.1   H46 


Ketelbet,  D.  M. 

A  history  of  modern  times  from  1789 
j         to  the  present  day.      [1929] 
j  940.98  K43 

ILtjcas-Dtjbreton,  Jean. 
i    The  restoration  and  the  July  monarchy. 
!  [1929]        (The    national    history    of 

i         France)  944.06  L93r 

IMoegenthau,  Henry  d  Strother,  French. 

{     I  was  sent  to  Athens.   1929.   949.5  M85 

I 

JNamiee,  Lewis  Bernstein. 

I     The  structure  of  politics  at  the  acces- 

j         sion  of  George  III.     1929.     2v. 

942.09  N17 
8—73829 


Packaed,  Laurence  Bradford. 

The  age  of  Louis  xiv.  cl929.  (The 
Berkshire  studies  in  European  his- 
tory) 944.03  P11 

Palieologue,  Georges  Maurice. 

The  tragic  romance  of  Alexander  u  of 
Russia.     2d  ed.  947  P156 

Peees,  Edgar  Allison. 

Spain ;  a  companion  to  Spanish  studies. 
[1929]  946  P37 

Phocas-Cosmetatos,  S.  P. 

The    tragedy    of    Greece.      1928. 

949.5  P57 

PoLiAKOFF,  Vladimir. 

Eagles    black    and    white.      1929. 

943.8  P766 

Scheidemann,  PhUipp. 

The  making  of  new  Germany.    1929. 

943.08  S31 

Sedgwick,  Henry  Dwight. 

Prance ;  a  short  history  of  its  politics, 
literature,  and  art.    1929.      944  S44 

Victobia,   empress   consort  of  Frederick 
m,  German  emperor. 
Letters  of  the  Empress  Frederick.  1929. 
943.08  B64 


ViLLARI,   Luigi. 
Italy.     1929. 


945  V722i 


ASIA 

Owen,  David  Edward. 

Imperialism  and  nationalism  in  the  Far 
East.  cl929.  (The  Berkshire  studies 
in  European  history)  950  097 

WooLACOTT,  John  Evans. 

India  on  trial ;  a  study  of  present  con- 
ditions.    1929.  954  W91 

Wu,  Chao-chu. 

The  Nationalist  program  for  China. 
1929.  951   W95 

NORTH   AMERICA 

AiTON,  Arthur  Scott. 

Antonio  de  Mendoza,  first  viceroy  of 
New  Spain.  1927.  (Duke  univer- 
sity publications)  972  A31 

Allen,  Gardner  Weld. 

Our  navy  and  the  West  Indian  pirates. 
1929.  973.5  A42 


114 


NEWS  NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Anghiera,  Pielro  Mar  tire  d'. 

De    orbe    novo,    the    eight   Decades    of 
Peter  Martyr  d'Anghera.     1912.    2v. 

970  A58 

Anthony,  Irvin. 

Paddle  wheels  and  pistols.     cl929. 

973  A62 
B  AS  SETT,  John  Spencer. 

A  short  history  of  the  United  States. 
1929.  973  B31a 

Bolton,  Charles  Knowles. 

The    real    founders    of   New    England. 
1929.      (Useful  reference  series) 

974  B69 

Bowers,  Claude  Gernade. 

The    tragic    era ;    the   revolution    after 
Lincoln.    1929.  973.8  B78 

Cahen,  Louis  H.  d  Fitzpatrick,  Edward 
I. 
The  empire  of  the  Golden  Gate,  1858- 

1928.  1928.  C979.461  C13 
Gift. 

Chatteeton,  Edward  Keble. 

Seed  of  liberty ;  the  story  of  the  Amer- 
ican colonies.     cl929.  973.2  C49 

[Davidson,  Ed.],  comp. 

San  Diego,  a  brief  history,  1542-1888. 
[1929]  C979.498  D252 

Glazebrook,   George   Parkin   de   Twene- 
broker. 
Sir  Charles  Bagot  in  Canada,  a  study 
in  British  colonial  government.   1929. 

971  G55 

HiSTOEiCAii   publishing    company.    Provi- 
dence, R.  I. 
Providence,    the    southern    gateway    of 
New  England.     1926.  q  974.5  H6 

Gift. 

Hunt,  Rockwell  Dennis  &  Sanchez,'  Mrs 
Nellie  (Van  de  Grift). 
A  short  history  of  California.     cl929. 
C979.4  H94s 

Kite,  Elizabeth  S.,  comp. 

L'Enfant  and  Washington,  1791-1792. 

1929.  (Historical  documents.     Insti- 
tut   frangais   de    Washington) 

q975.3   K6 

[Lafayette,    Marie    Joseph    Paul    Roch 

Yves  Gilbert  de  Motier,  marquis  de] 

Lafayette     in     Virginia ;     unpublished 

letters  from  the  original  manuscripts. 


1928.     (Historical  documents.    Insti- 
tut  franQais  de  Washington) 

q 973.3  LI 
Lonn,  Ella. 

Desertion  during  the  civil  w&y.     cl928. 

973.7  L86 
LooMis,  Hezekiah. 

Journal  of  Hezekiah  Loomis.     1928. 

973.4  L86 
McGroaety,  John  Steven. 
Mission  memories.     cl929. 

C979.402  1VI14 
Obreg6n,  Baltasar  de 

Obregon's  history   of  16th  century  ex- 
plorations in  western  America.   1928. 
972  013 
Ragatz,  Lowell  Joseph. 

The  fall  of  the  planter  class  in  the  Brit- 
ish Caribbean,  1763-1833.     cl928. 

972.9  R14 
Sabin,  Edwin  Legrand. 

Wild  men  of  the  wild  West.    cl929. 

c979  S11 
Scott,  James  Brown,  comp. 

The  United  States  and  France.     1926. 

973.3  S42 
Van  Tyne,  Claude  Halstead. 

The  war  of  independence ;  Amex-ican 
phase,  being  the  second  volume  of  a 
histoi^y  of  the  founding  of  the  Amer- 
ican  republic.     1929.  973.3  V28c 

Verriel,  Alpheus  Hyatt. 

Great  conquerors  of  South  and  Central 
America.     1929.  972  V55 

West,  Willis  Mason. 

A    history    of    the    American    nation,    k 
cl929.  973  W52hi 

Whitton,  Frederick  Ernest. 

Wolfe  and  North  America.    1929. 

973.2  W62 

INDIANS 
BuEDiCK,  Usher  Lloyd. 

The  last  battle  of  the  Sioux  nation. 
cl929.  970.1   B95 

Davis,  Britton. 

The  truth  about  Geronimo.     1929. 

970.2  D26  I 

Goodrich,   Chauncey   Shafter.  j 

The    legal    status    of    the    California  , 

Indian.     1926.  qc970.5  G6  ; 

Indian  defense  association  of  central  and  I; 
northern  California. 
[Pamphlets]      1924.  qc970.1   13 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


115 


EUROPEAN   WAR 
Allen,  William  Charles 


War !     cl929. 


940.939  A43 


Clakk,  William  Bell. 

When   the   U-boats   came   to  America. 
1929.  940.934  C59 

Commission  for  relief  in  Belgium. 
Public  relations  of  the  Commission  for 
relief  in  Belgium.     1929.     2  v. 

940.937  C73 

Gift 

Cramer,  Lawrence  William. 
The     diplomatic     background     of     the 
world  war.     1929.  q  940.9 12  C8 

Gregory,  John  Duncan. 

On  the  edge  of  diplomacy.     [1929] 

940.9  G82 
JiJNGER,  Ernst. 

The  storm  of  steel.    1929.    940.935  J95 

LoNERGAN,  Thomas  Clement. 
It  might  have  been  lost !     1929. 

940.973  L84 
LuciETO,  Charles. 

On    special    missions,    translated    from 
the  French.     1927.  940.921   L93 

NiEZYCHOWSKi,  Alfred  von. 

The  cruise  of  the  Kronprinz  Wilhelm. 
1929.  940.934  N68 

Peel,    Dorothy    Constance   Bayliff   "Mrs 
C.  S.  Peel." 
How  we  lived  then,  1914-1918.      [1929] 
940.942  P37 
WiTKOP,  Philipp,  ed. 

German  students'  war  letters.     [1929] 
940.935  W82 
FRENCH 
[Alleman,  Jeanne] 
Le  goeland.     cl926.  843  A42g 

Reine  d'Arbieux.     cl928. 

843  A42r 
Andreades,  Andreas  Michael,  d  others. 
Les  effets  economiques  et  sociaux  de  la 
guerre  en  Grece.  [1928?]  (Carne- 
gie endowment  for  international 
peace.  Division  of  economics  and 
history.  Histoire  economique  et 
sociale  de  la  guerre  mondiale  (Serie 
grecque))  q330.9495  A5 

[Aedenne  de  Tizac,  Jean  Henri  d'] 
L'oiseau  bleu  s'est  endormi.     cl926. 

843  A676 


Arland,  Marcel. 

Les  Times  en  peine.     cl927.       843  A72 

AzEMA,  Leon. 

Documents  d'architecture  coutempo- 
raine.      1927-28.      2  v.      q720.944  A9 

Basler,  Adolphe. 

L'art  precolombien.    1928.     q709.72  B3 

Beaumarchais,  Pierre  Augustin 
Caron  de. 
Oeuvres  completes     de     Beaumarchais. 
18.32.     6v.  848  B37 

Bedel,  ^Maurice. 

Jerome,  60°  latitude  nord.     [1927] 

843  B41 
Bellessort,  Andre. 

Sainte-Beuve  et  le  dix-neuvieme  siecle. 
1927.  840.9  844 

B£raud,  Henri. 

La  Gerbe  d"or.     cl928.  843  B48g 

Bernanos,  Georges. 

L'imposture.      [1927]  843  B517i 

Bernard,  Augustin. 

L'Afrique  du  Nord  pendant  la  guerre. 
[1926]  (Carnegie  endowment  for 
international  peace.  Division  of 
economics  and  history.  Histoire 
economique  et  sociale  de  la  gueiTe 
mondiale.     Serie  frangaise) 

q961    B5 

Bond,  Otto  Ferdinand,  ed. 

Terre  de  France,  premieres  lectures. 
[1928]  (The  University  of  Chicago 
junior  college  series.  Romance  lan- 
guages) 448  B71 


Bordeaux,  Henry. 
Le  baii'age.     cl927. 


843  B72b 


Boulenger,  Jacques  Romain. 

Miroir  a  deux  faces.     cl928.    843  B763 

BouLiN,  Pierre. 

L'organisation  du  travail  dans  la  region 
envahie  de  la  France  pendant  I'occu- 
pation.  [1927]  (Carnegie  endow- 
ment for  international  peace.  Divi- 
sion of  economics  and  history.  His- 
toire economique  et  sociale  de  la 
guerre  mondiale.     Serie  frangaise) 

q330.944  B7 
Bourgeois,  Nicolas. 

Les  theories  du  droit  international  chez 
Pi'oudhon,  le  federalisme  et  la  paix. 


116 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


1927.     ( Bibliotheque  generale  d'  eco- 
nomie  politique)  341   B77 


Calou,  Maurice. 

Le  Lac  de  Come.    1928. 


q9 14.52  C1 


Cangabdel,  Henri. 

La  marine  marchande  frangaise  et  la 
^erre.  [1927]  (Carnegie  endow- 
ment for  international  peace.  Divi- 
sion of  economics  and  histoiy.  His- 
toire  economique  et  sociale  de  la 
guerre  mondiale.  Serie  frangaise) 
Gift.  q330.944  C2 

Chack,  Louis  Paul  Andre. 

Sur  les  bancs  de  Flandre.     cl927. 

940.934  C43 


Chaffuein,  Louis. 
Pique-puce.    [1928] 


843  C43 


Chamson,  Andrg. 

Les  hommes  de  la  route.   1927.  843  C45 


Charbonneau,  Louis. 
Azize.     cl928. 


843  C46 


Chardonne,  Jacques. 

Le  chant  du  Bienheureux.     1927. 

843  C47 

Chevalier,  Louis  Jacques  Georges. 
Les  bois  d'ceuvre  pendant  la  guerre. 
[1927]  (Carnegie  endowment  for 
.  international  peace.  Division  of  eco- 
nomics and  history.  Histoire  eco- 
nomique et  sociale  de  la  guerre  mon- 
diale.    Serie  frangaise) 

.  q330.994  C5 

Clemenceau,  Georges  Eugene  Benjamin. 
Au  soir  de  la  pensee.     [1927]    2v. 

194  C62 
Constantin-Weyer,  Maurice. 

Cinq   eclats   de   silex.     1928.      (Prosa- 
teurs   frangais   contemporains) 

843  C758c 

•  Un    homme    se    penche    sur    son 


passe.     1928.      (Prosateurs  frangais 
contemporains)  843  C758 

CORdos,  Fernand. 
Catechisme  des  partis  politiques.  [1927] 
944.08  C79 

COTJRTEATJLT,   Paul. 

La  vie  economique  a  Bordeaux  pendant 
la  guerre.  [1925]  ([Carnegie  en- 
dowment for  international  peace. 
Division    of  economics   and   history] 


Histoire  economique  et  sociale  de  la 

guerre    mondiale.      S6rie    frangaise) 

Gift.  q330.944  C8 

Crehange,  Andre.  f 

Chomage  et  placement.  [1927]  (Car- 
negie endowment  for  international 
peace.  Division  of  economics  and  his- 
tory. Histoire  economique  et  sociale 
de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie  fran- 
gaise) q330.944  C9 

DoRSENNE,  Jean. 

Les  amants   sans   amour.      cl927. 

843  D71 

Fort,  Paul,  d  Mandin,  Louis. 

Histoire  de  la  poesie  frangaise  depuis 
1850.    1926.  841.09  F73 

Frois,  Marcel. 

La  sante  et  le  travail  des  femmes  pen- 
dant la  guei-re.  [1926]  ( [Carnegie 
endowment  for  international  peace. 
Division  of  economics  and  history] 
Histoire  economique  et  sociale  de  la 
guerre  mondiale.     Serie  frangaise) 

q330.944  F9 
Gift. 

GiDE,  Charles. 

De  la  lutte  contre  la  cherte  par  les  or- 
ganisations privees.  [1926]  (Car- 
negie endowment  for  international 
peace.  Division  of  economics  and 
history.  Histoire  economique  et 
sociale  de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie 
frangaise)  q330.944  G45 

GiGNOUx,  Claude  Joseph. 

Bourges  pendant  la  guerre.  [1926] 
(Carnegie  endowment  for  interna- 
tional peace.  Division  of  economics 
and  history.  Histoire  Economique  et 
sociale  de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie 
frangaise)  q330.944  G4 

Gift. 


GiRAUDOUX,  Jean, 
eglantine.     1927. 


843  G522e 


GoNTABD,  Jean. 

Dans  les  sierras  de  Californie.  192.3. 
C917.94  G64 
Green,  Julien. 

Leviathan.     cl929.  843  G79I 

■  Mont-Cinere.    [1926]     (L'aubier; 

collection  de  romans  et  d'essais) 

843  G79 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


117 


GuEEiN,  Marcel. 

L'oeuvre  grave  de  Gauguin.     1927.   2  v. 
vq767  G26g 
Hakcouet,  Raoul  d'. 

L'argenterie  peruvieune  a  I'epoque 
coloniale.     1927.  f739  H2 

Hazaed,  Paul. 

La  vie  de  Stendhal.     1928.     B  B573h1 

[Helyot,  Pierre] 
Histoire  des  ordres  monastiques,  religi- 
eux  et  militaires.     1714-19.     8  v. 

q271    H4 

iNTEENATiONAii  geological  congress.    IJfth, 
Madrid,. 1^2Q. 
Comptes  rendus  de  la  xiV  session  de 
Espagne,  1926.  q550.6  16 

Jacqtjemaire,  Mme  Madeleine    (Clemen- 
ceau) . 
Le  pot  de  basilic.     [1928]  843  J 19 

Jaloux,  Edmond. 

La  branche  morte.      [1928]     843  J  26  b 

Jeze,  Gaston  Paul  Amedee. 

Les  depenses  de  guerre  de  la  France. 
[1926]  (Carnegie  endowment  for 
international  peace.  Division  of  eco- 
nomics and  history.  Histoire  eco- 
nomique  et  sociale  de  la  guerre  mon- 
diale.     Serie  frangaise)      q336.44  J5 


JOUGLET,  Rene. 
Freres.    1927. 


843  J 863 


[JouvENEL,     Mme      Gabrielle     Claudine 
(Colette)   de]. 
La  naissance  du  jour.  cl928.   843  J864n 

Kahn,  Gustave. 

VieH   Orient,   Orient  neuf.     1928. 

843   K12 
Kahn,  Jules. 

Histoires    calif orniennes    (1866-1875). 
1925.  979.4  K12 

Keevilee,  Georges  Pocard  du  Cosquer  de. 
La  navigation  interieure  en  France  pen- 
dant la  guerre.  [1926]  (Carnegie 
endowment  for  international  peace. 
Division  of  economics  and  history. 
Histoire  economique  et  soc-iale  de  la 
guerre  mondiale.  Serie  francaise) 
q387  K4 


Kessel,  Joseph. 

Les  coeurs  purs.     cl927. 


843  K42c 


Nuits  de  princes.  cl927.  843   K42n 

KoESSLEB,  Maxime,  &  Deroequigny,  Jules. 

Les   faux  amis ;   ou,   Les  trahisons  du 

vocabulaire     anglais     (conseils     aux 

traducteurs)    1928.  443  K78 

Laceetelle,  Jacques  de. 

L'ame  cachee.     1928.  843  L14am 

La  Faille,  J.  B.  de. 

L'oeuvre  de  Vincent  Van  Gogh.  1928. 
4  V.  vq759.9  G6 

Lateue,  Frank. 
L'aout.  1928.    (Le  cabinet  cosmopolite) 
839.33  L35 
Le  Feanc,  Marie. 

Grand-Louis    I'lnnocent.      1927. 

843   L495 
Lemoisne,  Paul  Andre. 

Gavarni,  peintre  et  lithographe.  1924r- 
28.  2  V.  (La  vie  et  I'art  romanti- 
ques)  vq759.4  G2 

Leonard,   Nicolas   Germain. 

Idylles  et  poemes  champetres.     1781. 

841    L58 
Levainville,  Jacques  Rene. 

Rouen  pendant  la  guerre.  [1926] 
(Carnegie  endowment  for  interna- 
tional peace.  Division  of  economics 
and  history.  Histoire  economique  et 
sociale  de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie 
frangaise)  q330.994  L6 

Lh:ebitiee,  Michel. 
Tours  et  la  guerre ;  etude  economique 
et  sociale.  [1926]  (Carnegie  en- 
dowment for  international  peace.  Di- 
vision of  economics  and  history.  His- 
toire economique  et  sociale  de  la 
guerre  mondiale.     Serie  frangaise) 

q330.944  L68 

Lonchamp,  Frederic  Charles. 

Manuel  du  bibliophile  frangais  (1470- 
1920)     1927.     2  V.  rq016.09   L8 

LucAS-DtTBEETON,  Jean. 

Le  comte  d'Artois,  Charles  X.  cl927. 
(Figures  du  passe)  944.06  L93c 

LuKOMSKii,  Georgii  Kreskent'evich. 
L'art  decoratif  russe.    1928.   709.47  L95 

Mobilier  et  decoration  des  anciens 

palais  imperiaux  russes.     1928. 

q749  L95 

La  vie  et  les  moeurs  en  Russie  de 

Pierre  le  Grand  a  Lenine,    1928. 

q759.9  L95 


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NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Maxe,  fimile. 

Art  et  artistes  du  moyen  age.     1927. 

709.44  M24 

Maenas,  Melanie. 

Quel  est  done  cet  bomine?     1927. 

232  M35a 
Massox,  Paul. 

Marseille  pendant  la  guei-re.  [1926] 
(Carnegie  endowment  for  interna- 
tional peace.  Division  of  economics 
and  history.  Histoire  eeonomique  et 
sociale  de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie 
francaise)  q330.944  IV14 

Gift. 

Maxibiac,  Francois. 

La  vie  de  Jean  Racine.  [1928]  (Le 
roman  des  grandes  existences) 

B   R121m 
Maueois,  Andre. 

Climats.      [1928]  843  M457c 


fitudes  anglaises. 


1927. 

820.9  M45 


—  Le     pays     des     trente-six     mille 
volontes.     1929.  448  M45 


—  La  vie  de  Disraeli.     1929.    (Vies 
des  hommes  illustres)        B   B365ma1 


MiOMANDEE,  Francis  de. 
Les  baladins  d'amour. 


el928. 


843  M66b 


— Escrit  sur  de  I'eau.     1923. 

843  M66e 
MoNTFOETE,  Eugene. 

Cesar  Casteldor.      [1927]        843  M78c 


MOEAND,  Paul. 

Bouddha  vivant.     1928. 


843  MS2b 


Magie   noire.     1928.     325.26  M82 

Nalim,  pseud. 

L'etablissement  de  Celine.    1928.     (Bib- 
liotheQue  de  ma  fiUe)  843  N17 

NoAiLLES,   Anna  Elisabeth    (de   Branco- 
van),  comtesse  de. 
L'honneur  de  souffrir.    1927.    841    N74h 

NoGAEO,  Bertrand,  d  Weil,  Lucien. 
La  main-d'oeuvre  etrangere  &  coloniale 
pendant  la  guerre.  [1926]  (Car- 
negie endovpment  for  international 
peace.  Division  of  economics  and 
histoiT-  Histoii'e  eeonomique  et 
sociale  ^de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie 
frangai'se)  q  330.944  N7 


NoRJiAis'D,  Suzanne. 

Cinq    femmes    sur   une    galere.      cl927. 
("Le  beau  navire")  843  N84 

OuDAED,  Georges. 

Les  chevaliers  mendiants.     cl928. 

947.08  093 

Paeat,  Mathilde  Pierre. 

La     dentelle     et    la     broderie.      1927. 
( Bibliotheque  sociale  des  metiers) 

746  P22 

Peeochon,  Ernest. 

Bernard    I'Ours    et   la    torpedo-camion- 
ette.     cl927.  843  P453b 


PiEBEON,  Sander. 

Yieux-bonheur.     1927. 


843  P62 


PieenjVE,  Henri. 

La  Belgique  et  la  guerre  mondiale. 
[1928]  (Carnegie  endowment  for 
international  peace.  Division  of  eco- 
nomics and  histoi-y.  Histoire  eeo- 
nomique et  sociale  de  la  guerre 
mondiale.      (Serie  beige)) 

q940.949  P6 

Pees  SAC,  Pierre  de. 

Les  forces  historiques  de  la  France. 
[1928]  944  P93 

Peotjst,  Marcel. 

La  prisonniere  (Sodome  et  Gomorrhe, 
III).  1923.  2  V.  in  1.  (A  la  re- 
cherche du  temps  perdu)       843  P96 


Sodome   et  Gomorrhe,   II.     1922. 

3  V.  in  1.      (A  la  recherche  du  temps 
perdu)  843  P96 

Recotily,  Raymond. 

La  troisi^me  republique.  [1927]  (L'his- 
toire  de  France  racontee  a  tous) 

944.08   R31a 

ReiiarqtjE,  Erich  Maria. 

A  I'ouest  rien  de  nouveau.     1929. 

833   R38a 

Renouvix,  Pierre. 

Les  fonnes  du  gouvernement  de  guerre. 
[1925]  (Carnegie  endowment  for 
international  peace.  Division  of 
economics  and  history.  Histoire 
eeonomique  et  sociale  de  la  guerre 
mondiale.     Serie  frangaise) 

q944.08  R4 


Re^tje  intemationale     de 
V.  1-6.     [1924-1929] 


droit     penal. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


119 


(Bib- 


Retmond,  Charles  Marcel. 

La   sculpture   italienne.      1927 
liotheque  d'histoire  de  I'art) 

q735  R4 
ROBIQUET,  Jacques. 

L'art  et  le  gout  sous  la  restauration, 
1834  a  1830.  1928.  (CoUection 
L'art  et  le  gout)  709.44  R66 

RoiXAND,  Romain. 

Le  jeu  de  ramour  et  de  la  mort.  cl928. 
(The  Centur-y  modem  language 
series)  842  R74g1 

Roz,  Firmin. 

Les  fitats-Unis  d'Amerique.     1927. 

917.3  R89 

Salvekte,  Frangois  de,  comte. 

Les  ebenistes  du  XVIIIe  siecle.     1927. 

rq749  S1 
See,  Edmond. 
Le      theatre      frangais      contemporain. 
1928.       (CoUection    Armand    Colin: 
Section  de  langues  et  literatures) 

842.09  S45 
Sellier,   Henri. 

Paris  pendant  la  guerre.  [1926]  (Car- 
negie endowment  for  international 
peace.  Division  of  economics  and 
history.  Histoire  economique  et 
sociale  de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie 
frangaise)  q330.944  S4p 

Selliee,  Henri,  &  Bruggeman,  A. 

Le  probleme  du  logement,  son  influence 
sur  les  conditions  de  I'habitation  et 
I'amenagement  des  villes.  [1927] 
(Carnegie  endowment  for  interna- 
tional peace.  Division  of  economics 
and  history.  Histoire  economique  et 
sociale  de  la  guerre  mondiale.  Serie 
.    frangaise)  q 330.944  S4 

Gift. 

Silvestre,  Charles 
Amour  sauve.     cl927. 


843  S58am 


SOUDAY,  Paul. 
Andre  Gide. 


[1927] 


928.4  S71 


Marcel  Proust.     [1927] 


928.4  S71 


Paul  Valery.      [1927]     928.4  S71 

Tardieu,  Andrg  Pierre  Gabriel  Amedee. 
Devant  Tobstacle.     1927.  327  T18 


Theeive,  Andre. 
Sans  ame.    1928. 


843  T39s 


Tocqtjevelle,     Alexis     Charles    Henri 

Maurice  Clerel  de. 

De  TocquevUle's  voyage  en  Amerique. 

[1909]       (Heath's   modem   language 

series)  448  T63 

Traz,  Robert  de. 

La  puritaine  et  I'amour.     1919. 

843  T78 

Trieste,   la   cote   d'Istrie,   Zara.     cl928. 

q914.36  T8 

Teuchy,  Henri. 

Les  finances  de  guerre  de  la  France. 
[1926]  (Carnegie  endowment  for 
international  peace.  Division  of 
economics  and  history.  Histoire  eco- 
nomique et  sociale  de  la  guerre  mon- 
diale. Serie  frangaise)  q 336.44  T8 
Gift. 


ViLLETARD,  Pierre. 
Le   prince   charmant. 
theque  de  ma  fille) 


1928. 


(Biblio- 
843  V74 


VnxoN,  Frangois. 

Oeuvres  completes  de  Villon.     1927. 

841   V75d 

Vincent  de  Paul.     Lavedan,  Henri  Leon 
Emile. 
Moni^ieur  Vincent,  aumonier  des  galeres. 
[1928]      (Le  roman  des  grandes  ex- 
istences) B  V775411 


ViSKi,  Karoly. 

L'art  populaire  hongrois. 


1928. 
q709.43  V8 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED  DURING 
OCTOBER,  NOVEMBER  AND 
DECEMBER,  1929  f 

Many  of  the  administrative  depart- 
ments of  the  state  are  from  time  to  time 
publishing  reports,  bulletins,  etc.,  which 
are  of  considerable  interest.  Copies  can 
usually  be  obtained  free  by  writing  to 
the  departments  issuing  them.  The  pub- 
lications of  the  University  of  California 
are  offered  for  sale  or  in  exchange  by  the 
University  Press,  Berkeley,  with  the  ex- 
ception of  the  publications  of  the  Agri- 
cultural Experiment  station  and  some  of 
the  administrative  bulletins,  which  are 
distributed    free.      Most    of   the   publica- 


t  Except  when  othervdse  noted  publi- 
cations are  printed  at  the  state  printing 
office,  ^Sacramento,  and  are  octavo  in  size. 


120 


NEWS   NOTES  OF   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


tions  of  the  State  Mining  Bureau  are 
required  by  law  to  be  sold.  Price  is  given 
after  each  entry.  The  titles  are  listed  in 
Neivs  Notes  of  California  Lrilraries  as 
they  are  received  at  the  State  Library. 

Adjutant  General.  Provisions  of  the 
constitution  and  statutes  of  California 
relating  to  the  militia  and  national  guard. 
1929.     67  p. 

■■ —     Special    regulations    no.    1. 

Care  and  accounting  for  funds  and  prop- 
erty. Revised  to  October  1,  1929.  1929. 
103  p.    illus. 

Ageicdxttjee  Department.  Agricul- 
tural statutes  of  the  state  California: 
Part  1,  General  provisions ;  Part  9,  Ani- 
mal industry.  Corrected  to  September  1, 
1929.     1929.     Ill  p. 

Same,  Part  10,   Dairy  lavps. 


1929.    90  p. 


Monthly     bulletin,     vol.     18, 

nos.  7-10,  July-October,  1929.     iUus. 

Cork  oak,  a  forest  tree  v^ith 


possibilities  for  California,  prepared  by 
Woodbridge  Metealf,  Extension  Forester, 
University  of  California  for  Special  com- 
mittee on  cork  oak  cultivation  o*f  Sacra- 
mento Region  Citizens  Council.  [Re- 
printed from  Monthly  bulletin,  vol.  18, 
no.  10,  October,  1929.]  1929.  24  p. 
illus. 

Banks,  Superintendent  of.  Twen- 
tieth annual  report  showing  the  financial 
condition  of  state  banks  at  the  close  of 
business  June  30,  1929.    1929.    412  p. 

Bulletin,  vol.  3,  nos.  10-12, 


October-December,  1929. 

Building  and  Loan  Commissioner 
(San  Francisco).*  Thiity-sixth  annual 
report,  1929.    1929.    214  p. 

Control,  State  Board  of.  Rules  and 
regulations  governing  the  presentation 
and  audit  of  claims.  November  1,  1929. 
67  p.  24°. 

Controller.  Inheritance  tax  act  of 
California,  in  effect  August  2,  1921,  and 
as  amended  by  Statutes  1923,  1925,  1927 
and  1929.    1929.    47  p.  12°. 


*  The  location  of  an  office  or  institution 
is  in  Sacramento,  except  when  otherwise 
noted. 


Dental  Examinees,  Board  op  (Oak- 
land). Report,  July  20,  1929.  1929. 
116  p. 

For  the  period  July  20,  1926,  to  July 
1,  1929. 

Disabled  American  Veteeans  op 
THE  World  Wae,  State  Depaetment  op. 
Report  of  the  eighth  annual  convention, 
San  Bernardino,  California,  May  9,  10, 
and  11,  1929.    1929.    74  p. 

Education  Depaetment.  Bulletin  no. 
C-2.  The  California  plan  for  vocational 
education.  Federal  and  state  aided  in- 
struction in  home-making  for  girls  and 
women.  Revised  September,  1929.  1929» 
28  p. 

Bulletin     no.     5-0.       Short 


plays    for    foreign    students    in    evening 
schools.     1929.     34  p. 

Finance  Depaetment.  State  Lands 
Division.  Laws  governing  the  sale  of 
school  lands,  and  the  leasing  of  lands,  of 
the  state  of  California  together  with  rules, 
regulations  and  information  concerning 
same,  and  list  of  vacant  school  lands  on 
November  1,  1929.     1929.     20  p. 

Harbor  Commissioners,  State  Boaed 
of  (San  Francisco).  Biennial  report  for 
the  fiscal  years  commencing  July  1,  1926, 
and  ending  June  30,  1928.  1929.  iUus. 
map.    79  p. 

Health,  Department  of  Public. 
Weekly  bulletin,  vol.  8,  nos.  35—47,  Octo- 
ber-December, 1929. 

Industeial  Relations  Depaetment. 
Industrial  Accident  Commission  (San 
Francisco ) .  California  safety  news,  vol. 
13,  no.  4,  December,  1929.     15  p.     illus. 

■     Report     of     deci- 


sions of  the  Industrial  Accident  Commis- 
sion for  the  year  1928,  vol.  15.  1929. 
232  p. 


Workmen's  com- 
pensation, insurance  and  safety  laws  of 
the  state  of  California.  Effective  August 
14,  1929.     1929.     106  p. 

Labor    Statistics    and    Law 


Enforcement   Division.      Private   employ- 
ment agency  law.     1929.    11  p. 

Institutions  Depaetment.  Fourth 
biennial  report,  two  years  ending  June 
30,  1928.     1929.     151  p. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIPORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


121 


Insurance  Commissioner  (San  Fran- 
cisco). Sixty-first  annual  report  for  the 
year  ending  December  31,  1928. 

Vol.  1.     Fire  and  fire  and  marine. 

Investment  Department.  Insurance 
Division  (San  Francisco).  List  of  per- 
sons, partnerships  and  corporations  li- 
censed as  insurance  brokers  and  insur- 
ance adjusters  in  California,  Term  end- 
ing July  1,  1930,  including  licenses  issued 
to  August  31,  1929.    1929.    88  p. 

Legislature.  Constitution  of  the 
state  of  California,  Magna  Charta,  Decla- 
ration of  Independence,  the  Articles  of 
confederation  and  the  Constitution  of  the 
United  States.     1929.     Ulus.     288  p.  16°. 

Library,  State.  News  Notes  of  Cali- 
fornia Libraries,  vol.  24,  no.  4,  October, 
1929.     p.  299-540.     map. 

Books  for  the  blind  depart- 
ment. News  Notes.  Reprinted  from 
News  Notes  of  California  Libraries, 
October,  1929.     36  p.  32°. 

Medical  Examiners,  Board  of.  Sup- 
plement to  the  1929  Directory  of  physi- 
cians and  surgeons,  drugless  practitioners, 
naturopaths,  chiropodists  and  midwives 
holding  certificates  issued  under  the  medi- 
cal practice  acts  of  California,  as  of  Octo- 
ber 1,  1929.    1929.    66  p. 

Medical  practice  act,  p.  21. 

Natural  Resources  Department. 
Fish  and  Game  Division.  California  fish 
and  game,  vol.  15,  nos.  3-4,  July-October, 
1929.     illus.     maps. 


Fish    bulletin   no. 

17.  Sacramento- San  Joaquin  salmon 
(Oncorhynchus  tschawytscha)  Fishery  of 
California,  by  G.  H.  Clark.  1929.  illus. 
map.    73  p. 


Same,     no.     18, 

The  Pismo  clam.  Further  studies  of  its 
life  history  and  depletion,  by  William  C. 
Herrington.     1929.     69  p.  illus. 

Same,    no.     19. 


Sardine  fishing  methods  at  Monterey, 
California,  by  W.  L.  Scofield.  1929. 
62  p.    iUus,  maps. 


■ Mines  and  Mining  Division. 

Chapter   of   Report   XXV   of   the    State 
Mineralogist    covering    mining    in    Cali- 


fornia and  the  activities  of  the  Division 
of  Mines  and  Mining,  vol.  25,  no.  3,  .July, 
1929.    1929.    nius.    maps. 

Summary    of    op- 


erations California  oil  fields,  vol.  14,  no. 
6,  December,  1928.     103  p.     illus.     maps. 

Professional  and  Vocational 
Standards  Department.  State  Board 
of  Architectural  Examiners.  Tenth  re- 
port of  the  California  State  Board  of 
Architecture.     1929.     36  p. 

Public  Works  Department.  Cali- 
fornia highways  and  public  works,  vol.  7, 
nos.  10-12,  October-December,  1929. 
illus.     maps. 

Note :     The     November-December, 

1928  issue  is  numbered  vol.  6,  nos.  11- 
12,   instead  of  vol.   5,  nos.   11-12;   the 

1929  issues  are  numbered  vol.  7,  nos. 
1—12,  with  the  result  that  there  is 
no  vol.  6. 

Highways     Division.       Im- 


portant statutes  relating  to  the  Depart- 
ment of  PubUc  Works,  Division  of  High- 
ways, and  the  California  Highway  Com- 
mission.   1929.    218  p. 

Water    Resources    Division 


bulletin  no.  18.     California  irrigation  dis- 
trict laws,  1929  revision.     1929.     273  p. 

/S  a  m  e,     no.  -  22. 


Vol.  1.  Report  on  salt  water  barrier 
below  confluence  of  Sacramento  and  San 
Joaquin  Rivers,  California,  by  Walker 
R.  Young.     1929.     667  p.     plans,     maps. 

Report     of     con- 


sulting board  on  safety  of  the  proposed 
San  Gabriel  Dam,  Los  Angeles  County, 
California.     1929.     10  p.     4°.  mim. 

Railroad  Commission  (San  Fran- 
cisco). Letter  of  transmittal.  Annual 
report  of  the  Railroad  Commission  of 
the  state  of  California  from  July  1,  1928, 
to  June  30,  1929.     1929.     16  p. 


Public   utilities   act   of    the 

state  of  California  and  constitutional  pro- 
visions and  other  enactments  relating  to 
public  utilities  (with  1929  amendments). 
1929.    101  p. 

Real  Estate  Department.  Califor- 
nia real  estate  directory-bulletin,  vol.  10, 
no.  2,  September,  1929,    1929.    320  p. 

Social  Welfare  Department.  Laws 
relating    to    the    Department    of    Social 


]22 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


Welfare,    indudiug    the    Juvenile    Court 
law.     1929.     G2  p. 

Teachers  College,  San  Jose.  Bulle- 
tin, vol.  8,  no.  4.  The  teaching  profes- 
sion, rising  standards,  candidates'  qualifi- 
cations, admission  to  teacher  training. 
October,  1929.     8  p. 

TjNrv'EESiTY  OF  CaliforjSTIA  (Berk- 
eley). Calendar,  toI.  LXXI,  nos.  13-22, 
October-December,  1929. 

A   weekly   bulletin    of    official    Uni- 
versity announcements. 

Price  25  cents  a  half  year,  postpaid. 

Chronicle,    vol.    31,    no.    4, 


October,  1929.     p.  223-455.     lUus.     roy. 

8^ 

Price  $2.00  per  year;   single  copies 
50  cents. 

Publications.        College     of 


Agi'iculture.  Agricultural  Experiment 
Station.  Bulletin  no.  469.  The  solar 
heater,  by  A.  W.  Farrall.  Berkeley, 
June,  1929.    30  p.     illus. 

— •  Same,      no.      470. 


Maturity  standards  for  harvesting  Bart- 
lett  pears  for  eastern  shipment,  by  F.  W. 
Allen.     Berkeley,  July,  1929.    27  p.   illus. 

■ Same,     no.     471. 


The  use  of  sulfur  dioxide  in  shipping 
grapes,  by  H.  E.  Jacob.  Bei'keley,  July, 
1929.    24  p.    iUus. 


• Same,     no.     472. 

Adobe     construction,     by     J.     D.     Long. 
Berkeley.  September,  1929.     56  p.     illus. 

Same,     no.     473. 


Economic  aspects  of  the  sheep  industry, 
by  Edwin  C.  Voorhies  and  W.  E.  Schnei- 
der. Berkeley,  September,  1929.  173  p. 
maps. 

Same,     no.     474. 


Factors  affecting  the  cost  of  tractor 
logging  in  the  California  pine  region,  by 
M.  E.  Krueger.  Berkeley,  August,  1929. 
44  p.    illus. 


Same,     no.     475. 

Walnut  supply  and  price  situation,  by 
H.  B.  Erdman  and  W.  U.  Fuhriman. 
Berkeley,    Septmber,   1929.     60  p.     map. 

Same,     no.     476. 


Poultry  houses  and  equipment,  by  J,  E. 
Dougherty  and  H.  L.  Belton.  Berkeley, 
October,  1929.    100  p.    illus. 


■ Same,     no.  477. 

Improved    methods    of    haiTesting  grain 

sorghum,  by  John  P.  Conrad  and  E.  J. 

Stirniman.        Berkeley,      October,  1929. 
41  p.     illus. 


Same,     no.     478. 

Feeding  and  management  of  dairy  calves 
in  California,  by  S.  W.  Mead.  Berkeley, 
October,  1929.     31  p.     illus. 


Same,     no.     479. 

I.  Irrigation  experiments  with  peaches  in 
California,  by  A.  H.  Hendrickson  and 
F.  J.  Veihmeyer.  II.  Canning  quality 
of  irrigated  peaches,  by  P.  F.  Nichols. 
Berkeley,  November,  1929.     63  p.     illus. 

Same,     no.     480. 

The  use,  value,  and  cost  of  credit  in 
California,  by  Charles  H.  West.  Bei-ke- 
ley,  November,  1929.     44  p. 


Same,      no.      481. 

Utilization  of  wild  oat  hay  for  fattening 
yearling  steers,  by  H.  R.  Guilbert. 
Berkeley,  October,  1929.    21  p.     illus. 

Same,     no.     482. 


Substitutes  for  wooden  breakpins,  by  A. 
H.  Hoffman  and  E.  G.  McKibben. 
Berkeley,  November,  1929.     22  p.     illus. 


Same,     no.     483. 

Utilization  of  surplus  prunes,  by  E.  M. 
Mrak  and  W.  V.  Cruess.  Berkeley, 
November,  1929.     34  p.     illus. 

Hilgardia,  vol.  4, 


nos.  6-10,  September-December,  1929. 

Agricultural    Ex- 


tension Service.  Circular  no.  32.  What 
to  do  about  bovine  tuberculosis,  by  Sam 
H.  Greene,  C.  M.  Haring  and  J.  P.  Iver- 
son.    Berkeley,  March,  1929.    8  p.    Illus. 

Same,      no.      33. 


Rearing  dairy  heifers  free  from  tubercu- 
losis and  abortion  disease,  by  C.  M.  Har- 
ing. Berkeley,  October,  1929.  19  p. 
illus. 

Same,      no.      34. 


Plum  growing  in  California,  by  F.  W. 
Allen.  Berkeley,  October,  1929.  65  p. 
illus. 


Same,      no.      35. 

Alfalfa    production,    by    B.    A.    Madson. 
Berkeley,  October,  1929.    50  p.  illus. 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


123 


Same,      no.      36. 

Beekeeping  for  the  beginner  in  California, 
by  G.  H.  Vansell.  Berkeley,  November, 
1929.    52  p.    illus. 

8aine,       no.       37. 


Home  and  farm  preparation  of  pickles, 
by  M.  A.  Joslyn  and  W.  V.  Cruess. 
Berkeley,  October,  1929.    30  p.     illus. 

•  American  Archae- 


ology and  Ethnology,  vol.  24,  no.  4.  The 
valley  Nisenan,  by  A.  L.  Kroeber. 
Berkeley,  December  4,  1929.  p.  253-290. 
roy.     8°. 

Price  50  cents. 

Same,  vol.  24,  no. 


5.     The  Bear  River  dialect  of  Athapas- 
can,  by  Pliny  Earl  Goddard.     Berkeley, 
December  4,  1929.    p.  291-324.    roy.    8°. 
Price  40  cents. 

— —  Same,  vol.  27.    A 


grammar    of    the    Wappo    language,    by 
Paul    Radin.      Berkeley,    November    20, 
1929.     194  p.     roy.     8°. 
Price  $2.50. 

Astronomy.     Lick 


Observatory  bulletin,  no.  416.  A  deter- 
mination of  magnitudes,  spectral  types 
and  color  indices  in  the  scutum  cloud 
with  a  statistical  discussion,  by  C.  J. 
Krieger.  Berkeley,  October  8,  1929.  p. 
95-129.    4°. 

Sam^,     no,     417. 


Elements  and  ephemeris  of  comet  b  1929 

(Neujmin),  by  Ernest  Clare  Bower  and 

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1.  The  Passerine  remains  from  Rancho 
La  Brea  in  the  Paleoritological  Collec- 
tions of  the  University  of  California,  by 


124 


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The  Encomienda  in  New  Spain.  Forced 
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I 


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126 


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BOOKS    FOR    THE     BLIND    ADDED 

MAGAZINES 

DURING  OCTOBER,  NOVEMBER 
AND  DECEMBER,  1929 

Current  numbers  of  the  following : 
Dawn. 

In   European   Braille 

MAGAZINES 

Lutheran  herald  for  blind. 

Current  numbers  of  the  following  : 

Moon  magazine. 

Braille  courier. 

The  Moon,  weekly  newspaper. 

Braille  mail. 

Braille  musical  magazine. 

Braille  packet. 

Channels  of  blessing. 

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International  Braille  magazine. 

Lightbringer. 

Literary  journal. 

Progress. 

Tribune. 

MUSIC 

Braille  musical  magazine. 

In    Moon  Type 

books 

Grey,  Zane.   The  mysterious  rider.  7  vols. 

Reynolds,  Mrs  Gertrude  M.  (Robins). 

His  second  venture.    6  vols. 

The  story  of  a  girl  who  makes  a 
mistaken  marriage  but  by  courage- 
ously facing  disaster,  comes  success- 
fully through  many  exciting  episodes 
to  the  haven  of  mutual  love. 

RiGGS,  3Irs  Kate  Douglas  (Smith) 
WiGGiN.  A  cathedral  courtship. 

The  tale  of  a  little  courtship  which 
runs  its  placid  course  through  sleepy 
cathedral  towns. 

Russell,  Mary  Annette  (Beauchamp), 
countess.  Elizabeth  and  her  German 
garden.     3  vols. 

A  charming  story  written  in  the 
form  of  a  diary,  and  giving  a  tranquil 
picture  of  cultured  married  life  in  a 
nook  of  pre-war  Germany. 

Smith,  Annie  S.  (Swan).  Love,  the 
master  key.    6  vols. 

A  love  story  dealing  incidentally 
with  the  daily  life  of  employees  of  big 
shops. 

Wallace,  Edgar.  The  gaunt  stranger. 
5  vols. 

This  is  a  story  of  the  underworld  of 
London,  with  a  most  dramatic  ending. 


In    New  York   Point 

magazines 
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Christian  record. 

Gospel  trumpet. 

Matilda  Ziegler  magazine. 

Sunday  school  monthly. 

In   Revised   Braille 

Books  marked  c  are  printed  with  contractions 

BOOKS 

cBeach,  Rex  Ellingwood.  The  silver 
horde.    3  vols. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Universal  Braille 
Press. 

*cBenedict,  Milo  Ellsworth.  What 
music  does  to  us.     2  vols. 

cBenson,  Allan  Louis.  The  story  of 
geology.    2  vols. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Mrs  Richard 
Mortimer. 

cBercovici,  Konrad.  The  tent  windward. 

Includes:  Dogs  that  tree  and  stay, 
by  Vingie  E.  Roe. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  National  City 
Branch,  iS'an  Diego  Chapter,  American 
Red  Cross. 

*cBiGGERS,  Earl  Derr.  Behind  that 
curtain.     7  vols. 

*c Fifty  candles.    2  vols. 

cBiography  stories  for  boys,  by  various 
authors. 

*cBradford,  Gamaliel.  Sarah  Bernhardt. 

*cCather,  Willa  Sibert.  The  profes- 
sor's house.     5  vols. 

cCooK,  George  Cram  d  Glaspell, 
Susan.  Suppressed  desires,  a  comedy 
in  two  scenes. 

*cCraven,  Margaret.  Faith  in  Antha. 

Includes:  -Silk  stockings,  by  Arthur 
Somers  Roche. 


*iHand    copied.     Gift   of    S.    F.    Chapter. 
American  Red  Cross.   . 


vol.  25,  no.  1] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE    LIBRARY 


127 


cDeffendall,  Prentice  Hoo^tib.  Actual 
business  English.    4  vols. 

DeKexjif,  Paul  Henry.  Microbe  hunters. 
3  vols. 

Interpoint. 

cDe  La  Roche,  Mazo.    Jalna.    3  vols. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  N.  Y.  Section, 
The  Woman's  Auxiliary,  American 
Institute  of  Mining-  and  Metallurgical 
Engineers. 

*cEdmonds,  Walter  D.   An  honest  deal. 
Includes:    Roy   Chapman    Andrews' 
expedition     to     the     Gobi,     by    Merle 
Schuster. 

cEllsbeeg,  Edward.  On  the  bottom.  2 
vols. 

Interpoint. 

*cFreeman,  3Irs  Mart  Eleanor  (Wil- 
KINS).  The  revolt  of  mother  and 
One  good  time. 

cGeorge,  Henry.    Progress  and  poverty, 

Significant  paragraphs  from. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Robert  Schalken- 
back  Foundation,  N.  Y. 

*cGiBBS,  Philip  Hamilton.  The  age  of 
reason,  a  novel.    8  vols. 

cGrey,  Zane.   Tlie  bee  hunter.     5  vols. 

This  book  appeared  later  under  the 
title  of  "Under  the  Tonto  rim." 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  National  City 
Branch,  San  Diego  Chapter,  American 
Red  Cross. 

c Don,  the  story  of  a  lion  dog. 

c Wild  Horse  Mesa.    7  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Los  Angeles 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cHart,  William  Surrey.    My  life  east 

and  west.     3  vols. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Braille  Insti- 
tute of  America,  Inc. 

*cHeerick,  Robert.  The  master  of  the 
inn. 

cKennedy,  Mrs  Isabel  W.  History  of 
the  Pennsylvania  Home  Teaching 
Society. 

cMcAfee,  Clet.and  Boyd.     The  greatest 
English  classic,  a  study  of  the  King 
James  version  of  the  Bible  and  its 
influence  on  life.     2  vols. 
Interpoint. 

Macfarlane,  D.  C.  The  quest  of  the 
yellow  pearl. 

Full  spelling. 

Beautiful  little  story  with  splendid 
moral. 


*  Hand   copied.      Gift  of   S.   F.    Chapter,  *  Hand   copied.      Gift   of   S.   F.    Chapter, 

American   Red   Cross.  American   Red   Cross. 


*cMcSpadden,  .Joseph  Walker.  Cali- 
fornia, a  romantic  story  for  young 
people.    2  vols. 

*cMiLLAY,  Edna  St.  Vincent.  The  poems 
of  Edna  St.  Vincent  Millay.     8  vols. 

cMoRLEY,  Christopher.  The  Romany 
stain.    Selections  from.     3   vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Los  Angeles 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cNordhofp,  Charles  Bernard.  The  pearl 
lagoon.     3  vols. 

cPaeker,  Sir  Gilbert.  The  seats  of  the 
mighty.     6  vols. 

cPelley,  William  Dudley.    The  higher 

summons. 

Contains  also :  Social  work  and  re- 
ligion, by  Lucy  Wright.  An  essay  on 
the  art  of  making  an  effective  speech, 
by  Marjorie  Delavan. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Long  Beach 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cPerkins,   Lucy  Fitch.    The  American 
twins  of  the  Revolution.    2  vols. 
Juvenile. 

cPetersen,  Elizabeth  Benneche.  The 
silver  bracelet. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  San  Diego 
Section,  National  Council  of  Jewish 
Women  and  San  Diego  Chapter, 
American.  Red  Cross. 

*cPhelps,  William  Lyon.  Happiness. 

Includes :  Nobody  can  steal  my  hap- 
piness,  by  Edgar  Guest. 

ePoRTER,  2Irs  Gene  Stratton.  Freckles. 
3  vols. 

cPosT,  Melville  Davisson.  The  for- 
gotten witness. 

Contains  also:  An  hour  before  din- 
ner, by  Mrs  Elinore  Cowan  Stone  and 
Watch  house,  by  Thomas  McMorrow. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  a  Volunteer, 
Los  Angeles. 

cProuty,  Olive  Higgins.  Stella  Dallas, 
a  novel.    4  vols. 

Richey,  Emma  Carbutt.  Stories  of  ani- 
mal village. 

Interpoint.     Full  spelling. 
cRichmond,        Mrs        Grace       Louise 
(Smith).     Red    Pepper's    patients, 
with    an   account    of   Anne    Linton's 
ease  in  particular.     5  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Pasadena 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cRiGGS,  BIrs  Kate  Douglas  (Smith) 
WiGGiN.     Old  Peabody  Pew. 


128 


NEWS  NOTES  OP   CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES 


[Jan.,  1930 


cRiNEHABT,   Mrs   Maey   Roberts.      The 

dipper. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  National 
Council  of  Jewish  "Women  and  San 
Diego  Chapter,   American   Red  Cross. 

cRoLVA^vG,   Ole  Edvaet.     Giants  in  the 
earth,  a  saga  of  the  prairie.     4  vols. 
Interpoint. 

cRussEix,  Maey  Annette  Beauchamp, 
countess.  Introduction  to  Sally.  8 
vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  iSanta  Barbara 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cSedgwick,  Anne  Douglas.  Dark  Hes- 
ter.   2  vols. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Worth  While 
Club  of  Highland  Park,  Mich. 

*cShowalter,  William  Joseph.  Twin 
stars  of  Chile ;  Valparaiso,  the  gate- 
way and  Santiago,  the  capital ;  key 
cities  for  a  progressive  present  and  a 
romantic  past. 

*cSiMPiCH,  Feederick.  Arizona  comes  of 
age. 

cStaering,  Anna  Mtjllett  Farbab. 
Thought  rays  ;  poems.     3  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Pasadena 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cSteger,  Jane.  Leaves  from  a  secret 
journal,  a  record  of  intimate  experi- 
ences.   3  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Los  Angeles 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cStephenson,  Nathaniel  Wright. 
Abraham  Lincoln  and  the  union. 
2  vols. 

cStories  for  girls,  by  various  authors. 
cTate,   Allen.      Stonewall  Jackson,  the 
good  soldier ;  a  narrative.     3  vols. 

cTerhune,  Albert  Payson.  The  battle 
of  the  gods. 

Contains  also:  The  bad  little  egg, 
by  Sophie  Kerr  and  a  man  trap  for 
Gawky,  by  Mrs  Mary  Marvin 
(Heaton)  Vorse. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  a  Volunteer, 
Los  Angeles. 

cVan  Dyke,  Henry.    The  blue  flower.   4 

vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Long  Beach 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cWabner,  Frances  Lester.  Tlie  unin- 
tentional charm  of  men.     3  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Pasadena 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 


*  Hand  copied.     Gift  of  S.   F.   Chapter, 
American   Red   Cross. 


c"What  price  success,"  containing  a  hint 
or  two  from  the  winning  ways  of 
wise,  go-getting  salesmen,  also  full 
working  instructions  for  representa- 
tives of  Braille  Division  of  Review  of 
Reviews. 

Gift  of  Review  of  Reviews,  Braille 
Division. 

cWooDRUFF,  Douglas.  Plato's  American 
Republic. 

Interpoint.     Gift  of  Lion's  Club  of 
Mineola,  Long  Island,  N.  Y. 

MAGAZINES. 

Current  numbers  of  the  following : 
cAmerican  review  for  the  blind. 
cThe  Beacon. 
cThe  Braille  mirror. 
cBraille  star  theosophist. 
c Catholic  review. 
cChristian  record. 
cChristian  science'  quarterly. 
cChurch  herald  for  the  blind. 
cGosPEL  trumpet. 
cIlluminator. 
cThe  Lamp. 
cLutheran  messenger  for  the  blind. 

CLUX   VERA. 

cMatilda  Ziegler  magazine. 

Messenger  to  the  sightless. 

cReader's  digest. 

Gives  resumes  of  interesting  articles 
from  various  magazines. 

cSearchlight. 
cSuNDAY  school  monthly. 
cWeekly  news. 
cW^eekly  review. 

In   ink  Print 

MAGAZINES 
Current  numbers  of  the  following  : 

The  Beacon. 

Outlook  for  the  blind. 

St.  Dunstan's  review 


73829 


-.30      1400 


i 


4 


i 


Vol.  25,  No.  2  APRIL  1930 


News  Notes 


OF 


California  Libraries 


IN    THIS    NUMBER-SOME   OF  THE    ITEMS   OF   INTEREST 

discussion  groups— BERKELEY  PUBLIC  LIBRARY,  SANGER  (FRESNO 
COUNTY),   LONG    BEACH    PUBLIC   LIBRARY. 

BOOKS      OF      HISTORIC      AND      ANTIQUARIAN       INTEREST— OAKLAND 
TEACHERS   PROFESSIONAL   LIBRARY. 

CHAMBER    MUSIC— POMONA    PUBLIC    LIBRARY. 

ITALIAN  LITERARY  COLLECTION  GIFTS— STOCKTON  PUBLIC  LIBRARY, 
MONTEREY   PUBLIC   LI  BRARY,  ANTIOCH  (CONTRA  COSTA  COUNTY). 

PENALTIES    FOR    BOOK    MUTILATION    AND    THEFTS— OAKLAND    FREE 
LIBRARY,    SANTA    MONICA    PUBLIC    LIBRARY. 

FOR  SPECIAL  ARTICLES,  SEE  CONTENTS. 


California  State  Library 


CAIJFORNIA  STATK  PIUNTING   OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO,   1930 


CONTENTS 

Page' 
A  MODEKN  LIBRARY  FOR  A  MODERN  WORLD 129 

WHAT  ARE  SOME  OF  THE  BENEFITS  AND  OBSTACLES  TO  BE  MET 

IN  STRIVING  FOR  PROFESSIONAL  ADVANCEMENT? 1:54 

riCTURE  COLLECTION  SURVEY 136 

MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA  SHOWING  COUNTIES 138 

LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE   LIBRARIES 139 

J.IST  OF  LARGER  PUBLIC  LIBRARIES 1-40 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES— NEWS   ITEMS 141 

DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES    AND    OTHER    ITEMS    OF 

GENERAL    INTEREST i 16S 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION 170 

CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS 182 

LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC ^ 183 

BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS 186 

CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 188 

Staff,  Etc.  188 

DEP4BTME^'Ts    190  ; 

Recent  Accessions 194 

Califoknia  State  I'ublications  Received  Dlking  Jaxcaky,  February 

AND  Mabch,  1930 224 

California  City  Publications  Received  Duking  January,  February 

AND  March,  1930_' 229. 

Books  for  the  Blind  Added  During  January,  February  and  March, 

1930 229  < 


Issued  quarterly  in  the  interest  of  the  libraries  of  the  State  by  the  California 
State  Library. 

All    communications    should    be    addressed    to    the    California    State    Library, 
Sacramento,  California. 

Note. — Standing  matter  is  set  solid  and  new  matter  leaded. 

Entered  as  second-class  matter  December,  1913,  at  the  post  office  at  Sacramento, 
California,  under  the  Act  of  August  24,  1912. 

Acceptance  for  mailing  at  the  special  rate  of  postage  provided  for  in  Section 
1103.  Act  of  October  3,  1917,  authorized  August  27,  1918. 


A  MODERN  LIBRARY  FOR  A  MODERN  WORLD* 


By  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Libr 
We  talk  much  these  days  about  keeping 
up  with  a  fast  moving  world.  Even  we 
older  folk  try  to  be  modem,  though  our 
attempt  may  at  times  be  provocative  of 
mirth  to  the  freshman  class  of  1929. 
There  is  something  in  the  air  that  drives 
the  average  individual  forAvard  with  the 
crowd.  Womankind  scarcely  finds  com- 
fort and  ease  in  short  locks  and  short 
skirts  when  the  race  is  on  for  length  in 
both.  And  does  the  woman  of  today 
hesitate?  Not  for  long;  for  if  she  does 
she  finds  herself  out  of  fashion ;  and  to 
be  out  of  fashion  is  a  confession  of  ig- 
norance and  indifference  to  the  opinions 
of  the  pacemakers.  Our  automobile 
which  a  year  or  so  agO'  seemed  so  per- 
fect of  line,  so  silent  and  smooth  and  pow- 
erful today  loolvs  to  us  a  fit  subject  for 
a  motive  museum,  though  as  a  matter  of 
fact  it  may  still  have  a  long  life  of  mere 
miles  under  its  hood.  We  do  not  hesi- 
tate to  scrap  this  faithful  convenience, 
and  substitute,  at  very  considerable  cost, 
the  latest  thing  from  Detroit  over  which 
the  engineers  have  long  pondered.  The 
industrial  machines  in  our  factories  do 
not  wear  out.  They  probably  have  as 
much  good  in  them  when  we  throw  them 
upon  the  scrap  heap  as  they  have  ex- 
pended. But  to  keep  up  with  the  times, 
to  meet  the  competition  of  the  other  fel- 
low the  newest  implement  is  none  too 
good,  and  have  it  we  must.  In  fact,  this 
is  an  age  when  the  man  who  sleeps  a 
week  on  his  job  wakes  up  to  find  him- 
self a  veritable  Rip  Van  Winkle,  bewil- 
dered because  he  does  not  know  those 
about  him. 

In  the  field  of  education  the  advances 
and  improvements  have  been  no  less  revo- 
lutionary and  startling.  The  little  red 
schoolhouse  on  the  hill — if  it  ever  was 
red — has  given  way  to  the  union  school 
to  which  the  pupils  are  gathered  by  motor 
bus  from  a  great  encircling  area.  Teach- 
ers no  longer  guide  their  youthful  charges 
from,  A  B  C  to  the  higher  courses ;  they 
have  become  specialists  within  narrowing 
limits.  One  should  not  express  suprise  at 
this  fact,  because  the  bounds  of  knowledge 


arian,  California  State  Library 
have  been  expanded  with  staggering  rap- 
idity. The  high  school  boy  of  today, 
without  being  a  prodigy  of  learning,  may 
know  more  of  the  world  than  the  most 
learned  scholar  of  a  generation  ago :  he 
is  conversant  with  facts  that  were  not 
known  when  "A  hot  time  in  the  old  town 
tonight"  took  our  land  by  storm,.  He 
not  only  knows  the  motor  car  by  instinct, 
but  he  is  wise  to  the  airplane  and  the 
radio ;  and  the  school  to  keep  pace  with 
him  must  teach  these  subjects  and  a  host 
of  othei-s  which  were  once  the  dreams  of 
the  dreamer  in  his  most  extravagant  mood. 
And  be  it  said  to  the  credit  of  the  school 
master,  in  most  matters  he  is  trying  to 
keep  up,  if  not  ahead  of  this  dizzily  speed- 
ing procession  of  flaming  youth. 

Here  it  seems  opportune  to  turn  aside 
for  a  moment,  though  in  the  end  you  will 
see  the  digression  is  more  apparent  than 
real,  to  say  a  word  about  this  younger 
generation  vVhich  is  not  infrequently  given 
up  for  lost  by  the  critics  of  mature  years. 
There  is  nothing  new  in  this  clash  be- 
tween the  new  and  the  old ;  it  has  been 
going  on  since  Adam's  sons  leanaed  to 
walk  alone,  and  will  doubtless  continue 
as  long  as  mankind  goes  through  the  cycle 
of  the  seven  ages.  The  youth  of  today, 
call  them  flaming  if  you  will,  are  prob- 
ably wiser  and  more  capable  than  their 
kind  of  any  former  time.  They  are  given 
to  calling  a  spade  a  spade  because  it  is  a 
spade,  and  do  not  feel  any  necessity  for 
apology  for  their  frankness.  They  no 
longer  blush  to  discuss  matters  which 
would  have  sunk  without  trace  the  bud- 
ding mid-Victorian ;  and  if  we  are  not 
old  fashioned,  hopelessly  hidebound,  we 
must  honor  them  for  their  truthfulness 
and  be  aware  that  they  are  no  whit  the 
worse  for  that  commendable  quality.  The 
trouble  arises  more,  I  believe,  because  of 
the  dying  down  of  the  fires  of  age  rather 
than  because  of  the  boiling  condition  of 
youth.  Life,  real  life,  is  not  a  cold  thing. 
The  clash,  therefore,  may  be  lessened 
not  by  reducing  the  steam  pressure  of 
youth  but  by  keeping  up  the  gauge  as 
the  years  grow  long.  And  the  point  I 
insist  upon  is  not  so  much  a  physical  as 


*  This    paiDer    was    read    during    the    exercises    in    dedication    of    the    new    library 
building  at  the  University  of  Oklahoma,   February  22,   1930. 
76092 


130 


NEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


a  mental  quality.  If  men  and  women 
grow  old.  intellectually,  too  rapidly  is  it 
not  a  fault  of  our  educational  schemes, 
in  the  first  place ;  and  then,  in  the  second 
place,  to  throw  our  own  professional  sha- 
dow across  the  picture,  of  our  libraries 
and  their  service?  Professor  Thomdike 
has  proven  that  we  may  still  learn  into 
the  gray  thatched  years.  The  fault  of 
growing  old  too  early,  and  of  becoming 
unduly  critical  of  the  younger  gener-ation 
i.s  pussibly  one  of  mental  laziness.  Can 
we  librar^ians  do  anything  about  it? 

It  has  loug  been  a  convenient  practice 
ti)  name  ages  and  periods :  the  stone  age, 
the  golden  age,  the  mauve  decade,  the  ro- 
mantic '90"s.  Our  present  era  may  cause 
much  study  to  produce  its  proper,  inclu- 
sive name ;  but  if  one  be  influenced  by 
the  story  of  the  tax  bill  it  might  well  be 
called  the  school  age.  In  one  state,  to  my 
personal  knowledge,  the  educational  sys- 
tem costs  more,  considerably  more,  than 
all  the  other  governmental  functions  com- 
bined. It  will  be  long  before  the  library, 
I  fear,  grows  to  such  height  that  it  may 
become  the  inspiration  for  the  branders 
of  the  ages.  Some  of  our  more  enthusi- 
astic American  librarians  might  venture 
an  estimate ;  for  assuredly  there  are  reas- 
ons why  our  book  services  should  be 
viewed  with  growing  respect. 

In  tracing  the  line  of  development  of 
the  library  one  learns  of  its  strength  and 
its  weakness.  The  public  school  very 
early  was  conceived  as  the  state's  busi- 
ness, whatever  might  be  its  local  connec- 
tions. It  became  a  system  whose  support 
was  assumed  as  a  state  duty.  Very  early 
standards  for  teachers  were  set  up;  and 
as  the  years  passed  the  bars  were  steadily 
raised  until  not  only  was  a  failure  at 
preaching  or  in  business  not  eligible  to 
teach  but  even  positive  evidences  of  study 
and  practice  in  the  arts  of  pedagogy  were 
required.  Teachers  became  jealous  of 
their  profession,  and  formed  organizations 
to  further  their  aims,  to  convince  the  pub- 
lic that  public  school  buildings  fully 
equipped  are  a  prime  necessity,  and  to  ob- 
tain for  themselves  a  living  wage ;  all  of 
which,  to  be  sure,  is  a  proper  procedure. 

Tlie  library,  on  the  other  hand,  has  a 
far  different  history.  It  began  as  a  neces- 
sary adjunct  to  the  scholar,  or  as  a  some- 
what arrogant  display  on  the  part  of 
wealth.      And,    parenthetically    speaking. 


books  by  the  yard  and  in  pleasing  combi- 
nations of  color  are  still  held  decorative  in 
certain  systems  of  architecture.  But  the 
librax-y  of  a  public  character  is  a  com- 
paratively recent  development.  In  large 
cities,  often  under  the  stimulus  of  private 
assistance  it  has  grown  in  gratifying  man- 
ner during  the  past  fifty  years.  Our 
great  Library  of  Congress  in  a  like  pei-iod 
has  taken  position  of  high  honor  among 
the  great  book  collections  of  the  world. 
The  men  and  women  who  have  directed 
the  fortunes  and  sei-vices  of  these  larger 
institutions  have  been  persons  of  profes- 
sional attainments.  The  results  thus  se- 
cured have  been  excellent.  But,  despite 
the  drift  cityward  much  of  the  population 
of  America  is  still  to  be  found  in  the 
country  and  the  small  towns  where  metro- 
politan methods  do  not  succeed.  It  is 
to  the  man,  woman  and  child  in  the  vil- 
lage and  on  the  fann  that  I  would  devote 
some  of  our  time. 

The  small  town  library  has  had  a 
struggle.  Usually  it  has  been  started  by 
a  group  of  women,  as  have  so  many  of 
the  best  things  in  this  life.  But  women 
are  in  the  unfortunate  position  of  being 
only  recently  emancipated — their  prog- 
ress in  that  direction  of  late  years  has 
been  quite  modern — and  their  financial 
resources  have  been  sharply  limited.  As 
a  consequence  library  books  have  been 
gathered  up,  if  not  from  by-ways  and 
hedges,  then  from  cellar  and  attic  and 
storeroom.  A  book  was  a  book  though 
there  was  nothing  in  it ;  and  remained  a 
book  until  in  its  evolutionary  course  it 
closely  resembled  the  bundle  of  rags  from 
which,  historically  at  least,  it  was  de- 
rived. Funds  were  secured  in  that  most 
laborious  of  all  methods,  through  enter- 
tainments and  bazaars :  put  in  two  dol- 
lars and  take  out  one.  The  inefficiency  of 
the  method  was  a  just  assessment  upon 
the  purse  carrying  male  of  the  community. 
And  finally,  when  the  library  became  a 
recognized  public  charge,  it  was  too  often 
kept  on  a  charity  basis.  This  attitude 
is  not  yet  out-m,oded,  nor  is  it  always 
found  in  villages :  the  newspapers  in 
their  recent  comment  on  Chicago's  fiscal 
difficulties  noted  that  the  public  library 
and  other  charitable  institutions  were 
without  funds.  The  little  independent  li- 
brary is  an  inefficient,  uneconomical  de- 
vice,   whatever   sacrifice    and    enthusiasm 


vol.  25,  no.  2]    a  modern  library  for  a  modern  world 


131 


may  be  contributed  by  its  local  sponsors. 
It  can  not  bec-ome  an  apt  servant  of  mod- 
em people  who  throw  away  aging  ma- 
chines and  are  on  the  eager  outlook,  like 
the  Athenians,  for  some  new  thing.  But 
somehow,  unfortunately,  the  more  or  less 
reverent  regard  of  the  man  in  the  street 
for  books  has  enabled  many  of  our  libraries 
to  continue  when  factories  under  similar 
conditions,  and  schools,  would  be  rebuilt 
entire. 

As  to  books  for  the  people  in  the  coun- 
try, they,  as  we  used  to  say  in  territorial 
days  of  the  people  south  of  the  Canadian 
River  when  cora  was  short,  for  the  most 
part  simply  do  without.  Today  they  may 
receive  the  Saturday  Evening  Post  in  addi- 
tion to  the  traditional  farm  journal  and 
weekly  newspaper.  With  the  rapid  ex- 
tension of  good  roads  and  rural  free  mail 
delivery  the  city  daily  may  be  added  to 
the  list ;  and  the  stock  market  and  comic 
strips  may  be  followed  in  the  country 
with  the  same  interest  shown  those  fea- 
tures in  the  city.  But  books  under  or- 
dinary circumstances  are  limited  to  the 
Bible,  perhaps,  useless  sets  sold  by  clever 
book  agents,  and  unloved  texts  of  the 
children  in  school.  If  by  chance  some 
outside  influence  recognizes  the  need  of 
the  farmer  and  his  family  the  state  may 
go  so  far  as  to  send  out  traveling  libra- 
ries. A  generation  ago  this  device  was 
hopefully  expected  to  solve  the  problem. 
Thorough  trial  of  it,  for  a  short  time, 
proved  its  value  to  be  haphazard  and  al- 
most exclusively  recreational.  In  library 
practice  it  is  in  the  same  class  with  the 
one-lung  automobile  whose  idiosyncrasies 
produced  but  never  popularized,  for  the  vic- 
tim, that  mournful  ditty,  "get  out  and  get 
under."  A  library  service  is  not  a  bundle 
of  books  sent  out  from  a  distant  center 
to  an  individual  or  a  group  whose  needs 
and  manner  of  thinking  must  be  guessed 
at.  I  believe  the  fanner,  whose  well-being 
is  so  essential  to  the  great  cities,  should 
have  the  best  in  books  as  well  as  in  motor 
cars,  agricultural  implements,  and  meth- 
ods of  marketing  his  product.  The  latter 
instrumentality  has  been  slow  of  de- 
velopment, as  has  the  system  of  library 
service  suited  to  his  needs,  but  both  will 
come  in  complete  adequacy  during  the 
next  score  of  years. 

Then  there  is  one  other  field  I  would 
mention,    wherein,    strangely    enough,    so 


little  constructive  thinking  has  been  done ; 
and  that  is  in  libraries  for  the  schools, 
and  particularly  for  the  elementary 
schools  in  the  country  and  the  small 
towns.  Perhaps  teachers  are  at  fault  in 
feeling  that  education  is  a  process  limited 
to  the  immature  years  spent  in  the  class- 
room. Perhaps  they  have  been  so  ab- 
sorbed in  the  daily  task,  and  I  grant  you 
it  is  no  simple  problem,  of  keeping  control 
of  the  bodies  of  squirming  youth  and  at 
the  same  time  trying  to  direct  the  still 
more  elusive  and  unknowable  quantity, 
its  mind.  The  tendency  now  is  to  con- 
sider education  a  life-long  undertaking 
from  which  the  subject  will  derive  no 
little  fun,  when,  after  being  taught  how 
to  walk  by  the  schoolmaster,  he  may  run 
and  leap  and  caper  whither  and  how  his 
fancy  directs  him.  However,  that  Ely- 
sian  field  is  under  most  educational  sys- 
tems beyond  the  next  distant  turn  on  the 
pedagogical  highway.  .  This  I  know,  that 
in  too  many  schools  text  books  become 
dull  burdens,  and  the  task  of  teacher  and 
pupil  infinitely  harder  because  the  leav- 
ening influence  of  a  modern  library  ser- 
vice is  not  employed.  Instead  of  the 
dust  covered,  unsuitable  volumes  now  gen- 
erally to  be  found  in  the  old  type  of  school 
library,  an  adequate  living  stream  of 
book  service  and  professional  help  may 
be  secured,  through  proper  organization, 
and  at  little  more  than  the  old  time  ex- 
pense. 

What  makes  a  library  a  satisfaction,  a 
real  comjmunity  and  state  asset?  It  is 
not,  in  the  beginning  at  least,  the  fine 
type  of  building  which  is  the  incentive  for 
this  meeting ;  though  I  would  not  mini- 
mize the  importance  of  suitable  housing 
to  librarians  and  to  library  users.  The 
answer  is  simple;  it  is  trained,  alert, 
efiicient  personnel — yes,  I  put  the  libra- 
rian first,  not  1  believe  out  of  professional 
egotism ;  an  adequate  collection  of  books, 
printed  matter  and  other  adjuncts  which 
must  always  be  kept  a  fresh  stream  by 
the  addition  of  new  materials ;  and  finally 
the  proper  machinery  of  use,  of  distribu- 
tion, so  that  what  man,  woman  or  child 
requires  or  needs  may  be  brought  to  him 
without  unnecessary  delay  and  without 
the  payment  of  money  aside  from  the  item 
for  library  support  on  his  tax  bill.  I 
leave  out  of  this  consideration  colleges 
and  universities  whose  immediate  campus 


132 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


requirements  make  it  unwise  for  their 
book  stocks  to  be  sent  widely  over  the 
state ;  their  vei-y  excellent  contribution 
to  the  scheme  may  be  made  in  other  ways 
not  pertinent  to  this  inquiry.  So  far  and 
too  generally  we  have  looked  at  our  work 
as  being  confined  to  a  single,  isolated 
unit,  except  in  the  larger  cities,  unrelated 
to  any  other  institution  of  its  kind.  We 
have  been  little  influenced  by  the  prac- 
tices in  the  modern  world  about  us  where 
branch  banking  and  chain  stores  have 
demonstrated  their  astonishing  efiiciency 
and  strength. 

If  yoii  are  convinced  that  the  library 
is  something  which  can  serve  mankind, 
which  can  make  for  greater  happiness, 
defining  that  word  as  variously  as  you 
please,  why  can  we  not  put  aside  preju- 
dices, frame  our  plans  ambitiously,  and 
then  keep  striving  for  the  ideal  whatever 
may  be  the  discouragement  of  the  day? 
In  the  United  States  of  America  we  are 
obliged  to  consider  the  state  the  unit  of 
operation.  The  Library  of  Congress,  im- 
poi-tant  as  it  is  today  can  not,  except  in 
very  special  instances,  reach  out  from 
the  national  capital  to  serve  us.  The 
state  therefore  must  be  the  self  contained 
compartment  in  which  these  operations 
must  be  carried  on.  Today  the  state  toO' 
often  dissipates  its  effort  tJirough  several 
conflicting  and  competitive  channels.  It 
should  consolidate  its  commissions  and 
bureaus  and  offices  in  order  that  money 
may  not  be  wasted,  necessary  funds  may 
be  procured,  larger  print  materials  may 
be  made  available  for  proper  uses,  and, 
finally  more  talented  executive  and  profes- 
sional management  and  service  may  be 
secured.  No  system  rises  to  greater  im- 
portance than  its  directing  center.  In 
this  field  the  state  library,  call  it  what 
you  will,  has  two  indispensable  functions  : 
it  must  be  the  leader  in  matters  pertain- 
ing to  the  sei'vice  throughout  the  state, 
.giving  advice  and  encouragement,  iwint- 
ing  the  way ;  and  it  must  provide  a  great 
wealth  of  books  and  infonnation  of  a 
kind  so  infrequently  needed  by  any  except 
the  largest  units  as  to  make  local  pui-- 
chase  economically  indefensible,  yet  of 
such  great  importance  to  the  citizens  of 
the  state  as  to  make  its  lack  a  cultural 
crime. 

The  large  city,  with  its  center  and  its 
branches,  is  a  thing  sufficient  unto  itself. 


Under  the  plan  I  have  in  mind,  however, 
the  large  local  system  no  longer  stays 
within  its  Chinese  wall.  It  may  not 
infrequently  secure  books  from  the  state 
center,  and  also  advice,  but  it  links  itself 
up  with  the  greater  organization  so  that, 
by  interlending  and  interborrowing,  it 
both  gives  and  receives.  Are  you  famil- 
iar with  the  network  of  high  power  wires 
which  bring  the  current  from  the  moun- 
tains to  places  of  useV  Sometimes  when 
accident  interrupts  the  direct  line  the 
lights  are  only  momentarily  out ;  the  cur- 
rent is  sent  forward  over  other  channels. 
The  larger  libraries  may  not  only  benefit 
in  case  of  accident,  but  by  friendly  coop- 
eration in  a  great  organization  may  give 
and  receive  constantly.  A  book  long 
uuused  is  a  waste  of  capital. 

It  is  in  the  case  of  the  smaller  towns 
and  cities  and  especially  of  the  country 
people  that  the  greatest  opportunity  lies. 
Here  without  system,  sei'vice  will  not 
be  given,  or  if  given  will  be  secured  at 
an  unwan-anted  expense.  If  anything 
worth  while  is  to  be  accomplished  we 
must  forget  village  boundaries;  and  the 
unit  becomes  county  wide,  or  bicounty 
wide,  or  any  other  greater  area  up  to 
the  point  where  we  accumulate  a  tax  roll 
sufficient  to  produce,  at  an  easily  to  be 
borne  rate,  a  fund  to  give  us  trained  per- 
sonnel and  sufficient  books,  et  cetera,  of 
the  character  our  service  will  use  more  or 
less  constantly.  If  my  experience  were 
consulted  I  would  put  this  larger  unit 
under  the  general  supervision  of  the  le- 
gally constituted  authority  already 
charged  with  the  administration  of  the 
area.  In  the  case  of  a  bi-  or  tricounty 
scheme,  naturally,  suitable  arrangement 
would  be  made  to  prevent  double  or  triple 
headedness.  Other  librarians  may  advise 
otherwise :  I  merely  speak  from  a  knowl- 
edge gained  in  practice  stretching  over 
two  decades. 

Important  as  funds  and  boards  are — • 
without  the  former  it  is  stalemate  at  the 
beginning  of  the  game — I  would  be  even 
more  insistent  for  a  plan  which  would  ex- 
elude  from  executive  and  professional 
positions  all  persons  who  had  only  made 
preparation  for  the  service,  and  had  not 
also,  previous  to  appointment,  not  after, 
demonstrated  their  fitness  by  suitable 
tests  and  examinations.  Doctors  and  law- 
yers and  teachers  and  plumbers  and  bar- 


vol.  25,  no.  2]    a  modern  library  for  a  modern  world 


133 


bers  should  not  be  the  only  persons  re- 
quired to  show  cause  why  they  may  prac- 
tice their  arts.  This  properly  trained 
and  experienced  individual,  with  a  com- 
Ijetent  supiwrting  staff,  will  assure  the 
success  of  the  library  as  an  instrument  of 
service  to  the  people  fully  meriting  the 
expense  required  in  its  suppoi't. 

Then  there  is  the  phase  of  the  work 
relating  to  service  to  elementai-y  schools 
especially.  Large  high  schools  and  city 
elementary  school  systems  have  it  in  their 
power  to  provide  all  the  books  required 
in  a  supplementary  and  inspirational  ca- 
pacity but  the  small  high  school  and  the 
one-  or  two-teacher  school  in  small  towns 
and  in  the  countrj'  are  greatly  handi- 
capi>ed  for  books  of  the  right  kind.  Most 
school  libraries  in  such  localities,  out  of 
touch  with  professional  librarians,  are 
all  but  useless.  The  attention  of  the 
school  authorities  is  directed  to  the  imme- 
diate task  of  teaching,  and  as  a  conse- 
quence the  library  is  bad,  worse,  or  impos- 
sible. By  forming  contact  with  the  sys- 
tem designed  to  provide  books  for  the 
public,  the  smaller  schools  gain  a  kind 
and  quality  of  seiwice  which  is  otherwise 
impossible  to  be  had  except  at  an  unwar- 
ranted expense.  And  under  this  plan, 
which  has  been  definitely  proven  during 
the  past  twenty  years,  the  pupils  not 
only  receive  the  immediate  help  and  in- 
spiration so  stimulating  in  the  classroom 
but  they  also  form  a  contact  with  the  li- 
brary to  be  earned  over  into  the  post 
text  book  period  of  their  lives.     In  states 


where  the  system  is  in  working  order 
teachers  are  sufficiently  impressed  with 
the  advantages  of  this  librai-y  contact  as 
to  be  willing  to  accept  less  salary  with 
it  rather  than  more  without  it. 

Finally,  full  recognition  has  not  yet 
been  given  to  the  library  which  meets  the 
complete  needs  of  evei-yone  whether  he 
live  in  town  or  country  as  an  instrument 
in  the  work  jwpularly  spoken  of  as  adult 
education.  Xo  other  agency  can  so  read- 
ily and  satisfactoi-ily  be  employed  by  the 
average  citizen  to  give  him  the  informa- 
tion necessary  to  sane  living  in  this  mod- 
ern world,  and  to  inspire  him  to  keep  on 
learning  while  his  faculties  are  normal. 
With  better  teaching,  with  teaching  di- 
rected toward  that  after  school  period, 
the  future  product  of  school  and  college 
will  not  thank  God  on  commencement  day 
that  his  education  is  finished,  but  will 
then  enter  uix>n  the  most  joyous  part  of 
his  learning  program.  He  will  find  that 
it  does  not  pay  to  let  his  mind  grow 
rusty,  and  he  will  get  the  fun  out  of  men- 
tal exercise  that  golf  now  affords  him  as 
a  means  of  insuring  a  sound  healthy  body. 
Here  perhaps  is  the  field  in  which  li- 
brarians can  find  some  of  their  greatest 
satisfaction.  To  reap  the  hai-vest  before 
us,  however,  we  must  establish  a  library 
system  which  is  modern  in  the  sense  that 
our  adding  machines,  our  automobiles, 
oiir  business  organizations  are  modern, 
adjusted  to  the  needs  of  a  new  and  compli- 
cated age. 


334 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


WHAT  ARE  SOME  OF  THE  BENEFITS  AND  OBSTACLES 
TO  BE  MET  IN  STRIVING  FOR  PROFESSIONAL 
ADVANCEMENT?* 

By  Emily  'W.  Kemp^  Principal  Attendant,  Adult  Education  Department,  Los  Angeles 

Public    Library 


When  I  was  asked  to  take  part  in  this 
program  on  Professional  Advancement,  my 
heart  sank  within  me ;  I  thought  such 
a  thing  was  impossible.  Then  I  remem- 
bered Uncle  Mose,  an  old  colored  man 
from  Texas,  and  could  sympathize  with 
him.  He  came  to  town  after  cotton  pick- 
ing season  looking  for  work.  The  employ- 
ment agent  said,  "Well,  there's  a  job 
open  at  the  Eagle  Laundry;  want  it?" 
The  old  man  shifted  uneasily  from  one 
foot  to  the  other.  "Eagle  Laundry — ya 
say?  Yes  sah  Boss,  I'll  tackle  it,  but 
de  fact  is — I  ain't  nevah  washed  no 
eagles."  We  can't  accomplish  anything 
without  making  the  effort. 

In  library  work,  I  believe  we  realize 
more  than  in  any  other  vocation  that  edu- 
cation is  a  way  of  life  and  can  never  be 
finished. 

There  is  probably  not  another  place  in 
the  world  which  has  more  opportunities 
to  offer  for  advancement  than  California. 
With  all  the  art  galleries!,  museums, 
theatres,  lectures,  schools  and  libraries, 
there  should  be  no  excuse  for  lack  of  edu- 
cation or  progress.  However,  with  li- 
brarians there  are  two  obstacles  to  be 
met — lack  of  time  and  lack  of  money. 
Lack  of  time  causes  many  difficulties  in 
our  effoz-ts  for  advancement,  making  it 
a  problem  for  us  to  arrange  a  well-bal- 
anced, self-improvement  program.  If  too 
many  educational  courses  are  indulged  in, 
other  important  requisites  have  to  be 
neglected.  It  would  be  beneficial  to  have 
a  leave  of  absence  now  and  then  for  ad- 
vanced study  and  travel,  but  again  those 
two  obstacles  confront  us.  We  have 
neither  the  time  nor  the  means.  It  would 
be  so  nice  to  have  more  time  for  con- 
templation, more  time  to  develop  talents. 
It  would  be  especially  desirable  to  have 
leisure  for  productive  work  and  profes- 
sional writing.  Some  of  the  library  schools 
are  taking  much  interest  in  this  thought 
and  are  asking  their  alumnae  for  articles. 


or  books,  which  they  may  have  published. 
The  publications  are  to  be  placed  in  the 
archives  of  the  various  library  schools. 
If  there  were  more  time  for  this  sort  of 
thing,  many  buried  literary  lights  would 
be  coming  out  from  under  that  proverbial 
bushel. 

If  we  had  more  time  it  would  be  bene- 
ficial to  attend  the  A.  L.  A.  meetings, 
conference  and  institutes,  where  better 
acquaintance  is  made  with  those  engaged 
in  the  same  work,  where  discussions  are 
held  and  new  ideas  and  methods  are  ex- 
changed. Then  there  is  the  time,  which 
we  all  long  for,  when  we  can  sit  down 
quietly  and  read  the  A.  L.  A.  Bulletins, 
the  Library  Journals,  and  the  fascinating 
handbooks  and  surveys  on  Adult  Educa- 
tion ! 

Thei'e  is  the  obstacle,  also,  of  too 
much  routine  work  and  having  to  give 
rapid  fire  answers  to  the  hundreds  of 
questions  asked  us  every  day,  which  is 
apt  to  make  us  nan-ow,  bigoted  and  in- 
clined to  be  mechanical.  Too  much 
mechanism   weakens   personality. 

Saturday  night  comes  around,  and  after 
a  strenuous  week  of  the  usual  routine 
of  librai-y  duties  and  outside  obligations 
(such  as  reading,  attending  lectures  and 
classes)  and  we  have  seen,  heard,  smelled, 
tasted  and  touched  hundreds  of  volumes, 
someone  suggests  going  to  hear  a  delight- 
ful lecture  on  BOOKS.  You  feel  exactly 
like  the  old  colored  mammy  who  went 
to  Europe  mth  a  southern  family,  and 
who,  upon  being  urged  to  enter  the 
sculpture  room  of  a  famous  art  gallery, 
exclaimed,  "I  done  washed  and  dressed 
and  nursed  all  you  chillun  since  you  was 
bom  and  de  Lord  knows  looking  at  all 
dem  naked  folks  ain't  no  recreation  fer 
me!" 

From  our  own  dear  public  we  are 
taught  many  things.  Every  day  we 
learn  from  them  something  of  the  sub- 
ject matter  they  have  come  in  to  inquire 


*  Read  at  the  meeting  of   the   Sixth  District,   California  Library   Association,    San 
Diego,   February   1,    1930. 


vol.  25,  no.  2]    striving  for  professional  advancement 


135 


of  us.  It  is  a  matter  of  give  and  take 
all  day  long. 

We  learn  that  there  are  many  kinds  of 
dispositions  to  cope  with,  and  dealing  with 
them  teaches  us,  first  of  all,  humility,  to 
use  better  judgment,  to  accept  criticism 
and  to  profit  by  it,  as  in  the  case  of  the 
arrogant  woman  who  sailed  up  to  the 
desk  and  demanded  books  on  the  (frigate) 
Constitution  !  The  attendant  said  in  her 
kindest  and  meekest  voice;  "The  books 
on  the  constitution  will  be  found  in  the 
Sociology  Department."  In  about  five 
minutes  the  woman  was  swooping  down 
again.  "I  said,  the  FRIGATE  CONSTI- 
TUTION!" The  little  timid  attendant 
thought  of  the  wise  words  of  King  Solo- 
mon, "He  who  keepeth  his  mouth  and 
his  tongue,  keepeth  his  soul  from  trouble." 
"Oh,  I'm  sorry,  I  didn't  understand. 
You'll  find  that  in  the  History  Depart- 
ment." Thus  the  assistant  learned  about 
constitutions  from  her. 

But  library  work  is  not  all  drudgery ; 
there  is  a  bright  side  from  which  we  gain 
much  pleasure,  profit  and  amusement. 
Our  readers  teach  us  poise,  self-control, 
to  pay  attention  to  details,  and  tO'  speak 
distinctly.  One  day  a  young  man  stopped 
at  the  desk  and  said,  "Could  you  tell  me 
where  the  Po-try  Department  is?" 

"Poetry?"   asked  the  attendant. 

"Po-try,"  replied  the  man. 

"Poulti-y?" 

"Po-try." 

"Poetry?" 

"Po-try,  well — what  I  want  is — RAB- 
BITS !" 

Then  there  was  the  girl  who  asked  for 
material  on  The  Four  Strangers,  and 
after  a  fruitless  search,  the  attendant  dis- 
covered she  wanted  information  concern- 
ing the  "forest  rangers." 

An  old  gentleman  asked  for  a  book 
which  was  in  the  Philosophy  Department. 
The  assistant  said,  "You'll  find  that  book 
in  the  Philosophy  and  Religion  Depart- 
ment."    Seeing  that  the  old  man  looked 


confused,  she  said,  "In  the  Philosophy  and 
Religion  Department,  on  the  first  floor, 
down  this  hall  and  down  the  steps  and 
then  to  the  right." 

"How's  that?"  said  the  old  man  hold- 
ing his  hand  to  his  ear. 

"I  say,  the  book  will  be  found  in  the 
Philosophy  and  Religion  Department,  on 
the  first  floor." 

"What  say?"  yelled  the  old  man. 

This  time  the  attendant  took  a  pencil 
and  wrote  out  full  directions  on  a  piece 
of  paper  and  smilingly  handed  it  over 
to  the  old  gentleman.  He  took  it,  looked 
at  it  a  minute,  fumbled  in  his  pockets, 
and  then  handed  it  back.  "You'll  have 
to  read  it  to  me,  I  left  my  specks  at 
home."  This  day  a  lesson  in  patience 
was  learned. 

We  learn  to  be  broad  minded,  and  not 
to  be  sensitive.  When  some  one  ap- 
proaches you  and  asks  "Have  you  Brains 
and  Personality?"  they're  not  being  per- 
sonal at  all,  they  simply  want  a  book  by 
William  H.  Thomson. 

Our  patrons  teach  us  to  be  a  little 
kinder  and  more  sympathetic  and  to  get 
the  reader's  point  of  view.  "Now  dear," 
said  an  old  English  lady  one  day,  "I 
want  two  things ;  one  is  to  find  out  about 
noted  men,  and  the  other  is  potatoes. 
Shall  I  find  them  together?"  The  next 
person  jazzed  up  to  the  desk,  stopped 
chewing  her  gum  for  the  moment,  and 
said,  "Say,  have  ya  got  that  new  book  by 
Sir  James  Jeans  called  The  Universal 
Rounders?"  (meaning  of  course,  the  Uni- 
verse Around  Us) . 

And  so  on,  FAR  INTO  THE  NIGHT— 

By  these  contacts  with  thousands  of 
characteristics,  eccentricities,  moods  and 
manners,  we  reap  much  benefit,  and  as 
the  Cheerful  Cherub  says, 

"Our  r'oad  through  life  is  rough  at 
times, 
With  hills  that  dip  and  rise. 

But  all  this  helps  our  CHARACTER, 
It  NEEDS  the  exercise." 


136 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


PICTURE  COLLECTION  SURVEY* 

By  Bertha  S.  Taylor,  Prints  Department,  California  State  Library 


In  order  that  the  State  Librai^y  might 
have  on  file  infoiination  concerning  the 
methods  of  California  libraries  in  han- 
dling picture  collections,  a  questionnaire 
was  sent  out  in  October,  1929.  By  Feb- 
ruary, 95  answers  had  been  received  re- 
porting 60  collections,  from  small  begin- 
nings to  those  of  many  thousands.  The 
idea,  while  not  new,  seems  to  begin  to 
be  considered  an  essential  part  of  li- 
brary service  for  many  are  just  starting 
and  asking  for  infonnation  to  assist  them 
or  repoil  "We  do  not  have  but  should 
have  a  picture  collection." 

Of  the  60  collections  reported  the  ten 
outstanding  in  point  of  size  are,  in  the 
order  named :  Los  Angeles  Public  Li- 
brary, Oakland,  Pasadena,  Santa  Barbara, 
Long  Beach,  Richmond,  Contra  Costa 
County,  Fresno  County,  Berkeley  and 
Pomona. 

Nearly  all  collections  report  an  art 
section  with  color  reproductions  of  famous 
paintings — some  are  exclusively  this^ — 
and  15  include  original  etchings,  engrav- 
ings or  paintings.  For  the  rest  of  the 
collection — ±7  report  stereographs,  46 
clippings,  38  posters,  37  postal  cards,  36 
photographs,  11  slides  and  10  films.  Two 
county  libraries.  Contra  Costa  and  Mon- 
terey, include  all  of  these  types.  The 
sources  of  this  material  are  about  equally 
divided  between  clippings  from  periodi- 
cals, discarded  books  and  advertising  mat- 
ter ;   purchases  and  gifts. 

Fifty-one  report  the  use  of  mounts 
of  various  sizes  and  nine  of  these  also 
use  mats  for  part  of  the  collection.  As 
to  sizes  of  mounts  used,  three  did  not 
report  and  of  the  other  48  the  varieties 
of  size  seemed  to  approach  the  mystic 
number  57  as  more  than  37  sizes  were 
listed  and  a  generous  sprinkling  of  state- 
ments "and  other  sizes  as  needed."  One, 
two,  three,  four  and  more  sizes  were 
used  in  the  same  collection,  those  most 
often  reported  being  8x11,  9x11,  9x12, 
10x12,  10x13  and  11x14.  Other  sizes 
ranged'  from  5fx8J  to  16x20. 

The  filing  devices  are  almost  as  diverse 
as  the  mounting,  vertical  files  leading  with 
42  cases,  23  used  drawers  and  the  same 
number  envelopes  (in  many  instances  the 
envelopes   are   used   in   combination   with 


the  vertical  file),  16  use  portfolios,  15 
boxes,  6  bins,  2  shelves,  1  wall  rack  and 
1  fiexifile  on  a  table.  A  number  report 
looking  forward  to  the  purchase  of  verti- 
cal files  as  soon  as  funds  permit. 

The  arrangement  of  the  pictures  is  in 
the  majority  of  cases  by  subject,  42  so 
reporting — about  half  of  these  being  ex- 
clusively so,  while  the  other  half  combine 
with  other  ai'rangement ;  22  arrange  by 
artists,  19  by  countries,  5  by  schools  and 
4  each  by  form  and  by  class  number, 
and  1  by  period.  One  arranges  by  the 
school  grade  for  which  the  picture  is 
suited.  Most  were  evidently  a  combina- 
tion of  main  subject  heading  and  subhead. 
One  library  follows  as  completely  as 
possible  the  Newark  system  as  outlined 
in  the  American  Library  Economy  pamph- 
let "The  Picture  Collection"  by  John  Cot- 
ton Dana,  and  13  others  use  it  partially. 
Five  use  the  A.  L.  A.  list  of  subject  head- 
ings and  one  the  L.  C.  list. 

Only  33  reported  any  cataloging  aside 
from  subject  lists.  Of  these,  5  file  the 
cards  in  the  main  catalog  and  19  sepa- 
rately— where  the  others  board  does  not 
appear.  Several  with  separate  catalogs 
have  reference  cards  in  the  main  catalog 
and  one  with  no  catalog  has  reference 
cards  in  the  main  catalog. 

Forty-thi'ee  report  that  the  public  is 
allowed  full  acce.ss  to  the  picture  files 
while  15  are  closed  to  the  public.  Nine 
report  that  they  loan  to  schools  only, 
while  50  serve  the  general  public  also. 
Seven  loan  their  framed  pictures  tO'  the 
public  while  14  loan  them  to  schools  and 
branches  only.  In  4  the  original  etchings, 
engravings  or  paintings  are  loaned  but 
in  7  they  do  not  leave  the  library.  Of 
the  23  i-eporting  framed  pictures,  13  (all 
county  libraries  but  one)  use  frames  with 
removable  backs,  for  school  or  branches 
only. 

The  number  of  pictures  loaned  at  one 
time  varies  but  tends  to  be  "any  reason- 
able number"  and  the  time  kept  also 
varies  but  tends  to  be  the  "same  as  for 
books."  Among  the  group  of  largest  col- 
lections the  percentage  of  circulation  in 
comparison  to  the  size  of  the  collection 
varies  widely.  The  third  largest  collec- 
tion has  the  lowiest  percentage  while  the 


*  Read    at    meeting 
April  5,   1930. 


of    First    District,    California    Librarj^    Association,    Alameda, 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


PICTURE    COLLECTION    SURVEY 


137 


highest     percentage     is     found     in     the 
eleventh  in  point  of  size — 280  per  cent. 

Collech  Ciroula-  Per 

Hon  tion  cent 

Los  Angeles  Public  555,000  117,000  21 

Oakland    100  55  55 

Pasadena 92  6i       7 

Santa    Barbara—           64  14  22 

Long   Beach 38  27  71 

Richmond 34  34  100 

Contra  Costa  Co._           25  3  12 

Fresno  Co 20  4  20 

Berkeley   18  12  70 

Pomona 16  21  141 

Redlands 10  28  280 

Twenty-one  report  a  special  member  of 
the  staff,  other  than  the  librarian,  in 
charge.     Three  of  the  ten  largest  do  not. 

The  questionnaire  failed  to  bring  out 
the  manner  of  handling  the  pictures  in 
circulation — what  sort  of  containers  or 
protectors  are  used  for  can-ying  them. 
Some  I  know  use  envelopes.  One  library, 
Richmond,  uses  two  pieces  of  corrugated 
pasteboard  slightly  larger  than  their 
mounts.  One  piece  has  a  date  due  slip  at- 
tached and  the  other  has  a  tape  threaded 
through  two  slits  by  which  the  whole 
bundle  is  securely  tied.  This  makes  a 
strong,    light   and    inexpensive   container. 

The  factors  hindering  the  development 
of  this  type  of  service  seem  to  be  the 
cosmic  ones  of  time  and  space,  although 
these  resolve  themselves  into  the  mun- 
dane problem  of  money.  Almost  all  of 
the  collections  seem  to  have  "just  growed," 
like  Topsy,  and  with  the  increasing  use 
are  feeling  acutely  the  pinch  of  lack  of 
room  and  filing  facilities.  That  more 
uniform  and  efficient  methods  will  help 
conserve  both  time  and  space  is  indicated 
by  the  reports  of  those  having  the  largest 
circulations  also  showing  the  simplest 
and  most  unifonn  mounting  and  filing. 

Several  other  questions  arise  after 
studying  the.se  statistics.  Does  the  use 
of  the  pictures  in  the  various  classes 
stimulate  the  use  of  the  books  and  periodi- 
cals in  their  class,  or  does  the  use  of  books 
and  periodicals  lead  to  calls  for  pictures? 
Is  an  effort  made  to  balance  them? 
Also,  is  any  special  effort  made  for  pub- 
licity for  this  service?  Recently  Tulare 
County  Librai-y  featured  its  collection  in 
a  window  display  and  included  several 
fine  color  prints  from  the  State  Librai-y 
to  show  the  extension  of  the  service  from 
that  source. 

No  one  reported  the  use  of  frames  with 
removable    backs,    either   individually    or 


library  owned,  for  home  use  with  fine 
reproductions  or  originals.  Fairly  good 
color  reproductions  of  good  .size  may  be 
bought  for  less  than  the  price  of  a  book 
of  current  fiction  and  vei-y  fine  ones  or 
even  oi'iginals  for  no  more  than  the  cost 
of  many  nonfiction  books  that  circulate. 
Who  shall  measure  the  effect  of  a  month's 
enjoyment  of  a  fine  picture  or  say  that 
it  is  less  important  than  that  from  a 
book?  With  all  the  current  emphasis  on 
art  appreciation  we  are  apt  to  forget  that 
appreciation  is  not  an  intellectual  thing 
to  be  learned  from  a  book  but  a  matter  of 
seeing  and  enjoying  the  picture  and  form- 
ing judgments  for  one's  self.  Outside  of 
the  larger  cities,  how  much  opportunity 
for  this  has  your  average  patron?  With 
all  our  artist  colonies  and  art  societies, 
what  is  to  hinder  the  trying  out  of  some 
such  plan  as  is  being  used  in  Orange 
County  schools  through  the  P.  T.  A.  and 
the  Laguna  Beach  artists,  and  in  Port- 
land through  the  Portland  Library  Asso- 
ciation and  the  Society  of  Oregon  Artists 
as  told  by  Miss  Mulheron  in  the  May, 
1929,  Lihrary  Journal? 

A  recent  letter  in  the  Safety  Valve  of 
the  San  Francisco  Chronicle  suggests 
such  a  department  for  libraries,  giving 
the  credit  for  this  brand  new  idea  to 
D.  H.  Lawrence — referring  to  his  article 
in  the  December,  1929,  Vanity  Fair.  It 
is  a  good  article  and  a  good  idea  even  if 
not  brand  new,  a  "pictuary."  One  library, 
having  a  large  circulation  with  children 
outside  of  their  school  work,  reports  many 
children  asking  for  "pictures"  which  usu- 
ally means  pictures  of  animals,  birds  or 
fairy  stories.  They  take  two  or  three 
dozen  just  as  they  would  a  book.  Why 
could  not  this  be  worked  up  tO'  help  solve 
the  problem  of  the  dull  child  just  now  to 
the  fore,  as  well  as  being  an  introduction 
of  the  preschool  child  to  the  use  of  the  li- 
brary? After  all,  pictures  come  before 
printing  in  the  child's  development  as  well 
as  in  the  histoiy  of  printing  and  a  pic- 
ture can  tell  many  things  a  child's  read- 
ing vocabulary  can  not  yet  cover,  as  well 
as  stimulate  his  desire  to  read. 

For  hospital  seiwice  or  the  home  in- 
valid, when  even  a  small  book  is  too 
heavy  to  hold  or  too  long  to  read,  inter- 
esting pictures  mounted  with  some  de- 
scriptive print  should  be  a  boon.  In  fact, 
I  feel  that  the  surface  has  no  more  than 
been  scratched  in  the  field  of  possibilities 
open  to  the  picture  collection  in  the  li- 
brary. 


138 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA,  SHOWING  COUNTIES 


^trf/tucfe  tf  Ui^t  Cot/ 

^f  '"''S/weVDeLNoKTE; 


^t /ifcinillJ,  Xl.    5*N  FSWCISOI 


SS-M.  _ 
it»r  Oicrftsnn,  S  C. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


LIST   OF    COUNTT   FREE   LIBRARIES 


139 


LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARIES 
Statistics  of  July  1,  1929 


County 

Librarian 

Established 

Income, 
1928-291 

Books,  etc. 

Branches 

Total 
active 
school 
dists. 
in 
county 2 

Active 
school 
oists. 
that 
have 
joined 

Sept.  26,  1910 
June    2, 1919 
Sept.   3,1913 
June    8, 1915 
July  21,  1913 
Mar.  12,  1910 
April  8,  1914 
May  12,  1914 
Feb.     6,  1912 
Sept.  15,  1913 
Nov.  16,  1910 
June    4,  1912 
Sept.   7,  1915 
Sept.   5,1912 
May    3,  1910 
Aug.    3,1926 
Oct.     4,  1926 
June    6, 1910 
July     8,1915 
Aug.    6,1912 
Feb.     9,  1916 
Dec.    9,  1919 
Sept.    7,  1915 
Nov.    8,  1911 
Oct.     1,  1908 
Feb.    4,  1918 
July  14,  1913 
April  5,1912 

860,021  00 
7,092  36 
18,553  09 
12,407  50 
62,954  14 

148,400  66 

17.844  68 
18,757  59 
21,168  96 
10,057  34 

129,651  01 
27,351  63 
14,846  97 

206,943  01 
26,682  64 
15,606  00 
3,616  77 
40,068  76 
4,755  00 
25,150  00 
10,200  00 
30,546  24 
13,202  78 
16,747  50 
46,749  26 
10,213  77 
44,925  04 

40.845  95 

170,155 

23,371 

78,833 

a.  59,860 

202,443 

466,017 

63,318 
112,663 

92,042 

32,785 
280,282 
132,864 

53,846 
588,630 
102,814 
8,833 
5,227 
146,405 

19,844 
100,177 

34,128 
110,826 

46,535 

0 

112,281 

45,559 
122,483 
107,731 

95 
39 
89 
44 

109 

241 
51 

152 
63 
40 

190 
57 
64 

264 
70 
56 
32 
84 
37 

126 
80 
65 
83 
91 

117 
76 

135 

150 

53 
32 
64 
32 
64 

171 
42 

109 
55 
29 

103 
42 
36 

149 
51 
48 
27 
69 
42 
98 
49 
56 
28 
79 
84 
37 
74 

120 

37 

Amador 

Mrs  Henrietta  G.  Eudey.- 

27 

Butte 

56 

Colusa 

Contra  Costa 

Mrs  EUa  P.  Morse 

Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck  .. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle 

Mrs  Faye  K.  RusseU 

Edna  D.  Davis 

27 
58 
156 

Glenn 

36 
100 

Dorothy  Deming 

50 

28 

Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock 

*Mrs  Harriet  S.  Davids... 

Lenala  A.  Martin 

Helen  E.  Vogleson 

Blanche  Galloway 

98 

38 

35 

Los  Angeles 

108 
49 

36 

Mariposa 

Minette  L.  Stoddard 

Minette  L.  Stoddard 

Anna  L.  Williams 

Ellen  B.  Frink 

25 

58 

Modoc 

32 
89 

Estella  DeFord 

47 

Margaret  Livingston 

Katherine  R.  Woods 

Chas.  F.  Woods 

37 

28 

43 

Sacramento...!.. 

San  Benito 

San  Bernardino .. 
San  DiegO- 

Cornelia  D.  Provines 

Mrs  Florence  W.  Townsend 

Caroline  S.  Waters 

Eleanor  Hitt. 

69 
37 
65 
104 

Ida  E.  Condit 

Mar.    7,  1910 
July     6,  1915 
Sept.   5,  1912 
Feb.  16,  1910 
July  20,  1912 
Oct.   13,  1916 
Aug.    2,  1926 
June    7, 1915 
AprU  6,  1914 
Aug.  14,  1911 
May    9,  1917 
Aug.    8,1916 
Sept.    8,  1916 
June  10,  1910 
July     3,1917 
April  9,  1915 
July  12,  1910 

31,611  13 
16,344  15 
22,162  00 
26,640  00 
31,674  22 

9,322  88 

2,529  01 
13,155  71 
26,828  50 
29,826  97 
14,761  93 
12,102  36 

4,620  00 
62,180  75 

8,479  53 
45,270  65 
23,795  77 

0 

49,922 

a.  204,677 

0 

155,083 

0 

1,023 

82,660 

99,828 

109,535 

53,127 

51,435 

20,274 

165,285 

30,705 

122,963 

127,083 

154 
95 
65 
97 
91 
89 
11 

148 
60 
67 
44 
71 
48 

146 
51 
92 
65 

92 
90 
41 
66 
81 
54 
11 
85 
50 
68 
37 
54 
25 
129 
29 
57 
47 

77 

81 

San  Mateo 

Santa  Barbara ..- 

Santa  Clara 

Santa  Cruz 

Sierra 

tMrs  Edna  H.  Yelland... 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Mrs  Elizabeth  Singletary. 
Minerva  H.  Waterman.. . 
Katherine  R.  Woods 

28 
60 
74 
52 

7 

82 

Solano 

Clara  B.  Dills 

42 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn 

Frances  M.  Burket 

Anne  Bell  Bailey 

MrsLilaD.  Adams 

Gretchen  Flower 

Mrs  Helen  R.  Dambacher 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping 

Nancy  C.  Laugenour 

45 
37 

Tehama  . 

49 

Trinity 

25 

Tulare  . 

102 

Tuolumne 

25 
53 

Yolo- 

41 

46 

0  l,'08-O  4,'26 

$1,466,665  21 

a.  4,593,552 

4,094 

2,859 

2,453 

'  The  income  as  given  does  not  include  balance  in  fund,  July  1,  1928 
2  Includes  elementary  and  high. 

'  San  Francisco  city  and  county  are  coterminous.    The  city  library  therefore  covers  the  entire  county.    For  statistics 
see  under ' 'Public  Libraries,  etc."  next  page 
*  Began  work  February  1,  1930. 
t  Resigned  March  31,  1930. 


140 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


PUBLIC  LIBRARIES  OF  20,000  BOOKS,  ETC.,  AND  OVER 


City 


Alameda 

ALhambra 

Berkeley 

El  Centre 

Fullerton 

Glendale 

Huntington  Beach 

Long  Beach 

Los  Angeles 

Modesto 

Oakland 

Orange 

Oxnard 

Palo  Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San  Bernardino.  - 

San  Diego 

San  Francisco 

San  Jose 

San  Mateo 

Santa  Ana 

Santa  Barbara 

Santa  Cruz 

Santa  Monica 

Santa  Paula 

Santa  Rosa 

South  Pasadena.-. 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Whittier 


Librarian 


Jane  I.  Curtis 

Marian  P.  Greene 

Susan  T.  Smith 

Agnes  F.  Ferris 

Gertruae  De  Gelder 

Mrs  Alma  J.  Danford 

Mrs  Bertha  P.  Reynolds. 
Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt 

Everett  R.  Perry 

Bessie  B.  Silverthorn 

John  B.  Kaiser 

Mrs  Mabel  F.  FaiUkner.. 

Ethel  Carroll-. 

Anne  Hadden 

Jeannette  M.  Drake 

Sarah  M.  Jacobus 

Mabel  Inness 

Norah  McNeill 

Chas.  F.  Woods 

W.  F.  PurneU.- — 

May  Coddington 

Cornelia  D.  Plaister 

Robert  Rea.-- 

Mrs  Edith  Daley.- 

Inez  M.  Crawford 

Jeannette  E.  McFadden-- 

Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn 

Minerva  H.  Waterman... 

Elfie  A.  Mosse 

Mrs  Gladys  B.  Kennedy  _ 

Margaret  A.  Barnett 

Mrs  Nellie  E.  Keith 

IdaE.  Condit 

L.  Gertrude  Doyle 

Ruth  Ellis.. 


Established 


1877; 

1893; 
1907: 
1906; 
1906; 

1895 
1872 
1905 
1868 
1885 

1896 
1882 
1887 
1893 
1907 
1899 
1857 


1874: 
1884i 


1886; 


1869; 
1889; 


1883; 


as  F.  P. 

1906 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 

1909 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 

1906 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 

1891 

1882 

1878 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 

1891 

1882 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 

1907 
as  F.  P. 
as  F.  P. 

1880 
as  F.  P. 

1900 


1879 

1895 
1909 
1907 
1907 

1901 
1891 
1907 
1878 
1894 

1902 
1890 
1902 
1894 
1909 
1907 
1879 


1880 
1899 


1881 
1890 


1884 
1895 


1884 


Income, 
1928-29 


S40,922  87 
35,675  28 
92,756  33 
12,558  57 
a.  15,438  67 
64,519  84 
19,288  81 

160,949  55 

1,420,307  96 

19,812  7] 

252,581  97 
12,155  11 
10,458  87 
29,432  03 

167,391  23 
37,364  25 
32,485  28 
38,732  51 
60,425  86 
49,646  40 
25,000  00 

108,868  52 

324,619  85 
27,135  66 
17,861  20 
29,685  70 
57,073  34 
18,409  78 
37,879  75 
12,243  45 
12,171  25 
18,127  00 
48,718  ?9 
15,825  00 
24,608  75 


Books, 
etc. 


88,917 
34,643 

148,107 
27,853 
a.  23,626 
74,359 
21,181 

124,299 

1,214,030 

29,943 

382,755 
23,025 
42,266 
33,580 

146,772 
99,327 
82,428 
91,592 

134,782 

127,392 
37,889 

164,688 

475,744 
39,172 
23,089 
53,580 

111,618 
77,734 
59,473 
23,834 
33,106 
33,191 

174,911 
29,321 
26,430 


10,319 
18,218 
40,795 

5,268 

a.  6,548 

38,893 

4,438 
46,537 
300,951 

8,063 
61,406 
113,976 

4,612 
11,954 
59,026 
12,485 

9,706 
11,165 
10,561 
24,781 

8,044 
61,487 
119,333 
10,693 

5,901 
11,165 
24,885 

6,448 
14,950 

4,560 

6,940 


10,617 
6,539 
6,833 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


141 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY  NEWS   ITEMS 

Only  those  California  libraries  are  listed  for  which  there  were  news  items.     For 
complete  list  of  libraries,  see  Annual  Statistics  Number,  October,  1929. 


CALIFORNIA 

Area,  158,297  sq.  miles. 

Second  in  size  among  the  states. 

Population,  3,426,536. 

Assessed  valuation,  $9,885,903,184. 

Number  of  counties,  58. 

ALAMEDA  COUNTY 

(Third  class) 
County  seat,  Oakland. 
Area,  840  sq.  mi.     Pop.  344,127. 
Assessed  valuation,  $572,875,533   (tax- 
able for  county  $489,009,612). 

Alameda  Co.  Free  Library,  Oak- 
land.     Miss   Mary    Barmby,    Lib'n. 

An  all  day  meeting  of  the  branch  li- 
brarians was  held  at  the  m;ain  office,  8^9 
Harrison  street,  Oakland,  on  February 
26,  1930.  Ten  o'clock  was  the  hour  set 
for  the  opening  of  the  meeting.  Twenty- 
seven  branch  librarians  were  in  attend- 
ance besides  the  seven  members  of  the 
office  staff.  A  picnic  lunch  was  held  in 
the  school  room  at  noon.  Mrs  Holman, 
Home  Demonstration  Agent,  spoke  at 
the  morning  session.  She  told  of  her 
work  in  the  county  and  its  connection 
with  the  County  Library,  also  about  the 
coming  Better  Homes  Week  in  which  the 
branch  librarians  expect  to  cooperate  with 
her  in  miaking  it  a  big  success.  Mrs 
Creelman,  librarian  of  the  Hayward  Li- 
brary, told  how  she  arranged  her  books 
on  a  table  to  make  them  attractive  to 
her  patrons.  The  afternoon  was  spent  in 
reports  from  each  of  the  librarians  as  to 
her  library  work  in  her  community.  Li- 
brary gardens  were  discussed.  It  was 
decided  to  make  them  a  spring  ac-tivity 
and  to  have  the  librai'y  gardens  as  attrac- 
tive this  spring  as  possible.  Each  member 
of  the  office  staff  also  spoke  to  the  group 
on  the  work  of  the  different  departments. 

On  Tuesday,  March  25,  the  library  class 
of  the  University  of  California  was  taken 
throughout  Alameda  County  on  the  an- 
nual trip  of  inspection  of  the  county  li- 
brary branches  and  schools.     Thirty-two 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued 

students  went  on  the  trip  together  with 
Miss  Barmby  and  three  members  of  her 
staff ;  Miss  Anne  Hadden,  librarian  of  the 
PalO'  Alto  Public  Library,  and  Miss  Stella 
Huntington,  formerly  of  the  Santa  Clara 
County  Library. 

Miss  Barmby  gave  a  talk  on  March  IS 
to  the  pupils  of  the  San  Lorenzo  Gram- 
mar School  on  "How  to  use  the  refer- 
ence books  in  a  branch  library." 

Mary  Barmby,  Lib'n. 

Berkeley 

Berkeley  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Susan  T.  Smith,  Lib'n. 

Cooperating  with  the  Berkeley  Museum 
of  Art,  the  Berkeley  Public  Librai"y,  under 
the  leadership  of  Helena  Critzer,  Reader's 
Adviser,  has  sponsored  a  series  of  evening 
discussions  that  have  developed  in  appre- 
ciation and  interest  as  the  work  has  be- 
come known. 

In  spite  of  the  multiplicity  of  clubs, 
there  are  still  a  number  of  business  and 
professional  people  interested  in  books, 
who  lack  the  time  to  participate  in  book 
reviews.  With  a  view  to  presenting 
authors  worthy  of  consideration  but  not 
listed  on  the  best  seller  lists,  the  library 
has  asked  representatives  from  local  clubs 
to  present  certain  selected  titles  with  a 
view  to  provoking  criticism,  and  discus- 
sion. The  response  has  been  cordial  and 
generous.  The  first  fiction  program  in- 
cluded Miss  Rebecca  Porter,  the  well 
known  writer  and  reviewer. 

Men  and  women  prominent  in  the  busi- 
ness world  criticized  William,  Bolitho's 
modern  interpretation  of  biography  in 
"Twelve  against  the  Gods."  "Seven  Wo- 
men" a  man's  first  novel,  was  set  against 
"The  Six  Mrs  Greenes"  by  a  more  con- 
siderate feminine  writer.  The  audience 
has  entered  freely  into  the  discussions 
that  have  been  prolonged  to  the  edge  of 
the  sidewalk  when  closing  time  came,  and 
though  a  few  attended  regularly,  each  re- 
viewer has  had  a  special  following  that 
has  widened  the  interest  in  these  group 


142 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued 

Berkeley — Continued 
disc\issions.     The  meetings  are  held   the 
second    and    fourth    Wednesdays    at    the 
Berkeley  Museum  of  Art. 

The  contract  for  the  new  library  build- 
ing was  let  February  11  to  W.  K.  Parker, 
Oakland  contractor  for  $210,000,  the 
low  bid.  Temporary  quarters  have  been 
leased  at  2069  and  1956  University  avenue 
for  the  Main  Library  and  Children's  De- 
partment. The  stupendous  undertaking 
of  moving  and  setting  up  floor  covei'ing, 
furniture,  stacks,  and  about  80,000  books 
was  accomplished  in  two  weeks.  Although 
the  service  is  naturally  limited  until  all 
of  the  books  are  placed,  the  library  is 
functioning  in  an  almost  normal  manner. 
Susan  T.  Smith,  Lib'n. 

JJUniveesity  of  California  Li- 
BKAHY.  W.  W.  Campbell,  Pres.  J.  C. 
Rowell,  Lib'n  Emeritus ;  Harold  L. 
Leupp,  Lib'n. 

The  foUov/ing  changes  on  the  staff  of 
the  University  of  California  Library  have 
occurred  during  the  period  January  1  to 
March  31,  1930:  Appointments:  Dorothy 
Anne  Mills,  assistant  Morrison  Library, 
January  17.  Resignations :  Lela  de  Otte, 
junior  assistant,  January  1 ;  Margaret 
Agnew,  assistant  Morrison  Library,  Janu- 
ary 8 ;  Lillie  Lew,  junior  assistant, 
March  1. 

The  construction  and  finishing  of  the 
quarters  for  the  branch  library  to  be 
opened  in  the  new  Life  Sciences  building 
are  practically  completed,  and  it  is  antici- 
pated that  the  branch  will  be  opened  be- 
fore the  end  of  the  fiscal  year.  All  of  the 
departments  concerned  with  work  which 
is  biological  in  its  nature  are  being  moved 
into  the  new  building,  and  the  branch  li- 
brary at  first  will  consist  of  the  consoli- 
dated departmental  libraries  of  these  de- 
partments. Later,  when  the  stack  capac- 
ity is  increased,  the  books  in  the  General 
Library  classifying  in  biology  will  be 
transferred  to  the  branch,  which  then  will 
house  a  collection  of  between  fifty  and 
sixty  thousand  volumes.  The  initial  stack 
installation  is  not  large  enough  to  per- 
mit this  transfer  at  the  present  time,  but 
as  the  stack  area  provides  for  the  accomo- 
dation of  about  one  hundred  thousand 
volumes  eventually,  it  is  only  a  question 
of  time   and   appropriations. 

Habold  L.  Leupp,  Lib'n. 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued 

Oakland 

t Oakland  Fbee  [Public]  Libeaby. 
John  B.  Kaiser,  Lib'n ;  Chas.  S.  Greene, 
Lib'n  Emeritus. 

Of  the  five  new  branches  which  the 
Oakland  Free  Library  has  opened  in  the 
past  twelve  months,  two  were  opened  in 
February.  Telegrove  Branch,  with  Miss 
Amalia  Silver  in  charge,  was  formally 
opened  on  February  11.  The  district  is 
a  residential  and  business  community,  and 
had  felt  itself  in  need  of  a  "library  within 
walking  distance"  for  some  time.  At 
the  opening,  speeches  of  welcome  were 
made  by  the  representatives  of  the  vari- 
ous organizations  which  had  been  active 
in  making  the  needs  of  the  community 
known  to  the  Library  Board.  The  affair 
was  enthusiastically  attended  and  the 
audience  filled  the  room  and  extended  far 
out  onto  the  sidewalk. 

On  February  28  the  new  Montclair 
Branch  was  formally  presented  to  the 
City  of  Oakland,  another  gift  from  Mr 
C.  W.  Gibson.  The  building  is  of  red 
brick,  in  English  style,  with  gabled  slate 
roof  and  large  windows  which  allow  a 
glimpse  of  an  attractive  interior.  Like 
all  of  Mr  Gibson's  many  gifts,  it  is 
planned  primarily  for  children,  and  is  lo- 
cated very  close  to  the  Montclair  School. 

At  the  opening  the  deed,  with  the  keys, 
was  presented,  in  behalf  of  Mr  Gibson, 
by  Mr  Charles  W.  Fisher,  President  of 
the  Homes  and  Children's  Alliance,  the 
corporation  through  which  Mr  Gibson's 
benevolences  are  carried  out.  As  Mayor 
Davie  was  unable  to  be  present,  the  deed, 
with  the  attendant  responsibility  of  the 
maintenance  of  the  branch  library,  was 
accepted  for  the  City  of  Oakland  by  Mr 
Philip  Fisher,  Secretary  to  the  Mayor. 
The  trust  was  then  presented  to  the  Li- 
brary Board.  Mr  John  P.  Irish,  Vice 
President  accepted  the  responsibility,  and 
reminded  the  members  of  the  public  who 
were  present  that  with  requests  from 
groups  of  taxpayers,  the  City  Council 
would  more  readily  appropriate  sums  ade- 
quate for  good   library   service. 

The  district  of  Montclair  was  repre- 
sented by  its  active  social  and  improve- 
ment organizations,  and  expressed  a 
thorough  appreciation  of  Mr  Gibson's 
intelligent  benevolence.  Miss  Nye,  Chief 
of  the  Branch  Department,  expressed  for 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


143 


ALAMEDA  CO.— Continued 

Oakland — Continued 
the  staff  a  willingness  to  serve  to  the  full 
extent  of  its  powers.  The  program  was 
made  still  more  pleasing  by  music  by  the 
Firemen's  Band  and  by  songs  by  some 
of  the  children  of  the  Montclair  School. 

Library  substitutes  recently  appointed 
include  Miss  Elizabeth  Mahoney,  Mrs 
Nina  Sanchez,  Mrs  Muriel  Merman  and 
Miss  Billie  Schulte.  Mrs  Jessie  Dodge 
has  been  appointed  substitute  at  the 
Museum. 

The  following  temporary  appointments 
have  been  made,  as  Library  Assistants : 
Miss  Amalia  Silver  (in  charge  of  Tele- 
grove  Branch),  Mrs  Genevieve  Henkle, 
Reference  Department;  Mrs  Ruth  Cas- 
sidy,  Circulation  Department ;  Mrs  Elinor 
Wishart  and  Mrs  Claire  Antoniu  to 
Lakeview  and  Allendale  Branches.  Miss 
Ethel  McGough  was  appointed  to  the 
new  position  of  "Supervising  Assistant," 
Branch  Department.  Miss  Frances 
Smith  has  been  transferred  as  Assistant 
in  charge  at  the  new  Montclair  Branch. 

Miss  Veronica  Sexton  resigned  Febru- 
ary 20,  after  ten  years  of  service,  to 
join  the  staff  of  the  Library  of  the  Cali- 
fornia Academy  of  Sciences  at  San 
Francisco. 

Residence  requirements  for  newly 
appointed  staff  members,  except  in  cases 
especially  provided  for,  are  covered  by 
Resolutions  4379  N.S.  (February  13) 
and  4451  N.  S.  (May  28,  1929)  and  pro- 
vide that  all  employees  at  the  time  of 
employment  must  reside  in  Oakland  or 
some  city  having  a  contract  for  library 
service  with  Oakland,  so  that  it  pays  its 
pro  rata  share  of  the  Oakland  Library's 
running  expenses.  Piedmont  pays  Oak- 
laud  $4770  for  library  service  to  all 
Piedmont  residents  by  the  Oakland  Li- 
brary  system. 

The  Civil  Service  Office  is  scheduling 
examinations  needed  to  fill  permanently 
all  the  positions  now  filled  temporarily  in 
the  city  service  and  finds  itself  over 
150  examinations  in  arrears. 

Miss  Stella  Huntington,  by  a  gift  of 
$200,  has  established  the  Henry  Root 
Memorial  Fund,  the  interest  of  which  is 
to  purchase  continuations  of  the  U.  S. 
Supreme  Court  Reports  for  the  Melrose 
Branch,  to  which  Mr  Root  gave  the  set 
previously. 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continued 

Oakland — Continued 

A  new  lease  has  been  taken  on  the 
Elmhurst  Branch  for  two  years,  and  the 
owner  has  redecorated  the  interior  to  the 
amount  of  $260.  Numerous  organiza- 
tions have  petitioned  for  a  new  branch  in 
the  vicinity  of  Park  boulevard  and  Wel- 
lington street. 

A  high  school  pupil  has  been  fined  $10 
for  deliberately  cutting  two-thirds  of  a 
column  from  an  encyclopedia  at  the  Alden 
Branch. 

Circulation  gains  for  January  were 
23,662  or  19.9  per  cent  more  than  Janu- 
ary, 1929;  for  February,  1930,  the  gain 
was  17,447  or  15.3  per  cent,  and  for 
March,  1930,  the  gain  was  25,692  or 
20.7  per  cent. 

The  East  Bay  cities  unit  of  the  Wo- 
men's Overseas  Service  League  has 
elected  Irene  Farrell  to  be  their  official 
delegate  to  the  convention  which  will  be 
held  in  Paris,  May  24-30.  Miss  Farrell 
will  leave  Oakland  on  May  8  and  expects 
to  return  by  the  first  of  August.  Miss 
Farrell  is  a  member  of  the  Reference 
Department  and  Chairman  of  the  Staff 
Association.  She  served  with  the  Red 
Cross  during  1918,  1919,  and  part  of 
1920. 

The  Board  of  Library  Directors  has 
sent  to  the  City  Council  a  request  that 
at  the  August  general  election  the  voters 
of  Oakland  be  allowed  to  express  them- 
selves on  a  proposed  bond  issue  for  $993,- 
000  with  which  to  provide  at  least  ten 
medium-size  branch  libraries,  with  neces- 
sary sites  and  equipment  to  take  the  place 
of  ten  rented  branches,  and  including  an 
Administrative  and  District  Branch  to 
take  the  place  of  the  present  out-grown 
main  building  until  such  time  as  an  ade- 
quate new  Central  Library  can  be  pro- 
vided. 

The  Board  has  changed  its  purchasing 
routine  so  that  all  purchases  as  well  as 
books  are  now  bought  directly  by  the 
Library  Board  rather  than  by  the  Oity 
Purchasing  Agent. 

John  B.  Kaiser,  Lib'n. 

Teachers  Professional  Library. 
Mrs  Elizabeth  Madison,  Lib'n. 

The  library  is  open  week  days  from 
8.30  a.m.  to  5.30  p.m.,  Saturday  mornings 
and  Monday  and  Wednesday  evenings. 
84  magazines  and  6  newspapers  are  re- 


144 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


ALAMEDA   CO.— Continued 

OakJand — Continued 
ceived.      There    are    in    the   library    9668 
books.  3659  being  general  educational  li- 
brary  books,  and   6009   sample   text  and 
supplementary  books. 

The  Teachers'  Professional  Library  has 
expanded  in  several  directions  with  its 
final  establishment  in  the  commodious 
quarters  at  the  Educational  Administra- 
tion Building.  A  text  and  supplemental 
collection  of  6009  volumes  has  been  added, 
which  at  fii-st  was  classified  and  desig- 
nated by  a  line  and  color  system  only, 
throwing  the  volumes  into  large  groups, 
so  that  teachers  might  "browse"  among 
the  books  relating  to  their  general  field. 
Recently  a  simplified  Dewey  classifica- 
tion has  been  added,  so  that  the  collec- 
tion becomes  not  only  illuminating  as  a 
general  information  source,  but  can  now 
be  used  for  exact  reference  work.  An 
entire  wing  of  the  library  is  devoted  to 
this  material. 

A  collection  of  books  of  historic  and 
antiquarian  interest  is  slowly  building 
up,  starting  with  a  group  of  interest- 
ing text  books  from  the  period  of  1820, 
supplemented  with  gifts  which  already 
make  the  collection  repi-esentative  in  a 
general  way  of  children's  school  books 
and  general  reading  books  through  a 
century  of  American  life.  We  have  the 
"Intellectual  Arithmetic"  edited  by  Daniel 
Fish  in  1858,  Murray's  English  Gram- 
mar of  1818,  the  New  England  Almanac 
of  Providence,  in  New  England,  of  1773, 
and  others  of  great  interest. 

Centralized  cataloging  for  the  50  ele- 
mentary school  libraries  is  now  done  in 
the  Teachers'  Professional  Library.  19,- 
373  cards  were  sent  out  in  27  elementary 
school  catalogs  during  the  semester  just 
passed.  Books  for  the  new  Bret  Harte 
Junior  High  School  were  ordered  in  the 
Teachers'  Library  and  the  entire  library 
for  that  school  is  being  cataloged  cen- 
trally. 

A  cooperative  relationship  with  the 
Public  Library  is  operated  whereby  teach- 
ers may  select  books  at  the  Central  Pub- 
lic Library,  after  which  the  school  trucks 
transport  the  books  to  and  from  the 
school,  with  the  Teachers'  Library  and 
the  Public  Library  acting  as  clearing 
house.  In  the  semester  just  past,  13,892 
books  were  delivered  from  the  Public  Li- 


ALAMEDA  CO. — Continued 
Oakland — Continued 
brary   by    school    truck   to   55    schools   in 
392   deliveries. 

The  Teachers'  Professional  Library 
circulation  for  the  fall  semester  was  5170 : 
library  books  3171 ;  pamphlets  497  ;  mag- 
azines 854 ;  texts  647. 

The  Teachers'  Library  seats  sixty  per- 
sons, with  ample  possibilities  of  expan- 
sion. Its  windows  face  north,  west  and 
south.  The  westei-n  window  looks  over 
Lake  Merritt  and  the  city  sky  line  beyond 
the  lake,  the  large  Roman  window  with 
its  straight-line  drapes  framing  the  sun- 
sets. On  the  south,  the  windows  over- 
look the  tall  masts  in  the  estuary,  where 
ships  ride  at  anchor  in  a  safe  haven  after 
adventuring  to  Alaska,  Japan,  and  "far 
Cathay."  The  Teachers'  Library  is  com- 
ing to  mean  something  inspirational. 
Elizabeth  Madison,  Lib'n. 

Piedmont 

Piedmont  High  School  Library. 
Harry  W.  Jones,  Prin.  Gladys  English, 
Lib'n. 

The  Library  Committee  of  the  Pied- 
mont High  School  Library  visited  the 
new  Oakland  High  School  Library  on 
February  4  at  noon.  The  time  was 
rather  limited  for  luncheon  in  the  cafe- 
teria, a  visit  to  the  library  and  other 
interesting  departments,  but  the  visit 
was  much  enjoyed  by  the  students.  Miss 
Hazel  Levy,  the  school  librarian,  has 
promised  to  return  our  visit  soon  with 
the  members  of  her  Library  Committee. 
Gladys  English,  Lib'n. 

ALPINE  COUNTY 

(Fifty-eighth  class) 

County    seat,    Markleeville. 
Area,  575  sq.  mi.     Pop.  243. 
Assessed    valuation    $898,009    (taxable 
for   county   $721,173). 

AMADOR  COUNTY 

(Forty-fifth  class) 
County  seat,  Jackson. 
Area,  568  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7793. 
Assessed  valuation  $8,308,111   (taxable 
for  county  $7,222,503). 

BUTTE  COUNTY 

( Twenty-second  class ) 
County    seat,    Oroville. 
Area,  1764  sq.  mi.     Pop.  30,030. 


Yol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES 


145 


BUTTE    CO.— Continued 

Assessed  valuation  .$40,634,956  (tax- 
able for  county  ,$.37,232,123). 

Butte  Co.  Free  Library,  Oroville. 
Miss  Ida  M.  Reagan,  Lib'n. 

On  January  6  our  branch  library  build- 
ing at  Paradise  was  destroyed  by  a 
heavy  fall  of  snoMr.  The  roof  folded 
against  the  sides  of  the  building  so  that 
the  books  were  not  damaged  but  the 
furniture  was  all  destroyed.  A  number 
of  boys  volunteered  to  help  Mrs  Black- 
burn, librarian,  move  the  books  into  tem- 
porary quarters  across  the  street,  so  li- 
brary service  was  hardly  interrupted. 
We  have  now  rented  a  small  building  and 
with  shelving  up  and  new  chairs  and  table 
the  library  is  a  very  attractive  place. 

During  the  quarter  Miss  Reagan  spoke 
at  the  Gridley  Woman's  Club  and  at  the 
Wyandotte  Woman's  Club  and  at  the 
West  Liberty  Farm  Bureau. 

The  schools  iu  the  county  are  all  being 
checked  for  books  that  have  been  charged 
against  them  for  several  years.  By  June 
they  will  all  have  been  done  and  com- 
plete new  records  made.  The  visits 
being  made  by  Miss  Reagan  and  her 
assistant  are  bringing  the  library  and 
schools  into  closer  contact. 

Ida  M.  Reagan,  Lib'n. 

Chico 

State  Teachers  College  Library. 
C.  M.  Osenbaugh,  Pres.  Alice  Anderson, 
Lib'n. 

Miss  Ruth  Doxsee,  Cataloger  at  Chico 
State  Teachers  College  Library,  has  been 
granted  a  year's  leave  of  absence  begin- 
ning July  1,  1930.  Miss  Doxsee  will  con- 
tinue the  advanced  course  at  the  School 
of  Librarianship,  University  of  California. 
Alice  Anderson,  Lib'n. 

CALAVERAS  COUNTY 

(Forty-ninth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Andreas. 
Area,  990  sq.  mi.     Pop.  6183. 
Assessed  valuation  .$9,186,532   (taxable 
for  county  $7,418,740), 

COLUSA  COUNTY 

(Forty-second  class) 
County  seat,  Colusa. 
Area,  1080  sq.  mi.     Pop.  9290. 
Assessed    valuation    $27,750,849    (tax- 
able for  county  $22,758,310) . 
2 — 76092 


CONTRA  COSTA  COUNTY 

(Thirteenth  class) 
County  seat,  Martinez. 
Area  750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  53,889. 
Assessed  valuation  $108,521,900    (tax- 
able for  county  $95,528,755). 

Contra  Costa  Co.  Free  Library, 
Martinez.  Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

Through  the  courtesy  of  Colum.bus 
Tiodge,  Sons  of  Italy,  in  Antioeh,  a  fifty 
volume  set  of  Italian  books  will  be  do- 
nated  to   Antioeh   Public  Library. 

The  donation  includes  encyclopedias, 
booksi  on  science,  commerce,  fiction,  biog- 
raphies.— Martinez  Standard,  F  8 

DEL    NORTE   COUNTY 

(Fifty-fourth  class) 
County  seat.  Crescent  City. 
Area,   1&46  sq.   mi.     Pop.  2759. 
Assessed    valuation    $11,448,753     (tax- 
able for  county  $11,-302,282). 

EL   DORADO   COUNTY 

(Forty-eighth  class) 
County  seat,  Placerville. 
Area,  1891  sq.  mi.    Pop.  6426. 
Assessed    valuation    $13,497,030    (tax- 
able for  county  $10,917,672). 

Placerville 

Placerville  Free  Public  Library. 
Esther  A.   Brewster,   Lib'n. 

The  name  of  the  librarian  at  Placer- 
ville Free  Public  library  is  now  Esther 
A.  Brewster. 

FRESNO   COUNTY 

( Fourth   class ) 
County  seat,  Fresno. 
Area,  5696  sq.  mi.     Pop.  128,779. 
Assessed   valuation   $207,641,992    (tax- 
able for  county  $158,822,540). 

aFresno  Co.  Free  Library,  Fresno. 
Miss  Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Lib'n. 

The  County  library  is  sponsoring  a 
new  project  in  cooperation  with  the  Fres- 
no Evening  High  School.  It  is  a  Reading 
with  a  Purpose  discussion  group  and  is 
held  on  alternate  Monday  evenings  at 
the  main  library.  The  first  weeks  were 
taken  up  with  the  Twentieth  Century 
novel  and  the  next  topic  will  be  Recent 
Biography.  About  fifty  persons  are  en- 
rolled. Miss  Mina  Keller,  Readers'  Ad- 
viser at  Fresno  City  Branch,  is  in  charge. 

At  Sanger  the  "Pleasant  Tuesday  Eve- 


146 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


FRESNO  CO.— Continued 

iiiiijr  Mo<'tiiigs"  have  been  establislu.'d. 
This  has  been  brought  about  by  the  coop- 
ei-atiou  of  i\iiss  Huiisberger,  Custodian  at 
the  Sanger  Branch,  with  the  Adult  Edu- 
cation Department  of  the  night  school  and 
the  Civic  Improvement  Club.  A  speaker 
is  provided  for  each  Tuesday  evening. 
These  meetings  seiTe  to  bring  the  people 
to  the  library  as  well  as  providing  a 
means  for  the  most  interesting  and  edu- 
cational discussions. 

iliss  McCardle  and  sixteen  assistants 
attended  the  Fourth  District  Meeting  at 
Modesto  and  enjoyed  it  very  much.  ]\Irs 
Babeock  of  Kern  County,  and  several  of 
her  assistants  and  custodians  were  onr 
guests  the  day  before,  stopping  ofl:  on 
their  way  to  Modesto.  We  were  de- 
lighted to  have  them.  In  January  several 
of  our  stafc  paid  a  visit  to  the  Kern 
County  Library  and  had  a  pleasant  day 
getting  acquainted  with  the  staff,  over- 
looking their  records,  etc.,  etc. 

The  Selma  Branch  was  closed  for  a 
week  while  a  new  hardwood  floor  was 
laid  and  some  minor  improvements  Avere 
made.  A  new,  modem  type  desk  was  in- 
stalled, which  adds  greatly  both  to  the 
convenience  of  the  work  and  the  looks 
of   the  room. 

Sarah  E.  McCaedle,  Lib'n. 

GLENN  COUNTY 

(Thirty-eighth  class) 
County  seat.  Willows. 
Area,  1460  sq.  mi.     Pop.  11.853. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,152,461     (tax- 
able for  county  $2.3,791,(X)1). 

(tLenn  Co.  Fbee  Library,  Willows. 
Mrs  Faye  K.  Russell,  Lib'n. 

During  February  the  Gleun  County 
Librarj'  moved  into  its  new  quarters  in 
the  American  Legion  Memorial  Building. 

We  have  one  large  room  with  approxi- 
mately three  thousand  square  feet  of  floor 
space  and  an  oSice  for  the  libi-arian. 
The  shelving  is  from  the  library  depart- 
ment of  the  Remington-Rand  Business 
Service,  and  there  is  space  for  the  fu- 
ture. We  have  daylight  all  day  through- 
out the  rooms. 

Mrs  Faye  K.  Rxjsseix,  Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT   COUNTY 

(Twentieth  class) 
Countjr  seat,  Eureka. 
Area,  3507  sq.  mi.     Pop.  37,413. 
Assessed    valuation    $61,613,266    (tax- 
able for  county  $56,540,672). 


IMPERIAL   COUNTY 

(Seventeenth  class) 
County  seat,  El  Centro. 
Area,  4316  sq.  mi.     Pop.  43,383. 
Assessed    valuation    $55,723,639     (tax- 
able for  county  $45,798,417). 

Imperlai,  Co.  Free  Library,  El  Cen- 
tro.    Miss  Dorothy  Deming,  Lib'n. 

On  February  1,  Miss  Deming  and  Miss 
Kathai'yn  Campbell,  first  assistant,  at- 
tended the  convention  of  the  Sixth  Dis- 
trict of  the  California  Library  Associa- 
tion in  San  Diego. 

Miss  Violet  Maddux  was  married  in 
March  to  Mr  Joe  Thompson  of  El  Centro. 
Mrs  Thompson  is  continuing  her  work 
as  assistant  in  the  library. 

In  Februai-y  a  bi-anch  library  was 
i  stablished  at  Amos,  a  small  telegraph 
station  on  the  railroad  east  of  Niland. 

The  county  library  maintained  an  ex- 
hibit at  the  Imperial  County  Fair,  Feb- 
ruary 25  to  March  2.  This  was  the  first 
time  for  many  years  that  the  library  has 
had  an  exhibit,  and  our  booth  attracted 
a  good  deal  of  attention.  We  were  able 
to  show  a  number  of  attractive  new 
books  which  we  had  just  received,  and  an 
attendant  at  the  booth  filed  requests  for 
these,  which  were  later  sent  to  the  various 
branches  requesting  them.  Seventy  re- 
quests were  taken  during  the  week,  the 
three  most  popular  books  being  Halli- 
burton's "New  Worlds  to  Conquer,"  Tom- 
linson's  "All  Our  Yesterdaj's."  and  Hum- 
phrey's "Loafing  Through  Africa."  The 
children  were  much  interested  in  the  at- 
tractively illustrated  juveniles,  and  many 
requests  were  taken  for  these  also. 

Dorothy   Deming,   Lib'u. 

Brawley 

Brawley  Union  High  School  and 
.Junior  College  Library.  P.  E.  Palmer, 
Prin.     Mrs  Mii-iam  C.  Post,  Lib'n. 

The  following  items  were  written  by 
one  of  the  library  training  girls  for  this 
week's  issue  of  the  school  paper,  "The 
Brawley  Wild  Cat,"  under  heading  of 
"Treasure   Chest"  : 

"This  past  quarter  has  been  the  busiest 
we've  had  so  far  in  the  library.  The 
third  year  pupils  have  been  busy  on  their 
American  history  term  papers,  and  others 
on  European  and  world  histoi-y.  The 
junior  college  geology  and  the  U.  S. 
constitution  orators  have  used  many  ref- 
erences. 

From  January  27  to  March  27  we  have 
had  2267  high  school  pupils  transferred  to  ; 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


147 


IMPERIAL  CO.— Continued 
Brawley — Continued 
the  library  for  the  purpose  of  reference 
work  and  to  borrow  books.  1980  books 
have  been  borrowetl ;  1635  of  these  were 
nonfiction.  Many  new  books  have  been 
put  into  circulation  since  January." 

The  total  registration  for  the  high 
school  and  junior  college  this  year  is 
463. 

Mrs  Miriam  Colcord  Post,  Lib'n. 

INYO   COUNTY 

( Forty-seventh  class ) 
County  seat,  Independence. 
Area,  10224  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7031. 
Assessed    valuation    $19,477,744    (tax- 
able for  county  $11,881,591). 

KERN    COUNTY 

(Twelfth  class) 
County  sieat,  Bakersfield. 
Area,  8159  sq.  mi.     Pop.  54,843. 
Assessed   valuation  $213,502,719    (tax- 
able for  county  $175,239,610). 

KINGS   COUNTY 

(Twenty-ninth   class) 
County  seat,  Hanford. 
Area,  1373  sq.  mi.     Pop.  22,031. 
Assessed    valuation    $33,724,352    (tax- 
able for  county  $28,308,420). 

Kings  Co.  Fkbe  Library,  Hanford. 
Mrs  Harriet  S.  Davids,  Lib'n. 

This  has  been  rather  an  eventful  quar- 
ter for  the  Kings  County  Free  Library, 
inasmuch  as  it  has  brought  us  a  moving 
day,  a  fire,  and  a  new  libi*arian.  The 
moving  took  place  at  Lemoore,  where  our 
largest  branch  is  located.  The  library 
was  closed  to-  the  public  for  only  one  day, 
and  since  there  were  almost  five  thousand 
volumes  to  move,  exclusive  of  bound  and 
unbound  magazines,  we  are  quite  proud 
of  our  record.  Miss  Helen  Arnold,  first 
assistant,  and  the  librarian  worked  two 
days,  revising  and  correcting  the  branch 
catalog,  rearranging  the  books  on  the 
shelves,  checking  with  our  branch  file, 
etc.,  while  Miss  Arnold  and  Mrs  Bu- 
chanan, branches  assistant,  were  a  third 
day  finishing  up  this  work  and  assisting 
Mrs  Henley,  the  custodian,  in  starting  her 
inventory.  We  ai-e  very  proud  of  our 
neat  and  attractive  Lemoore  Branch  and 
have   the   added   satisfaction   of  knowing 


KINGS  CO.— Continued 

that  books,  records,  and  catalog  are  all  in 
an  orderly  condition. 

The  fire  was  at  Armoua  school,  one  of 
the  larger  schools  of  the  county.  The 
loss,  fortunately,  proved  less  than  we  had 
at  first  feared,  and  complete  insurance 
has  been  recovered. 

As  for  the  new  librarian,  of  course  she 
is  wi'iting  this  and  she  has  to  be  modest. 
She  is  trying  to  learn  the  county,  to  get 
acquainted  with  the  people,  and  to  con- 
tinue the  friendly  relations  already  es- 
tablished by  Miss  Gregory,  her  prede- 
cessor. 

The  staff  gave  an  informal  tea  in  honor 
of  Miss  Gregory  on  the  Thursday  before 
her  departure.  We  were  joined  by  several 
friends  from  neighboring  ofiices,  and  a 
delightful  hour  was  enjoyed. 

On  April  15,  the  supervisors  established 
a  new  branch  at  the  Kings  County  Hos- 
pital. Mrs  Drennan,  matron  of  the  hos- 
pital,  was  appointed  custodian. 

Mrs  Harriet  S.  Davids,  Lib'n. 

LAKE  COUNTY 

(Fifty-first    class) 
County  seat,  Lakeport. 
Area,  1332  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5402. 
Assessed    valuation    $10,329,420    (tax- 
able for  county  $10,229,625). 

LASSEN  COUNTY 

(Forty-fourth  class) 

County  seat,  Susanville. 
Area,  4750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  8507. 
Assessed    valuation    $18,987,857    (tax- 
able for  county  $14,356,692). 

IjASSen  Co.  Free  Library,  Susan- 
ville. Miss  Lenala  A.  Martin,  Lib'n  (on 
leave  of  absence).  Miss  Carmelita  Duff, 
Acting  Lib'n. 

Miss  Lenala  Martin  and  Miss  Elisabeth 
Haines  of  the  Lassen  County  Free  Li- 
brary are  leaving  February  5  on  a  three- 
months  leave  of  absence  which  will  take 
them  as  far  east  as  New  York  City.  Their 
itinerary  includes  stops  at  San  Fran- 
cisco, New  Orleans,  Baton  Rouge,  Hav- 
ana, New  York  City,  Philadelphia  and 
Washington,  D.  C.  In  their  absence 
from  Susanville,  the  local  library  will 
be  in  charge  of  Miss  Carmelita  Duff,  for- 
mer librarian  of  Plumas  and  Butte 
County  Free  Libraries,  and  Miss  Anna 
G.  McNamee  of  Berkeley. — Susanville 
Mail,  Ja  31 


148 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


LOS  ANGELES  COUNTY 

(First  class) 
County  seat,  Los  Angeles. 
Area  4100  sq.  mi.     Pop.  936,438. 
Assessed    valuation   $4,522,926,824 
(taxable  for  county  $4,202,950,310). 

Los  Angeles  Co.  Fkeb  Library,  Los 
Angeles.    Miss  Helen  E.  Vogleson,  Lib'n. 

The  Los  Angeles  County  Library  had  a 
large  representation  at  the  Sixth  Dis- 
trict meeting  held  in  San  Diego,  Satur- 
day, February  1,  eighteen  from  the  cen- 
tral office  and  six  branch  librarians  at- 
tending. It  was  a  beautiful  California 
spring  day  and  every  one  enjoyed  the 
program  the  president.  Miss  Hitt,  had 
arranged. 

The  following  appointments  to  the  staff 
have  been  made  after  a  series  of  recent 
civil  8ei"viee  examinations :  Miss  Elsie 
Gadbois,  first  assistant  in  Branches  De- 
partment ;  Mrs  Bess  Yates,  senior  assist- 
ant in  Reference  Department ;  Mrs  Ruth 

E.  Putnam,  reviser  in  the  Catalog  Depart- 
ment; Mrs  Alice  H.  Billings  and  Miss 
Louina  Van  Norman,  senior  catalogers ; 
Mrs  Agnes  T.  Lokken,  Miss  Maxine 
Wheatley,  and  Miss  Catherine  E.  Ruby 
as  junior  library  assistants ;  Miss  Gene- 
vieve Stevens,  Miss  Laurita  PoUey,  and 
Mrs  Data  Ehrig  as  page  assistants. 

The  Los  Angeles  County  Library  feels 
signally  honored  in  having  its  service  map 
appear  as  the  frontispiece  on  the  March 
Bulletin  of  the  American  Library  Asso- 
ciation. 

Preparations  are  being  made  through 
the  generosity  of  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Board  of  Supervisors  and  the  courtesy  of 
the  Los  Angeles  Chamber  of  Commerce 
for  taking  members  of  the  American  Li- 
brary Association  on  trips  to  visit  county 
library  branches  and  to  see  various  as- 
pects of  the  county  during  convention 
week,   June  23  to  28. 

Helen  E.  Vogleson,  Lib'n. 

Arcadia 

Arcadla.  Free  Public  Library.     Mrs 

F.  W.  Treen,  Lib'n. 

We  have  had  considerable  delay  in 
getting  the  furniture  for  our  new  build- 
ing. We  fully  expected  to-  open  the  new 
library  February  1  but  it  now  looks  as 
though  it  will  be  another  month  before  it 
will  be  possible.  The  completed  building 
has  been  duly  accepted  as  finished  and 
the  grounds  are  being  put  into  condition 
for  landscaping. 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Arcad  ia — Continued 

We  hope  to  add  about  a  thousand  books 
to  our  collection  soon. 
C.  F.  Bass,  Secretary  of  Library  Board. 

Azusa 

Citrus  Union  High  School  and 
Junior  College  Library.  F.  S.  Hay- 
den,   Prin.     Mrs  Irene  McLeod,  Lib'n. 

At  Citrus  Union  High  School  and  Jun- 
ior College,  the  library  and  study  hall  are 
combined.     An  innovation  was  introduced 
this   quarter,    by   having  all   of  the  high 
school  students  instructed  in  the   use  of 
the  books  and  the  library.     The  libi'arian     , 
used  one-half   of   each   study   hall   period 
for  this  purpose  until  each  student  had 
had  one  lesson.     The  librarian  discussed 
the   significance    of    the   numbers   on    the  j 
backs  of  the  books,  the  card  catalog,  the  1 
different   parts   of   a   book,    and   how    to   I 
care  for  a  book,  particularly  a  new  one, 
properly. 

Mrs  Irene  McLbod,  Lib'n. 

Claremont 

ScRiPPS  College  Library.  Ernest  J. 
Jaqua,  P  r  e  s.  Margaret  Withington, 
Lib'n. 

Bids  for  the  erection  of  the  new  $75,000 
library  biiilding  at  Scripps  College,  Clare- 
mont, have  been  received  and  are  being 
considered  by  the  board  of  trustees.  Archi- 
tect Gordon  B.  Kaufmann  of  Los  An- 
geles prepared  the  plans  and  specifications. 

The  structure  will  be  of  reinforced  con- 
crete construction,  "T"  shaped,  and  of 
cathedral  design.  Plans  call  for  reference 
room,  reading  room^  work  room,  stock 
room,  etc. — Los  Angeles  Journal  of  Com- 
merce, Mr  31 

Long  Beach 

Long  Beach  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Mrs  Theodora  R.  Bi-ewitt,  Lib'n. 

The  success  of  the  book  discussion 
group  on  "American  Life  in  Books," 
which  has  been  meeting  for  the  past  two 
years,  has  led  to  the  formation  of  a  sec- 
ond discussion  group  on  "California  in 
Books."  Both  groups  meet  alternate 
weeks  and  the  average  attendance  for 
each  is  something  over  fifty.  Membersi  of 
the  groups  are  enthusiastic  over  this 
method  of  providing  opportunity  for  book 
discussion  to  library  patrons.  The  inter- 
est is  demonstrated  not  only  by  the  fact 
that    each    group    reads    a    minimum    of 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


149 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 
Long  Beach — Continued 

fifty  books  for  each  meeting,  but  also  by 
the  animated  discussion.  Miss  Hazel 
Zimmerman,  Adult  Education  Supei*visor, 
is  in  charge  of  the  discussion  group  or- 
ganization. A  leader  is  furnished  by  the 
Evening  School  for  "American  Life  in 
Books."  For  "California  in  Books"  a 
diiferent  leader  has  been  used  for  each 
occasion,  a  number  of  these  leaders  being 
authors  of  books  on  California. 

Central  Branch  was  opened  February 
IS  in  a  rented  cottage.  This  branch  is 
open  for  the  present  only  two  afternoons 
a  week.  It  serves  a  densely  populated 
community  between  East  Long  Beach 
Branch  and  Burnett  Branch.  This  is  the 
fourth  event  in  the  expansion  of  the 
branch  system  during  the  current  j'ear. 
The  Bay  Shore  Branch  was  established  in 
the  fall.  North  Long  Beach  Branch  in- 
augurated its  daily  opening  about  the 
same  time.  A  small  subbranch,  open 
one  afternoon  a  week,  was  established  in 
the  district  just  north  of  Signal  Hill.  The 
library  now  has  nine  branches,  five  of 
which  are  open  daily. 

The  usual  series  of  book  review  lec- 
.tures  has  been  given  under  the  auspices 
of  the  library  by  Miss  Helen  E.  Haines. 
Mrs  Theodoka  R.  Brewitt,  Lib'n. 

Los  Angeles 

iIjOS  Angeles  [Free]  Public  Li- 
brary.     Everett    R.    Perry,    Lib'n. 

Coincident  with  the  opening  of  the  new 
Felipe  de  Neve  Branch  a  verj'  attractive 
brochure,  written  by  OiTa  E.  Monnette, 
was  printed,  giving  a  brief  sketch  of  the 
life  of  Don  Felipe  de  Neve,  one  of  the 
founders  of  the  city  of  Los  Angeles. 

The  value  of  "Black  Gold"  to  a  Cali- 
fornia community  is  well  illustrated  by 
the  fact  that  petitions  have  been  granted 
to  certain  citizens  of  Venice,  giving  thera 
permission  to  drill  for  oil  wells.  One  of 
these  wells  is  only  450  feet  from  the  new 
branch  library  building  in  Venice. 

Lecture  series  under  the  auspices  of 
various  departments  in  the  Central  Li- 
brary are  coming  to  a  close.  All  of  these 
have  been  successful,  some  of  them  par- 
ticularly so,  in  the  size  and  response  of 
the  audience  and  in  the  increased  circu- 
lation of  books. 

The  last  of  the  concerts  given  through 
the   courtesy    of   Mrs    Elizabeth    Sprague 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 
Los    Angeles — Continued 

Coolidge  was  a  program  provided  by  the 
Pro-Arte    Quartet    of    Brussels. 

Exhibits  in  the  Lecture  Room  included 
Japanese  pnnts ;  paintings  by  the  Women 
Painters  of  the  West ;  the  spring  exhibi- 
tion of  the  California  Water  Color  Soci- 
ety, and  beautiful  photographs  of  award 
buildings  in  Southern  California,  while 
the  glass  exhibit  cases  in  the  first  floor 
lobby  included  photographs  of  authors  of 
R.  W.  A.  P.  courses ;  World  Peace ;  Me- 
teors ;  Art  Objects  of  Greece,  Rome  and 
Pompeii,   with   appropriate  reading  lists. 

The  photograph  and  photostat  work  of 
the  library  increases  steadily,  especially 
since  the  plan  was  instituted  at  the  begin- 
ning of  the  year  of  duplicating  order  cards 
by  photography. 

The  circulation  of  the  Library  con- 
tinues to  soar  month  by  month.  In 
March  nearly  900,000  volumes  were  is- 
sued, while  on  a  single  day  more  than 
11,000  were  issued  at  the  Central'Library 
alone. 

The  little  Pacific  Ready  Cut  Branch 
building  at  Palms  is  being  enlarged  at 
an  expense  not  to  exceed  $2,000,  the  work 
being  done  by  the  carpenter  force  of  the 
Library. 

The  new  building  for  Venice  Branch, 
at  California  and  Electric  avenues,  cost- 
ing .$.35,000,  designed  by  Witmer  and  Wat- 
son, furnished  by  Remington-Rand  Com- 
pany, has  been  completed  and  in  use 
since  March  10.  Informal  dedication  ex- 
ercises are  to  occur  April  7. 

The  Library  School  students  enjoyed 
the  opportunity  of  visiting  public,  school, 
college  and  county  libraries  in  Los  An- 
geles, Long  Beach,  Pasadena,  Pomona  and 
Claremont,  and  as  far  north  as  Santa 
>arbara.  They  profited  greatly  by  the 
visits  and  had  the  pleasure  of  touring  in 
their   own    cars. 

Beginning  in  March  weekly  book  talks 
have  been  given  over  KFI  every  Monday 
at  3  o'clock  by  Mrs  Mai'shall,  head  of  the 
Fiction  Department,  who  reviews  three 
or  four  titles,  both  fiction  and  nonfiction. 

Miss  Sarah  C.  N.  Bogle  spent  a  few 
busy  days  in  California  in  February, 
studying  curricula  and  methods  of  library 
schools   and    training   classes. 

Plans  are  under  way  for  a  beautiful 
little  garden   in   the   patio  at  Van   Nuys 


150 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Los    Angeles — Continued 

Branch,  the  local  Garden  Club  and  Hor- 
ticultural Club  furnishing  rocks  and 
plants. 

Helen  T.  Kennedy, 
Second  Assistant  Lib'n. 

Hollywood  High  School  Libraby. 
Louis  F.  Foley,  Prin.  Static  M.  Weber, 
Lib'n. 

We  have  added  several  new  paintings 
to  our  picture  collection.  We  now  have 
eight  paintings  by  California  artists  hung 
in  the  librai-y.  These  were  purchased 
with  student  body  funds. 

Statie  M.   Webek,   Lib'n. 

Sons  of  the  Revolution  in  the 
State  of  Califoenia,  Library  of  the. 
Dr  Edward  M.  Pallette,  Pres.  Willis 
Milnor  Dixon,    Lib'n. 

We  have  received  a  donation  of  600 
volumes  for  our  library  during  the  last 
quarter  period. 

We  have  over  10,000  volumes  in  our 
library  now. 

W.  M.  Dixon,  Lib'n. 

University  High  School  Library 
(formerly  Warren  G.  Harding  High 
School  Library) .  Angus  Cavanagh, 
Prin.     Mrs  Anne  M.  Beeman,  Lib'n. 

Our  school  has  become  a  practice 
school  for  the  University  of  California  at 
Ix)S  Angeles,  so  we  have  35  student  teach- 
ers who  are  making  wonderful  use  of 
the  library. 

We  have  a  new  library  service  which 
has  been  in  use  about  two  months,  and 
during  that  time  this  new  service  has 
just  about  doubled  the  circulation  of 
books  for  home  use,  not  to-  speak  of  the 
library  use.  This  system  is  direct  sei*vice 
of  books  to  a  classroom.  The  teacher 
sends  in  a  requisition  to  us,  giving  the 
subject  to  be  studied  and  the  period  the 
books  are  to  be  used,  and  whether  for 
junior  or  senior  classes.  We  have  some 
special  table  book  cases  on  which  the 
books  and  pamphlets,  and  any  mounted 
pictures  are  placed. 

Two  class  librarians  are  appointed  from 
the  class  using  the  books,  and  they  come 
at  the  beginning  of  the  period  and  get 
the  books,  and  return  them  at  the  end 
of  the  period.  If  the  teacher  wishes  the 
books  to  be  kept  intact  for  a  day  or 
so   she   can   have   the   case   placed   on   a 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Los    Angeles — Continued 

table  in  the  library  and  labeled  with  the 
teacher's  name.  Any  student  may  reserve 
a  book  in  the  collection  and  take  it  out 
at  the  end  of  the  day. 

All  of  our  teachers  and  student  teach- 
ers are  very  enthusiastic  about  the  serv- 
ice. The  Oakland  high  schools  have 
been  using  this  plan  for  some  time. 

Mrs  Anne  M.  Beeman,  Lib'n. 

Pasadena 

Pasadena  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  .Teannette  M.  Drake,  Lib'n. 

Construction  of  two  branch  libra- 
ries was  ordered  by  the  Board  of  City 
Directors  March  4  on  recommendation  by 
City  Manager  R.  V.  Orbison.  The  North 
Branch  Library  will  be  located  in  the 
southeast  portion  of  La  Pintoresca  Park, 
overlooking  North  Raymond  avenue  and 
East  Washington  street.  The  Northeast 
Branch  will  be  erected  at  999  East  Wash- 
ington street  on  property  the  city  owns 
at  the  northwest  corner  of  North  Cata- 
lina  avenue  and  East  Washington  street. 
The  two  buildings  and  equipment  will 
represent  an  outlay  of^  $65,000. — Pasa- 
dena Star-News,  Mr  4 

Pomona 

Pomona  [ Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Sarah  M.  Jacobus,  Lib'n. 

The  music  collection  has  acquired  fifty 
complete  scores  of  chamber  music,  divided 
about  equally  between  trios  and  quar- 
tettes. Pomona  is  now  taking  consider- 
able interest  in  ensemble  performance, 
and  this  fact  seems  to  justify  the  library 
in  making  this  rather  costly  purchase. 

A  small  map  of  a  real  estate  subdivi- 
sion in  Pomona,  dated  1887,  has  been  per- 
manently loaned  to  the  library's  histori- 
cal collection.  Street  names,  prices  of 
lots,  allusions  to  the  clean  side  of  the 
street  and  to  the  "County  Road,"  and 
other  features  give  value  to  this  scrap 
of  advertising. 

A  collection  of  duplicates  for  the  ex- 
clusive use  of  the  staff  has  been  estab- 
lished. 

Miss  Helen  M.  Schwindt  has  taken  a 
position  in  the  library  of  the  Veterans' 
Hospital  at  Fort  Lyon,  Colorado.  Miss 
Bertha  Neher  is  temporarily  filling  her 
place. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


151 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Pomona — Continued 
Miss    Marjorie    Dicmas    is    now    Mrs 
Howard   Reynolds.      She   continues  work 
in  the  library. 

Visits  of  inspection  by  the  Los  Angeles 
Library  School  and  the  Riverside  Service 
School  have  been  made,  to  the  real 
pleasure  of  the  Pomona  staff. 

Sakah  M.  Jacobus,  Lib'n. 

Santa    Monica 

Santa  Monica  [Free]  Public  Li- 
BBARY.     Miss   Klfie   A.   Mosse,   Lib'n. 

In  February  an  oil  painting  by  Walter 
Barron  Currier  was  purchased.  The  pic- 
ture, which  had  been  left  in  the  library 
after  an  exhibition  in  the  gallery,  was 
so  universally  admired  that  a  committee 
was  appointed  to  ask  for  the  purchase. 

During  the  last  three  months  an  or- 
ganization of  a  Community  Arts  Asso- 
ciation in  Santa  Monica  has  been  formed 
by  Mayor  Herman  Michel.  The  heads 
of  all  the  service  organizations  were 
named  on  the  committee,  including  the 
librarian.  In  a  second  organization  in- 
cluding a  group  of  four  interests — The- 
ater Guild,  Writer's  Club,  Music  Associ- 
ation and  Art  Association,  the  librarian 
was   named   as   honorary   vice   president. 

Last  February  our  city  detectives  re- 
covered two  hundred  dollars  worth  of 
books  taken  from  our  library  by  W.  H. 
Pembrook,  a  writer.  Judge  Spencer 
ruled  a  sentence  of  ninety  days. 

The  librarian  addressed  the  literai-y  sec- 
tion of  the  Santa  Monica  Bay  Woman's 
Club.  A  collection  of  rare  first  editions 
and  art  books  was  displayed. 

Miss  Isobel  O'Connor  resigned  at  the 
beginning  of  March.  Miss  O'Connor  has 
been  with  us  since  November,  1927,  and 
will  be  greatly  missed.  The  vacancy  has 
been  filled  by  Miss  Agnes  I.  McMillan. 

Our  exhibitions  in  the  art  gallery  have 
been   exceptionally   interesting. 

The  influx  of  students  from  the  new 
University  U.  C.  L.  A.  in  Westwood  and 
the  newly  formed  junior  college  in  Santa 
Monica  is  bringing  new  adjustments  with 
the  demands  on  the  library. 

On  January  7  the  librarian  was  reap- 
pointed for  four  years. 

Elfie  a;  Mosse,  Lib'n. 


LOS  ANGELES  CO.— Continued 

Whittier 

Whittier  Union  High  School  IjI- 
BRARY.     Olney  C.  Albertson,  Prin. 

Miss  Jessie  A.  Harris,  Librarian  of 
Whittier  Union  High  School  Library,  has 
resigned  and  is  doing  graduate  work  at 
the  University  of  Michigan  Library 
School. 

MADERA    COUNTY 

(Thirty-seventh   class) 
County  seat,  Madera. 
Area,  2140  sq.  mi.     Pop.  12,20.3. 
Assessed    valuation    $.30,682,805     (tax- 
able for  county  $25,290,151). 

MARIN   COUNTY 

(Twenty-fifth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Rafael. 
Area,  516  sq.  mi.     Pop.  27,342. 
Assessed    valuation    $87,723,600    (tax- 
able for  county  $33,532,655). 

San    Anselmo 

San  Anselmo  I"^,ee  Public  Library. 
Mrs  Martha  S.  Adams,  Lib'n. 

Miss  A.  Belle  Meagor,  librarian  of  the 
San  Anselmo  Public  Library  has  resigned 
in  order  to  be  married  to  Mr  Henry 
Diener.  Mrs  Martha  S.  Adams,  assistant 
librarian,  will  take  her  place,  and  Miss 
Virginia  Richwagen  will  take  the  place 
of   assistant  librarian. 

Four  new  stacks  have  been  added  to 
the  library  for  nonfiction  books,  and  sev- 
eral more  will  be  added  in  the  near  future. 
Mrs  Martha  S.  Adams,  Lib'n. 

San    Quentin 

San  Quenttn  Prison  Library.  James 
Holohan,  Warden.  Earle  M.  Stigers, 
Educational    Director. 

Warden  James  B.  Holohan  announced 
March  18  plans  for  a  new  prison  library 
building  to  be  erected  at  San  Quentin 
at  a  cost  of  .$30,000.  The  structure,  which 
will  be  erected  by  convict  labor,  will 
contain  a  library,  class  rooms  and  a 
chapel. — Sacramento  Bee,  Mr  19 

San     Rafael 

*DoMiNiCAN  College  Library-.  Mother 
M.  Raymond,  Prin.  Sister  M.  Edward, 
Lib'n. 

The  total  number  of  volumes  in  the 
library   is   now   18,511,    and   we   are   re- 


152 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


MARIN   CO.— Continued 

San  Rafael — Continued 
ceiving    regularly    75    magazines    and    2 
newspapers. 

A  valuable  addition  tO'  our  library  is 
a  set  of  five  illuminated  missals,  the  gift 
of  a  friend  in  England,  who  had  pur- 
chased the  books  in  Italy.  These  volumes 
are  20  inches  by  22  inches  and  are  six 
inches  thick  and  were  the  life  work  of  a 
Dominican  nun  in  Lucca.  Though  made  in 
1515  they  are  still  in  excellent  condition, 
with  the  illuminations  wonderfully  well 
preserved.  One  of  these  missals,  414  years 
old,  was  used  this  year  at  midnight  mass 
by  the  chanters  of  the  Dominican  Con- 
vent. The  music  of  the  chants  was  sung 
exactly  as  it  was  in  the  year  1515  in  the 
Dominican  Monastery  of  Nuns  in  Lucca, 
Italy,  where  the  missals  wei-e  first  used. 

Miss  Mary  Helen  Maher,  the  author  of 
"The  Philosophy  of  Teaching  of  St. 
Thomas  Aquinas,"  was  graduated  with  the 
degree  of  B.A.  from  the  Dominican  Col- 
lege in  Sail  Rafael  in  May,  1926.  After 
a  year  of  post-graduate  work  here  she 
attended  Marquette  University  where  in 
1929  she  received  the  degree  of  A.M. 
summa  cum  laude.  Miss  Maher's  trans- 
lation of  the  De  magistro  of  St.  Thomas, 
with  the  introductory  essay  and  an  in- 
terpretation of  St.  Thomas'  theory  of 
teaching,  was  pi'esented  as  a  thesis  for 
her  master's  degree  at  Marquette  Univer- 
sity. 

SiSTEB  M.  Edward,  Lib'n. 

MARIPOSA  COUNTY 

(Fifty-third  class) 
County  seat,   Mariposa. 
Area,  1580  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2775. 
Assessed  valuation  $6,123,001   (taxable 
for  county  $5,119,288). 

MENDOCINO    COUNTY 

(Twenty-eighth  class) 
County  seat,  Ukiah. 
Area,  3400  sq.  mi.     Pop.  24,116. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,945,875     (tax- 
able for  connty  $24,982,310). 

Ukiah 

Ukiah  Union  High  School  Libraky. 
Chas.  Fulkerson,  Prin.  Laura  F.  Kaiser, 
Lib'n. 

On   January  10,   1930,  we  moved  into 


MENDOCINO  CO.— Continued 
U  kiah — Continued 
our    new    $150,000    school    plant,    which 
includes  an  attractive  library   (connected 
with    the    study    hall ) ,     equipped    with 
shelves  for  five  or  six  thousand  volumes. 

Now  that  we  have  library  furniture  and 
shelving  facilities,  we  hope  to  arrange  for 
the  replacement  of  many  books  which 
were  destroyed  by  fire  in  November,  1928. 
We  plan,  also,  to  add  as  many  standard 
reference   and   fiction   works   as   possible. 

In  the  past  six  months  we  have  acces- 
sioned about  twO'  hundred  volumes, 

Laura  F.  Kaiser,  Lib'n. 

MERCED    COUNTY 

(Twenty-seventh  class) 
County  seat,  Merced. 
Area,  1750  sq.  mi.     Pop.  24,579. 
Assessed    valuation    $44,107,091     (tax- 
able for  county  $36,600,294). 

Merced  Co.  Fkeie  Library,  Merced. 
Miss  Minette  L.  Stoddard,  Lib'n. 

On  January  18,  1930,  Miss  Silverthorn, 
librarian  of  Stanislaus  County,  paid  us 
a  pleasant  visit. 

February  1  Mrs  Nellie  Shively  returned 
to  the  staff  after  a  six  weeks'  leave  of 
absence. 

Miss  Stoddard  and  five  members  of  the 
staif  and  five  custodians  attended  the 
Fourth  District  Meeting  at  Modesto  on 
Februai'y  15, 

February  18,  Miss  Silverthorn  visited 
the  librax-y  and  she  and  Miss  Stoddard 
met  Miss  Galloway  of  Madera  County 
at  Chowchilla  for  a  conference  on  library 
affairs  at  the  Tri-County  Tubercular  Hos- 
pital at  Ahwahnee. 

During  March  Miss  Stoddai-d  spoke 
before  the  Dos  Palos  Woman's  Club  and 
Los  Banos  Woman's  Club  on  new  books 
and  music. 

John  D.  Willard,  research  associate  of 
the  American  Association  for  Adult  Edu- 
cation, spent  two  days  in  Mei'ced  and 
Mariposa  counties  making  a  study  on  be- 
half of  the  National  Advisoi-y  Committee 
on  Education,  to  be  incorporated  in  a 
eport  to  be  presented  Congress  on  results 
being  obtained  by  Federal  Aid  to  Educa- 
tion. With  Miss  Stoddard  he  visited 
the  different  types  of  branches  in  the 
counties  and  Yosemite. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


153 


MERCED  CO.— Continued 

Mrs  Bray  resigned  December  1  after 
five  years  as  custodian  of  the  Merced 
Falls  Branch  and  is  now  living  in  Los 
Angeles. 

MiNETTE  L.  Stoddard,  Lib'n. 

MODOC    COUNTY 

(Fifty-second  class) 
County  seat,  Alturas. 
Area,  4097  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5425. 
Assessed    valuation    $10,537,116    (tax- 
able for  county  $9,655,826). 

MONO   COUNTY 

(Fifty-seventh    class) 
County  seat,  Bridgeport. 
Area,  2796  sq.  mi.     Pop.  960. 
Assessed     valuation     $6,684,222     (tax- 
able for  county  $3,294,090). 

MONTEREY   COUNTY 

( Twenty -fourth  class ) 
County  seat,   Salinas. 
Area,  3450  sq.  mi.     Pop.  27,980. 
Assessed    valuation    $63,273,841     (tax- 
able for  county  $53,835,178) . 

Mjonteeey  Co.  Fbe:b  Library,  Sajlinas. 
Miss  Ellen  B.   Frink,   Lib'n. 

Our  position  of  first  assistant  was  filled 
January  1-5  by  Miss  Roxie  Hall,  formerly 
of  Stanislaus  and  Ventura  County  Fx-ee 
Libraries. 

While  Miss  Estelle  Walker  was  on 
brief  leave,  Mrs  Beraice  Ellis  Walker 
filled  temporarily  that  position  which  she 
had  held  before  her  marriage. 

April  1  Miss  Margaret  Dold  takes  up 
the  indexing  of  the  Monterey  County  col- 
lection of  pictures,  pamphlets,  etc.  We 
hope  to  have  the  benefit  of  her  broad  ex- 
perience for  some  months  on  this  and 
similar  undertakings. 

With  the  usual  visiting  of  our  own 
county,  we  have  included  brief  visits  to 
our  neighbors,  San  Benito  and  San  Luis 
Obispo   County   Free   Libraries. 

We  have  been  pleased  and  proud  to 
have  as  visitors  Miss  Anne  Hadden,  now 
of  Palo  Alto  Public  Library  and  Miss 
Annika  Mannerheim  of  the  Stockholm 
Library,  Sweden.  We  tried  to  show  Miss 
Mannerheim  such  details  of  the  oflSce  as 
were  different  and  also  the  three  or  four 
different    sections    of    our    county,    fruit, 


MONTEREY    CO.— Continued 

grazing,  vegetable,  dairy  and,  with  each, 
scenery. 

We  are  experimenting  with  staff  meet- 
ings and  have  so  far  found  them  inter- 
esting and  thank  everyone  both  on  and 
off  our  staff  for  assistance. 

Ellen  B.  Frink,  Lib'n. 

Monterey 

Monterey  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Etta  Eckhardt,  Lib'n. 

The  trustees  of  the  city  of  Monterey 
have  recently  purchased  a  lot  in  New 
Monterey  as  a  site  for  the  branch  library 
which  will  probably  be  constructed  within 
the  next  year.  The  lot  is  centrally  lo- 
cated near  the  grammar  school  and  Bap- 
tist Church. 

Etta  Eckhardt,  Lib'n. 

One  hundred  volumes  of  Italian  liter- 
ature will  be  foiinally  presented  to  the 
Monterey  Public  Library  at  a  ceremony 
to  be  held  the  evening  of  February  5  in 
the  library  building  on  Van  Buren  street. 
A.  Brucia,  president  of  the  Monterey 
lodge  of  Sons  of  Italy,  will  make  the  pres- 
entation in  behalf  of  his  organization, 
which  has  as  one  of  its  objectives  estab- 
lishment of  similar  Italian  language  col- 
lections in  all  towns  and  cities  where 
branches  of  the  lodge  exist. — Monterey 
Herald,  F  3 

Monterey  Union  High  School  Li- 
brary. E.  B.  Morehead,  Prin.  Harriet 
M.  Baker,  Lib'n. 

With  the  aid  of  fifteen  student  libra- 
rians, a  library-study  hall  combination 
accessible  to  students  throughout  the  day 
has  been  made  possible. 

We  are  receiving  48  magazines  and  have 
about  2300  volumes  now. 

Harriet  M.  Baker,  Lib'n. 

Presidio  of  Monterey,  Post  Library. 
Edward  L.  Branham,  Post  Lib'n. 

Traveling  libraries  are  the  order  of  the 
day  now.  We  have  a  fine  one  of  latest 
fiction  from  the  9th  Corps  Area  and  are 
expecting  another  the  end  of  the  month. 

It  is  wonderful  what  a  little  paint  ju- 
diciously applied  will  do  to  brighten  up 
the  appearance  of  a  library.  We  have 
just  had  some  work  done  in  our  library 
which  has  improved  the  looks  of  things 
50  per  cent. 


154 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


MONTEREY  CO.— Continued. 

M  onterey — Continued 

There  seems  to  be  an  increase  in  de- 
mand for  nonfiction  books  on  the  part  of 
the  young  men.  For  those  who  are  in- 
clined to  look  with  anxiety  upon  the 
frivolous  youth  this  should  be  a  hopeful 
sign. 

Edw.  L.  Bbanham,  Lib'n. 

Pacific  Grove 

Pacific  Gbove  [Free]  Public  Li- 
braky.     Miss  Jessie  W.  Nichols,  Lib'n. 

George  Kohler  presented  the  Pacific 
Grove  Public  Library  with  a  handsome 
gift  of  books  for  the  juvenile  section 
during  the  Christmas  season.  The  books 
have  now  been  cataloged  and  placed  on 
the  shelves.  Mr  Kohler  has  been  a  con- 
sistent donor  to  the  library  in  recent 
years.  His  gifts  have  been  to  the  juve- 
nile section  and  have  served  as  a  memo- 
rial to  his  daughterr,  Olive  Ruth  Kohler. 
— Pacific  Grove  High  Tide,  Ja  10 

NAPA   COUNTY 

(Thirty-first   class) 
County   seat,   Napa. 
Area,  800  sq.  mi.     Pop.  20,678. 
Assessed    valuation    $28,604,.538     (tax- 
able for  county  $24,399,441). 

Napa  Co.  Free  Libeaby,  Napa.  Miss 
Estella  De  Ford,  Lib'n. 

Our  headquarters  at  the  Hall  of  Rec- 
ords were  opened  to  the  public  July  1, 
1929.  About  1500  cards  were  sent  to 
rural  residents  informing  them  of  the 
change  and  a  booth  at  the  fair  advertised 
the  new  venture.  Country  patrons  have 
expressed  their  pleasure  at  being  able 
to  have  this  sei-vice  and  we  feel  that  it 
has  promoted  an  understanding  of  the 
library.  The  circulation  has  increased 
from  a  beginning  of  400  a  month  to  1500. 

The  adoption  of  social  studies  in  the 
curriculum  has  made  a  change  in  the 
School  Department  as  now  the  teachers 
expect  more  individual  attention  in  selec- 
tion. The  schools  are  now  giving  us  $50 
per  teacher  instead  of  $40  as  in  previous 
years. 

At  Christmas  time  we  had  a  display  of 
children's  books.  This  was  planned  to  aid 
the  public  in  a  better  selection  of  gift 
books.  We  also  displayed  our  collection 
of  dolls.     Any  number  of  the  unbreakable 


NAPA    CO.— Continued 

ones  are  being  used  by  teachers  in  their 
social   study  work. 

This  was  followed  by  a  display  of  gar- 
den books.  These  are  in  great  demand 
in  Napa  County  because  of  the  Garden 
Club  and  many  beautiful  volumes  from 
the  State  Library  were  made  use  of. 
Estella  Db  Foed,  Lib'n. 

St.  Helena 

St.  Helena  [Fbee]  Public  Library. 
Mrs  G.  B.  Anderson,  Lib'n. 

Both  exterior  and  interior  improve- 
ments have  been  made  in  the  St.  Helena 
Public  Library,  additional  shelves  built 
in,  and  a  general  rearrangement  carried 
out. 

A  very  attractive  collection  of  juvenile 
books  was  presented  to  the  library  by 
our  local  Woman's  Impi-ovement  Club. 
These  books  are  kept  on  display  and  the 
little  ones  urged  to  use  them. 

With  the  help  of  the  grammar  school 
teachers,  a  special  effort  has  been  made  to 
encourage  the  young  children  to  use  the 
library. 

Mrs  G.  B.  Anderson,  Lib'n. 

NEVADA    COUNTY 

(Thirty-ninth  class) 
County  seat,  Nevada  City. 
Area,  982  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,850. 
Assessed    valuation    $10,129,164    (tax- 
able for  county  $7,116,025) . 

Grass   Valley 

Grass  Valley  [Free]   Public  Li-  ^ 
beary.     Miss  Frances  Doom,  Lib'n.  I 

Mrs  Elizabeth  Brock,  wife  of  Mayor  M.  ■ 
J.  Brock,  was  appointed  to  the  Grass 
Valley  Library  Board  by  the  city  coun- 
cil February  25  to  succeed  Mrs  Jeanette 
Woody,  who  resigned  to  make  her  resi- 
dence in  Fresno. — Grass  Valley  Union, 
F  26 

Eleven  hundred  books  of  the  Grass 
Valley  Library  have  been  rebound  and  are 
going  back  to  the  shelves  for  general  cir- 
culation at  the  rate  of  125  a  day.  This 
work,  ordered  by  the  librai-y  board  and 
completed  by  W.  A.  Boyer,  experienced 
bookbinder,  will  give  the  volumes  an  addi- 
tional period  of  life.  It  was  the  first 
large  scale  work  in  many  years  on  the 
rebinding  of  the  popular  works  of  the  in- 
stitution. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


155 


ORANGE  COUNTY 

(Tenth  class) 
County  seat,   Santa  Ana. 
Area,  780  sq.  mi.     Pop.  61,375. 
Assessed  valuation   $218,269,012    (tax- 
able for  county  $179,460,750). 

PLACER   COUNTY 

( Thirty -second   class ) 
County   seat.   Auburn. 
Area,  1484  sq.  mi.     Pop.  18,584. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,606,588    (tax- 
able for  county  $20,241,185). 

Auburn 

Auburn  Free  Public  Library.  Mrs 
Madeline  Kriechbaum,  Lib'n. 

During  the  last  three  months  4995 
people  visited  our  library,  and  120  signed 
cards  for  membership. 

A  number  of  new  books  were  added  to 
our  shelves  during  that  time,  and  many 
more  are  needed.  The  City  Trustees  have 
appropriated  $150  toward  buying  new 
chairs,  and  making  some  very  necessary 
repairs  in  our  reading  room. 

M.  Kriechbaum,  Lib'n. 

PLUMAS  COUNTY 

(Fiftieth  class) 
County  seat,    Quincy. 
Area,  2-361  sq.  mi.     Pop.  5681. 
Assessed    valuation    $20,786,182     (tax- 
able for  county  $12,144,719). 

Plujias  Co.  Free  Libraey,  Quincy. 
Miss  Katherine  R.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

Buck's  Saddle  Branch  of  Plumas 
County  Free  Library  was  discontinued 
January  1,   1930. 

Katherine  R.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE  COUNTY 

(Fifteenth   class) 
County  seat,  Rivereide. 
Area,  7008  sq.  mi.     Pop.  50,297. 
Assessed    valuation    .|80,005,153     (tax- 
able for  county  $62,854,540). 

Hemet 

Hemet  [Free]  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  Rn^msiDE  Co.  Free  Libraey. 
Mrs  Alice  Caldwell  Mathers,  Lib'n. 

A  gratifying  and  encoui'aging  improve- 
ment continues  to  be  evident  in  all  de- 
partments of  the  Hemet  Public  Library, 
particularly  in  the  work  with  children, 


RIVERSIDE    CO.— Continued 
H  emet — Continued 

The  finances  of  the  library  wiU  be  in 
better  condition  this  year,  due  to  the  fact 
that  the  city  council  has  apportioned  the 
legal  maximum  tax  levy  of  three  mills. 
This  will  raise  over  $3600. 

On  January  1,  the  salary  of  the  li- 
brarian was  raised  to  $1500  a  year. 

A  movement  is  on  foot  to  raise  $2000 
to  $2500  by  subscription  among  the  citi- 
zens of  Hemet  and  other  interested  per- 
sons, for  the  purchase  of  new  books  for 
the  library.  If  the  book  collection  can  be 
rehabilitated  in  this  way,  we  may  hope 
for  steady  growth  and  improvement  in  the 
future. 

Mrs  Alice  Caldwell  Mathers,  Lib'n. 

Riverside 

Riverside  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Chas.  F.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Frances  Strang,  Riverside  1923, 
since  1924  in  charge  of  our  county  li- 
brary work,  died  January  18,  1930,  after 
an  illness  of  but  a  few  weeks.  Miss 
Strang  was  a  faithful  and  capable  worker, 
beloved  of  all  those  associated  with  her, 
employees,  students  and  patrons  of  the 
library. 

She  has  been  succeeded  by  Miss  Eleanor 
Nimmo  Wilson,  Riverside  1928,  lately 
librarian  of  the  Public  Library,  Paw- 
huska,  Oklahoma.  Miss  Wilson  entered 
upon  her  duties   early  in   February. 

Chas.  F.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

San   Jacinto 

San  Jacinto  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  Riverside  Co.  Free  Library. 
Mrs  M.  L.  Baisley,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  M.  L.  Baisley  was  appointed  city 
librarian  February  11.  She  succeeds  Mrs 
L.  May  Benedict  who  has  been  libra- 
rian for  the  past  ten  years.  Mrs  Baisley 
is  to  take  charge  February  15. — San 
.Jacinto  Register,  F  13 

SACRAMENTO  COUNTY 

(Seventh  class) 
County  seat,   Sacramento. 
Area,  988  sq.  mi.    Pop.  90,978. 
Assessed   valuation   $176,929,988    (tax- 
able  for   county    $141,160,3-52.) 

Sacramento  Co.  Free  Library,  Sac- 
ramento. Miss  Cornelia  D.  Provines, 
Lib'n. 


156 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


SACRAMENTO  CO.— Continued 

A  uew  branch  was  established  at  Per- 
kins, on  January  13,  in  the  sei-vice  sta- 
tion of  Myrvin  Ryno.  Mi-s  Ryno  will 
act  as  custodian.  This  is  a  branch  which 
has  long  been  needed,  and  we  are  glad  to 
have  found  a  place  for  it.  The  Brown 
and  Twin  Cities  branches  were  disestab- 
lished February  28,  as  being  no  longer 
sufficiently  patronized  to  warrant  their 
being  continued. 

On  February  1,  we  had  a  delightful 
visit  from  Miss  Sarah  C,  N.  Bogle,  As- 
sistant Secretary  of  the  A.  L.  A.,  and 
had  the  privilege  of  driving  her  on  a  short 
trip  about  the  county.  We  look  forward 
to  seeing  her  again  in  Los  Angeles  in 
June.  Another  welcome  visitor  was  Miss 
Annika  Mannerheim,  from  Stockholm, 
Sweden,  who  came  to  us  in  the  afternoon 
of  her  first  day  in  California,  and  whom 
we  introduced  to  the  thrills  of  picking  her 
first   orange   from    the   tree. 

Miss  Provines  attended  the  meeting  of 
the  Fourth  District  of  the  California 
Library  Association  which  was  held  at 
Modesto  on  February  15.  It  was  an  al- 
together delightful  occasion,  long  to  be 
remembered. 

The  following  addresses  were  given  by 
the  County  Librarian  during  the  quarter : 
January  17,  Woman's  Club  of  Lodi,  Bal- 
lads and  Balladry ;  January  18,  joint 
dinner  of  Pen  Women  and  Writers  Club 
of  Sacramento,  Writers  of  the  Sea ;  Feb- 
ruary 20,  Book  Section  of  Business  and 
Professional  Woman's  Club,  Books  I 
Have  Enjoyed ;  March  14,  Sacramento 
Chapter  Delphian  Club,  Strange  Women 
and   Strange  Lands    (book   review). 

C0RNEI.1A  D.  Provines,  Lib'n. 

Sacramento 

ilfCALiFORXiA  State  Library.  See 
page  188. 

Teachers  Professional  Library. 
Jewel   Gardiner,   Lib'n. 

The  organization  of  the  librai-y  began 
July  1,  1929.  A  lai*ge  section  of  the 
school  department's  storeroom,  located  in 
a  building  adjacent  to  the  main  Adminis- 
tration Building,  was  redecorated,  shelved, 
equipped  with  regulation  librai-y  furniture 
and  given  over  to  the  library.  As  the 
main  purpose  of  the  library  this  year  has 
been  to  sei-ve  the  teachers  who  are  at 
work  revising  the  curriculum  of  the  city 


SACRAMENTO  CO. — Continued. 

Sacramento — Continued 

schools,    it   has   been   used    as   a   meeting 

place  for  all  curriculum  committees.     The 

room  can  conveniently  seat  forty  readers. 

Originally  the  book  collection  numbered 
about  700.  It  has  almost  doubled  that 
size  in  its  few  months  of  existence  and 
has  the  beginnings  of  a  good  reference 
library  in  the  field  of  education.  The 
books  are  classified  according  to  the 
Dewey  Decimal  System  and  Librai-y  of 
Congress  cards  are  used  exclusively. 
Fifty-five  periodicals  are  received  regu- 
lariy. 

There  is  a  large  collection  of  sample 
books  sent  by  the  leading  publishers.  New 
books  are  rec-eived  soon  after  they  are  off 
the  press,  so  that  this  collection  is  kept 
up  to  date.  These  books  are  shelved  ac- 
cording to  subject  and  are  used  for  ref- 
erence by  cun"iculum  committees.  They 
are  cataloged  simply,  with  an  author, 
subject  and  publisher  entry. 

Besides  serving  the  curriculum  commit- 
tees, the  library  has  provided  leading 
books  of  the  year  in  edii cation,  for  any 
teacher  in  the  city  who  desires  to  borrow 
them^  and  has  also  loaned  many  books  to 
teachers  and  others  enrolled  in  extra- 
hour  courses  given  by  the  Junior  College. 
Jewel  Gardiner,  Lib'n. 

SAN    BENITO    COUNTY 

(Forty-third  class) 
County  seat,   Hollister. 
Area,  1476  sq.  mi.     Pop.  8995. 
Assessed    valuation    $17,-346,182     (tax- 
able for  county  $15,877,345). 

San  Benito  Co.  Free  Library,  Hol- 
lister. Mrs  Florence  W.  Townsend, 
Lib'n. 

A  fire  from  an  overheated  gas  stove  de- 
stroyed a  table  and  a  box  of  books  be- 
longing to  the  County  Librai-y  in  Janu- 
ary.    The  loss  was  covered  by  insurance. 

On  February  3  the  librarian  was  re- 
appointed for  a  tenn  of  four  years. 

Mrs  Florence  W.  Townsend,  Lib'n. 

SAN    BERNARDINO    COUNTY 

(Ninth  class) 
County   seat,    San   Bernardino. 
Area.   20,055  sq.  mi.     Pop.   73,401. 
Assessed   valuation   $131,999,962    (tax- 
able for  county  $87,401,035). 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


157 


SAN     BERNARDINO    CO.— Continued 

San  Bernakdino  Co.  Free  Libbaey, 
San  Beenabdino.  Miss  Caroline  S. 
Waters,    Lib'n. 

The  Chino  Garden  Club,  which  was 
started  by  and  is  being  sponsored  by  the 
librarian  of  the  Chino  Branch  of  the  San 
Bernardino  County  Library,  Mrs  Lena 
A.  Bailey,  has  been  meeting  every  two 
weeks  in  the  morning  at  the  Chino  Li- 
brary quarters.  Thei-e  are  65  members  in 
the  club.  Through  their  efforts,  50  gai-- 
dens  in  the  city  of  Chino  have  been  de- 
veloi>ed  and  beautified,  and  250  roses 
planted. 

During  the  month  of  March,  the  season- 
able time  for  the  beginning  of  spring  gar- 
dening, the  librarian,  Mrs  Bailey,  has 
made  special  displays  in  the  two  show 
windows  of  the  library,  of  books  and  mag- 
azines on  the  beautifying  of  gardens  and 
homes,  together  with  some  beautiful  speci- 
mens of  potted  plants  and  flowers,  which 
have  attracted   much   attention. 

Mrs  Genevieve  Van  Dugteren,  custo- 
dian of  our  Lake  Arrowhead  Branch,  re- 
signed March  8.  Miss  Grace  Welti  is 
acting  as  custodian. 

Caroline  S.  Waters,  Lib'n. 

Colton 

CoLTON  High  School  Library.  F.  S. 
Mooi'e,    Prin.      Mary   K.   Davis,    Lib'n. 

In  our  library  there  were  2625  un- 
cataloged  books,  accumulated  during  the 
past  five  years.  These  have  been  worked 
over,  and  author,  title,  and  subject  cards 
made  for  each  book.  It  was  a  long,  hard 
task,  but  well  worth  the  effort.  With 
each  book  numbered  and  in  place,  and 
the  catalog  in  splendid  working  condi- 
tion, we  believe  we  have  a  model,  though 
small,  library. 

Maby  K.  Davis,  Lib'n. 

Redlands 

A.  K.  Smiley  [Fbee]  Public  Libeaby. 
Miss  Mabel  Inness,  Lib'n. 

According  to  the  will  of  Mr  Mellen  M. 
Phinney  who  passed  away  in  Redlands 
February  7,  1930,  the  Endowonent  Fund 
of  the  Smiley  Library  is  to  receive  $1,000. 

According  to  the  will  of  Frederick  C. 
Hornby  who  passed  away  in  Los  Angeles 
January  20,  19.30,  the  Smiley  Library 
is  to  receive  the  sum  of  $10,000  "for  the 
use  and  benefit  of  said  library."  The  en- 
tire estate  is  to  be  placed  in  trust,  the  in- 


SAN     BERNARDINO    CO.— Continued 

Redlands — Continued 
come  of  which  is  to  go  to  Mrs  Hornby, 
the  widow,   during  her  lifetime. 

Both  Mr  Hornby  and  IMr  Phinney  were 
residents  of  Redlands  for  many  yeai"S. 
Mabel  Inness,  Lib'n. 

San    Bernardino 

San  Beenabdiono  Polytechnic  High 
School  Library.  Geo.  R.  Momyer,  Prin. 
Miss  Eleanore  Kyle,   Lib'n. 

The  Library  of  the  San  Bernardino 
Senior  High  School  is  now  settled  in  the 
remodeled  AdminLstration  Building.  We 
moved  in  October  20  and  last  quarter 
completed  our  first  full  quarterly  statis- 
tics. These  statistic-s  show  a  really  amaz- 
ing gain  over  the  corresponding  quarter  of 
1927-1928,  which  was  the  last  year  we 
worked  under  normal  conditions.  The 
home  loans  showed  an  increase  of  10  per 
cent  which  is  probably  normal  when  the 
increase  in  enrollment  is  considered.  The 
period  loans  increased  from  9,000  for 
1927-1928  to  20,000  for  the  same  quarter 
of  this  year  and  the  present  quarter, 
which  is  now  almost  over,  will  show  a 
still  greater  growth. 

Part  of  this  increase  is  certainly  due 
to  increased  seating  capacity.  Our  aver- 
age attendance  in  the  library  is  between 
750  and  800  students  daily.  But  a  well 
defined  and  gi'owing  interest  in  books  is 
being  shown  which  is  very  gratifying 
when  our  limited  book  fund  is  taken  into 
consideration.  Better  books  are  being 
read  and  the  travel,  biography  and  pop- 
ular science  shelves  are  bare  while  the 
fiction  shelves  are  full. 

The  library  class  numbers  thirty-four 
students  this  year  and  they  have  done 
exceptionally  fine  work.  In  fact,  an  as- 
sistant would  certainly  have  been  neces- 
sary had  it  not  been  for  the  help  of  the 
students.  It  is  hoped  that  next  year  we 
may  have  a  part-time  assistant. 

Eleanore  Kyle,  Lib'n. 

SAN  DIEGO  COUNTY 

(Fifth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Diego. 
Area,  4377  sq.  mi.     Pop.  112,248. 
Assessed   valuation  $264,362,251    (tax- 
able for  county  $247,875,173). 


158 


NEWS    NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


SAN   DIEGO  CO.— Continued 
Coronado 

CoRONABO  Beach  [Free]  Public  Iji- 
BRARY.     Miss  Gabrielle  Morton,  Lib'n. 

Two  bond  issues  totaling  $80,000  will 
be  voted  on  at  a  special  election  by  Coron- 
ado citizens  April  14.  One  calls  for  the 
construction  of  a  $20,000  addition  to  the 
public  library. — San  Diego  Sun,  F  25 

Julian 

Julian  Union  High  School  Library 
AND  Branch,  San  Diego  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.    E.   E.  York,   Prin. 

The  number  of  volumes  in  the  library 
is  about  485.  However,  these  are  sup- 
plemented by  San  Diego  County  Library 
books.  About  27  books  have  been  pur- 
chased this  year. 

17  magazines  and  1  newspaper  are  re- 
ceived regularly. 

Irene  A.  Miindelsohn,  Lib'n. 

San    Diego 

La  Jolla  Library  Association  Li- 
brary AND  Branch  of  San  Diego  P.  L. 
Miss  Alice  V.  Carey,  Lib'n. 

The  Library  Association  of  La  Jolla 
gave  a  well  attended  reception  to  its  pat- 
rons and  friends  the  afternoon  of  New 
Year's  Day,  at  the  library.  The  feature 
of  the  occasion  was  the  unveiling  of  four 
bronze  tablets  as  a  tribute  of  appreciation 
to  those  who  were  actively  helpful  during 
and  since  the  organization  days  of  the 
library.  An  interesting  program  preceded 
the   unveiling. 

The  program  comprised  a  biief  talk  by 
Rev  R.  H.  Hartley,  on  the  place  of  the 
library  in  the  community,  a  message  from 
Miss  Ellen  Browning  Scripps  read  by 
Miss  Katharine  J.  Smith,  a  symbolic 
story  related  by  Miss  Josephine  Simrall, 
Dean  of  Women  at  the  University  of 
Cincinnati,  and  the  unveiling  of  the  tab- 
lets by  the  Misses  Virginia  Bontelle 
(Bishop's  School)  and  Ruth  Larimer  (La 
Jolla  High  School),  W.  C.  Crandall, 
president  of  the  board  presiding. — San 
Diego   Union,  Ja  5 

SAN     FRANCISCO 

(Second  class) 
City   and   county   coterminous. 
Area,  43  sq.  mi.     Pop.  506,676. 
Assessed  valuation  $1,585,101,520  (tax- 
able for  county  $1,196,384,989). 


SAN    FRANCISCO— Continued 

California  Academy  of  Sciences  Li- 
brary. G.  P.  Rixford,  Lib'n.  Thomas 
Cowles,  Asst.  Lib'n  in  charge. 

Miss  May  Peffer,  formerly  of  the  West- 
ern Union  Telegraph  Company  Librai-y 
in  New  York,  was  appointed  assistant  the 
first  of  the  year,  but  had  to  resign  shortly 
on  account  of  illness.  Her  place  was 
taken  early  in  February  by  Miss  Veronica 
J.  Sexton,  for  several  years  in  the  Oak- 
land  Free   Library   system. 

Thomas  Cowles,  Asst.  Lib'n. 

Teachers'  Professional  Library. 
Madeleine  L.  Glavin,  Lib'n. 

Miss  Margaret  O'Connell  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  California  Library  School,  class 
of  1928  was  assigned  to  the  Teachers' 
Professional  Library  early  in  the  spring 
term.  Miss  Ruby  Kerr,  who  organized 
the  central  catalog  department  for  the 
Department  of  Texts  and  Libraries  and 
who  had  been  teaching  library  science  at 
the  Teachers  College  at  San  Jose  since 
leaving  the  department  in  June,  1928, 
returned  to  work  in  the  Teachers'  Li- 
brary in  July,  1929. 

The  library  now  has  for  circulation 
about  5000  mounted  informational  pic- 
tures covering  a  wide  variety  of  subjects, 
such  as  science,  transportation,  history, 
geography,  industries,  famous  people, 
stories,  poetry  and  fairy  tales.  Teachers 
employed  in  the  San  Fl-ancisco  schools 
may  call  at  the  library  and  select  their 
own  material.  Each  teacher  is  allowed 
to  take  twenty  pictures  at  one  time  and 
may  keep  them  for  a  period  of  two  weeks. 
Renewals  may  be  made,  provided  the  de- 
mand is  not  too  great  at  the  time  of 
renewal.  That  these  mounted  pictures 
have  proved  to  be  very  worth  while  as 
well  as  most  helpful,  has  been  shown  by 
recent  statistics  which  have  shown  that 
the  library  is  circulating  almost  2000  pic- 
tures per  month. 

Among  the  well-known  visitors  who 
called  at  the  Teachers'  Library  during 
the  last  few  months,  was  Miss  Hannali 
Logasa  of  the  University  of  Chicago  Li- 
brary School.  Miss  Logasa  is  the  author 
of  "The  High  School  Library." 

Madeleine  L.  Glavin,  Lib'n. 

SAN   JOAQUIN   COUNTY 

(Eighth    class) 
County  seat,  Stockton. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


159 


SAN    JOAQUIN    CO.— Continued 

Area,  1370  sq.  uii.     Pop.  79,905. 
Assessed  valuation   $143,092,.341    (tax- 
able for  county  $123,494,240). 

San  Joaquin  Co.  Free  L  i  b  e  a  r  y, 
Stockton.     Miss  Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 

On  February  14  Miss  Angeline  Orr, 
head  of  the  school  department,  met  with 
the  Mothers'  Club  of  the  Van  Allen 
School  where  she  explained  the  library 
s^chool  service  and  distribution  of  books. 
She  also  talked  with  the  pupils  about  the 
books  they  had  read. 

Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 

Lodi 

LoDi  [Free]  Public  Library  and 
Branch,  San  Joaquin  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Amy  L.  Boynton,  Lib'n. 

During  the  last  two  weeks  in  January 
the  library  displayed  the  Graphic  Arts 
Exhibit  from  the  National  Museum  which 
created  much  interest  and"  paved  the 
way  for  a  talk  on  prints  at  the  Lodi 
Woman's  Club  on  January  31.  Miss 
Bertha  S.  Taylor,  Head  of  the  Prints 
Department  of  the  California  State  Li- 
brary, gave  a  most  enlightening  talk  on 
prints,  their  history  and  a  description 
of  the  processes  by  which  they  are  made, 
with  intimate  details  about  some  of  the 
more  important  artists.  She  brought  a 
number  of  prints  from  the  State  Library 
collection  with  her  to  illustrate  her  points. 

Another  treat  which  the  library  was 
able  to  secure  for  the  Lodi  Woman's 
Club  was  a  talk  on  the  "Charm  of  Bal- 
lads," by  Miss  Cornelia  D.  Provines, 
who  certainly  charmed  the  club  women 
by  the  able  way  that  she  presented  her 
subject  and  rendered  some  of  the  old 
ballads  for  them. 

The  Lodi  Woman's  Club  chose  books 
as  the  theme  of  the  annual  jinks  this 
year,  each  division  presenting  book  char- 
acters from  different  types  of  literature 
such  as  Mother  Goose,  Fairy  Tales,  Ad- 
venture, Romance,  Religious,  Drama, 
Song,  etc.  The  library  was  able  to  coop- 
erate in  selecting  book  characters  and 
supplying  suggestions  for  their  presenta- 
tion. It  was  declared  one  of  the  most 
attractive  jinks  programs  ever  staged  by 
the  club. 

The  librarian  and  Miss  Dorothy  Thomp- 
son, assistant,  attended  the  meeting  of 
the  Fourth   District  at  Modesto,   Febru- 


SAN  JOAQUIN  CO.— Continued 
Lod  i — Continued 
ary  1.5,  and  the  Fifth  District  Meeting 
at  Stockton  will  be  attended  by  the  li- 
brarian and  two  other  assistants.  Miss 
Ellenor  Chanuell  and  Miss  Katherine 
Davis. 

A  set  of  Boy  Scout  Merit  Badge 
Series  pamphlets  has  been  purchased  and 
has  proved  very  popular.  At  the  same 
time  that  the  pamphlets  were  put  out  a 
mimeographed  list  of  books  of  interest  to 
Boy  Scouts  was  also  issued  to  all  mem- 
bers of  Boy  Scout  troops  in  Lodi  and 
vicinity.  The  list  is  four  pages  long  and 
was  compiled  to  include  every  subject 
covered  by  the  merit  badge  pamphlets.  It 
has  been  very  successful  in  promoting  fur- 
ther reading  on  these  subjects. 

The  librarian  talked  on  "Our  Reading 
Public  and  Their  Literary  Food"  at  the 
annual  institute  of  the  W.  C.  T.  U.  held 
in   Lodi,    February   22. 

A  little  daughter  was  born  to  Mr  and 
Mrs  Earl  H.  Botts  March  3.  Mrs  Botts 
was  a  member  of  the  local  staff  for  seven 
years. 

Amy  L.  Boynton,  Lib'n. 

Tx)Di  Union  High  School  Llbraby. 
V.  A.  Rohrer,  Prin.  Miss  Margaret  B. 
Davis,    Lib'n. 

Miss  Davis,  the  school  librarian  and 
part  of  her  library  force.  Miss  Boynton, 
city  librarian  and  two  of  her  assistants, 
spent  a  delightfid  afternoon  Saturday, 
March  5.  The  party  met  at  the  city  li- 
brary and  after  a  tour  of  the  library  work 
room,  children's  room,  the  stafl:  room  and 
the  basement  whei'e  the  books  that  are  not 
often  used  are  stored,  the  group  visited 
both  the  Lodi  Printing  and  the  Clark 
Printing  comipanies  where  they  learned 
many   interesting   things. 

To  conclude  the  interesting  and  enter- 
taining afternoon  the  group  visited  China- 
town where  a  Chinaman  served  a  Chinese 
tea  to  them. — Lodi  Flame 

Stockton 

i  Stockton  Free  Public  Library. 
Miss  Ida  E.  Condit,  Lib'n. 

The  Stockton  Free  Public  Library  was 
the  recipient  of  a  very  valuable  collec- 
tion of  Italian  books  fx'om  the  members 
of  the  local  Italian  community.  On  the 
occasion    of    the    "Mostra    Italiano    del 


160 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


SAN    JOAQUIN    CO.— Continued 

Stockton — Continued 

Libro"  (Italian  exposition  of  books)  at 
San  Francisco  recently,  it  was  decided  by 
leading  Stockton  Italians  to  make  this 
gift  to  our  library.  The  books  are  printed 
in  English  and  Italian,  and  include  works 
on  history,  modern  and  ancient  literature, 
monumental  Italy,  books  on  the  works  of 
master  painters,  and  a  wide  variety  of 
subjects  by  the  best  old  and  modern 
authors. 

The  following  changes  were  made  on 
our  staff  due  to  the  resignation  of  Miss 
Tillie  Prasher,  head  of  the  county  de- 
partment, and  Mrs  Dorothy  Parks,  in 
charge  of  the  periodical  department.  Miss 
Elaine  West,  a  member  of  our  staff  for 
several  years,  is  now  taking  charge  of 
the  county  work,  and  Mrs  Abbie  Ashley, 
a  member  of  the  staff,  is  in  charge  of  the 
I)eriodical  work.  The  two  new  appointees 
to  fill  the  vacancies  ci'eated  by  the  resig- 
nations were  Miss  Dorothy  Reynolds  and 
Miss  Edna  Foy. 

The  Young  People's  Department  has 
been  renovated,  the  walls  were  painted  a 
light  green,  the  woodwork  buff  with 
orange  trimmings.  A  new  Library  Bu- 
reau table  and  chairs  for  children  was 
added.  New^  floor  covering  has  been  laid 
in  the  reading  rooms  and  two  large  tables 
and  chairs  placed  in  the  ladies'  reading 
room. 

Ida  E.   Condit,  Lib'n. 

SAN   LUIS  OBISPO  COUNTY 

(Thirtieth    class) 
County  seat,  San  Luis  Obispo. 
Area,   3500  sq.   mi.     Pop.   21,89.3. 
Assessed    valuation    $42,692,344     (tax- 
able for  county  $36,954,240). 

San  Luis  Obispo  Co.  Free  Library, 
San  Luis  Obispo.  Miss  Lilian  Sabin, 
Lib'n. 

On  a  very  rainy  day  early  in  January, 
the  librai'y  had  two  very  welcome  visitors  : 
Miss  Ellen  B.  Frink,  librarian  of  Mon- 
terey County  Free  Library  and  Mrs 
Harriet  S.  Davids,  her  first  assistant 
who  has  since  been  appointed  librarian 
of  Kings  County  Free  Libral■}^ 

In  February  the  librarian  paid  a  brief 
visit  to  the  Los  Angeles  County  Free  Li- 
brary. 


SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CO.— Continued 
The  Morro  Bay  Branch,  which  for 
several  years  has  been  inadequately 
housed  and  cared  for  in  the  post  office, 
was  moved  in  January  to  very  attractive 
quarters  in  the  Picture  Shop  and  is  now 
in  charge  of  Miss  Olive  Cotter,  one  of 
the  owners  of  the  shop.  There  has  been 
a  revival  of  interest  in  the  branch,  shown 
in  an  increase  of  circulation,  number  of 
new  borrowers,  and  si>ecial  requests.  We 
are  planning  "fruitful"  moves  for  two 
other  branches. 

One  of  the  rural  teachers  brought  her 
entire  school  to  visit  the  library.  After 
an  inspection  of  the  arrangement  of  the 
library,  the  children  had  the  unusual 
pleasure  of  selecting  their  own  books 
from  the  shelves. 

The  library  furnished  an  exhibit  of 
picture  books  and  mounted  pictures  for 
a  county  teachers'  meeting  held  in  San 
Luis   Obispo   in   March. 

Lilian    Sabin,   Lib'n. 

San    Luis    Obispo 

San  Luis  Obispo  Free  Public  Li- 
brary.    Mrs  E.  L.   Kellogg,   Lib'n. 

Cooperating  with  the  supervisor  of 
curriculum  of  the  primary  grades,  a  third 
grade  reading  project  was  launched  dur- 
ing March.  A  special  shelf  was  made  for 
the  third  grade  and  new  books  purchased 
for  it,  making  an  attractive  corner  in  the 
library  near  the  charging  desk.  The  li- 
brarian visited  all  the  third  grades  in  the 
city  schools,  distributing  reading  lists, 
displaying  the  more  attractive  of  the 
books  and  making  brief  and  provocative 
talks  on  them,  and  closing  each  program 
with  story  telling.  Response  was  imme- 
diate and  continuous,  and  it  is  believed 
that  the  enthusiasm  of  little  third  graders 
for  their  reading  shelf  has  had  much  to 
do  with  the  March  increase  in  the  juve- 
nile circulation  of  808  over  March  of  the 
previous  year. 

Much  time  has  been  given  this  spring 
to  conferences  with  a  committee  of  teach- 
ers from  the  intei-mediate  grades  on  the 
making  of  reading  lists  to  be  published 
in  the  couree  of  study  for  next  year.  The 
lists  are  now  complete  and,  having  been 
most  carefully  prepared,  should  bring  ex- 
cellent reading  results  in  the  c-oming 
school  term. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


161 


SAN   LUIS  OBISPO  CO.— Continued. 
San   Luis  Obispo — Continued 
The  large  increases  in  circulation   re- 
ported earlier  in  the  fiscal  year  still  hold, 
the   peak  having  been  reached  in   March 
with  an  increase  of  1343  over  last  year. 
]\I!rs  E.  L.  Kellogg,  Lib'n. 

SAN    MATEO    COUNTY 

(Twenty-first    class) 
County  seat,  Redwood  City. 
Area,  470  sq.  mi.     Pop.  36,781. 
Assessed    valuation    $68,341,403    (tax- 
able for  county  $63,302,300). 

San  Mateo  Co.  Free  Library,  Red- 
wood City. 

Mrs  Edna  Holroyd  Yelland  presented 
her  resignation  to  the  supervisors  in 
March  to  take  effect  March  31.  She  and 
her  husband  left  the  last  of  the  month 
for  a  trip  abroad.  Her  successor  as  li- 
brarian of  the  San  Mateo  County  Free 
Library  has  not  yet  been  appointed. 

Redwood  City 

Redwood  City  Free  Public  Libeary 
AND  Branch,  San  Mateo  Co.  Free  Li- 
brary.    Miss  Laura  E.  Barton,  Lib'n. 

Our  circulation  has  increased  rapidly, 
the  highest  figures  being  in  the  last  three 
months.  March  has  been  higher  than 
January  or  February  with  a  circulation 
of  5795  volumes.  This  is  an  increase  of 
2,643  over  March  of  the  preceding  year. 
Activity  in  all  phases  of  the  work  in- 
creases each  month  and  at  times  there  is 
scarcely  seating  capacity  for  the  increas- 
ing numbers  of  people  who  are  using  the 
library. 

Several  pieces  of  new  Library  Bureau 
furniture  have  been  added,  including  a 
new  charging  desk.  A  new  registration 
system  has  been  installed  as  well  as  the 
Newark  method  of  book  charging.  All 
this  greatly  facilitates  the  desk  routine. 

A  reference  department  is  being  de- 
veloped and  this  work  constantly  in- 
creases in  scope.  We  continue  our 
weekly  Story  Hour  for  school  children, 
make  school  visits,  and  are  adding  new 
volumes  as  fast  as  possible  to  keep  up 
with  the  renewed  reading  interest.  The 
cooperation  of  the  County  Library  in 
lending  books  has  meant  a  great  deal. 

During  Miss  Barton's  absence  on  sick 
leave.  Miss  Janet  Wood,  formerly  assist- 
3 — 76092 


SAN  MATEO  CO.— Continued 
Redwood  City — Continued 
ant  in  the  Los  Angeles  County  Library, 
has  been  employed  part-time.  Our  full- 
time  assistant  is  Miss  Helen  Harvie,  for- 
merly of  the  Palo  Alto  Public  Library. 
The  library  staff  consists  of  two  full  time 
people  and  two  half-time.  (This  number 
was  incorrectly  given  in  last  annual  i-e- 
port. ) 

Wilhelmina  Harper,   Organizer. 

San    Mateo 

San  Mateo  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss   Inez   M.   Crawford,   Lib'n. 

At  the  March  meeting  of  the  Board  of 
Trustees  of  the  San  Mateo  Public  Li- 
brary the  resignation  of  Mrs  Dorothea  L. 
Best,  to  take  effect  June  1,  was  accepted. 
Dorothy  F.  Fuller,  a  graduate  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  California  School  of  Libra- 
rianship,  1930,  was  appointed  to  fill  the 
vacancy. 

I.  M.  Crawford,  Lib'n. 

SANTA  BARBARA  COUNTY 

(Eighteenth  class) 
County  seat,   Santa  Barbara. 
Area,  2450  sq.  mi.     Pop.  41,097. 
Assessed   valuation  $138,405,531    (tax- 
able for  county  $126,374,938). 

Santa  Barbara  Co.  Law  Library, 
Santa  Barbara.  A.  R.  Edmondson, 
Sec. 

An  addition  of  410  volumes  to  the 
Santa  Barbara  County  Law  Library, 
given  by  Mrs  James  D.  Otis,  daughter  of 
the  late  Judge  Robert  B.  Canfield,  was 
announced  by  the  County  Law  Library 
Association  Februai-y  7.  As  the  late 
.Judge  Canfield  expressed,  during  his  life- 
time, a  wish  that  some  of  his  law  books 
be  given  the  County  Law  Library 
Association,  but  made  no  provision  for 
the  gift  in  his  will,  Mrs  Otis  purchased 
the  books  from  the  estate.  The  trustees 
of  the  association  selected  the  books 
needed  in  the  library. — Santa  Barbara 
Press,  F  8 

Santa    Barbara 

■-•-'State  Teachers  College  Library. 
Clarence  L.  Phelps,  Prin.  Miss  Kath- 
arine P.  Ball,  Lib'n  (on  leave  of  absence). 
Miss  Elizabeth  Wanzer,  Acting  Lib'n. 

Miss  Elizabeth  Wanzer  of  the  Sacra- 
mento  City   Library   has   been   employed 


162 


NEWS    NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


SANTA  BARBARA  CO.— Continued 
Santa  Barbara — Continued 
to  fill  the  place  of  Miss  Katharine  F. 
Ball  as  librarian  at  the  State  College. 
Aliss  Ball  is  leaving  January  29  on  a 
leave  of  abseuee  for  an  extensive  cruise 
of  th?  Mediterranean  and  motor  tour 
through  Europe.  She  will  return  in  time 
to  resume  her  duties  vs^ith  the  reopening 
of  the  fall  term  next  September. — Santa 
Barbara  Netos,  Ja  29 

SANTA    CLARA    COUNTY 

(Sixth  class) 
County  seat,  San  Jose. 
Area,  1355  sq.  mi.     Pop.  100,588. 
Assessed   valuation  $1.39,700,872    (tax- 
able for  county  $128,427,500). 

Morgan   Hill 

Live  Oak  Union  High  School  Li- 
ER.\RY.     I>ev7is  H.  Britton,  Prin. 

We  have  enlarged  our  library  so  that 
it  now  contains  2947  volumes.  We  also 
^.ubscl■ibe  to  16  periodicals. 

Mildred  K.  Bontz,  Lib'n. 

Palo   Alto 

Palo  Alto  [Free]  Public  Library. 
Miss  Anne  Hadden,   Lib'n. 

Miss  Marjorie  M.  Frink  has  been  ap- 
pointed to  fill  the  vacancy  caused  by  the 
resignation  of  Mrs  Alic-e  Dye  Carlstroem, 
an  assistant  in  the  Catalog  Department, 
to  take  effect  April  1,  1930. 

Anne  Hadden  was  invited  by  Miss 
Mary  Barmby  to  accompany  the  Library 
School  of  the  University  of  California  on 
its  annual  tour  of  the  branches  of  the 
Alameda  County  J~'ree  Library  March  25, 
1930,  and  took  great  pleasure  in  accept- 
ing. 

A  remarkably  fine  Indian  mortar  and 
pestle  was  presented  to  the  Palo  Alto 
Public  Library  during  March  by  Miss 
Frances  M.  Cole  of  Palo  Alto.  This  is 
said  to  have  been  found  in  Ventura 
County  many  years  ago. 

Several  interesting  exhibits  have  been 
held  in  the  Library  Art  (4allery  during 
the  quai'ter.  January  17-30  Miss  Helen 
Forbes  held  a  one-man  exhibition  of  paint- 
ings. This  was  followed  on  Februai-y 
first  by  a  three-weeks  sho-^ang  of  photo- 
graphs by  members  of  the  Palo  AltO'  Art 
Club.  Some  very  beautiful  landscape  and 
portrait  and  unique  still  life  views  were 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued 
Palo  Alto — Continued 
hung.  An  exhibit  of  the  woi'k  of  the 
children  from  the  Peninsula  School  of 
Creative  Education  was  held  from  March 
1  to  8.  This  exhibit  showing  talent  and 
great  originality,  attracted  many  visi- 
tors. From  March  8  to  21  there  was  a 
loan  exhibition  of  etchings  from  the  Cali- 
fornia Association  of  Print  Makers.  The 
last  week  of  March  a  one-man  exhibition 
was  hung  by  Mi-s  Frances  S.  Brown.  The 
attendance  at  these  exhibitions  shows  that 
the  public  appreciates  the  gallery. 

Anne  Hadden,  Lib'n. 

The  following  tribute  to  Frances  Pat- 
terson, former  librarian  of  Palo  Alto,  was 
written  by  Guy  E.  Miller,  Trustee,  and 
originally  published  in  the  Palo  Alto 
Tim.es,  June  25,  1929: 

I"^ances  Patterson 

In  the  passing  of  Miss  Frances  Patter- 
son, librarian,  the  city  has  lost  one  of 
its  most  faithful  and  efficient  servants. 
In  mere  length  of  service,  more  than  26 
years,  she  had  a  record  surpassed  by  few. 
The  first  of  these  years  meant  little  in 
the  way  of  remuneration,  her  original 
appointment  as  an  assistant  being  at  $15 
per  month,  "hours  to  be  arranged."  A 
year  later  this  was  increased  to  $20,  little 
enough  for  a  college  graduate,  even  one 
living  at  home.  The  minutes  of  the  board 
meetings  show  gradual  increases  of  $5  at 
a  time,  but  it  was  10  years  befoce  the 
figure  approached  what  could  be  called  a 
salai-y,  even  in  the  days  when  the  dollar 
had  a  higher  value  that  at  present. 

As  trustee  for  nine  years  the  writer 
had  a  large  part  in  the  making  of  the  an- 
nual budget.  The  city  was  allowing  us 
all  it  could  but  it  was  a  serious  problem 
to  make  the  appropriation  fit  the  needs 
of  the  institution.  No  one  was  more  heli>- 
ful  than  Miss  Patterson  during  these 
years,  and  twice  when  it  was  necessary  to 
tell  her  that  a  raise  was  impossible  be- 
cause of  the  need  for  new  stacks  or  other 
supplies  she  met  the  verdict  with  her 
brave  smile  and  an  expression  of  under- 
standing. Another  time  when  a  raise 
was  mentioned  she  said  "But  Miss  .  .  . 
must  have  a  raise."  Her  reward  was  long 
delayed  but  finally  came  in  the  more  pros- 
perous recent  years. 


i 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


163 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued 
Palo   Alto — Continued 

The  library  and  its  needs,  the  public 
and  its  wants,  were  always  first  with  her. 
The  wi'iter  was  more  than  once  rebuked 
in  making  suggestions  to  ease  her  burdens 
because  these  suggestions  meant  the  cur- 
tailing of  service  to  the  public  in  some 
small  way  and  this  she  would  not  listen 
to.  If  the  demands  of  the  patrons  were  too 
heavy  for  a  small  staff  then  the  staff  must 
do  a  little  more,  though  this  meant  usu- 
ally that  the  extra  work  feU  on  the  li- 
brarian, for  many  times  the  suggestion 
for  extra  labor  was  not  even  mentioned 
to  the  assistants.  Many  hours  of  work 
were  done  at  home,  and  more  than  once 
vacation  plans  were  changed  so  that  she 
could  be  sure  certain  things  were  accom- 
plished on  time. 

Library  work  has  in  recent  years  been 
brought  up  to  professional  standards  and 
the  technical  knowledge  required  of  libra- 
rians has  increased  tremendously.  But 
Miss  Patterson  kept  abreast  of  all  the 
changes  and  kept  advancing  with  the  pro- 
[fession.  She  took  advantage  of  all  the 
opportunities  for  attending  conventions 
and  thus  kept  in  touch  with  the  work  and 
the  workers  all  over  the  state.  And  she 
^  would  not  agree  to  the  employment  of 
■any  but  trained  assistants  when  need 
I  arose  for  an  addition  to  the  staff. 
i  Realizing  that  a  library  can  not  be 
(conducted  successfully  without  rules,  she 
}was  always  ready  to  make  a  liberal  con- 
istruction  of  those  rules  when  the  public 
[was  concerned  and  gave  the  patron  what- 
i  ever  advantage  it  was  possible  to  give, 
[though  without  surrendering  any  of  the 
'rights  of  the  library.  She  kept  a  nice 
balance  between  the  public  whom  she  was 
(sei-ving  and  her  employer. 
'I  Miss  Patterson  took  over  the  library 
[when  it  occupied  only  a  third  of  its  pres- 
lent  quarters,  did  not  even  own  the  lot 
[at  the  i-ear  for  future  expansion,  and  had 
[for  its  total  funds  less  than  the  amount 
[now  spent  on  books  alone.  She  carried 
[it  successfully  through  the  difficult  period 
iof  rapid  growth  to  the  present  and  was 
*  facing  the  future  with  broad  vision  and 
icourage  for  what  she  foresaw  as  even 
more  difficult  problems  to  come. 
.  The  founding  of  our  library  was  due. 
!most  largely  to  the  energy  and  inspiration 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued 
Palo  Alto — Continued 
of  Mrs  E.  L.  Campbell.  The  genius  and 
further  inspiration  of  the  institution  for  a 
long  period  following  was  Mrs  Julia  R. 
Gilbert,  whose  long  trusteeship  was  ter- 
minated only  with  her  death.  Miss  Anne 
Hadden,  first  librarian,  carried  on  the 
work  for  15  years  and  was  able  to  leave 
a  real  library  to  her  successor  when  she 
left  for  a  larger  field.  To  this  roll  of 
honor  must  be  added  the  name  of  Miss 
Frances  Patterson. 

GXJY    C.    MiLLEK. 

Palo  Alto,   June  25,   1929. 

San  Jose 

State  Teachees  Colxege  Libraby. 
Thos.  W.  Mac-Quarrie,  Pres.  Miss  Joyce 
Backus,   Lib'n. 

In  January  the  State  Board  of  Educa- 
tion authorized  San  Jose  State  Teachers 
College  to  grant  an  A.B.  degree  with 
major  in  Librarianship.  The  graduate 
receives  the  special  credential  in  Libra- 
rianship and  is  authorized  to  serve  as 
librarian  in  the  schools  of  California. 
Several  programs  of  study  are  planned. 
By  careful  selection  students  may  combine 
ti'aining  for  teaching  and  library  work 
in  the  four  years. 

Early  in  February  Miss  Sarah  C.  N. 
Bogle,  of  the  A.  L.  A.  Board  of  Educa- 
tion for  Librarianship,  spent  a  day  visit- 
ing our  libraries  and  confeiTing  with 
faculty  members.  Miss  Bogle  came  to 
California  at  the  request  of  Superin- 
tendent of  Education  Kersey,  to  survey 
library  training  facilities. 

Our  Children's  Library  in  the  new 
demonstration  school  building  was  infor- 
mally opened  during  the  month.  We  plan 
to  have  a  formal  opening  when  the  new 
furniture  arrives.  In  the  meantime  we 
are  happily  at  work  in  our  attractive  new 
quai'ters. 

The  Department  of  Librarianship  will 
hold  its  third  summer  session  from  June 
23  to  August  2.  The  program  includes 
courses  in  Cataloging,  Classification, 
School  libraries,  Reference,  History  of 
libraries   and   Book   selection. 

Joyce  Backus,  Lib'n. 

Stanford     University 

JLeland  Stanfoed  Junioe  Univeb- 
SITY  LiBEAEY.  Dr  Ray  Lyman  Wilbur, 
Pres.    (on  leave  of  absence).     Robert  E. 


164 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


SANTA  CLARA  CO.— Continued. 

Stanford    University — Continued 

Swain,   Acting  Pres.     Nathan  Van  Pat- 
ten, Director  of  thie  University  Libraries. 

Miss  Florence  Craig  will  preside  as 
Chairman  of  the  Catalog  Section  of  the 
American  Library  Association  at  the  Los 
Angeles  Conference.  Miss  Helen  Sutliff 
is  to  present  a  paper  before  the  same 
section  on  "What  is  Research  in  Catalog- 
ing?" Miss  Louise  Katz  will  take  part 
in  a  discussion  on  cataloging  League  of 
Nations  material  at  an  informal  gather- 
ing of  catalogers  interested  in  the  subject. 

Mr  Van  Patten  will  address  the  Second 
General  Session  on  Wednesday,  June  25 
on  "College  and  University  Libraries  of 
California,"  and  will  present  a  paper  on 
"Sources  for  Mexican  Bibliography"  be- 
fore the  Bibliographical  Society  of 
America.  He  will  also  preside  at  the  pub- 
lic session  of  the  American  Library  As- 
sociation's Committee  on  Cooperation 
with  the  Hispanic  Peoples. 

We  have  three  new  membere  on  our 
staff :  Miss  Alice  Glaeser,  Assistant,  Lane 
Medical  Librai-y,  a  graduate  of  Brown 
University,  who  received  her  library  train- 
ing in  the  Providence  Public  Librai'y ; 
Miss  Laura  Kennel,  Assistant,  Reference 
Division,  a  graduate  of  Bluffton  CWlege, 
Iowa,  and  of  the  training  class  at  the 
Cincinnati  Public  Library,  who  is  taking 
Miss  Ruth  Scibird's  place  while  she  is 
ill ;  Mrs  Elsie  Stone,  Cataloger  Charlotte 
Ashley  Felton  Memorial  Library,  a  gradu- 
ate of  Simmons  College  Library   School. 

Mrs  Evelyn  F.  French,  Assistant,  Doc- 
ument Division,  is  ill  in  the  Stanford 
Hospital  in  San  Franc-isco. 

Sec.  of  Stanford  Library  Club. 

SANTA   CRUZ   COUNTY 

(Twenty-sixth    class) 
County  seat,   Santa  Cruz. 
Area,  425  sq.  mi.     Pop.  26,269. 
Assessed    valuation    $30,237,372     (tax- 
able for  county  $26,027,869). 

Watsonville 

Watson VLLLE  [Free]  Public  Libbaby. 
Mrs  Edith  Simons,  Lib'n. 

Mrs  Edith  Simons,  formerly  libra- 
rian of  Oroville  Public  Library,  took  the 
place  of  librarian  of  Watsonville  Public 
Library  February  1.  She  succeeds  Miss 
Lucy  S.  Bliss,  who  resign etl  October  1, 
1929. 


SHASTA  COUNTY 

(Thirty-fifth   class) 
County  seat,  Redding. 
Area,  4050  sq.  mi.    Pop.  13,311. 
Assessed    valuation    $25,611,878    (tax-  , 
able  for  county  $15,081,270).  ^, 

SIERRA  COUNTY 

(Fifty-sixth  class) 
County  seat,  Downieville. 
Area,  957  sq.  mi.     Pop.  1783. 
Assessed  valuation  $3,206,857   (taxable 
for  county  $2,802,355). 

SrEBRA  Co.  Free  Libbaby.  Miss  Kath- 
erine  R.   Woods,   I^ib'n. 

Goodyear  Bar  School  District  Branch 
of  Sieira  County  Free  Library  was  estab- 
lished February  3. 

Kathekine  R.  Woods,  Lib'n. 

SISKIYOU    COUNTY 

(Thii-ty-third  class) 
County  seat,  Yreka. 
Area,  6079  sq.  mi.     Pop.  18,545. 
Assessed    valuation    $29,832,171    (tax- 
able for  county  $21,754,500). 

SOLANO   COUNTY 

(Nineteenth  class) 
County  seat,  Fairfield. 
Area,  911  sq.  mi.     Pop.  40,602. 
Assessed    valuation    $41,301,897    (tax- 
able for  county  $33,942,910). 

Solano  Co.  Free  Libbaby,  Fairfield. 
Miss  Clara  B.  DUls,  Lib'n. 

The  Solano  County  Free  Library  re- 
ports a  busy  quarter  mixed  with  sorrow. 
On  January  8  Mrs  Dorothy  W^brden  of  the 
staff  died  at  the  Sutter  Hospital  in  Sacra- 
mento following  a  serious  operation.  She 
will  be  missed  by  all  and  her  death  leaves 
a  vacancy  on  the  library  staff  that  will 
be  keenly  felt.  Her  understanding  of  the 
work  was  so  helpful. 

Since  January  the  time  has  been  spent 
in  getting  the  much  upset  temporai-y  quar- 
ters in  the  American  Legion  Building  in 
Suisun  in  shape  to  resume  book  seiTice 
to  schools  and  branches.  Much  time  also 
was  used  in  getting  the  figures  ready  for 
the  insurance  adjuster,  for  no  seiTice  was 
allowed  to  be  given  until  the  insurance 
company  had  made  its  settlement. 

Service  was  commenced  by  the  middle 
of    February    and   now    the   schools   and 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


165 


SOLANO  CO.— Continued 
branches  as  well  as  the  public  libraries 
are  being  sei-ved  with  the  books  recently 
purchased  to  fill  the  long  delayed  requests. 

Miss  M.  Ethel  Goodfellow  has  come  to 
help  the  library  bring  order  out  of  all 
this  chaos. 

Plans  to  hold  the  annual  meeting  of 
the  Third  District  ol  the  California  Li- 
brary Association  in  Suisun  have  been 
arranged  by  Miss  Margaret  Adelle  Bar- 
nett,  the  president  of  the  district,  and 
the  Solano  County  Library.  The  lessons 
from  the  fire  and  the  insurance  settle- 
ment were  thought  to  be  of  interest  to 
every  member  of  these  six  counties. 

Clara  B.  Dills,  Lib'n. 

SONOMA    COUNTY 

(Fourteenth  class) 
County  seat,   Santa  Rosa. 
Area,  1540  sq.  mi.    Pop.  .51,990. 
Assessed    valuation    $55,733,143     (tax- 
|able  for  county  $47,345,797). 

Healdsburg 

Healdsbubg  High  School  Lieraey. 
Edwin  Kent,  Jr.,  Prin.  Gertrude  Bon- 
ham,  Lib'n. 

We  are  using  the  Library  of  Congress 
cards  for  our  catalog,  and  have  now  pur- 
chased over  half  the  required  cards  and 
have  them  in  the  drawers  for  use.  One 
drawer  of  our  catalog  case  is  being  re- 
served for  bibliography  on  various  sub- 
jects. 

Gertrude  Bonham,  Lib'n. 

STANISLAUS  COUNTY 

(Sixteenth  class) 
County  seat,  Modesto. 
Area,  1486  sq.  mi.     Pop.  43,557. 
Assessed    valuation    $66,186,191     (tax- 
able for  county  $57,240,460). 

Stanislaus  Co.  Free  Library,  Mo- 
desto.   Miss  Bessie  B.  Silverthom,  Lib'n. 

The  outstanding  event  of  this  quarter 
was  the  Fourth  District  Meeting  of  the 
California  Library  Association,  February 
15,  held  in  our  library,  which  brought  to- 
gether not  only  a  large  attendance  of  our 
own  memhers,  but  many  delightful  guests 
from  other  districts. 

Book  reviews  were  given  during  the 
month  by  the  county  librarian  at  the  fol- 
lowing  clubs :    Turlock    Woman's   Relief 


STANISLAUS  CO.— Continued 

Corps,  February  26 ;  Modesto  W.  C.  T.  U., 
February  28,  and  an  address  on  Life  in 
Washington,  D.  C,  before  the  Merced 
Business  and  Professional  Women's  Club, 
February  25. 

March  18  to  29,  an  exhibit  of  Japanese 
prints  was  held  in  the  assembly  room  at 
headquarters  in  cooperation  with  the 
American  Association  of  University  Wo- 
men, at  which  time  186  beautiful  wood 
cuts  in  color  were  loaned  by  the  Japan 
Art  and  Novelty  Importing  Company,  of 
Minneapolis.  These  were  later  sold  by 
the  Association  for  the  benefit  of  its 
scholarship  fund. 

Welcome  visitors  to  our  library  dur- 
ing the  past  month  have  been  Misses  Mai-y 
Barmby,  Sarah  McCardle,  M'inette  Stod- 
dard, Cornelia  Provines,  county  libra- 
rians, respectively,  of  Alameda,  Fresno, 
Mereed  and  Sacramento^  counties. 

Owing  to  the  failing  health  of  the  cus- 
todian, Mrs  F.  M.  Handlon,  the  Hickman 
Branch  is  being  moved  to  the  home  of 
Mrs  Margaret  Martinelli.  The  branch 
has  been  in  the  Hickman  Hotel  for  the 
past  twelve  years.  Mrs  H.  W.  Cornils 
succeeds  Mrs  Grace  Miller  as  custodian 
of  the  Newman  Branch. 

Bessie  B.  Silvekthoen,  Lib'n. 

SUTTER  COUNTY 

( Forty-first    class ) 
County  seat,  Yuba  City. 
Area,  611  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,115. 
Assessed    valuation    $23,511,685    (tax- 
able for  county  $18,542,232). 

TEHAMA  COUNTY 

(Thirty-sixth  class) 
County  seat.  Red  Bluff. 
Area,  3200  sq.  mi.     Pop.  12,882. 
Assessed    valuation    $23,208,869    (tax- 
able for  county  $19,134,190.) 

Tehama  Co.  Free  Library,  Red 
Bluff.     Miss  Anne  Bell  Bailey,  Lib'n. 

Red  Bank  Branch,  one  of  the  oldest  in 
the  county,  which  was  suspended  last 
fall  has  been  reopened  in  the  Community 
Church,  with  Miss  Gladys  Pitkin  as  cus- 
todian. 

Renewed  efforts  to  interest  the  people 
of  the  county  in  the  formation  of  a  his- 
torical  society   have   resulted  in   the  ap- 


166 


NEWS    NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


,     TEHAMA   CO.— Continued 

pointment  of  a  committee  to  attend  to 
the  details  of  form  and  aims  of  the  or- 
ganization and  an  early  meeting  of  the 
society  as  an  entity  seems  probable.  Te- 
hama County  retains  much  of  the  atmos- 
phere of  old  California  but  is  rapidly 
assuming  the  appearance  and  air  of  an 
up-to-date  hustling  American  business 
center.  Picturesque  incidents  of  the  early 
days,  if  remembered  at  all,  are  being 
decorated  mth  legendary  trimmings  and 
they  exist  for  the  most  part  only  in  the 
miemory  of  some  of  the  old-timers.  The 
need  of  perpetuating  them  on  paper  and 
finding  a  place  to  preserve  them  is  the 
very  vital  need  at  present.  Mr  J.  D. 
Sweeney,  whose  hobby  is  "California  His- 
toi-y,"  is  chairman  of  the  committee  and 
the  county  librarian  is  secretary. 

The  librarian  and  Mrs  Russell  of  Glenn 
County  Free  Library  spent  a  most  profit- 
able day  with  Miss  Burkett  of  Sutter 
County  February  26. 

The  librarian  attended  the  annual 
county  meeting  of  the  School  Trustees  in 
Red  Bluff  when  Mr  Kersey  spoke  in  his 
usual  vigorous  and  inspiring  manner  and 
also  the  Coming  P.  T.  A.  meeting  for 
February,  when  she  again  enjoyed  the 
privilege  of  hearing  him. 

Anne  Bell  Bailey,  Lib'n. 


TRINITY    COUNTY 

(Fifty-fifth  class) 
County  seat,   Weaverville. 
Area,  3276  sq.  mi.     Pop.  2551. 
Assessed  valuation  $3,781,373   (taxable 
for  county  $3,328,125). 

TULARE   COUNTY 

(Eleventh  class) 
County  seat,  Visalia. 
Area,  4863  sq.  mi.     Pop.  59,031. 
Assessed    valuation    $97,250,518     (tax- 
able for  county  $72,716,340). 

Orosi 

Obosi  High  School  Libbakt.     Frank 
A.  Bauman,  Prin. 

The  Orosi  High  School  has  established 
a  complete  filing  system,  card  index,  cross 
index  and  shelf  list  for  entire  library. 
E.  W.  PiLGBiK,  Lib'n. 


TUOLUMNE  COUNTY 

(Forty-sixth  class) 
County  seat,  Sonora. 
Area,  2292  sq.  mi.     Pop.  7768. 
Assessed    valuation    $12,436,752     (tax- 
able for  county  $8,543,027). 

VENTURA   COUNTY 

(Twenty-third  class) 
County  seat,  Ventura. 
Area,  1850  sq.  mi.     Pop.  28,724. 
Assessed   valuation   $119,364,140  •  ( tax- 
able for   county   $107,300,580). 

Venttjba  Co.  Free  Libbaby,  Ven- 
TUEA.     Miss  Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 

Two  members  of  the  office  staff,  together 
with  the  librarians  of  the  Ventura  Junior 
High  School  and  of  the  Ojai  Branch,  and 
the  children's  librarian,  Mrs  Webster  of 
Santa  Paula,  attended  the  Sixth  District 
meeting. 

The  county  librarian  gave  a  talk  on 
upper  grade  reading  at  a  meeting  of  the 
rural  school  teachers  of  the  county  at 
Somis ;  she  also  spoke  on  "Recent 
Books"  at  the  Mound  Club  and  the  Cur- 
rent Topics  Club,  and  on  "Books  on  Wo- 
man's Progress"  at  the  Ventura  Sorop- 
timist  Club. 

The  new  .Junior  College  Librai-y  has 
been  opened  in  charge  of  Miss  Elizabeth 
Tolman.  This  is  a  branch  of  the  county 
library.  One  new  branch  has  been  opened 
at  Oak  View  Gardens  and  one  old  one 
reopened  at  Stauffer.  Mrs  Ruth  Sho- 
berg  is  in  charge  at  Oak  View  and  Mr 
E.  J.  Dodge  at  Stauffer. 

The  library  of  the  Nordhoff  Union  High 
School  which  was  bought  last  summer 
was  arranged  and  placed  on  the  shelves 
in  the  new  building.  A  thousand  dol- 
lars was  budgeted  for  new  books.  The 
same  amount  was  budgeted  for  the  Santa 
Paula  Union  High  School  Library  which 
was  also  put  into  shape  for  use. 

On  February  23,  1930,  the  new  Simi 
Branch  Library  was  opened.  Mr  Sol 
Sheridan,  the  author  of  the  "Little 
Spotted  Seal"  gave  a  charming  talk  on 
reading.  The  Simi  Valley  Union  High 
School  furnished  the  music.  Mr  Sheri- 
dan's brother,  Mr  Ed  Sheridan,  spoke  oni 
"Early  days  in  the  Simi  Valley."  The 
county  librarian  gave  a  short  introduc- 
tory talk.     Mrs  R.   A.   Printz  responded 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES 


167 


VENTURA  CO.— Continued 
for  the  valley  in  the  ahsence  of  Mrs  Hart- 
well  who  was  ill. 

The  Simi  Branch  is  a  very  small  li- 
brary building.  It  was  originally  planned 
for  a  twenty-five  foot  lot,  but  the  day  the 
contract  was  awarded,  the  neighborhood 
raised  money  for  the  purchase  of  a  fifty- 
foot  lot.  Nearly  fifty  dollars  was  given 
by  the  people  of  Simi  in  addition  for  the 
purchase  of  any  accessories  for  the  build- 
ing not  provided  in  the  budget.  So  far 
this  fund  has  furnished  andirons,  a  fire- 
place set,  and  a  clock. 

The  building  itself  is  colonial  in  style. 
It  has  a  very  home-like  look  and  will  be 
even  more  pleasant  when  the  shrubbery 
around  has  a  good  start.  Fortunately, 
there  are  some  large  eucalyptus  trees  and 
pepper  trees  to  make  a  good  background. 

The  Chamber  of  Commerce  of  Ventura 
City  has  asked  the  librarian  to  seiwe  on  a 
conxmittee  to  have  charge  of  the  celebra- 
tion of  the  one  hundred  and  fiftieth  anni- 
versary of  the  founding  of  San  Buena- 
ventura Mission.  This  celebration  wiU 
occur  in  about  two  years,  just  after 
Easter. 

A  weekly  story  hour  is  now  held  in 
Ventura  City,  The  Avenue,  Ojai  and  Fill- 
more. 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 

Santa   Paula 

Dean  Ho5?bs  Blanchard  MemoPvIAL 
[Free  Public]  Library.  Mrs  Gladys 
Brownsou  Kennedy,  Lib'n. 

On  February  first,  Mrs  Gladys  Brown- 
son  Kennedy  was  appointed  librarian,  to 
take  the  place  of  Miss  Mary  Boynton. 
who  is  now  librarian  for  Beverly  Hills. 

An  especially  interesting  piece  of  work 
has  been  our  cooperation  with  the  Ameri- 
canization classes.  Santa  Paula  has  a 
very  large  Mexican  population,  many  of 
whom  speak  no  English.  Both  day-time 
and  evening  classes  are  busy  with  the 
work  of  Americanization,  and  the  libi-ary 
has  placed  a  good  deposit  of  books  in  each 
school.  We  also  have  groups  of  the  chil- 
dren come  to  the  library  wath  their  teach- 
ers, that  we  may  interest  them,  and 
through  them  the  whole  family. 

We  have  acquired  a  large  collection  of 
the  lovely  colored  photographs  of  wild 
flowers,  done  by  Martindale,  and  are  hav- 
ing a  display  of  them  in  our  new  Multi- 
plex display  fixture. 


VENTURA    CO.— Continued 
Santa   Paula — Continued 
We  have  and  use  the  large  twelve  vol- 
lune  edition  of  the  new  Oxford  dictionary. 
Mrs  Gladys  Brown  son  Kennedy, 

Lib'n. 
Ventura 

Ventura  [ITree]  Public  Library 
AND  Branch,  Ventura  Co.  Fijee  Li- 
brary. Miss  Elizabeth  R.  Topping, 
Lib'n. 

Mrs  Spiller,  head  of  circulation  in  the 
city  library,  gave  a  book  review  at  the 
P.  E.  O.  and  the  Business  and  Profes- 
sional Woman's  Club.  Miss  Adelaide 
Wright  was  reappointed  to  half-time 
work. 

Elizabeth  R.  Topping,  Lib'n. 

YOLO    COUNTY 

(Thirty -fourth  class) 
County  seat,  Woodland. 
Area,  1017  sq.  mi.     Pop.  17,105. 
Assessed    valuation    $35,609,763     (tax- 
able for  county  $28,557,544). 

Woodland 

Woodland  High  School  Library. 
Raymond  H.  Butzbach,  Prin. 

Woodland  High  School  library  now  has 
2144  books  gathered  in  six  years.  We 
have  had  the  good  fortune  to  add  350 
books  since  September,  about  fitfty  given 
by  the  class  of  1929  as  a  graduation  gift 
and  fifty  more  from  a  patron  of  the  school. 
We  have  added  a  magazine  section  of 
fifteen  magazines  and  a  new  Brittanica. 

Mrs  Elamae  L.  Proctor,  Vice  Prin. 

YUBA    COUNTY 

(Fortieth  class) 
County  seat,   Mai-ysville. 
Area,  625  sq.  mi.     Pop.  10,375. 
Assessed    valuation    $21,978,516     (tax- 
able for  county  $17,593,9^). 

Marysviiie 

Marysville  City  [Free  Public] 
Library'.     Miss  Donna  L.  Burchell,  Lib'n. 

The  Marysville  City  Library  is  a  bene- 
ficiary under  the  wdll  of  Peter  Engel, 
Mai"ysville  school  administrator  and  re- 
tired jeweler,  according  to  a  petition  for 
probate  of  the  will  filed  .January  6  in  the 
Yuba  County  Superior  Court.  The  be- 
quest to  the  library  is  $250  cash. — Marys- 
ville AppeaT-Democrat,  Ja  7 


168 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


DIRECTORY  FOR  LIBRARY  SUPPLIES  AND  OTHER  ITEMS 
OF  GENERAL  INTEREST 


The  following  directory  is  based  on 
recommendations  received  from  the  libra- 
ries of  California.  New  recommendations 
and  corrections  will  be  welcomed  at  any 
time. 

SUPPLIES 
A.  L.  A. 
Headquarters. 

520  North  Michigan  ave.,  Chicago,  111. 

All  A.  L.  A.  publications  sold  from 
headquarters  except  1904  Catalog  which 
can  be  purchased  for  $1  from  Superin- 
tendent of  Documents,  Washington,  D.  C. 

Binding  and    Mending 
Binding. 

Cooperative  Binding  Co.,  330  Jackson 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Foster  &  Futernick  Co.,  444  Bryant  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Herring  &  Robinson,  1927  Howard  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Hicks-Judd  Co.,  1045  Sansome  st.,  San 

Francisco,  Calif. 
Pacific    Library    Binding   Co.,    770   E. 

Washington  st.,   Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Sacramento    Bookbindery,    309    J    St., 

Sacramento,  Calif. 
Silvius   and   Schoenbackler,  423  J   st., 

Sacramento,  Calif. 
Universal  West  Coast  Bindery,  164  N. 

Hill  ave.,  Pasadena,  Calif. 

Materials. 

Gaylord   Bros..   44   N.    Stanislaus   St., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Blind 
Embossed   books,   etc.     Addresses   will 
be  furnished  by  the  State  Library. 

Book  Cases  and  Shelving 
Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Book   Packing    Bags 

Hoegee  Co.,  138-142  S.  Main  st.,  Los 
Angeles,  Calif. 


Book  Packing  Boxes 
Pacific  Box  Factory,  2600  Taylor  st, 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Corrugated  Paper  Cartons, 

Illinois-Pacific    Glass    Co.,    15th    and 

Folsom  sts.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Richardson-Case      Paper      Co.,      1021 

Front  St.,  Sacramento,  Calif. 

Book  Plates 
Manhattan  Photogravure  Co.,  142  West 

27th  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Times-Mirror    Printing    and    Binding 

House,      118      S.      Broadway,      Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Western    Lithograph    Go.    600-610    E. 

Second  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Book  Pockets 

Democrat  Px'inting  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Hicks-Judd  Co.,  1045  Sansome  St.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Sei-vice,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave. 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

The  Zellerbach  Paper  Co.,  534  Battery 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Book    Stacks,    Metal    Furniture,    Etc. 

Art  Metal  Construction  Co.,  James- 
town, N.  Y. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

J.  Niederer  Co.,  3409  S.  Main  st.,  Los 
Angeles,  Calif. 

Van  Dorn  Iron  Works  Co.,  Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Book  Supports,  Bracket  and  Pedal  for 
Perforating  Stamp  and  Otiier  Me- 
chanical Appliances 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 
Gaylord    Bros.,    44   N.    Stanislaus   St., 
Stockton,  Calif, 


vol.  25,  no.  2]      directory  for  library  supplies,  etc. 


169 


Book  Supports,   Etc. — Continued 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion. Remington  liand  Business 
Sei-vice,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner  Co.,  365-369  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Book  Varnish 
Pacific   Library    Binding   Co.,    770   E. 
Washington  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Books 
Baker  &  Taylor  Co.,  55  5th  ave..  New 

York  City. 
Chivers  Book  Binding  Co.,  126  Nassau 

St.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
For  books  in  Chivers  binding. 

Paul  Elder  &  Co.,  289  Post  St.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Emporium,  835-865  Market  St.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

Himebaugh  &  Browne,  471  Fifth  ave., 
New  York,  N.  Y. 

Holmes  Book  Co.,  274  14th  St.,  Oak- 
land, and  152  Kearny  st.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 

H.  R.  Huntting  Co.,  Springfield,  Mass. 

Levinson's,  The  Book  Store,  1012  K  st., 
Sacramento,  Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Library  Depart- 
ment, 333  E.  Ontario  st.,  Chicago,  111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  St., 
New  York  City. 

Newbegin's,  358  Post  St.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's  Book  Store  (C.  C.  Parker), 
520  W.  6th  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Sather  Gate  Bookshop,  2235  Telegraph 
ave.,  Berkeley,  Calif. 

Chas.  Scribner's  Sons,  597  5th  ave., 
New  York,  N.  Y. 

G.  E.  Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33  E.  10th 
St.,  New  York.  N.  Y. 

Technical  Book  Co.,  525  Market  st, 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Technical  Publishing  Co.,  124  W.  4th 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Handles  only   technical  books. 

LTnion  Library  Association,  118-120  E. 
25th  St.,  New  York  City. 


Books — Continued 

Vroman's  Book  Store,  329  E.  Colorado 

St.,  Pasadena. 
Harr    Wagner,    609    Mission    at.,    San 

Francisco,  Calif. 

Especially  western  books  by  western  authors. 

White  House,  Sutter  st.,  bet.  Grant 
ave.  and  Kearny  st.,  San  Francisco, 

Calif. 

English  Books  and  Publications. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33   E.   10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   F.   Stevens  &  Bi-own,  4  Trafalgar 
Square,  London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 

Foreign    Books   and   Publications    in 

Various  Languages. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,   31-33   E.  10th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
E.  Steiger  &  Co.,  49  Murray  st..  New 

York,  N.  Y. 
B.   Westermann  Co.,  Inc.,  19  W.  46th 

St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Fi'ench. 

French  Book  Store,  Alfred  Blanc  &  J. 
Delabriandais,  324  Stockton  St.,  San 
Francisco,  Calif. 
J.    Terquem,    19    Rue    Scribe,    Paris, 
France. 

Italian. 

A.  Cavalli  &  Co.,  255  Columbus  ave., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano  Suarez,  Madrid,  Spain. 

Law  Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney   Co.,  200  McAllister 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Matthew  Bender  &  Co.,  109  State  st., 

Albany,  N.  Y. 

School  Books. 

Milton  Bradley  Co.,  554  Mission  St., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

California  School  Book  Depository,  149 
New  Montgomery  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif. 

Ginn  &  Co.,  45  Second  st,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Library  Depart- 
ment, 333  B.  Ontario  st.,  Chicago,  111. 

Owen  Publishing  Co.,  554  Mission  st., 
San  Francisco.  Calif. 


170 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Books — Continued 
Second-Hand  Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson's,  Inc.,  30  Church  at., 

New  York  City. 
Mudie's    Select    Library,    30-34    New 

Oxford  St.,  London,  Eng. 
Charles  T.  Powner  Co.,  542  S.  Spring 

St.,  I^.s  Angeles,  Calif. 
Henry    Sotheran    &    Co.,    140    Strand, 

London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 
G.   E.   Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33   E.  10th 

at.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
B.   F.   Stevens  &  Brown,  4  Trafalgar 

Square,  London,  W.  C.  2,  Eng. 
A.  R.  Womrath,  21  W.  45th  st.,  New 

York,  N.  Y. 

For  used  Action. 

Especially  Californiana. 

Dawson's  Book  Shop,  627  S.  Grand 
ave.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

F.  M.  De  Witt,  620  14th  st.,  Oakland, 
Calif. 

Holmes  Book  Co.,  274  14th  st.,  Oak- 
land, and  152  Kearny  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

John  Howell,  328  Post  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Cabinets 

See  Furniture  and  Supplies. 

Catalog  Cards 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Yawman  &  Erbe  Manufacturing  Co., 
132-140  Sutter  st.,  San  Francisco, 
and  727  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts 
H.  S.  Crocker  Co.,  565-571  Market  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
A.  J.  Nystrom  &  Co.,  Chicago,  lU.,  Pub- 
lishers. ( Local  Agent  M.  H.  E.  Beck- 
ley,   90    Second    st.,    San   Francisco, 
Calif.) 


Clippings. 

Allen's    Press    Clipping    Bureau,    255 

Commercial  st.,   San  Francisco,  and 

626  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Cutter  Tables,  Size  Rulers,  Etc. 
Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  St.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Duplicating  Appliances 

Dandy  Duplicator. 

Dodge  &  Dent,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
Edison  Rotary  Mimeograph. 

H.   S.   Crocker  Co.    (Agents),  565-571  "fj' 
Market  st.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Filing  Cases 

See  Furniture  and  Supplies. 

Films 

For  Rent. 

American  Red  Cross  Films,  distributed 

by  University  of  California  Library, 

Berkeley,  Calif. 
Fox  Film  Corporation,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
National  Producers  Film   Service,  111 

Golden    Gate    ave.,    San    Francisco, 

Calif. 
Pathe   Exchange,    Inc.,   Non-Theatrical 

Dept.,    985    Market    st.,    San    Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 
United    States    Forest    Service,    Ferry 

bldg.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
University     of     California,     Extension 

Division,  Berkeley,  Calif. 

Fine  Computer  and  Circulating  Library 
Calculator 

H.  S.  Hirshberg,  c/o  Western  Reserve 
University,  School  of  Library  Sci- 
ence, Cleveland,  Ohio. 

Furniture   and    Supplies 

Griraes-Stassforth  Stationery  Co.,  737- 
739  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave.. 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-FuUer  Desk  Co.,  877  Mission 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 


i 


vol.  25,  no.  2]      directory  for  library  supplies,  etc. 


171 


Furniture    and    Supplies — Continued 
Yawman    &    Erbe    Manufacturing    Co., 
132-140    Sutter   st.,    San    Francisco, 
and  727  S.  Spring  st.,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Filing  Cases  for  Music. 

Los  Angeles  Desk  Co.,  848  S.  Hill  st., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Globes 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  5235-7  Ravens- 
M'ood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
agent :  A.  B.  Maine,  Box  6.35,  Arcade 
Station,  Los  Angeles,  Calif.) 

A.  J.  Nystrom  &  Co.,  Chicago,  111.,  Pub- 
lishers. (Local  Agent  M.  H.  B.  Beck- 
ley,  90  Second  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif.) 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento,  Calif. 

Rand-McNaHy  Co.,  125  E.  Sixth  st., 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

C.  F.  Weber  &  Co.,  985  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Magazine    Binders 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Erne  File  and  Binder  Co.,  215-217 
Greene  st.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Gaylord    Bros.,    44    N.    Stanislaus    St., 
Stockton,  Calif. 
'..    Gem    Binder    Co.,    65    W.    Broadway, 
New  York. 

Wm.  G.  Johnston  &  Co.,  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

iVIagazines 

See  Periodicals. 

Maps 

Denoyer-Geppert  Co.,  5235-7  Ravens- 
wood  ave.,  Chicago,  111.  (Local 
agent :  A.  B.  Maine,  Box  635,  Arcade 
Station,   Los  Angeles,   Calif.) 

A.  J.  Nystrom  &  Co.,  Chicago,  111.,  Pub- 
lishers. ( Local  Agent  M.  H.  E.  Beck- 
ley,  90  Second  st.,  San  Francisco, 
Calif.) 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally  Co.,  125  E.  Sixth  st., 
Los  Angeles,  and  559  Mission  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 


Maps — Continued 
C.   F.   Weber   &   Co.,   985   Market   st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Music 

Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  Kearny  and  Sut- 
ter sts.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

G.  Schirmer,  3  E.  43d  st..  New  York, 
N.  Y. 

Pamphlet    and    Multi-Binders,    and 
Pamphlet   Boxes 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Library  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Paste 

Gaylord    Bros.,    44   N.    Stanislaus   st., 

Stockton,  Calif. 
Pacific    Library    Binding    Co.,    770    E. 

Washington   st.,   Los  Angeles,   Calif. 

Pasting    Machines 

A.  G.  Prior,  136  Liberty  st..  New 
York,  N.  Y. 

Perforating  Stamps 

B.  F.  Cummins  Co.,  Chicago,  111. 
Moise-Klinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Periodicals 
Back  Volumes  and  Numbers. 

F.  W.  Faxon  Co.,  83-91  Francis  st., 
Back  Bay,  Boston,  Mass. 

F.  M.  De  Witt,  620  14th  st.,  Oakland, 
Calif. 

Pacific  Library  Binding  Co.,  770  E. 
Washington   st.,   Los  Angeles,   Calif. 

Universal  Library  Service,  2189  Wool- 
worth  bldg..  New  York  City. 

H.  W.  Wilson  Co.,  958-64  University 
ave..  New  York  City. 

Subscription  Agencies. 

John    A.    Clow,    2925    N.    Lake    ave., 

Pasadena,  Calif. 
F.   W.   Faxon   Co.,   83-91   Francis   st.. 

Back  Bay,  Boston,  Mass. 
Franklin      Square     Agency,     Franklin 

Square,  New  York  City. 
Moore-Cottrell    Subscription    Agencies, 

North  Cohocton,  N.  Y. 


172 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Periodicals — Continued 

Mutual  Subscription  Agency,  602  Cro- 
zer  Bldg.,  Pliiladelphia,  Pa. 

Pacific  News  Bureau,  643  S.  Olive  St., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Purnell  Stationery  Co.,  915  K  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San  Frtfnciseo  News  Co.,  657  Howard 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

G.  B.  Stechert  &  Co.,  31-33  E.  10th 
St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

For  foreign  periodicals  only. 

Sunset  Subscription  Agency,  631 
South  West  Bldg.,  130  S.  Broadway, 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Pictures 

Braun  &  Co.,  Dornach,  Alsace,  France. 
Curtis    &    Cameron,     Copley     Square, 
Boston,  Mass. 

Especially  for  reproduction  of  American  art. 

Toni  Landau  Photo  Co.,  1  E.  45th  st.. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

(Formerly  Berlin  Photographic  Co.) 
Perry  Pictures  Co.,  Maiden,  Mass. 
Vickery,  Atkins  &  Torrey,   550   Sutter 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Rubber   Stamps  and   Type 

Chipron  Stamp  Co.,  224  West  First 
St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Los  Angeles  Rubber  Stamp  Co.,  131  S. 
Spring  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner  Co.,  365-369  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Sleeper  Stamp  Co.,  528  J  st.,  Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

Scales 
Fairbanks-Morse    &    Co.,     Spear    and 
Harrison  sts.,   San  Francisco,   Calif. 

Shelf  Label-Holders 

Democrat  Printing  Co.,  Madison,  Wis. 

Gaylord  Bros.,  44  N.  Stanislaus  st., 
Stockton,  Calif. 

Librai-y  Dept.,  Library  Bureau  Divi- 
sion, Remington  Rand  Business 
Service,  Inc.,  39  Second  st.,  San 
Francisco,  and  1200  S.  Grand  ave., 
Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Signs 
Sam  H.  Harris,  631  S.  Spring  st.,  Los 

Angeles,  Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner    Co.,    365-369    Market 

St.,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Tablet  &  Ticket  Co.,  604  Mission  st., 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 


Slides 

Geo.  Kanzee,  12  Geary  st.,  San  Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Movie  Slides. 

Victor  Animatograph  Co.,  Davenport. 
Iowa. 

Stamp  Affixers 
Multipost  Co.,  Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Steel  Stacl<s 

See  Book  Stacks. 

Stereoscopic  Views 
Keystone  View  Co.,  Meadville,  Pa. 
W.  O.  Wright   (Agent  Keystone  View 

Co.),  832  Indian  Rock  ave.,  Berkeley, 

Calif. 
George  E.  Stone,  Carmel,  Calif. 

For  Califomia  vrild  flowers,  marine  life,   hlstorio 

views. 

Typewriter   Ribbons 

L.  &  M.  Alexander,  444  Market  st., 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Remington  Typewriter  Co.,  240  Bush 
St.,  San  Francisco,  420  S.  Spring  st., 
Los  Angeles,  and  913  8th  st.,  Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter  Inspection  Co.,  426  S. 
Spring  St.,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Underwood  Typewriter  Co.,  531  Market 
St.,  San  Francisco,  430  S.  Broad- 
way, Los  Angeles,  and  611  J  St., 
Sacramento,  Calif. 

CALIFORNIA     LIBRARY    SCHOOLS 

Los  Angeles  Library  School.  For  full 
information,  write  to  Librarian,  Public 
Library,  Los  Angeles,  California. 

Riverside  Library  Service  School. 
For  full  information  write  to  Librarian, 
Public  library.  Riverside.  Calif. 

University  of  California  School  of  Li- 
brarianship.  For  fuU  information  write 
to  Chairman,  School  of  Librarianship, 
University  of  California,  Berkeley,  Calif. 

AMERICAN  LIBRARY  ASSOCIA- 
TION 

Officers  for  1929-30  are: 

President,  Andrew  Keogh,  Librarian, 
Yale  University  Library,  New  Haven, 
Conn. 

1st  Vice  President,  Everett  R.  Perry, 
Librarian,  Public  Library,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 


vol.  25,  no.  2]      dieectory  for  library  supplies,  etc. 


173 


2d  Vice  President,  Jennie  M.  Flexner, 
Public  Library,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Secretary,  Carl  H.  Milam,  Chicago,  111. 

Treasurer,  Matthew  S.  Dudgeon,  Li- 
brarian, Public  Library,  Milwaukee,  Wis. 

AMERICAN   ASSOCIATION   OF   LAW 
LIBRARIES 

Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 

President,  Frederick  W.  Schenk,  Law 
Librarian,  University  of  Chicago,  Chicago, 
111. 

1st  Vice  President,  S.  D.  Klapp,  Li- 
brarian, Minneapolis  Bar  Assoc,  Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

2d  Vice  President,  Helen  S.  Moylan, 
University  of  Iowa  Law  Library,  Iowa 
City,   Iowa. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Arthur  S.  Mc- 
Daniel,  Asst.  Ln.  Association  of  the  Bar 
Library,  42  W.  44th  st..  New  York  City. 

CALIFORNIA  SCHOOL  LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 

Northern  Section — Polly  R.  Hatch, 
Polytechnic  High  School,  San  Francisco, 
President. 

Helen  Price,  University  High  School, 
Oakland,  Vice  President. 

Lillian  Morehouse,  Palo  Alto  Union 
High  School,  Palo  Alto,  Secretary. 

Mrs  Neil  B.  Fuller,  Modesto  Junior 
College,  Modesto,  Treasurer. 

Katherine  D.  Steele,  San  Mateo  Junior 
College,  San  Mateo,  Director. 

Southern  Section — Rosa  B.  Cage,  Riv- 
erside Polytechnic  High  School,  River- 
side, President. 

Marjorie  Fullwood,  Franklin  Junior 
High  School,  Long  Beach,  Vice  President. 

Clara  E.  Purdum,  Mt.  Vernon  Junior 
High  School,  Los  Angeles,  Secretary. 

Lillian  Dickson,  Santa  Ana  High 
School  and  Junior  College,  Santa  Ana, 
Treasurer. 

LEAGUE  OF  LIBRARY  COMMIS- 
SIONS 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 

President,  Mrs  Lillian  B.  Griggs,  Sec- 
retary and  Director,  North  Carolina  Li- 
brary Commission,  Raleigh,  N,  C. 

1st  Vice  President,  Malcolm  G.  Wyer, 
Librarian,  Denver  Public  Library,  Den- 
ver, Colo. 

2d  Vice  President,  Fannie  C.  Rawson, 
Secretary  and  Director,  State  Library 
Commission,  Frankfort,  Ky. 


Secretary-Treasurer,  Jane  Morey,  Sec- 
retary, Missouri  Library  Commission, 
Jefferson  City,  Mo. 

NATIONAL   ASSOCIATION   OF 
STATE  LIBRARIES 

Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 

President,  Louis  J.  Bailey,  Director, 
Indiana  State  Library,  Indianapolis,  Ind, 

1st  Vice  President,  Mrs  Clare  E. 
Ausherman,  Librarian,  Wyoming  State 
Library,  Cheyenne,  Wyo. 

2d  Vice  President,  Carrie  L.  Brough- 
ton.  Librarian,  North  Carolina  State  Li- 
brary, Raleigh,  N.  C. 

Secretary- Treasurer,  Irma  A.  Watts, 
Reference  Librarian,  Pennsylvania  Legis- 
lative Reference  Bureau,  Harrisburg,  Pa. 

PACIFIC   NORTHWEST  LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 

President,  Ellen  Garfield  Smith,  Li- 
brarian, Public  Library,  Walla  Walla, 
Wash. 

1st  Vice  President,  Sarah  Virginia 
Lewis,  Public  Library,  Seattle,  Wash. 

2d  Vice  President,  John  Hosie,  Libra- 
rian, Provincial  Library,  Victoria,  B.  C. 

Secretary,  Mirpah  G.  Blair,  State  Li- 
brary, Salem,  Ore. 

Treasurer,  Ora  L.  Maxwell,  Public 
Library,  Spokane,  Wash. 

SPECIAL     LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 

President,  William  Alcott,  Librarian, 
Boston  Gloie,  Boston,  Mass. 

1st  Vice  President,  Florence  Bradley, 
Librarian,  Metropolitan  Life  Insurance 
Co.,  New  York  City. 

2d  Vice  President,  Margaret  Reynolds, 
Librarian,  First  Wisconsin  National 
Bank,  Milwaukee,  Wis. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Mary  H.  Brigham,  11 
Nisbet  St.,  Providence,  R.  I. 

Treasurer,  Elizabeth  O.  CuUen,  Refer- 
ence Librarian,  Bureau  of  Railway  Eco- 
nomics, Washington,  D.  C. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CHAPTER,  NA- 
TIONAL SPECIAL  LIBRARIES 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1930  are: 
President,    Thomas   Cowles,    California 
Academy  of  Sciences. 


^4 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Vice  President,  Mrs  Amy  M.  Caya, 
California   State  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

Secretary,  Margaret  Miller,  Standard 
Oil  Co.  of  California,  Dept.  of  Economics. 

SOUTHERN  CALIFORNIA  CHAP- 
TER, NATIONAL  SPECIAL 
LIBRARIES  ASSOCIATION 

Officers  for  1929-30  are: 

President,  Ralph  M.  Whiting,  Munici- 
pal Reference  Department,  Los  Angeles 
Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Vice  President,  Anna  F.  Frey,  Western 
Precipitation  Co.,  Los  Angeles. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Plelen  L.  Allen,  956 
North  Brand  blvd.,   San  Fernando. 

Treasurer,  Margaret  E.  Addison, 
Security-First  National  Bank. 

PASADENA  LIBRARY  CLUB 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 
President,  Willard  O.  Waters. 
Secretary-Treasurer,       Mrs       Patricia 
Dutcher,  Pasadena  Public  Library. 

ORANGE  COUNTY  LIBRARY  CLUB 

Officers  for  1930-31  are  : 

President,  Edith  .T.  Hubbart,  Librarian, 
.Huntington  Beach  High  School  Library. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Mrs  Blanche  Wis- 
ner,  Garden  Grove  Branch,  Orange  County 
Free  Library. 

SAN   ANTONIO   LIBRARY  CLUB 

Officers  for  1929--30  are  : 

President,  Bespie  Sheppard,  Pomona 
Public  Library. 

Secretary,  Alberta  Schaefer,  Ontario 
Public  Library. 

CONFERENCE  OF  COLLEGE  AND 
UNIVERSITY  LIBRARIANS  OF 
SOUTHERN  CALIFORNIA 

Officers  for  1929-30  are : 

President,  Mrs  Ethelene  M.  Kitching, 
Librarian,  FuUerton  Union  High  School 
and  Junior  College. 

Secretary,  Dr  Marcus  Skarstedt,  Li- 
brarian, Whittier  College. 

EAST   BAY   LIBRARY  COUNCIL 

Officers  for  1929-30  are  : 

Chairman,  Susan  T.  Smith,  Librarian, 
Berkeley  Public  Library. 

Secretary,  Jean  D.  Baird,  Alameda 
County  Free  Library.  ' 


ALUMNAE  ASSOCIATION  OF  THE 
UNIVERSITY  OF  CALIFORNIA 
AND  STATE    LIBRARY   SCHOOLS 

President,  Ruth  Steinmetz,  Stanford 
University. 

Vice  President,  Caroline  Wenzel,  Cali- 
fornia State  Library,   Sacramento. 

Secretary,  Mary  Dornin,  University  of 
California,   Berkeley. 

EMPLOYMENT   BUREAU 

The  State  Library  registers  all 
library  workers  in  California  who  are 
looking  for  positions  and  all  from  outside 
the  state  who  wish  to  come  here.  Also 
it  will  be  glad  to  know  of  libraries  that 
want  head  librarians  or  assistants  in  any 
branch  of  their  work.  In  writing  for 
recoznmendations,  librax-ies  are  urged  to 
be  as  specific  as  possible,  especially  in 
regard  to  time  position  must  be  filled  and 
salary  offered.  A  librarian  who  wishes 
to  be  dropped  from  the  Employment 
Bureau  list  and  a  library  that  fills  a  posi- 
tion for  which  it  has  asked  a  recom- 
mendation will  help  the  work  greatly  by 
notifying  the  State  Library  at  once.  For 
further  information,  write  to  the  State 
Library,  Sacramento,  California. 

ANNUAL   CONVENTION    SPECIAL 
LIBRARIES  ASSOCIATION 

Special  librarians  from  all  parts  of  the 
United  States  will  meet  in  San  Francisco 
June  18  to  21  for  the  twenty-second  an- 
nual convention  of  the  national  Special 
Libraries  Association.  This  is  the  first 
time  the  meeting  has  been  held  on  the 
Pacific  Coast.  The  delegates  will  be  wel- 
comed by  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  librarian  of 
the  California  State  Library.  Headquar- 
ters are  to  be  at  the  Clift  Hotel. 

The  Special  Libraries  Association  was 
founded  in  1909.  Membership  includes  li- 
brarians from  all  types  of  business  and 
professional  concerns.  Newspapers, 
manufacturing  firms,  banks,  insurance 
companies,  museums,  law  firms,  research 
organizations  are  represented.  By  pool- 
ing the  experience  and  knowledge  of  meth- 
ods and  sources  of  its  members  the  or- 
ganization acts  as  a  clearing  house  of 
information  on  all  subjects.  Educational 
work  is  carried  on  in  connection  with  the 
establishment  of  libraries  for  business 
houses  and  helping  them  in  selecting  effi- 
cient systems  of  classification  and  filing. 


vol.  25,  no.  2]      directory  for  library  supplies,  etc. 


175 


Approximately  1100  members  and  sub- 
scribers are  scattered  throughout  the 
United  States  and  twelve  foreign  coun- 
tries. William  Alcott,  librarian  of  the 
Boston  Globe,  is  president  of  the  Asso- 
ciation. 

For  centralization  of  knowledge  con- 
cerning specific  activities,  six  groups  ex- 
ist within  the  organization.  These  are 
Civic-Social,     Commercial-Technical,     Fi- 


nancial,   Insurance,   Museum   and   News- 
paper. 

For  the  past  two  years  the  convention 
has  been  held  in  Washington,  D.  C. 
Angus  Fletcher,  British  Library  of  In- 
formiation.  New  York,  is  chairman  of  the 
national  convention  committee.  Miss 
K.  Dorothy  Ferguson,  librarian  of  the 
Bank  of  Italy,  is  chairman  of  the  local 
committee. 


176 


NEWS    NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION 


OFFICERS 

President,  Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock,  Kern 
County  Free  Library,  Bakersfield. 

Vice  President,  John  B.  Kaiser,  Free 
Library,  Oakland. 

Secretary-Treasurer,  Hazel  G.  Gibson, 
P.  O.  Box  189,  Sacramento. 

Trustees  Section 

President.  Mrs  Otto  J.  Zahn,  Trus- 
tee Public  Library,  Los  Angeles. 

Secretary,  Miss  E.  Kate  Rea,  Trustee 
Public  Library,  Anaheim. 

Municipal   Libraries  Section 
President,  Gertrude  E.  DeGelder,  Pub- 
lic Library,  FuUerton. 

Secretary,  Ruth  Ellis,  Public  Library, 
Whittier. 

Special  Libraries  Section 

President,  Anna  P.  Kennedy,  Alameda 
County  Medical  Society  Library,  Oak- 
land. 

Secretary,  Thomas  Cowles,  California 
Academy  of  Sciences  Library,  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

COMMITTEES 

Executive  Committee — The  President, 
Vice  President,  Secretary-Treasurer  and 
Mabel  R.  Gillis,  Sarah  E.  McCardle, 
Everett  R.  Perry,  Robert  Rea,  Mrs  Alice 
G.  Whitbeck,  Charles  F.  Woods. 

Auditing — Mrs  Alma  J.  Danford,  Pub- 
lic Library  Glendale,  chairman ;  Mrs 
Florence  E.  Robinson. 

Nominating — The  Constitution  provides 
for  a  "Nominating  Committee  consisting 
of  representatives  selected  by  the  respec- 
tive districts  at  their  district  meetings." 

First  District,  Susan  T.  Smith ;  Sec- 
ond District,  Mrs  Alice  G.  Wbitbeck ; 
Third  District,  L.  Gertrude  Doyle ; 
Fourth  District,  Bessie  B.  Silverthorn ; 
Fifth  District,  Ida  E.  Condit ;  Sixth  Dis- 
trict, Eleanor  Hitt ;  Seventh  District, 
H.  A.  Kendal;  Eighth  District,  Kather- 
ine  R.   Woods. 

Puilications — Mrs  Faith  Holmes 
Hyers,  Public  Library,  Los  Angeles, 
chairman ;  Jeanne  F.  Johnson ;  Mrs 
Katherine  Wahrenbrock, 


Resolutions — Stella  Huntington,  1254 
Taylor  St.,  San  Francisco,  chairman ; 
Ellen  B.  Frink ;  Mrs  R.  A,  McNally. 

Certification — Mabel  R.  Gillis.  State 
Library,  Sacramento,  chairman  (1930)  ; 
Susan  T.  Smith  (1931),  Eleanor  Hitt 
(1932),  Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt 
(1933),  Mary  Barmby   (1934). 

J.  L.  Gillis  Memorial — Milton  J.  Fer- 
guson, State  Library,  Sacramento,  chair- 
man ;  Mary  Barmby,  Eleanor  Hitt. 

Historical — George  T.  Clark,  Univer- 
sity Library,  Stanford  University,  chair- 
man ;  Sarah  E.  Bedinger,  Robert  E. 
Cowan,  Francis  B.  Graves,  Charles  S. 
Greene,  Alice  J.  Haines,  Joseph  C. 
Rowell. 

Legislative — Charles  F.  Woods,  Public 
Library,  Riverside,  chairman ;  Gretchen 
Flower,  Mrs  Frances  Burns  Linn,  Sarah 
E.  McCardle,  Althea  H.  Warren.     • 

Library  Schools — Edith  M.  Coulter, 
University  of  California  Library,  chair- 
man ;  Helen  Evans,  Faith  E.  Smith. 

Memhership — Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck, 
Contra  Costa  County  Free  Library,  Mar- 
tinez, chairman ;  1st  District,  Pauline 
Roy ;  2d  District,  Aimee  M.  Peters ;  3d 
District,  Clara  B.  Dills;  4th  District, 
Anne  Margrave ;  5th  District,  Nancy  0. 
Laugenour;  6th  District,  Mrs  Theodora 
R.  Brewitt;  7th  District,  Henry  A. 
Kendal ;  8th  District,  Katherine  R. 
Woods;  9th  District,  Ida  M.  Reagan, 

Redistricting — Althea  H.  Warren,  Pub- 
lic Library,  Los  Angeles,  chairman ;  C. 
E.  Graves ;  Mrs  Frances  B.  Linn ;  Anne 
Margrave ;    Susan  T.   Smith. 

Salaries — Blanche  Galloway,  Madera 
County  Free  Library,  chairman ;  Stanley 
Abel,  Mabel  Inness,  Mrs  I.  N.  Lawson, 
Jr.,  Miuette  L.  Stoddard. 

DISTRICT  OFFICERS  AND 
DISTRICTS 

First  District 

President,  Susan  T,  Smith,  Public  Li- 
brary, Berkeley. 

Secretary,  Jane  Isabel  Curtis,  Public 
Library,   Alameda. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY   ASSOCIATION 


177 


The  first  district  consists  of  the  follow- 
ing cities :  San  Francisco,  Alameda, 
Berkeley,  Oakland ;  and  the  following 
libraries :  Leland  Stanford  Junior  Uni- 
versity Library  and  Margaret  Carnegie 
Library,  Mills  College. 

Second   District 

President,  Mary  Barmby,  Alameda 
County  Free  Library,  Oakland. 

Secretary,  Aune  Hadden,  Public  Li- 
brary,   Palo   Alto. 

The  second  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties  :  Alameda  ( excepting  Ala- 
meda, Berkeley,  and  Oaldand),  Contra 
Costa,  Monterey,  San  Benito,  San  Mateo, 
Santa  Clara  (excepting  Stanford  Univer- 
sity), Santa  Cruz. 

Third   District 

President,  Margaret  A.  Bamett,  Pub- 
lic Library  Santa  Rosa. 

Secretary,  Ruth  Hall,  Public  Library, 
Santa  Rosa. 

The  third  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties:  Lake,  Marin,  Mendo- 
cino, Napa,  Solano,  Sonoma. 

Fourth  District 

President,  Bessie  B.  Silverthom, 
Stanislaus  County  Free  Library, 
Modesto. 

Secretary,  Alma  F.  Rossel,  McHenry 
Public  Library,  Modesto. 

The  fourth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties:  Fresno,  Inyo,  Kem, 
Kings,  Madera,  Mariposa,  Merced,  Stanis- 
laus, Tulare,  Tuolumne. 

Fifth   District 

President,  Ida  E.  Condit,  Public  Li- 
brary, Stockton. 

Secretary,  Angeline  Orr,  Public  Li- 
brary,  Stockton. 

The  fifth  district  consists  of  the  follow- 
ing counties:  Alpine,  Amador,  Calaveras, 
El  Dorado,  Mono,  Nevada,  Placer,  Sacra- 
mento, San  Joaquin,  Yolo. 

Sixth   District 

President,  Eleanor  Hitt,  San  Diego 
County  Free  Library,  San  Diego. 

Secretary,  Cornelia  D.  Plaister,  Public 
Library,  San  Diego. 

The  sixth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties:  Imperial,  Los  Angeles, 
Orange,  Riverside,  San  Bernardino,  San 

4 — 76092 


Diego,  San  Luis  Obispo,  Santa  Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh  District 

President,  C.  E.  Graves,  Humboldt 
State  Teachers  College  Library,  Areata. 

Secretary,  Mrs  Virginia  Todd'  Smith, 
Public  Library,  Areata. 

The  seventh  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Del  Norte,  Humboldt. 

Eighth   District 

President,  Lenala  A.  Martin,  Lassen 
County  Free  Library,  Susanville. 

Secretary,  Katherine  R.  Woods, 
Plumas  County  Free  Library,  Quincy. 

The  eighth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Lassen,  Modoc,  Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth   District 

President,  Mrs  Faye  K.  Russell,  Glenn 
County  Free  Library,  Willows. 

SecretaiT,  Elizabeth  Eubank,  Public 
Library,  Willows. 

The  ninth  district  consists  of  the  fol- 
lowing counties :  Butte,  Colusa,  Glenn, 
Shasta,  Siskiyou,  Sutter,  Tehama,  Trinity, 
Tuba. 

ANNUAL  MEETING 

The  Annual  Meeting  will  be  held  at 
Los  Angeles,  June  23-28,  1930,  in  con- 
junction with  the  American  Library 
Association  Conference.  A  special  time 
during  that  week  will  be  announced  later 
for  a  business  meeting  of  the  California 
Librai-y  Association.  Otherwise  the  mem- 
bers will  participate  in  the  A.  L.  A. 
programs.  Headquarters  will  be  at  the 
Hotel    Biltmore. 

DISTRICT    MEETINGS 
Fourth  District  Meeting 

The  Members  of  the  Fourth  District  of 
California  Library  Association  convened 
Saturday  morning,  February  15,  1930, 
in  the  assembly  room  of  the  McHenry 
Public  Library  at  Modesto,  with  Miss 
Bessie  Silverthom,  District  President, 
presiding. 

After  an  address  of  welcome  by  Miss 
Silverthom,  Miss.  Blanche  Galloway,  Li- 
brarian of  Madera  County,  gave  some 
reasons  for  joining  the  American  Library 
Association.  One  of  these  was,  that 
those  who  are  interested  in  library  work 
should  be  ready  to  welcome  the  American 


178 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Ijibi-ai\v  Association  in  California  this 
year,  not  as  outsiders,  but  as  membei-s. 

Miss  Cornelia  D.  Provines,  Past  Presi- 
dent of  the  California  Library  Associa- 
tion, made  a  plea  for  joining  the  Cali- 
fornia Library  Association  through  loy- 
alty for  a  profession  that  represents  edu- 
cation and  cultural  progress. 

The  business  of  the  meeting  was  then 
taken  up,  and  Miss  Silverthorn  was  unan- 
imously elected  Nominator  for  the  Fourth 
District,  and  Miss  Blanche  Galloway 
was  named  as  alternate. 

Miss  Neva  Hunsberger,  custodian  for 
the  Sanger  Branch  of  the  Fresno  County 
Library,  discussed  the  "Kind  of  shipment 
the  custodian  likes  to  receive  from  the 
main  library."  She  showed  the  great 
need  of  cooperation  to  bring  book  and 
reader  togfether.  Some  helps  for  the  cus- 
todian were :  regularity  of  shipment,  at- 
tractive posters  sent  out  from  headquar- 
tere,  and  books  with  good  print,  that  have 
short  reviews.  Miss  Hunsberger  believed 
the  custodian  should  have  some  kind  of  in- 
struction as  to  the  use  of  her  ''library 
tools." 

In  answer  to  Miss  Hunsberger,  Mrs 
Phoebe  Winkler,  Branch  Assistant,  Tu- 
lare County  Library,  expressed  "The  kind 
of  cooperation  the  county  library  likes  to 
receive  from  the  custodian."  Loyalty  for 
her  Librarian  is  shoAvu  by  being  the  eyes 
and  ears  of  the  community,  since  it  is 
through  her  custodian  that  the  librarian 
knows  the  individual  needs.  The  custo- 
dian should  keep  the  good  will  of  the 
people  and  receive  her  patrons  with  an 
impersonal  interest,  giving  contidentia] 
and  willing  service.  Censorship  of  books 
should  be  left  to  the  librarian.  Fines 
should   be  collected  regularly. 

There  was  some  discussion  as  to 
whether  or  not  the  class  of  fiction  should 
be  designated  in  some  manner  to  help  the 
branch  borrower  select  his  books.  A 
copy  of  a  "branch  manual"  prepared  and 
used  by  Miss  Flower  as  a  guide  to  cus- 
todians was  on  exbibit  and  some  inter- 
esting remarks  made  on  reports  sent  in 
were  read  by  Mrs  Winkler.  Custodians 
were  urged  to  join  the  California  Libx*ary 
Association. 

Luncheon  was  served  at  12.30  o'clock  in 
the  banquet  rooms  of  the  Presbyterian 
Church  to  129  guests.  During  the  lun- 
cheon   there   was   a   flute   solo    by    John 


Wing,  and  a  clarinet  solo  by  Max  Denney. 
Both  were  accompanied  by  Mrs  Ruby 
Denney.  Also  during  the  course  of  the 
luncheon.  Miss  Silverthorn  took  the  op- 
portunity to  introduce  the  speakers,  the 
visitors  from  other  districts,  and  the  mem- 
bers of  her  staff. 

At  two  o'clock  the  meeting  was  opened 
by  some  vocal  selections  by  Miss  Grace 
Jack. 

Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock,  President  of  the 
California  Library  Association,  then  gave 
an  address  on  "California  is  hostess  to 
the  American  Library  Association."  She 
stated  that  there  would  be  no  separate 
meeting  of  the  California  Library  Asso- 
ciation this  year,  only  a  short  business 
session,  and  then  the  California  Library 
Association  would  join  the  American  Li- 
brai-y  Association  in  their  meeting.  She 
hoped  each  librarian  would  act  as  host- 
ess to  welcome  the  visiting  members  of 
the  American  Library  Association.  She 
said  the  California  Library  Association 
had  taken  a  sustaining  membership  in  the 
American  Library  Association.  She  spoke 
of  the  suggested  plan  for  an  initiation  fee 
for  new  members  of  the  California  Li- 
brary Association.  She  announced  that 
a  committee  had  been  appointed  for  re- 
districting  the  state ;  also  that  a  trustee 
and  a  supervisor  had  been  added  to  the 
salary  committee. 

Mrs  Lucy  Powers  then  sang  three  se- 
lections, one  in  German. 

Follo^viug  on  the  program  was  an  ad- 
dress by  Miss  Edna  Stangland,  Associate 
Chief,  Division  of  Adult  Education,  State 
Department  of  Education,  in  which  she 
gave  her  own  observations  in  California 
and  abroad.  She  touched  on  adult  educa- 
tion in  England,  and  cited  an  interesting 
account  of  a  tailor  who  became  a  potter 
by  recei\'ing  his  instruction  through  sug- 
gestions of  various  subjects  allied  to  the 
subject  of  pottery.  In  France  there  is 
apparently  no  definite  interest  in  adult 
education  since  the  art  of  conversation  is 
so  well  preserved  and  developed.  In 
Germany  there  seems  to  be  a  strong  de- 
sire to  maintain  folk-lore  and  songs  of 
their  country.  A  contrast  of  conditions  in 
California  was  shown.  Adult  education 
is  not  entirely  education  of  the  foreign- 
born,  nor  those  who  were  deprived  of  edu- 
cation in  their  youth,  but  a  necessity 
of  study  day  by  day  of  of  changing  ideas. 


II 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY    ASSOCIATION 


179 


The  library  becomes  a  definite  p;irt  in 
adult  education  by  supplying  the  texts 
for  this  movement,  such  as  the  "Reading 
with  a  purpose"  series. 

In  conclusion,  Professor  De  Marcus 
Brown,  Director  of  the  Little  Theatre  of 
the  College  of  the  Pacific,  gave  an  excel- 
lent dramatic  reading  of  "The  Ship,"  a 
play  by  St.  John  Irvine. 

Alma  Rosseol,  Secietary. 

Sixth    District   Meeting 

In  opening  the  annual  meeting  of  the 
Sixth  District  of  the  California  Librai-y 
Association  in  San  Diego  on  Saturday, 
February  1,  1930,  Miss  Eleanor  Hitt, 
president,  offered  to  those  assembled  in 
the  Unitarian  Church  a  welcome  which 
had  been  accumulating  for  them  for 
twelve  years,  that  length  of  time  having 
elapsed  since  San  Diego  had  served  as 
hostess   to   this   convention. 

Lyman  Bryson,  Director  of  the  Cali- 
fornia Association  for  Adult  Education, 
opened  the  morning  session  with  a  talk 
on  "New  Life  in  Old  Books."  Mr  Bry- 
son said  that  he  had  been  privately  in- 
structed to  talk  about  adult  education  if 
he  wished,  but  under  no  circumstances  to 
get  caught  at  it.  He  built  his  discus- 
sion around  three  or  four  fundamental 
ideas,  i.e.,  Reading  is  a  matter  of  vicari- 
ous experience;  a  group  of  present  day 
influences  have  led  to  a  nonparticipating 
type  of  reading  which  is  deadly  to  true 
education ;  active  participation  in  experi- 
ence is  being  accomplished  successfully 
for  a  certain  class  of  people  through  the 
movies,  and  to  a  certain  extent  although 
not  so  effectively  through  the  radio.  It 
is  our  duty  as  librarians  to  train  our 
readers  actually  to  experience  the  life 
and  moods  and  problems  depicted  in  books 
and  to  instill  in  them  a  realization  that 
true  reading  is  more  than  a  recognition 
of  a  series  of  symbols  on  a  printed  page. 
The  speaker  pled  for  a  return  to  the 
atmosphere  which  existed  in  the  old  days 
of  the  bards  and  the  story  tellers  when  the 
tale  was  picked  up  and  carried  foi"ward  - 
by  all  in  the  group  rather  than  by  one 
speaker  on  a  platform.  As  a  means  of 
making  reading  a  vicarious  experience 
Mr  Bryson  suggested  that  librarians  urge 
and  plan  for  book  discussions  and  book 
conversations.  He  would  like  to  see  con- 
versation rooms  as  numerous  in  the  mod- 


ern public  lil)rary  building  as  reading 
rooms.  And  if  people  will  talk  together 
of  what  they  have  read  they  will  draw 
life  and  truths  from  old  books,  thus  les- 
sening this  feverish  demand  for  the  newest 
titles  hot  from  the  press  of  today. 

Mrs  Theodora  R.  Brewitt  urged  mem- 
bership for  all  library  assistants  in  the 
California  Library  As.sociation  as  a  mark 
of  professional  interest  and  Miss  Eleanor 
Stephens  explained  the  plan  of  member- 
ships in  the  American  Library  Associa- 
tion for  individuals  and  for  institutions. 

Miss  Hitt  then  introduced  Mrs  Jack 
Yallely  of  Los  Angeles  who  for  one  hour 
charmed  her  audience  with  her  witty, 
searching,  and  comprehensive  review  of 
twelve  current  books.  One  gathered  as 
valuable  information  on  the  art  of  book 
reviewing  from  Mrs  Vallely's  talk  as  one 
did  a  knowledge  of  the  books  about  which 
she  spoke,  for  with  engaging  candor  she 
told  of  the  manner  in  which  her  reviews 
were  built  around  one  theme,  the  psy- 
chology which  she  constantly  employed  in 
appealing  to  her  audience  and  the  value 
which  she  is  assured  results  from  en- 
thusiastic book  talks. 

The  session  then  adjourned  to  El  Cor- 
tez  hotel  where  280  sat  down  to  luncTieon. 
Lee  Shippey,  editor  of  the  "Lee  Side  o' 
L.  A."  in  the  Los  Angeles  Times  was  the 
guest  speaker.  Mr  Shippey  claimed  kin- 
ship with  the  group  he  was  addressing 
since  he  was  at  one  time  custodian  of  a 
branch  of  the  San  Diego  County  Library. 
He  frankly  admitted  that  he  asked  for  a 
branch  library  in  Del  Mar  and  offered  to 
be  its  librarian  in  order  to  insure  himself 
a  good  book  supply  and  that  as  soon  as 
the  branch  was  established  in  his  home 
his  wife  did  all  the  woi-k.  'Mr  Shippey's 
theme  was  "Personal  Glimpses  of  Famous 
Authors"  and  in  a  chatty  talk  he  told  of 
associations  with  Hamlin  Garland, 
Fanny  Hurst  and  others. 

The  afternoon  session  began  with  a 
group  of  stories  from  the  Tschaikowsky 
"Nutcracker  Suite"  as  told  by  Mrs  Ritza 
Freeman  Reardon  with  orchestration  by 
Sweetwater  Union  High  School  Orches- 
tra under  the  direction  of  James  G.  See- 
bold. 

During  the  short  business  session  Miss 
Eleanor  Hitt  was  unanimously  elected 
Nominator  for  the  Sixth  District  and  Miss 
Cornelia  D.  Plaister,  alternate. 


180 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930  M^ 


Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock,  President  of  the 
California  Library  Association,  was  a 
guest  during  the  meeting  and  Miss  Hitt 
called  Mrs  Babcock  to  the  platform.  She 
reported  several  matters  as  acted  upon  by 
the  executive  committee  at  a  recent  meet- 
ing. Most  important  of  these  was  that 
due  to  the  fact  tha  the  American  Library 
Association  is  holding  its  annual  con- 
ference this  year  in  Los  Angeles  in  June, 
the  1930  meeting  of  the  California  Li- 
brary Association  will  be  but  a  business 
session  held  at  the  same  time  as  the 
A.  L.  A.  Mr  Babcock  called  to  mind  the 
suggestion  made  at  Sacramento  at  the 
1929  meeting  of  C.  L.  A.  that  a  publicity 
expert  be  employed  to  carry  on  the  salary 
sui^vey  undertalien  last  year.  John  B. 
Kaiser  is  investigating  the  possibility  of 
securing  University  students  to  handle 
this  work.  Mrs  Babcock  told  of  the  pro- 
posed plan  to  charge  $1  initiation  fee  in 
addition  to  the  regular  C.  L.  A.  dues  and 
reported  that  a  committee  was  to  be  ap- 
pointed to  redistrict  California  in  an  en- 
deavor to  establish  a  fairer  division  of 
membership. 

Miss  Mabel  Gillis,  also  a  visitor  at  the 
meeting,  was  welcomed  and  said  in  reply 
that  the  fame  of  the  Sixth  District  meet- 
ings had  long  been  held  before  her  and 
that  now  she  had  attended  one  she  never 
excepted  to  miss  another. 

Mrs  Otto  J.  Zahn  of  the  Los  Angeles 
Library  Board  spoke  briefly  on  the  ten- 
tative plans  for  the  A.  L.  A.  Conference, 
especially  urging  cooperation  on  the  part 
of  libraries  in  interesting  their  Boards 
of  Trustees  to  attend  the  sessions. 

Miss  Faith  Smith  reported  for  the 
"Committee  of  children's  librarians,  psy- 
chologists, and  representatives  of  the  pub- 
lic school  course  of  study  department" 
appointed  last  year  at  the  Sixth  District 
meeting  for  the  purpose  of  keeping  our 
association  in  touch  with  the  newer  de- 
velopments in  psychology  and  with  or- 
ganizations working  on  these  principles. 
Various  projects  in  recreational  reading 
have  been  undertaken  with  the  following 
interesting  conclusions : 

Children  using  public  libraries  have 
a  high  grade  of  intelligence.  Slow 
readers  are  apparently  not  being 
reached  as  successfully  as  they  should 
be. 


Possibly  tha  books  of  the  libraries  do 
not  appeal  to  children  of  low  I.  Q. 

Children  on  the  lower  mental  level 
go  most  frequently  to  the  movies  and 
have  fewer  books  in  their  homes. 

A  plan  for  the  investigation  of  the 
reading  interests  of  delinquent  boys  by 
Dr  Normian  Fenton  of  the  Whittier 
State  School  was  briefly  sketched. 

It  was  moved,  seconded,  carried  that 
the  report  be  accepted  and  the  committee 
asked  to  continue  its  work. 

A  general  discussion  of  the  topic  of 
"Pi'ofessional  advancement"  led  by  Mjss 
Helen  E.  Vogleson  closed  the  meeting.| 
She  said  in  introducing  her  subject 
trade  works  for  money,  a  profession  fori 
service ;  a  trade  watches  the  clock,  a  pro- 
fession knows  no  hours."  Willis  H.  Kerr 
outlined  four  ideals  as  higher  require- 
ments contributing  to  professional  ad- 
vancement :  i 

1.  To  meet  serenely  the  demands  which 
come  to  us.  I 

2.  To  connect  the  current  of  our  thought; 
with  that  of  other  great  minds. 

3.  To  read.  j 

4.  To  be  aware  of  the  high  type  of  ser-| 
vice  expected  of  us. 

Mrs  Theodora  Brewitt  treated  the  sub 
ject  of  effort  toward  professional  advance-} 
ment  from  the  viewpoint  of  cooperation 
between  the  executive  and  the  assistant.^ 
The    fonner,  must    strive    to    inspire    to: 
larger   fields,    to   develop   natural   ability 
along   professional   lines   in   her  subordi- 
nates  and   not   be   distressed   over   pettyH 
failures    and    shortcomings.      The   latter 
must  have  vision  which  will  enable  her 
to  see  beyond  the  increase  of  salary  only, 
and   an   enthusiasm  for  her  work  whichi  i 
will  lead  her  to  investigate  its  every  op^i 
portunity  for  larger  efforts.  j 

Miss  EmUy  W.  Kemp  in  a  witty  paper*! 
drew  a  cross-section  of  a  busy  assistant's! 
day  at  the  library  and  utilized  incidents 
from  it  to  illustrate  some  of  the  benefits 
and  obstacles  met  in  striving  for  profes- 
sional advancement.  She  admitted  that 
rising  in  one's  position  was  bi'oadening 
and  character  building,  but  lack  of  time 
and  of  money  were  serious  handicaps. 

In  a  concise  manner  Miss  Inez  Kilton 
told   of   the    requirements  laid   down   by 


*  See  page  134. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY   ASSOCIATION 


181 


city  and  state  boards  of  education  to  in- 
sui-e  advancement  in  the  teaching  profes- 
sion. Membership  in  local,  state  and  na- 
tional organizations,  a  minimum  amount 
of  pi'ofessional  reading,  attendance  at  in- 
stitutes and  other  educational  meetings, 
and  study  and  travel  were  mentioned. 

In  the  general  discussion  v?hich  fol- 
lowed these  talks,  two  themes  seemed  to 
be  paramount — that  of  adequate  salary 
compensation,    and    that    of    further    op- 


portunities for  study.  In  closing  the 
round  table  Miss  Vogleson  felt  that  there 
was  one  word  which  could  be  well  linked 
with  any  effort  toward  bettering  our 
standing  professionally  and  that  was  ap- 
plication— application  of  thought  and  of 
effort  to  recognize  the  problems  and  the 
joys  of  achievement  and  application  of 
time  and  money  to  realize  them. 

Cornelia    D.    Plaistek, 

Secretary. 


182 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


CALIFORNIA  COUNTY  LIBRARIANS 


Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Ex  officio  Chair- 
man. 

Advisory  Committee 

Stella  Huntington,  1254  Taylor  Street, 
San  Francisco.  Chairman. 

Clara  B.  DUls,  Solano  County. 

Margaret  E.  Livingston,  Orange  County. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County. 

Cornelia  D.  Provines,  Sacramento 
County,  Treasurer. 

Committee  on  Cooperation  With  Insti- 
tutional Relations  Committee,  Cali- 
fornia     Federation      of      Women's 
Clubs 
Cornelia     D.      Provines,      Sacramento 
County,  Chairman. 

Mary  Barmby,  Alameda  County. 
Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County. 

County    Librarians    Section,    A.    L.    A. 

Sarah  E.  McCardle,  Fresno  County, 
President. 

J.  Elizabeth  Olson,  Umatilla  County 
Library,  Pendleton,  Oregon,  Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

The  Section  will  hold  two  meetings  dur- 
ing   the    American    Library    Association 


Conference  at  Los  Angeles.  They  are 
scheduled  for  Monday  and  Tuesday  morn- 
ings, June  23  and  24,  1930,  at  10  a.m. 

County  Library  Exhibit  Committee 

Bessie  B.  Silverthom,  Stanislaus 
County,   Chairman. 

Helen  E.  Vogleson,  Los  Angeles  County. 

Mrs  Alice  G.  Whitbeck,  Contra  Costa 
County. 

This  committee,  appointed  by  the  Presi- 
dent of  the  California  Library  Associa- 
tion will  have  charge  of  the  county  library 
exhibit  at  the  American  Library  Associa- 
tion Conference  at  Los  Angeles,  June 
23-28,    1930. 

County  Library  Publication 
A  particularly  valuable  and  interesting 
county  library  pamphlet  is  "The  library 
of  the  open  road"  by  Ralph  A.  Felton 
and  Marjorie  Beal.  It  is  Cornell  Exten- 
sion Bulletin  188,  published  by  the  New 
York  State  College  of  Agriculture  at  Cor- 
nell University,  Ithaca,  N.  Y.,  November, 
1929.  It  was  prepared  in  cooperation 
with  the  Library  Extension  Division  of 
the  New  York  State  Department  of  Edu- 
cation, 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


LIBRARY    CLUBS,    ETC. 


183 


LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC. 


Under  this  heading  will  be  given  ac- 
counts of  meetings  of  the  various  library 
clubs  and  similar  organizations  through- 
out the  state.  News  items  of  the  various 
clubs  are  solicited. 

PASADENA  LIBRARY  CLUB 

Members  of  the  Pasadena  Library  Club 
assembled  at  their  winter  banquet  Sat- 
urday evening  in  the  University  Club 
heard  Mrs  Thomas  G.  Winter,  the  repre- 
sentative of  14,000,000  women  of  America 
in  the  motion   picture  industry. 

When  the  Pasadena  woman  was  se- 
lected from  all  in  America  to  become  the 
ambassador  of  women  at  Hollywood,  her 
first  problem  was  that  of  the  child  and 
the  movies.  She  told  the  librarians 
many  interesting  things  concerning  this 
phase  of  her  work,  deelai-ing  that  statis- 
tics prove  the  delinquent  child  the  great- 
est patron  of  the  movies.  Instances  have 
been  known,  she  said,  where  a  child  has 
gone  to  as  many  as  six  "movies"  daily 
week  in  and  week  out. 

The  speaker  took  a  gentle  slap  at  par- 
ents who  try  to  exploit  their  children  at 
the  studios,  hoping  to  get  them  •  placed 
in  big  paying  jobs.  The  chances  for  do- 
ing so  are  unusually  slim,  she  declared. 

For  the  children  who'  are  used  in  the 
films,  she  stated,  adequate  education  is 
provided.  None  is  allowed  to  work  "on 
the  lot"  longer  than  four  hours  daily.  It 
makes  no  difference  whether  there  is  but 
one  or  ten,  a  teacher  recommended  by 
school  authorities  is  hired  to  see  that  no 
part  of  the  "movie"  child's  education  is 
neglected. 

Mrs  Winter  touched  upon  the  financial 
side  of  the  industry,  declaring  that  the 
person  "on  the  outside"  can  not  under- 
stand why  it  costs  so  much  to  turn  out 
a  picture  story.  She  gave  an  illustra- 
tion. Just  the  other  day,  she  declared,  it 
became  necessary  to  take  a  scene  on  a 
desert  in  which  there  were  but  two  actors. 
To  "shoot"  these  few  feet  of  film,  it  was 
necessary  for  ninety-eight  workmen  with 
materials  to  make  the  trip. 

The  advent  of  the  "talkie,"  according 
to    Sirs    Winter,    has    completely    revolu- 


tionized things.  Here,  she  explained  the 
difference  between  stage  acting  and  act- 
ing for  the  "talkies."  In  the  former,  she 
pointed  out,  men  and  women  try  to  ap- 
pear as  someone  else,  while  in  the  latter, 
naturalness  is  the  chief  aim.  This  last 
fact  alone  makes  a  great  art  of  the  thing 
that  was  one  time  considered  a  play- 
thing. 

Producers  nowadays  are  fortunate  in 
that  they  are  pioneers  of  a  great  move- 
ment, the  speaker  told  the  librarians. 
They  are  spreading  the  English  language 
across  the  world.  England  and  her  col- 
onies are  the  greatest  listeners,  Spain  sec- 
ond and  then  France  and  Italy.  In  all, 
motion  picture  talkies  are  being  shipped 
regularly  to  thirty-eight  countries  of  the 
world. 

Mrs  Patricia  O.  Dutches, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

CALIFORNIA  SCHOOL  LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION,  NORTHERN  SEC- 
TION 

The  California  School  Library  Associa- 
tion, Northern  Section,  held  its  annual 
meeting  with  the  Library  Sec-tion  of  the 
California  Teachers'  Association,  Bay 
Section,  in  the  University  High  School 
Library,  Oakland,  December  18,  1929. 
Miss  Katherine  D.  Steele,  San  Mateo 
Junior  College,  presided  and  introduced 
Mr  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Librarian, 
Sacramento,  who  talked  to  us  about  his 
trip  to  South  Africa.  He  dealt  mostly 
with  the  libraries  there  and  his  contact 
with  many  interesting  people.  His  mes- 
sage was  thoroughly  enjoyed. 

Mrs  Helen  H.  White,  McClymonds 
High  School,  Oakland,  who  was  fortunate 
in  being  able  to  attend  the  Library  and 
Bibliographical  Congress  in  Rome,  gave 
a  very  entertaining  account  of  the  meeting 
and  of  her  experiences. 

Polly  R.  Hatch,  Poly.teehnic  High 
School,  San  Francisco,  spoke  on  "High- 
lights of  the  Santa  Barbara  Meeting." 
This  was  so  delightfully  told  I'm  sure 
those  who  did  not  attend  that  state 
meeting  fully  realized  what  they  had 
missed. 


184 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


The  program  was  folloowed  by  the 
business  session.  The  minutes  of  the 
last  meeting  asi  read  by  the  secretary, 
Polly  R.  Hatch,  were  approved.  Like- 
wise the  report  of  the  treasurer,  Mary 
Elizabeth   Fox. 

Margaret  V.  Girdner,  Galileo  High 
School,  San  Francisco,  chairman  of  the 
Professional  Committee  reported  for  her 
committee  and  all  siibcommittees.  A 
mimeographed  copy  of  the  repoi't  was 
given  to  each  one  present.  This  very 
clearly  outlined  the  plan  of  the  year's 
work  and  included  a  report  of  the  work 
accomplished  by  the  Training  Committee, 
Study  Committee  and  Junior  High  School 
Committee.  Attached  to  these  reports 
were  recommendations  for  future  work  of 
the  Professional  Committee  and  each  sub- 
committee. 

Dorothy  Clark,  Fremont  High  School, 
Oakland,  reported  for  the  Membership 
Committee.  This  report  showed  a  very 
gratifying  increase  in  members  during 
the  past  year. 

Gladys  English,  Piedmont  High  School, 
Chairman  of  the  Year  Book  Committee 
said  they  had  arranged  to  have  the  col- 
lected information  published  and  the  com- 
mittee had  subsequently  dissolved.  Helen 
Price,  University  High  School,  Oakland, 
reported  for  the  Program  Committee. 

Elizabeth  Patton,  Garfield  Junior  High 
School,  Berkeley,  reported  for  the  Pub- 
licity Committee.  She  told  of  the  pub- 
licity given  the  work  of  the  Association, 
principally  through  official  Bulletins  that 
were  edited  by  this  committee  and 
through  articles  sent  to  educational  pub- 
lications. She  thanked  those  who  had 
contributed  material  and  cooperated  with 
the  committee  which  made  this  undertak- 
ing possible  and  urged  their  continued 
support.  Recommendations  were  ofliered 
for  the  future  work  of  the  Publicity  Com- 
mittee. 

Miss  Clark  announced  the  A.  L.  A. 
meeting  to  be  held  in  California  in  June. 
The  place  had  not  been  decided  upon. 
Miss  English  made  a  plea  for  all  those 
who  had  not,  joined  the  A.  L.  A.  to  do  so 
at  the  close  of  the  meeting. 

Miss  Patton  announced  the  sale  of  the 
supplement  of  the  handbook  issued  by  the 
Southern  Section  and  the  C.  S.  L.  A. 
Northern  Section  Bulletins  to  nonmem- 
bers  who  wished  to  buy  them. 


By  a  unanimous  vote  the  following 
were  elected  honorary  members  of  the 
California  School  Library  Association, 
Northern  Section ;  Mr  Vierling  Kersey, 
State  Superintendent  of  Public  Instruc- 
tion ;  Mr  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Li- 
brarian ;  Miss  Mabel  Gillis,  Assistant 
State  Librarian ;  Mi's  May  Dexter  Hen- 
shall,  County  Library  Organizer,  Sacra- 
mento ;  Mr  Sydney  B.  Mitchell,  Director 
of  School  of  Librarianship,  University  of 
California,  Berkeley  ;  Miss  Mary  Barmby, 
Alameda  County  Librarian,  Oakland ;  Dr. 
T.  W.  McQuarrie,  President,  San  Jose 
State  Teachers  College ;  and  Miss  Susan 
T.  Smith,  Librarian,  Berkeley  Public  Li- 
brary, Berkeley.  The  Secretary  was  in- 
structed to  notify  and  mail  a  December 
Bulletin  to  each  one. 

It  was  moved  that  the  newly  elected 
officers  serve  from  January  1,  1930  to 
June  30,  1931  and  that  thereafter  the 
term  of  office  extend  from  June  to  June 
instead  of  from  January  1,  to  December 
31.  After  much  discussion  it  was  unani- 
mously passed.  The  officers  elected  for 
the  year  and  a  half  term  are :  President, 
Polly  R.  Hatch,  Polytechnic  High  School, 
San  Francisco ;  Vice  President,  Helen 
Price,  University  High  School,  Oakland ; 
Secretary,  Lillian  Morehouse,  Palo  Alto 
Union  High  School,  Palo  Alto  ;  Treasurer, 
Mrs  Nell  B.  Fuller,  Modesto  Junior  Col- 
lege, Modesto;  Director,  Katberine  D. 
Steele,  San  Mateo  Junior  College,  San 
Mateo. 

A  vote  of  thanks  was  given  the  retiring 
officers  and  com'mittees  for  the  splendid 
work  accomplished  during  the  year.  In 
response  to  the  invitation  of  Miss  Price 
all  adjourned  to  the  lunch  room  which 
had  been  attractively  arranged  by  her  and 
her  committee,  where  we  enjoyed  a  social 
time  over  the  tea  cups. 

ORANGE    COUNTY    LIBRARY 
CLUB 

The  Orange  County  Library  Club  held 
its  spring  meeting  March  7,  1930,  in  the 
Ebell  Club  House  in  Santa  Ana  as  the 
guests  of  Miss  Margaret  Livingston  of 
the  Orange  County  Library  and  Miss 
Lillian  Dickson,  of  Santa  Ana  High 
School  Library.  A  most  delicious  din- 
ner was  served  by  the  ladies  of  the 
Poetry  Club  of   Santa  Ana. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


LIBRARY   CLUBS,   ETC. 


185 


After  the  dinner  a  business  meeting 
was  held  at  which  the  annual  election  of 
officers  was  held.  Miss  Edith  Hubbart 
of  Huntington  Beach  High  School,  was 
elected  president ;  Mrs  Crowe  of  Orange 
County  Library,  vice  president;  and  Mrs 
Blanche  Wisner  of  Garden  Grove  Branch, 
secretary-treasurer.  Plans  were  discussed 
for  advertising  Orange  County  at  the 
meeting  of  the  A.  L.  A.  in  Los  Angeles. 
Miss  Livingston  and  Mrs  Margaret  Scott 


were  appointed  a  committee  to  arrange 
plans. 

Mrs  Signe  Best  of  Santa  Ana,  read 
several  original  poems  from  a  volume 
published  by  her.  She  also  sang  several 
which  had  been  set  to  music.  Miss  Mary 
Boyer  of  Santa  Ana  and  her  assistant 
gave  a  demonstration  of  puppet  shows 
for  children.  The  program  was  most 
interesting. 

Olive  M.  Potter,  Secretary-Treasurer. 


I 


186 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS,  CALIFORNIA 


MEMBERS   OF  THE   BOARD 

Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State  Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert  Rea,  Librarian,  San  Francisco 
Public  Library,   Secretary. 

Everett  R.  Perry,  Librarian,  Los  An- 
geles Public  Library. 

Sections  G  and  7  of  the  County  free 
library  law  (Chap.  68,  Cal.  Statutes 
1911)    read  as  follows: 

Sec.  6.  A  commission  is  hereby  cre- 
ated to  be  known  as  the  board  of  library 
examiners,  consisting  of  the  state  libra- 
rian, who  shall  be  ex  officio  chairman  of 
said  board,  the  librarian  of  the  public 
library  of  the  city  and  county  of  San 
Francisco,  and  the  librarian  of  the  Los 
Angeles  public  library. 

Sec.  7.  Upon  the  establishment  of  a 
county  free  library,  the  board  of  super- 
visors shall  appoint  a  county  librarian, 
who  shall  hold  office  for  the  term  of  four 
years,  subject  to  prior  removal  for  cause, 
after  a  hearing  by  said  board.  No  per- 
son shall  be  eligible  to  the  office  of 
county  librarian  unless,  prior  to  his 
appointment,  he  has  received  from  the 
board  of  library  examiners  a  certificate 
of  qualification  for  the  office.  At  the 
time  of  his  appointment,  the  county 
librarian  need  not  be  a  resident  of  the 
county  nor  a  citizen  of  the  State  of 
California. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHAIRMAN 

There  has  been  no  meeting  of  the  Board 
this  quarter. 

CERTIFICATE   HOLDERS 

Adams,  Mrs  Lila  (Dobell),  Ln.  Trinity 
County  Free  Library,  "Weaverville. 

Babcock,  Mrs  Julia  G.,  Ln.  Kern  County 
Free  Library,  Bakersfleld.  (Life  certifi- 
cate.) 

Bailey,  Anne  Bell,  Ln.  Tehama  County 
Free  Library,  Red  Bluff. 

Barmby,  Mary,  Ln.  Alameda  County  Free 
Library.     Oaklajid.       (Life    certiflcate.) 

Beardsley,  Mrs  Arline  Davis,  Asst.  Orange 
County  Free  Library,  Santa  Ana. 

Burket,  Frances  M..  Ln.  Sutter  County 
Free  Library,  Yuba  City. 

Culver,  Essae  M.,  Exec.  Sec.  Louisiana 
Library  Commission,  Baton  Rouge,  La. 

Dambacher,  Mrs  Helen  (Rowland),  Mrs 
Gustav  Dambacher,  Ln.  Tuolumne 
County  Free  Library.  Sonera. 

Davids,  Mrs  Harriet  Snyder,  Ln.  Kings 
County   Free   Library,   Hanford. 

Davis,  Edna  D.,  Ln.  Humboldt  County 
Free  Library,  Eureka. 

De  Ford,  Estella,  Ln.  Napa  County  Free 
Library,  Napa.      (Life  certificate.) 

Deming,  Dorothy,  Ln.  Imperial  County 
Free  Library.  El  Centro. 

Dills,  Clara  B.,  Ln.  Solano  County  Free 
Library,  Fairfield.     (Life  certiflcate.) 

Duff,  Maroella  Carmelita,  Acting  Ln.  Las- 
sen   County    Free    Library,    Susanville. 


Eudey,  Mrs  Henrietta  G.,  Mrs  Fred  Budey, 
Ln.  Amador  County  Free  Library, 
Jackson. 

Ferguson,  Milton  J.,  Ln.  State  Library, 
Sacramento. 

Flower,  Gretchen  L..,  Ln.  Tulare  County 
Free  Library,  Visalia.  (Life  certifi- 
cate. ) 

Frink,  Ellen  B.,  Ln.  Monterey  County 
Free  Library,  Salinas. 

Galloway,  Blanche,  Ln.  Madera  County 
Free  Library,  Madera. 

Gibson,  Hazel  G.,  Asst.  Sacramento  County 
Free  Library,   Sacramento. 

Gleason,  Celia,  Ln.  Siskiyou  County  Free 
Library,  Treka. 

Greene,  (Charles  S.,  Ln.  Emeritus  Free 
Library,   Oakland. 

Greene,  Margaret,  Asst.  Contra  Costa 
County  Free  Library,  Martinez. 

Hadden,  Anne,  Ln.  Public  Library,  Palo 
Alto.      (Life  certificate.) 

Harris,  Mary  W.,  Ln.  Webster  Parish  Li- 
brary, Minden,  La. 

Herrman,  Mrs  Jennie  (Herrman),  Mrs 
James  White  Herrman,  Asst.  San  Diego 
Public  Library.     (Life  certiflcate.) 

Hill,  Grace,  Asst.  Public  Library,  Kansas 
City,  Mo. 

Hitt,  Eleanor,  Ln.  San  Diego  County  Free 
Library,  San  Diego. 

Hooker,  D.  Ashley,  Technology  Ln,  Pub- 
lic  Library,   Birmingham,  Ala. 

Jackson,  Joy  Belle,  Asst.  State  Teachers 
College  Library,   San  Jose. 

Jones,  Louise  E.,  Asst.  Public  Library, 
Los   Angeles. 

Kobler,  Marjorie  H.,  Asst.  San  Diego 
County  Free  Library,  San  Diego. 

Kyle,  Eleanore,  Ln.  San  Bernardino  Poly- 
technic High  School  Library,  San  Ber- 
nardino. 

Laugenour,  Nancy  C,  Ln.  Yolo  County 
Free  Library,  Woodland. 

Linn,  Mrs  Frances  Burns,  Ln.  Santa  Bar- 
bara Free  Public  Library  and  Santa 
Barbara  County  Free  Library,  Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston.  Margaret  E.,  Ln.  Orange 
County  Free  Library,  Santa  Ana.  (Life 
certiflcate.) 

Long,  Mary  O.,  Asst.  Kern  County  Free 
Library,  Bakersfleld. 

McCardle,  Sarah  E.,  Ln.  Fresno  County 
Free  Library,  Fresno.  (Life  certifl- 
cate.) 

MeCright,  Edith  C,  Asst.  Public  Library, 
El  Paso,  Texas. 

Margrave,  Anne,  Ln.  Inyo  County  Free 
Library,  Independence. 

Martin,  Lehala  A.,  Ln.  Lassen  County 
Free  Library,  Susanville.  (Life  certifi- 
cate.)     (On  leave  of  absence.) 

Morse,  Mrs  Ella  (Packer),  Mrs  Guy 
Morse,  Ln.  Colusa  County  Free  Library, 
Colusa. 

Morse,  Marion,  Ln.  Honolulu  Academy 
of  Arts,  Honolulu,  T.  H. 

Mumm,  Beulah,  Reference  Ln.  State  Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Nourse,  Louis  M.,  Asst.  Kern  County 
Free  Library,  Bakersfleld. 

Perry,  Everett  R.,  Ln.  Public  Library,  Los  i 
Angeles. 

Provlnes,  Cornelia  D.,  Ln.  Sacramento 
County  Free  Library,  Sacramento, 
(Life    certificate.) 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


BOARD   OF    LIBRARY  EXAMINERS 


187 


Rea,    Robert,    Ln.    Public    Library,    San 

Francisco. 
Reagan,  Ida  M.,  Ln.   Butte  County  Free 

Library,  Oroville.      (Life  certificate.) 
Russell,  Mrs  Faye  (Kneeshaw),  Mrs  Ralph 

H.     Russell,     Ln.     Glenn    County    Free 

Library,  "Willows. 
Sabin,  Lilian,  Ln.  San  Luis  Obispo  County 

Free  Library,  San  Luis  Obispo. 
Silverthorn,  Bessie  B.,  Ln.  McHenry  Pub- 
lic Library  and  Stanislaus  County  Free 

Library,  Modesto.     (Life  certificate.) 
Singletary,  Mrs  Elizabeth   (Stevens),  Mrs 

Harry   H.    Singletary,   Ln.    Santa   Clara 

County  Free  Library,  San  Jose. 
Smith,     Susan     T.,     Ln.     Public     Library, 

Berkeley. 
Stephens,  Eleanor  S.,  Asst.  Ln.  Los  Angeles 

County  Free  Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Stoddard,  Minette  L.,  Ln.  Merced  County 

Free  Library,  Merced. 
Taylor,    Bertha    S.,    Head    Prints    Dept., 

State    Library,    Sacramento. 
Topping,  Elizabeth  R.,  Ln.  Ventura  Public 

Library   and  Ventura   County  Free   Li- 
brary, Ventura. 
Townsend,  Mrs  Florence   (Wheaton),  Mrs 

R.  L.  Townsend,  Ln.  San  Benito  (jounty 

Free  Library,  Hollister. 
Vogleson,     Helen    E.,     Ln.     Los     Angeles 

County  Free  Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Warren,  Althea  H.,  First  Asst.  Ln.  Public 

Library,  Los  Angeles. 
Waterman,   Minerva   H.,   Ln.    Santa   Cruz 

Public  Library  and  Santa  Cruz  County 

Free  Library,  Santa  Cruz. 
Waters,  Caroline   S.,   Ln.   San  Bernardino 

County  Free   Library,    San   Bernardino. 
Whitbeck,  Mrs  Alice  G.,  Ln.  Contra  Costa 

County  Free  Library,   Martinez.      (Life 

certificate.) 
Williams,    Anna    L.,    Ln.    Modoc    County 

Free  Library,  Alturas. 
Woods,  Katherine  R.,  Ln.  Plumas  County 

Free   Library,    Quincy. 
Wright,    Muriel,    Ln.    Marin    County    Free 

Library,   San   Rafael. 
Yates,   Mrs  Bess    (Ranton),  Mrs  John  D. 

Yates,   Asst.   Los  Angeles   County  Free 

Library,  Los  Angeles. 

At  Present  Out  of  Library  Work 

Dalton,  Mrs  Blanche   (Harris),  Mrs  John 

E.  Dalton. 
Dyer,    Mrs    Flo     (Gantz),    Mrs    Maurice 

Foster  Dyer. 
Gantt,   Edith. 


Gregory,    Marion. 

Helm,  Mrs  Frances  (Stockebrand),  Mrs 
Herbert  G.  Helm. 

Huntington,   Stella.      (Life  certificate.) 

Price,  Mrs  Melba  (Burden),  Mrs  Louis  B. 
Price. 

Wheeler,  Mrs  Blanche  (Chalfant),  Mrs 
De  Forest  N.   Wheeler. 

Yelland,  Mrs  Edna  (Holroyd),  Mrs  Ray- 
mond Yelland    (Life  certificate.) 

COUNTY   FREE   LIBRARY   LAW 

The  "California  county  free  library 
law  and  circular  of  information  for 
applicants  for  certificates  of  qualification 
to  hold  office  of  county  librarian  in  Cali- 
fornia" was  published  in  Netvs  Notes  of 
California  Libraries,  April,  1911,  and 
later  reprinted  in  pamphlet  form.  The 
edition  being  exhausted,  a  revised  edition 
of  the  circular  was  printed  in  News  Notes 
of  California  Libraries,  January,  1914. 
This  has  been  reprinted  as  a  pamphlet. 
The  latest  edition  was  issued  February, 
1928.  (Circular  of  information  only.) 
The  fifth  edition  of  the  County  free 
library  law  was  issued  in  September, 
192.0.  Copies  of  both  of  above  pamphlets 
will  be  furnished  on  request. 

NEXT   EXAMINATION 

The  next  examination  will  be  held  at 
the  Public  Library,  Los  Angeles,  M,'ay  24, 
1930,  and  at  the  State  Library,  Sacra- 
mento, May  29,  1930. 

APPLICATION   BLANKS 

All  who  wish  to  take  the  examination 
should  file  applications  with  the  Chairman 
of  the  Board.  For  application  blanks  or 
further  information  address  the  CHiairman 
of  the  Board,  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  State 
Librarian,  Sacramento,  California. 


188 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY 


The  bill  establishing  the  California 
State  Library  was  signed  by  Governor 
Peter  H.  Burnett,  January  24,  1850. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
established  by  resolution  adopted  Sep- 
tember 4,  1913. 

California  State  Library  School  was 
discontinued  by  motion  adopted  May  22, 
1920. 

Biennial  income  for  1929-31,  $325,700. 

Total  accessions  294,557  (less  8820  lost 
and  witiidrawn=290,737)  exclusive  of 
25,067  accessions  in  Books  for  Blind  De- 
partment and  94,966  volumes  in  the  Sutro 
Branch  in  San  Francisco. 

STAFF 

MUton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian. 

Mabel  R.  Gillis,  Assistant  Librarian 
and  Head  of  Books  for  the  Blind  Depart- 
ment. 

Herbert  V.  Clayton,  Law  and  Legisla- 
tive Reference  Librarian. 

Eudora  Garoutte.  Head  of  California 
Department. 

Alice  .J.  Haines.  Head  of  Documents 
Department. 

Mrs  May  Dexter  Henshall,  County 
Library  Organizer. 

Dora  M.  Himmelsbach,  in  charge  of 
Periodicals  and  Binding. 

Wm.  H.  Lugg,  Head  of  Shipping,  Re- 
pairs, etc..  Department. 

Beulah  Mumm.  Reference  Librarian. 

Ida  G.  Munson,  Head  of  Catalog 
Department. 

Myrtle  Ruhl,  in  charge  of  Order 
Department. 

Bertha  S.  Taylor,  in  charge  of  Prints 
Department. 

Margaret  Bennett,  Typist. 

Helen  Braddock,  Assistant. 

Mrs  Gwendolyn  Brannely,  Stenog- 
rapher. 

Helen  M.  Bruner,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch.  San  Francisco. 

Sarah  Carder,  Assistant. 

Helen  Clayton,  Assistant. 

Evelyn  Cooper,  Assistant. 

Helen  Cornell,  Assistant. 

Mrs  Marjorie  M.  Degner,  Assistant. 

Margaret  Dennison,  Assistant,  Sutro 
Branch.  San  Francisco. 

Mrs  Marguerite  Walker  Duggins,  Ste- 
nographer. 

Kate  M.  Foley,  Home  Teacher  of  the 
Blind,  146  McAllister  st.,  San  Francisco. 

Minnie  L.  Gee,  Typist. 

Zilla  Grant.  Assistant. 

Ena  Harmon,  Assistant. 

Lyndall  Harmon.  Assistant. 

Dorothy  Hill.  Assistant. 

Mrs  Alicia  Manning  Hook,  Assistant. 

Florence  Lamb.  Bookkeeper. 

Rachel  Look,  Assistant. 


Helen  M.  Maughmer,  Assistant. 

Helen  Mayden,  Assistant. 

D.  Florence  Montfort.  Assistant. 

Catharine  J.  Morrison.  Home  Teacher 
of  the  Blind,  951  S.  Kenmore  ave.,  Loa 
.\nseles. 

Vera  Palermo,  Assistant. 

Wyman  Pease,  Shelf  Curator. 

Irene  E.  Ryan.  Assistant. 

Lilian  Sargent,  Assistant. 

Irma  M.  Schoepflin,  Assistant. 

Elyse  Schultz,  Assistant. 

Blanche  Ju  Shadle,  Assistant. 

William  T.  Simmons,  Assistant. 

Lily  M.  Tilden.  Assistant. 

Mrs  Bessie  Herrman  Twaddle,  Indexer. 

Mrs  .Tulia  M.  Waldron.  Assistant. 

Caroline  Wenzel.  Assistant. 

Margaret  Cox,  Book  Repairer. 

Helen  Dobson,  Book  Repairer. 

Mrs  Mae  Hoskin,  Book  Repairer. 

Mrs  Gladys  N.  Richards,  Book  Re- 
pairer. 

Arthur  Valine,  Book  Marker. 

Wm.  Crowe,  Assistant  Shipping  Clerk. 

Wm.  G.  Lyons,  Assistant  Shipping 
Clerk. 

Harlo  Whipple,  Assistant  Shipping 
Clerk. 

Nancy  Anderson,  Messenger. 

John   Heinrich,   Messenger. 

George  J.  Miller,  Messenger. 

Forrest  Stead,  Messenger. 

Walter   Stevens,   Messenger. 

John  B.  Byrne,  Janitor. 

J.   L.  Foss,  .Tanitor. 

Wm.  Jones,  Janitor. 

G.  A.  Klees.  Janitor. 

Dominick  Meo,  Janitor. 

Jacob   Misfelt,   Janitor. 

Harry  A.  Simons,  Elevator  Operator. 

STAFF  NEWS  ITEMS 

Mr  Ferguson  was  an  honored  guest  at 
the  dedication  of  the  new  library  build- 
ing at  the  University  of  Oklahoma  at 
Norman,  February  21-22.  He  is  a  gradu- 
ate of  that  University  and  was  the  libra- 
rian there  before  coming  to  California. 
He  took  part  in  the  second  day's  program, 
speaking  on  ''A  modern  library  for  a 
modern  world."*  On  the  day  before  going 
to  Norman  he  spc>ke  at  the  meeting  of  the 
American  Association  of  University  Wo- 
men at  Tulsa,  Oklahoma.  This  organiza- 
tion is  greatly  interested  #i  library  de- 
velopment in  Oklahoma. 

Miss  Gillis  attended  the  meeting  of  the 
Sixth  District,  California  Library  Asso- 
ciation in  San  Diego,  February  1.    While 


Sec  page  129. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


189 


south  she  held  a  two-day  meeting  of  the 
Certification  Committee  of  the  C.  L.  A. 
and  spoke  on  the  State  Library  at  the 
Library  School  of  the  Los  Angeles  Pub- 
lie  Library. 

Miss  Taylor  spoke  on  prints  before  the 
Lodi  Women's  Club  at  Lodi  and  the  Farm 
Circle  at  the  Davis  Farm.  This  latter 
organization  is  made  up  of  all  the  women 
connected  in  any  way  with  the  University 
Farm.  The  talk  was  given  at  an  evening 
meeting.  These  talks  were  in  addition 
to  two  given  in  the  Prints  Room  and  re- 
ported under  the  Department. 

Mrs  Henshall  continues  giving  her 
course  on  County  Libraries  at  the  School 
of  Librarianship,  University  of  California. 

Miss  Cooper,  Miss  Gillis,  Miss  Shadle, 
Miss  Tilden  and  Mr  Lugg  attended  the 
meeting  of  the  Fourth  District,  California 
Library  Association,  at  Modesto,  Febni- 
aiT  15. 

Elmer  Laine  resigned  as  messenger 
January  20  to  work  for  the  law  firm  of 
Devlin  and  Devlin.  His  place  in  the  Law 
Department  was  taken  by  Forrest  Stead. 

Mrs  Frances  L.  Smith  resigned  from 
the  library  February  15  and  moved  to 
Fresno,  Mr  Smith's  business  having  made 
It  necessary  for  him  to  live  there.  Mrs 
Smith  was  succeeded  by  Mrs  Gwendolyn 
Brannely,  v/ho  began  work  on  Febru- 
ary 24. 

The  engagement  of  Mass  Margaret  Cox 
and  Mr  Herman  A.  Downing  has  been  an- 
nounced. The  wedding  will  take  place  in 
May  and  Miss  Cox  is  resigning  early  in 
the  month. 

Mrs  Anne  L.  Dodson  began  on  March 
18  on  a  temporary  appointment  as  stenog- 
rapher. 

QUARTERLY  NOTES 

At  the  staff  meeting  January  9,  the 
following  officers  of  the  new  staff  organi- 
zation were  elected :  President,  Miss  Gil- 
lis ;  vic-e  president,  Mr  Clayton  ;  secretai'y- 
treasurer,  Elyse  Schultz.  These  three 
with  Mrs  Waldron  and  Miss  Munson 
make  up  the  executive  committee.  Mr 
Ferguson  spoke  briefly  of  his  trip  to  the 
midwinter  A.  L.  A.  meeting  at  Chicago, 
and  of  the  work  Miss  Culver  is  doing  in 
Louisiana. 

A  staif  meeting  was  held  March  5  at 
which  definite  policies  for  the  newly  or- 
ganized staff  organization  were  adopted. 


Following  the  business  meeting  Mr  Fer- 
guson told  about  the  new  library  build- 
ing at  the  University  of  Oklahoma  and 
gave  some  incidents  of  his  trip  to  the  dedi- 
cation. 

A  committee  composed  of  Miss  Taylor, 
Miss  Ruhl  and  Mrs  Twaddle  made  a 
report  on  plans  for  a  staff  book  club.  One 
of  the  plans  was  subsequently  adopted, 
books  were  selected  and  purchased  and 
the  library  is  now  in  running  order.  Those 
who  wished  to  participate  contributed  a 
certain  sum  and  popular  books  of  fiction 
and  nonfiction  were  selected  by  those  who 
wished  to  use  them.  The  collection  is 
kept  on  shelves  in  the  catalog  room  and 
is  found  to  be  filling  a  need  for  those 
staff  members  who  have  wanted  a  chance 
to  read  popular  nonfiction  before  they 
would  have  an  opportunity  to  secure  the 
one  State  Library  copy  and  the  best  fic- 
tion before  it  could  be  secured  from  city 
or  rental  libraries. 

An  exhibit  of  drawings  by  Maynard 
Dixon,  largely  sketches  for  his  various 
murals,  was  held  in  the  Gallery  at  the 
Library  for  two  weeks  beginning  the 
latter  part  of  January.  Mr  Dixon  was 
a  visitor  at  the  library  during  the  ex- 
hibit. Miss  Ruth  Ferguson  was  in  charge 
of  the  gallery  during  the  two  weeks. 

For  other  exhibits,  see  report  of  Prints 
Department,  page  192. 

Sarah  O.  N.  Bogle,  Assistant  Secre- 
tary of  the  American  Librai-y  Association, 
visited  the  State  Library  January  31  and 
February  1.  She  was  in  California  to 
make  a  survey  of  library  schools  par- 
ticularly in  refei'ence  to  courses  for  school 
librarians.  Miss  Bogle  is  secretai-y  of  the 
Board    of    Education    for    Librarianship. 

Other  interesting  visitors  during  the 
quarter  were  Miss  Annika  Mannerheim, 
a  librarian  from  Sweden ;  Mr  Alfred  A. 
Knopf ;  Mr  Heni-y  K.  Chang,  Consul-Gen- 
eral  of  China  at  San  Francisco,  and  Mr 
John  D.  Willard  from  the  American  Asso- 
ciation for  Adult  Education. 

LIBRARY   HOURS 

Week  days 9  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

Legislative  session  : 

Week  days 9  a.m.  to  9  p.m. 

Sundays    1  p.m.  to  5  p.m. 

The  library  closes  at  noon  on  Satur- 
days during  July  and  August. 


190 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


LAW    AND    LEGISLATIVE    REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT 

Herbert  V.  Clayton,  in  charge. 

The  Law  and  Legislative  Reference 
Department  is  fully  equipped  with  the 
latest  reports,  digests,  encyclopedias  and 
textbooks,  the  statutes  of  other  states, 
the  United  States,  Great  Britain,  Can- 
ada, Australia  and  certain  other  foreign 
countries,  and  briefs  of  counsel  in  cases 
decided  iu  the  California  Supreme  and 
Appellate  courts.  State  ofBcers  are  en- 
titled to  borrow  books,  and  private  indi- 
viduals are  accorded  the  same  privilege 
upon  presentation  of  a  request  signed  by 
a  Supreme,  Appellate  or  Superior  Judge, 
or  other  state  officer.  Kooks  may  be  kept 
three  weeks,  and  will  be  once  renewed 
for  two  weeks.  All  books  are  subject  to 
recall,  if  required  by  a  state  officer,  or  if, 
in  the  opinion  of  the  Librarian,  a  recall 
is  fair  and  expedient. 

In  addition  to  special  service  to  mem- 
bers of  the  Legislature,  information  on 
the  laws  of  California  and  other  states 
and  countries  is  given  on  inquiry  from 
libraries  or  individuals. 

Recent  accessions  to  the  department 
will  he  found  listed  under  the  heading 
"Law"  in  the  section  on  "Recent  Acces- 
sions." 

During  January  aboue  3500  law  books 
were  oiled  and  repaired. 

Two  bibliographies  have  been  revised 
during  the  quarter.  Copies  of  the  one 
on  statutes  and  codes  were  sent  to  the 
members  of  the  State  Commission  on  the 
Revision  of  the  Lavr's  and  copies  of  the 
other — on  state  constitutional  conventions 
— to  the  members  of  the  Constitutional 
Convention  Commission. 

DOCUMENTS  DEPARTMENT 

Alice  J.  Haines,  in  charge. 

The  Documents  Department  aims  to 
coUecl:,  arrange  and  make  available  gov- 
ernment publications,  federal,  state,  city 
and  foreign. 

Recent  accessions  of  California  State 
and  City  publications  will  be  found  on 
pages  224  and  229. 

Copies  of  42  California  State  publica- 
tions have  been  received  for  distribution 
to  libraries:  during  January,  February  and 
March,   1930. 

Adjutant  General.  Motor  transport  in- 
struction manual.  1930. 
■ Rules  and  regulations  for  the  gov- 
ernment of  California  high  school  cad- 
ets. 1930. 
Agriculture  Department.  Agricultural 
statutes,  1929,  pts.  2.  3,  3-a. 

Black  juice  grape  varieties. 

Monthly  bulletin,  vol.  18,  no.  11 ; 

vol.  19,  nos.  1-2. 

Special  publications,  nos.  94,  95, 


97,  98. 
Banking  Dept.     Bulletin,  vol.  4,  nos.  1-8. 


Education   Dept.     Biennial   report,  1928, 
pt.  2. 

Finance  Dept.     Report,  1927-1930. 

Industrial  Relations  Dept.     Special  bul- 
letin no.  1. 

Industrial  Accident  C'omm.     Cali- 
fornia safety  news.  Vol.  14,  no.  1. 

Labor  Statistics  Div.  Labor  laws. 


1929. 
Institutions   Dept.      Bureau    of   Juvenile 

Research.     Bulletin  no.  2. 
Investment  Dept.     Insurance  Div.     List 

of  insurance  brokers,  July  1,  1930. 
Natural   Resources  Dept.   Fish   &   Game 

Coman.      California   fish   &   game,    vol. 

16,  no.  1. 

Fish  bulletin  nos.  20,  21. 

Professional     &      Vocational      Standards 

Dept.    Civil  Engineers  Registration  Bd. 

Rules   and   regulations.     1930. 
■  Medical  Examiners  Bd.     Annual 

report.     1929. 
Public  Works  Dept.     California  highways 

and  public  works,  vol.  8,  nos.  1-3. 

Engineering     &     Irrigation     Div. 

Bulletins,  nos.  19  &  maps ;  21. 

•  Water  Resources  Div.     Bulletin, 

no.  22,  vol.  2. 

Water  Commission  act.    1929. 

Railroad  Comm.     Uniform  system  of  ac- 
counts for  electrical  corporations.  1929. 

Uniform  classification  of  accounts 


for  class  A  automotive  transportation 
companies. 

Secretary  of  State.    Roster.    1930. 

Teachers  College,  Chico.  Circular,  physi- 
cal and  industrial  arts,  1930-1931. 

United  Spanish  War  Veterans.  Proceed- 
ings.    1929. 

REFERENCE    DEPARTMENT 

Beulah  Mumm,  in  charge. 

The  Reference  Department  furnishes 
information  to  any  inquirer.  It  furnishes 
books  to  public  libraries  on  request  of 
the  librarian,  and  to  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  on  request  of  its  official 
head  or  its  librarian ;  to  individuals 
through  the  signature  of  a  state  officer, 
of  the  Librarian  of  the  local  library  or 
of  the  official  head  of  any  other  educa- 
tional institution  or  on  receipt  of  a  $5.00 
deposit ;  to  a  club  on  request  of  its  presi- 
dent, secretary  or  librarian.  In  counties 
having  county  free  libraries,  all  requests 
must  be  made  through  the  county  free 
library. 

ORDER  AND  ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT 

Myrtle  Ruhl,  in  charge. 

During  January,  Februai'y  and  March, 
1999  books,  19  prints  and  40  maps  were 
accessioned. 

CATALOG  DEPARTMENT 
Ida  G.  Munson,  in  charge. 

During  January,  February  and  March, 
1275    books   were   cataloged    and    10,128 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


191 


cards  were  added  to  the  tile.    29,071  cards 
were  tiled  iu  the  Union  Catalog. 

CALIFORNIA    DEPARTMENT 

EuDORA  Gaboutte,  in  charge. 

The    California    Department    aims    to 
have    a    thoroughlj'    good     collection    of 
books  on  the  history  and  description, 
resources  and  industries  of  the  State,   as 
well   as  the  works  of  California  authors 
in   all   departments   of   literature.     These 
are   made  accessible   by  means  of  a   card 
catalog.      Full    names    and    biographical 
sketches    of    California    authors,    artists, 
musicians,  pioneers  and  early  settlers  are 
being  secured,  together  with  their  photo 
graphs.      The    collection    of    bound    peri- 
odicals  is  quite   large.     The   Department 
J  also  contains  about  12,000  bound  volumes 
1  of   newspapers',   a   tile   of   which   is    being 
1  indexed   with    reference   to  the  history  of 
the   State.     Students  will  be  assisted  in 
j  their  work. 

Pioneers  and  Early  Settlers 

Among  the  many  interesting  cards  re- 
ceived we  note  that  of  General  Bennet 
j  Riley,  who  was  military  governor  of  Cali- 
fornia in  1849  and  issued  a  proclamation 
to  the  people  regarding  the  fii-st  consti- 
tutional convention.  At  the  close  of  the 
convention  General  Sutter  was  appointed 
by  the  delegates  to  express  the  thanks  of 
the  convention  to  General  Riley  for  the 
aid  and  cooperation  he  had  extended  in 
the  forming  of  a  state  government.  Gen- 
eral Riley  died  in  1853. 

James  Jackson  Jarves  visited  Cali- 
fornia several  times  during  the  period 
1837-1842.  His  chief  contribution  to 
California  was  a  book  which  was  pub- 
lished in  1844  entitled  "Scenes  and  sce- 
nery in  California."  Mr  Jai^ves  was  a 
scholar,  author  and  art  collector.  The 
"Jarves  collection"  is  in  the  Tale  Gallery 
of  Fine  Arts. 

Another  interesting  card  is  that  of 
Louis  Pellier,  a  Frenchman  who  arrived 
from  Chile  in  1849.  He  settled  in  Santa 
Clara  county  and  introduced  the  first 
French  prune  into  the  United  States.  He 
also  brought  rare  varieties  of  fruits,  vines 
and  ornamental  plants  from  other  parts  of 
the  world. 

John  Burke  with  his  most  interesting 
family  consisting  of  his  wife  and  seven 
children  arrived  in  San  Francisco  by 
sailing  vessel  in  1849.  Mr  Burke  was 
born  on  the  Island  of  Jamaica.  He  mar- 
ried Barbara  Forbes  in  Hobart  Town. 
Tasmania,   where  he  held   several  public 


offices.  His  profession  on  arriving  in 
California  was  that  of  translator  and 
interpreter,  being  a  master  of  Spanish, 
French  and  Italian.  He  died  in  1854. 
Cards  for  his  wife  and  children  are  also 
on  file. 

William  Edward  Rowland  with  his  wife 
and  two  children  arrived  by  sailing  ves- 
sel from  Australia  in  1849.  He  was  one 
of  the  first  merchants  in  San  Francisco. 
It  is  told  that  when  his  daughter  was  ill, 
his  son  walked  a  mile  each  day  to  buy 
one  egg  for  her  from  a  Mexican  family, 
at  fifty  cents  each,  and  a  person  could 
buy  only  one  each  day.  Cards  for  his 
family  have  also  been  received. 

One  more  forty-niner  must  be  men- 
tioned. He  is  still  living  and  filled  out 
his  card  in  a  manner  that  should  put  the 
intervening  generation  to  shame.  The 
writing  is  beautiful.  His  name  is  Paris 
.Jasper  Ferguson.  He  is  a  most  inter- 
esting speaker  and  has  a  vast  fund  of 
reminiscences  which  he  relates  in  a  most 
entertaining  manner. 

Other  cards  received  are  as  follows : 
Isaac  S.  Boswick,  1852;  Edwin  B.  Dan- 
gerfield,  1850;  John  Albert  Graham, 
1853 ;  James  Weld  Towne,  1852. 

California  Authors 

The  following  author  cards  have  been 
received    since    the    last    issue    of   News 
Notes  of  California  Liiraries: 
Bird,   Frederick  Lucien. 
Bonfils,  Mrs  Winifred  Black   (Sweet) 
Mrs  Charles  Bonfils  (Annie  Laurie). 
Butler,   Mrs   Jennie    (McBride) 

Mrs  E.   A.   Butler. 
Fultz,  Francis  Marion. 
Hambly,   Harry  B. 
Hoyt,   Vance   Joseph. 
Jaeger,  Edmund  Carroll. 
Kohut,     Mrs     Rebekali     ( Bettelheim ) 

Mrs  Alexander  Kohut. 
*Latta,  Frank  Forrest. 
*McKeever,  "VVilliam  McKinley. 
McWilliams,  Carey. 
Podesta,   Mrs  Lori    (Petri) 

Mrs   Louis   A.    Podesta. 
Sawyer,   Edmund   Ogden,   Jr. 
*  Stewart,  George  William. 

California  Artists* 

The  following  artist  cards  have  been 

received    since    the    last    issue    of    News 

Notes  of  California  Libraries: 

Botke,    Cornelis. 

Botke,  Mrs  Jessie    (Arms) 

Mrs    Cornelis    Botke. 
Hope,   Mrs   Thelma    (Paddock) 

Mrs  Frederick   Putnam  Hope. 
Newell,    Edson. 


^Native    Californians. 


192 


NEWS   NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Saunders,  Mrs  Ruth    (Thomson) 

Mrs  Lynne  F.   Saunders. 
Schnier,   Jacques. 
*Skinner,  Mrs  Charlotte    (Butler) 

Mrs  William   Lyle  Skinner. 
*Ulber,   Althea. 
Wuermer,  Carl. 

Newspaper   Index 
The     index     covers     the     period     from 
August  15,  1846,  to  date. 

Catalog 

722  cards  have  been  added  to  the  Cali- 
fornia catalog  during  the  last  quarter. 

PRINTS    DEPARTMENT 

Beetha  S.  Taylob,  in  charge. 

The  Prints  Department  has  been  estab- 
lished only  since  the  new  State  Library 
building  has  been  occupied.  In  it  are 
kept  the  prints  acquired  by  the  State 
Library  for  several  years  past  and  now 
for  the  first  time  suitably  housed  and  dis- 
played. In  display  cases  can  be  shown 
about  fifty  prints  at  a  time  and  exhibits 
are  constantly  maintained.  Visitors  are 
invited. 

Two  thousand  two  hundred  and  three 
prints  have  now  been  cataloged.  During 
the  quarter  723  persons  visited  the  Prints 
Room — this  included  four  groups  of 
school  children.  Two  talks  were  given  in 
the  room — one  to  an  Eastern  Star  art 
section  and  one  to  one  of  the  groups  of 
school   children. 

An  exhibit  of  the  etchings  and  dry 
points  of  Roi  Partridge  was  shown  from 
the  last  of  December  until  February, 
when  it  was  replaced  by  a  showing  of 
lithographs  by  French,  German,  British 
and  American  artists.  The  Roi  Part- 
ridge exhibit  was  the  first  "one  man 
show"   in   the   Prints  Room. 

BOOKS  FOR  THE  BLIND 
DEPARTMENT 

Mabel  R.  Gixlis,  in  charge. 

Embossed  books  in  the  various  types 
are  sent  to-  any  blind  resident  in  Cali- 
fornia upon  application.  Circular  and 
finding  list,  with  Call  slip  postal,  will  be 
sent  on  request.  Writing  appliances  and 
games  for  the  blind  are  loaned  as  samples 
to  those  wishing  to  buy  such  articles,  so 
that  the  different  kinds  can  be  tried  before 
they  are  ordered.  Addresses  of  firms  sup- 
plying all  articles  loaned  will  be  furnished 
on  request. 

Books  sent  to  individuals  from  an  in- 
stitution distributing  embossed  literature 
are  carried  free  through  the  mails. 

*  Native   Californians. 


Embossed  catalogs  of  the  earlier  mate- 
rial in  American  Braille,  Moon,  and  New 
York  point  are  available.  They  will  be 
loaned  to  borrowers  wishing  them  for  use 
in  book  selection. 

A  catalog  of  all  books  in  Moon  type  in 
the  Library  up  to  October  1,  1926,  and 
one  including  all  books  in  Braille  up  to 
April  1,  1927,  will  be  sent  to  anyone 
requesting  it. 

The  State  Library  will  be  glad  to  have 
borrowers  who  care  to  do  so  write  any 
letters  or  requests  for  books  to  the  Li- 
brary in  Braille  or  New  York  Point. 

The  first  book  was  loaned  June  13, 
1905.  There  are  now  2966  blind  bor- 
rowers, 40  borrowers  having  been  added 
during  January,  February  and  March. 
Total  accessions  are  25.067,  as  follows: 
New  York  point  books  2791;  New  York 
point  music  187 ;  American  Braille  books 
3148;  American  Braille  music  1289;  Eu- 
ropean Braille  books  3909 ;  European 
Braille  music  272;  Esperanto  Braille 
books  3 ;  Moon  books  6049 ;  Moon  music 
5  ;  Revised  Braille  books  6326 ;  Revised 
Braille  music  156 ;  Standard  dot  books 
14 ;  Line  books  193 ;  Line  music  21 ;  Ink 
Print  books  534  ;  ^Appliances  84  ;  *Games 
54 ;  Maps  32. 

During  January,  February  and  March, 
8805  books,  etc.,  were  loaned  as  follows: 
New  York  point  81 ;  American  Braille  67 ; 
European  Braille  685;  Moon  3186;  Re- 
vised Braille  4781 ;  Line  2  ;  Ink  Print  0  ; 
Appliances  1 ;  Games  2 ;  Maps  0.  The 
loans  were  divided  by  class  as  follows : 
Philosophy  and  religion  481 ;  sociology 
16 ;  language  26  ;  primers  42  ;  science  50 ; 
useful  arts  20 ;  fine  arts  1 ;  amusements 
1 ;  music  21 ;  literature  192 ;  fiction  6141 ; 
travel  and  history  295 ;  biography  221 ; 
periodicals  1298. 

Copies  of  magazines  have  been  donated 
during  the  last  three  months  by  Frank 
Austin,  F.  B.  Beans,  Mrs  C.  W.  Brett, 
Mrs  H.  W.  Bruning,  Mrs  H.  O.  Buker, 
Anna  Courtois,  F.  M.  Ferren,  Kate  M. 
Foley,  Alva  Geen,  J.  W.  Hoggard,  Ruby 
Holtz,  W.  H.  Hughes,  H.  D.  Jones,  Bes- 
sie Long,  Mrs  Rose  McComb,  Mrs  Ida 
McGrath,  W.  A.  Miller,  Mrs  L.  I.  Morris, 
Hattie  B.  Newman,  Newell  Perry,  Mrs 
M.  E.  Phillips,  Ethel  Roikjer,  Mrs  L. 
Sargent,  Bessie  Sawyer,  George  W.  Shoe- 
maker, Mrs  A.  J.  Smith,  Mrs  Mary 
Springer,  Mrs  F.  M.  Thompson,  J.  B. 
Walker,      Donald      Wheaton,      American 


*  Appliances   and   games   are   loaned  as 
samples   to   anyone  wishing   to   try   them. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


193 


Braille  Press  for  War  and  Civilian  Blind, 
Inc.,  Board  of  Missions  for  Deaf  and 
Blind  of  the  Lutheran  Synod  of  Missouri, 
Ohio  and  other  states,  Board  of  Mis- 
sions to  Deaf  Mutes  of  the  Evangelical 
Lutheran  Synod  of  Missouri,  Ohio  and 
other  states,  Canadian  National  Insti- 
tute for  the  Blind,  Christian  Record 
Piiblishing  Company,  Christian  Science 
Publishing  Company,  Department  of  Mis- 
sions of  Protestant  Episcopal  Church, 
Gospel  Trumpet  Company,  Michigan 
School  for  the  Blind,  National  Institute 
for  the  Blind,  New  York  Association 
for  the  Blind,  Society  for  Aid  of 
the  Sightless,  Theosophical  Book  Associa- 
tion for  the  Blind,  Western  Pennsylvania 
School  for  Blind,  Xavier  Braille  Publish- 
ing Company,  Ziegler  Publishing  Com- 
pany and  a  friend. 

■Other  gifts  are  indicated  in  the  list  of 
books,  etc.,  which  have  been  added  to  the 
library  during  the  last  three  months. 
See  page  229. 

Home  Teaching 

Kate  M.  Foley,  home  teacher  of  the 
blind,  is  at  the  Ai-gyle  Apartments,  146 
McAllister  street,  San  Francisco,  every 
Thursday  from  9  a.m.  to  5  p.m.  Her 
telephone  number  is  Market  0690.  She 
gives  lessons  regularly  in  the  bay  region 
and  the  Santa  Clara  Valley,  with  occa- 
sional trips  to  other  parts  of  the  state. 
Catharine  J.  Momson,  home  teacher  of 
the  blind,  is  at  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Free  Library,  Broadway  Annex,  Hall  of 
Records,  every  Wednesday.  Her  home 
address  is  951  S.  Kenmore  ave.,  Los 
Angeles.  Her  telephone  number  is 
Drexel  5339.  She  gives  lessons  regularly 
in  Los  Angeles  and  vicinity  and  makes 
occasional  trips  to  San  Diego. 

From  January  1  to  March  31,  home 
teachers  gave  561  lessons  in  the  homes 
of  the  blind  and  49  lessons  in  libraries. 
They  made  283  visits  and  calls  in 
connection  with  the  work  for  purposes 
other  than  giving  lessons,  and  have  re- 
ceived 64  visits  in  connection  with  the 
work. 

During  the  quarter  Miss  Foley  and 
Miss  Morrison  spent  335  hours  on  corre- 
spondence and  preparing  lessons.  They 
wrote  459  letters  and  210  postals  and 
received  321  letters  and  31  postals.  They 
also  answered  and  made  570  telephone 
5 — 76092 


calls.  They  made  1  address.  Miss 
Foley  teaches  regularly  in  Oakland,  in 
Alameda  and  in  San  Francisco  classes  of 
seeing  people  to  write  Braille.  She  spent 
35  hours  in  proofreading  hand-copied 
books.  The  various  other  activities  in 
connection  with  the  work  of  the  home 
teachers  can  not  be  easily  tabulated. 

SUTRO   BRANCH 

The  Sutro  Branch  occupies  space  in  the 
Public  Library,  Civic  Center,  San  Fran- 
cisco, and  is  open  every  day,  except  Sun- 
day, from  9  a.m.  to  5  p.m. 

CALIFORNIA     STATE     LIBRARY 
SCHOOL  GRADUATES 

Esther  M.  Bomgardner,  '15 

Ln.  Luther  Burbank  Junior  High  School 

L.,  Los  Angeles. 
Thelma  Brackett,  '20 

Ln.  Newark  Museum,  Newark,  N.  J 
Helen  V.   Briggs,  '14 

46  Fairview  ave.,  Los  Gatos 
Agnes  E.   Brown,  '15 

Asst.    San   Mateo   High    School    L.,    San 

Mateo 
Helen  M.  Bruner,   '14 

Asst.  in  charge,  Sutro  Branch,  State  L., 

San  Francisco 
Mrs   Lucile    Huff   Buchan    (Mrs   Dean   W. 
Buchan),  '20 

1631   Cowper  St.,  Palo  Alto 
Mrs    Virginia    Clowe    BuUis    (Mrs    James 
S.  Bullis),  "17 

1314  Alameda  Padre  Serra,   Santa  Bar- 
bara 
Ruth  B.  Bullock,  '15 

Ln.    Belvedere    Junior    High    School    L., 

Los  Angeles 
Elta  L.  Camper,  '17 

Asst.  P.  L.,  Berkeley. 
Marguerite  Chatfield,  '20 

Asst.  P.  L.,  Pasadena 
Nellie   E.   Christensen,  '19 

Ln.  Selma  High  School  L.,  Selma 
Mabel  Coulter,  '14 

Ln.    Lange    Library    of    Education, 

Berkeley 
Helen  Esther  Crawford,  '20 

Galileo  High  School  L.,  San  Francisco. 
Tillie  de  Bernardi,  '18 

234  E.  79th  St.,  New  York  City 
Estella  De  Ford,  '15 

Ln.  Napa  Co.  F.  L.,  Napa 
Margaret  Dennison,  '17 

Asst.  Sutro  Branch,  State  L.,  San  Fran- 
cisco 
Abbie  Doughty,  '20 

Ln.  Garfield  Hig>h  School  L.,  Los  Angeles 
Mrs  Vivian  Gregory  Douglas    (Mrs  James 
R.  Douglas),  '14 

2804  Fleur  drive,  San  Marino 
Mrs  Flo  Gantz  Dyer  (Mrs  Maurice  Foster 
Dyer),  '20 

810  S.  Main  St.,  Salinas 
Mrs  Dorotha  Davis  Elliott    (Mrs  William 
Foster  Elliott),  '17 

Ln.  Fresno  High  School  L.,  Fresno 
Ellen  B.  Frink,  '19 

Ln.   Monterey  Co.  F.  L.,   Salinas 
Hazel  G.  Gibson.  '19 

Asst.  Sacramento  Co.  F.  L.,  Sacramento 
Margaret  V.  Girdner,  '17 

Ln.  Galileo  High  School  L.,  San  Fran- 


194 


NEWS    NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Mary  E.  Glock.  '15 

Died,  March   6,   1922 
Mrs    Jennie    Rumsey    Gould     (Mrs    J.    A. 
Gould),    '14 
Asst.   Yolo   Co.  F.   L.,  Woodland. 
Mrs  Mildred  Kellogg  Hargis  (Mrs  William 
K.  Harsis),  'IS 
3  36  Front  St.,  Salinas 
Mrs   Louise   Jammg   Harriss    (Mrs  Frank 
U.    Hairi.';s).   '1.5 
414  E.  12th  St.,  North,  Portland,  Ore. 
Margaret  Hatch,  '15 

Ln.    The    Emporiuin    L.,    San    Francisco 
Mrs   Hazel    Meddaugh  Heffner    (Mrs   Roy 
.T.   Heffner),   '18 
178   Mills   St.,   Morristown,   N.   J. 
Cecilia  Henderson,  '14 

Santa   Paula 
Mrs    Helen    Hopwood    Judd    (Mrs    Wllber 
Judd),   '2n 
Care  Navy  Y.  M.  C.  A.,  Shanghai,  China 
Mrs     Winona    McConnell     Kennedy     (Mrs 
John  Elmer  Kennedy),  '15 
1320   39th  St.,   Sacramento 
Mrs    Marguerite    Ryan    Kirschman     (Mrs 
Orton   A.  Kirschman').   '19 
723   Colusa  ave.,   Berkeley 
Mrs  Angelina   Marlow   Lawson    (Mrs  Tver 
N.    Lawson,   Jr.),   'IS 
3231   Front  st.,  San  Diego 
Mar.iorie  C.  Learned,  '20 

.As-s^t.  P.  L.,  New  York  City 
Mrs  M.  Ruth  McLaughlin  Lockwood    (Mrs 
Pnlnh    L.    Lockwood),   '17 
1627  Mendocino  st.,  Pasadena. 
Amv  G.  Luke,  '15 

Tulare 
Mrs    Bessie    Heath    McCrea     (Mrs    Robert 
W.   McCrea).   '19 
4941  8th  ave.,  Sacramento 
N.  "Ruth  McCullongh,  '17 

2210  Allerton  House,  Chicago,  111. 
Mrs   Ruth  Beard   McDowell    (Mrs  Roy   F. 
McDowell).   '14 
Asst.  McHenry  P.  L.,  Modesto. 
Mrs    Everett    McCullough    McMillin     (Mrs 
Jamps  M.   McMillin).   '19 
4412  Harrison,  Washington.  D.  C. 
Anne  Margrave,  '14 

Ln.  Inyo  Co.  F.  L.,  Independence 
Lenala  Martin,  '14 

Ln.  Lassen  Co.  F.  L..  Susanville 
Mrs    Georgia    Pearl    Seeker    Meyers    (Mrs 
Robert  K.   Meyers),   '19 
Ln.  Tulare  Joint  Union  High  School  L., 
Tulare 
Vera  V.  Mitchell,  '19 

Ln.  Biggs  High  School  L.,  Biggs 
Marion  Morse,  '17 

Ln.   Honolulu  Academy  of  Arts,   Hono- 
lulu, T.  H. 
Mrs   Alice    Moore   Patton    (Mrs   James    L. 
Patton),  '18 
416  S.  Hoover  st.,  Los  Angeles 
Mrs     Helen     Katherine     Kellogg    Peabody 
(Mrs  Roger  Peabody),  '19 
6    Sound  View  drive,  Larchmont,   N.   Y. 
Mrs    Marion    Schumache;:'    Percival     ( Mrs 
H.  Frederic  Percival).  '15 
1G33  38th  St.,  Sacramento 
Mrs  Miriam  Colcord  Post,  '14 

Ln.    Brawley   High    School    and    Junior 
College  L.,  Brawley 
Margaret  L.  Potter,  '16 

Asst.  Lane  Medical  L.,  San   Francisco 
Mrs     Eunice    Steele    Price     (Mrs    Jay    H. 
Price),  '16 
I0;i4  Cragmont  ave.,  Berkeley 
Mrs   Essie   White    Primrose    (Mrs    George 
Primrose),    '19 
Ln.    Sacramento    High    School    I^.,    Sac- 
ramento 
Mrs   Beatrice   Brasefleld   Rakestraw    (Mrs 
Norris  W.  Rakestraw),  '18 


Asst.  Rhode  Island  School  of  Design  L., 

Providence,  R.  I. 
Esther  L.  Ramont,  '20 

414  Johnson  st.,   Modesto 
Mrs  Frances  Haub  Raymond   (Mrs  George 
J.  Raymond),  '20 

724  Santa  Ynez  Way,  Sacramento 
Anna  Belle  Robinson,  '18 

Died,  June  22,  1920 
Myrtle  Ruhl,  '14 

Head   of   Order  Dept.,    State    L.,    Sacra- 
mento 
Ruth  Seymour,  '18 

Ln.    Tamalpais   Union    High    School    L., 

Sausalito 
Blanche  L.   Shadle,  '17 

Asst.   State  L.,  Sacramento 
Mrs  Bemice  Goff   Simpson    (Mrs  John  R. 
Simpson),  '14 

Asst.  John   Crerar  L.,  Chicago 
Mrs   Edith   Edinburg   Smalley    (Mrs   Carl 
J.  Smalley),  '18 

Died,  July   27,   1929. 
Mrs    Edna    Bell    Smith    (Mrs    William   A. 
Smith).  '17 

1225   42d  St.,   Sacramento 
Mrs  Elizabeth   Snyder  Smith    (Mrs  Joseph 
K.   Smith),  '20 

3100  19th  St.,  Bakersfield 
-Mrs    Beatrice    Gawne    Todd     (Mrs    Ewart 
Burns  Todd),  '17 

1860  Green  st.,  San  Francisco 
Mrs  Rosamond  Bradbury  Waithman   (Mrs 
Joseph   de  L.  Waithman),   '18 

16  85  San   Lorenzo  ave.,  Berkeley 
Caroline  Wenzel,  '14 

Asst.  State  L.,  Sacramento 
Mrs    Blanche   Chalfant   Wheeler    (Mrs   De 
Forest  Nathaniel  Wheeler),  '14 

Box  865,  San  Jose 
Josephine  L.   Whitbeck.   '16 

Acting  Ln.  P.  L.,  Richmond 
Mrs  Katharine  Gaboon  Wilson   (Mrs  Llovd 
R.  Wilson),  '17 

1125   Grand  ave.,   Seattle,  Wash. 
Aldine  Winhani,  '20 

Asst.    San    Bernardino    Co.    F.    L.,    San 

BernaTflinn 
Mr«  Dorothy  CHarke  Worden,  '15 

Died.  .January  8.  1930 
Mrs  Bess  Ranton  Yates   (Mrs  John  DeWitt 
Yates).  '18 

Asst.   Los   Angeles   Co.   P.   L.,   Los   An- 
geles. 
Mrs  Edna  Holroyd  Yelland  (Mrs  Raymond 
Yelland),  '15 

Ln.  San  Mateo  Co.  F.  L.,  Redwood  City 

News    Items 

Lenala  Martin,  '14,  left  in  February 
for  a  three-months'  trip  through  the. 
United  States.  She  had  a  leave  of  ab- 
sence from  the  Lassen  County  Free  Li- 
brary. She  was  accompanied  by  her  as- 
sistant, Elisabeth  C  Haines. 

Mrs  Raymond  Yelland  (Edna  Holroyd. 
'15)  resigned  from  tbe  librarianship  of 
the  San  Mateo  County  Free  Library 
March  31  and  with  her  husband  has  gone 
for  a  several  months'  trip  abroad. 

RECENT  ACCESSIONS 

Additions  to  the  Library   During  Janu- 
ary, February  and   March,  1930. 
The  last  number  of  the  Quarterly 
Bulletin  of  the  California  State  Library 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


195 


which  was  issued  was  no.  4  of  vol.  4, 
covering  the  accessions  for  September- 
December,  1905.  The  Bulletin  has  been 
discontinued  and  the  matter  contained  in 
it  is  now  appearing  in  News  Notes  of 
California  Libraries. 

The  last  list  of  recent  accessions 
appeared  in  the  January,  1930,  issue  of 
this  publication. 

GENERAL  WORKS 

Atwatek,  Helen  Woodard. 

Home  economics ;  the  art  and  science  of 
homemaking.  1929.  (Reading  with 
a  purpose)  028  ASS 


Canslee,  Charles  W. 
A  library  milestone. 

Fitch,  John  Andrew. 
Capital    and    labor, 
with  a  purpose) 


1929.     x021   C22 


1929. 


(Reading 
028  F54 


Johnson,  Mrs  Margaret  (FuUerton). 
Manual  of  cataloging  and  classification 
for  elementary  school  libraries.   1929. 
X025.3  J  68 
Koch,  Theodore  Wesley. 

Reading :  a  vice  or  a  virtue.    1929. 

028  K76 

LiBBAEY  efficiency  corporation. 
The     Diekman     bookcharging     system. 
1929.  X025.6  L69 

Gift. 


—  The    Diekman    bookcharging    sys- 
tem.    Supplies.  qx025.6  L6 

Gift. 


Lowes,  John  Livingston. 
Of  reading  books.    1929. 


028  L917 


Moody,  Katharine  Twining,  ed. 

The   library   within   the   walls.      1929. 
(Classics  of  American  librarianship) 
x020  M81 
MOTT,  Frank  Luther. 

A  history  of  American  magazines,  1741- 
1750.     1930.  051   M92 

Pottle,  Frederick  Albert. 

The  literary  career  of  James  Boswell, 
esq.     1929.  012  B74 

Waeeen,  Carl  N. 
News  reporting ;  a  practice  book.    1929. 

070  W28 

Wilson,  H.  W.,  firm,  puilishers. 

Standard  catalog  for  public  libraries : 


history    and    travel    section.      1929. 
(Standard  catalog  series) 

rq016.9  W7 


The  World  z*eview. 


V.  1-4.     1925-27. 

q051   W9r 


PHILOSOPHY  AND   ETHICS 

The  Abolitionist,    v.  25-29.     1924r-28. 

q  179.405  A1 
Bennett,  Arnold. 

How  to  live.     cl925.  170  B47ht 

Boas,  George. 

The  adventures  of  human  thought. 
1929.  109  B66 

Beooks-Bbight  foundation. 

Brooks-Bright  prize  essays,  1929. 

172.4  B87 
Beown,  Ancil  T. 

Energizing  personality.     1929. 

174  BS77 
Gadman,  Samuel  Parkes. 

Peace.      cl929.  171  C12 

Caee,  Herbei-t  Wildon. 

Leibniz.  1929.  (Leaders  of  philoso- 
phy) 193  L52zc 

Goleeidge,   Samuel  Taylor. 

Coleridge  on  logic  and  learning.     1929. 

160  C69 
Davie,  Maurice  Rea. 

The  evolution  of  war.  1929.  (Yale 
publications  in  economics,  social 
science  and  government)      172.4  D25 

Eneiques,  Federigo. 

The  historic  development  of  logic. 
cl929.  160  E59 

Essays  in  honor  of  John  Dewey,  on  the 
occasion  of  his  seventieth  birthday 
October  20,  1929.     cl929.       104  E78 


Laied,  John. 

The  idea  of  value.     1929. 


192  L18 


Muiehead,  John  Plenry. 

The    use    of    philosophy ;     Galifornian 
addresses.     1929.  104  M95u 

NoREis,  Mrs  Kathleen  (Thompson). 
Mother  and  son.     1929.  c173  N85 


Pateick,  Mary  Mills. 
The  Greek  sceptics. 


1929. 


186  P31 


Pitkin,  Walter  Boughton. 

The  psychology  of  happiness.     1929. 

171   P68 


196 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Russell,  Leonard. 

An  introduction  to  philosophy.  1929. 
(Workers'  educational  association 
outlines)  102  R964 

Takneb,  Juauita,  pseud. 

The  intelligent  man's  guide  to  marriage 
and   celibacy.     cl929.  173  T16 

PROHIBITION 

Boole,  Mrs  Ella  (Alexander). 

Give  prohibition  its  chance.     cl929. 

178  B72 
Cbowthee,   Samuel. 

Prohibition  and  prosperity.     cl930. 

178  C95 

Willebkandt,  Mrs  Mabel  (Walker). 
The  inside  of  prohibition.     cl929. 

178  W69 

METAPHYSICS 

Dewey,  John. 

The  quest  for  certainty.  1929.  (Gif- 
ford  lectures.   1929)  121   D51 

FiTE,  Warner. 

The  living  mind ;  essays  on  the  signifi- 
cance of  consciousness.     1930. 

126  F54 
JoAD,  Cyril  Edwin  Mitchinson. 

Matter,  life  and  value.    1929.     110  J62 

Mackenzie,  John  Stuart. 

Outlines  of  metaphysics.  1929.  (Mac- 
millan's  manuals  for  students) 

110  M15 
MtJLLER-FREiENFELs,  Richard. 

Mysteries  of  the  soul.     1929.     128  M95 

PiPEE,   Raymond  Frank,   &  Ward,   Paul 
William. 

The  fields  and  methods   of  knowledge. 

1929.  112  P66 

Urban,  Wilbur  Marshall. 

The  intelligible  world  ;  metaphysics  and 
value.  [1929]  (Library  of  phi- 
losophy) 110  U72 

CHILD    STUDY.       MENTAL    TESTS 

Bakee,  Harry  Jay. 

Educational  disability  and  case  studies 
in  remedial  teaching.     cl929. 

136.7  B16e 
Hamilton,  Eric  Ronald. 

The  art  of  interrogation.     1929.      (In- 
ternational    library     of     psychology, 
philosophy     and     scientific    method) 
136.7  H21 


HiLDEETH,  Gertrude  Howell. 

Functions  of  the  department  of  psycho- 
logical measurement.    cl927. 

136.7  H64f 
Newcomb,  Theodore  Mead. 

The  consistency  of  certain  extrovert- 
introvert  behavior  patterns  in  51 
pi'oblem  boys.  1929.  (Teachers 
college,  Columbia  university.  Con- 
tributions to  education)     136.76  N53 

SCHWEGLER,  Raytaond  Alfred. 

A  study  of  introvert-extrovert  responses 
to  certain  test  situations.  1929. 
( Teach ei*s  college,  Columbia  univer- 
sity.    Contributions  to  education) 

136.7  S412 
Scott,  Mrs  Adelin  (White). 

A  compai-ative  study  of  responses  of 
children  of  different  nationalities  and 
environments  on  intelligence  and 
achievement  tests.  1929.  (Teachers 
college,  Columbia  university.  Con- 
tributions to  education)     136.7  S425 

Speek,  Robert  Kenneth. 

Measurement  of  appreciation  in  poetry, 
prose,  and  art,  and  studies  in  appre- 
ciation. 1929.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  136.7  S74 

Waring,  Mrs  Ethel  May   (Bushnell),  & 
Wilker,  Marguerite. 
The  behavior  of  young  children.     cl929. 
(Series  on  childhood  education) 

136.7  W27b 

MIND  AND  BODY 

BiANCHi,  Leonardo. 

Foundations  of  mental  health.    1930. 

131   B57 
Elkind,  Henry  Byron,  ed. 

The  healthy  mind ;  mental  hygiene  for 
adults,  by  Joseph  Jastrow,  &  others. 
cl929.  131   E43 


Kenyon,  Theda. 
Witches  still  live. 


1929. 


133  K375 


PSYCHOLOGY 

Boring,  Edwin  Garrigues. 

A  history  of  experimental  psychology. 
cl929.  (The  Century  psychology 
series)  150  B73 

Bridges,  James  Winfred. 

Psychology,  normal  and  abnormal. 
1930.  150  8851 


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CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


197 


HoLLiNGWORTH,  Harry  Levi. 

Vocational  psychology  and  character 
analysis.     1929.  151   H74a 

Rand,  Benjamin,  comp. 

The  classical  psychologist.     cl912. 

150  R18 

TEGAKDEJf,    JB   Hollis. 

Why  do  we  do  as  we  do?     A  popular 
presentation    in    psychology.      cl929. 
150  T26 
RELIGION 
Angus,  Samuel. 

The  religious  quests  of  the  Graeco- 
Roman  world.    1929.  270  A59r 

Baldwin,  Summerfield. 

The  organization  of  medieval  Christian- 
ity. cl929.  (The  Berkshire  studies 
in  Eui-opean  history)  270  B18 

Barnes,  Harry  Elmer. 

The   twilight   of   Christianity.      cl929. 

239  B26 
Beluoc,  Hilaire. 

Survivals  and  new  arrivals.     1929. 

282  B44s 
Bebnpeld,  Simon,  comp. 

The  teachings  of  Judaism,    v.  1.    1929. 

296  B526 
Brunnee,  Heinx-ich  Emil. 

The  theology  of  crisis.     1929.    230  B89 

Campbell,  James  Marshall. 

The  Greek  fathers.  1929.  (Our  debt 
to  Greece  and  Rome)  270.2  C18 

Ca-se,  Shirley  Jackson. 

Experience  with  the  supernatural  in 
early  Christian  times.    el929. 

281  C33 
Cave,  Sydney. 

Christianity  and  some  living  religions 
of  the  East.  1929.  (Studies  in 
theology  series)  290  C37c 

Clarke,  Charles  Philip  Stewart. 

Short  history  of  the  Christian  church, 
from  the  earliest  times  to  the  pres- 
ent day.     1929.  270  C59 

Code,  Joseph  Bernard. 

Great  American  foundresses.      1929. 

271.9  C66 
Cram,  Ralph  Adams. 

The  Catholic  church  and  art.  1930. 
(The  Calvert  series)  282  C88 

Dewart,  Mrs  Elizabeth  Haven. 

The  march  of  life.     1929.  213  D51 


Emhardt,  "William  Chauncey. 

Religion  in  soviet  Russia.     cl929. 

274.7  E53 

Fisher,  Herbert  Albert  Laurens. 

Our  new  religion.     1929.         289.9  F53 

Hawkins,  Chauncey  Jeddie. 

Do  the  churches  dare?    1929.    260  H39 

Haydon,  Albert  Eustace. 

The  quest  of  the  ages.    1929.    201   H41 

Larrimeb,  Mary. 

The  life  of  Paul  of  Tarsus.    cl929. 

225.9  P32I 
Levonian,  Lutfi. 

Moslem   mentality.      [1928]        297  L66 

Mackenzie,  Frederick  Arthur. 

The  clash  of  the  cymbals ;  the  secret 
history  of  the  revolt  in  the  Salvation 
army.     [1929]  267.1   M15 

Mahan,  William  Dennes. 

The  archko  volume.    [1929]     296  M21a 

March  ANT,  Sir  James,  ed. 

The  reunion   of   Christendom.      [1929] 

204  M31 
PowYS,  Llewelyn. 

The  cradle  of  God.  1929.  220.9  P88 

Roback,  Abraham  Aaron. 

Jewish  influence  in  modern  thought. 
1929.  296  R62 

Sghleiermacher,     Fried  rich     Ernst 
Daniel. 
The  Christian  faith.     1928.        239  S34 

Shuster,  George  Nauman. 

The  Catholic  church  and  current  liter- 
ature.    1930.      (The  Calvert  series) 
282  S56c 

Speculum  religionis,  being  essays  and 
studies  in  religion  and  literature 
from  Plato  to  Von  Hiigel.     1929. 

204  S74 
Waite,  Arthur  Edward. 

The  holy  kabbalah.     .[1929]     q212  W1 

Willett,  Herbert  Lockwood. 

The  Bible  through  the  centuries. 
cl929.  220  W71 

SOCIOLOGY:    GENERAL 

BoRSODi,  Ralph. 

Tliis  ugly  civilization.     1929.     301    B73 

Ellwood,  Charles  Abram. 

Man's    social    destiny    in    the    light    of 


198 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


science.  1929.  (The  Cole  lectures 
for  1929  delivered  before  Vanderbilt 
universitj')  301   E47m 

Florence,  Philip  Sargant. 

Sociology  and  sin.     cl929.      (The  new 
science  series)  301   F63 


Lloyd  Geokge,  David. 

Slings  and  arrows.     1929. 


308  L79 


Odum,   Howard    Washington,    &    Jocher, 

Katharine  O. 

An    introduction    to    social    research. 

cl929.       (American     social     science 

series)  301  027  i 

Stratton,  George  Malcolm. 

Social  psychology  of  international  con- 
duct.    1929.  301   S91 

STATISTICS 

Florence,  Philip  Sargant. 

The  statistical  method  in  economics  and 
political  science.  1929.  (Interna- 
tional library  of  psychology,  philoso- 
phy and  scientific  method)     311   F63 

Thompson,  Warren  Simpson. 

Danger  spots  in  world  population. 
1929.  312  T478 

Walker,  Helen  Mary. 

Studies  in  the  history  of  statistical 
method.     1929.  311  W17 

POLITICAL   SCIENCE 

Bird,  Frederick  L.,  &  Ryan,  Frances  M. 
The  recall  of  public  officers.     1930. 

321.4  B61 
PiRAWLET,  Benjamin  Griffith. 

The  negro  in  literature  and  art  in  the 
United  States.     3d  ed.     1929. 

325.26  B82a2 
Bxjllabd,  Arthur. 

American  diplomacy  in  the  modern 
world.     1928.  327.73  B93 


Cain,  James  Mallahan. 
Our  government.     1930. 


320.73  CI 3 


Davis,  John  William. 

Party  government  in  the  United  States. 
1929.  (The  Stafford  Little  lectures 
for  1929)  329  D26 

HOETZSCH,  Otto.  ; 

Germany's  domestic  and  foreign  poli- 
cies. 1929.  (The  Institute  of  poli- 
tics publications,  Williams  college, 
Williamstown,  Mass.)        327.43  H69 


Jones,  Chester  Lloyd,  &  others. 

The  United  States  and  the  Caribbean. 
cl929.  (American  policies  abroad; 
opinions  expressed  for  the  Chicago 
council  on  foreign  relations) 

327.73  J76 

Lucas,  Sir  Charles  Prestwood. 

The  British  Empire ;  six  lectures. 
1924.  325.3  L93 

M ALLISON,  George. 

Color  at  home  and  abroad.     cl929. 

325.26  M25 
Mathieson,  William  Law. 

Great  Britain  and  the  slave  trade, 
1839-1865.     1929.  326  M43 

Merbiam,    Charles    Edward,    cG    Gosnell, 
Harold  Foote. 
The  American  party  system.     1929. 

329  M56a 
SIMMS,  Henry  Harrison. 

The  rise  of  the  Whigs  in  Virginia, 
1824^1840.     1929.  329.4  S59 

Stawell,  Florence  Melian. 

The  growth  of  international  thought. 
cl930.  (Home  university  library  of 
modem  knowledge)  320.9  S79 

Young,  Rose  Emmet. 

The   record  of  the   Leslie   woman   suf- 
frage commission,  inc.,  1917—1929. 
1929.  324.3  Y75 

ZiMMERN,  Alfred  Eckhard. 

America  &  Europe,  and  other  essays. 
1929.  320.4  Z76 

ECONOMICS 

California  fruit  growers  exchange. 
Annual  report  of  the  general  manager. 
1929.  c338.1  C15 

Chase,  Stuart. 

Prosperity :  fact  or  myth.  1929. 
(Paper  books)  330.973  C48 

Cole,  George  Douglas  Howard. 

The  next  ten  years  in  British  social 
and   economic   policy.      1929. 

330.942  C68 
Cox,  Garfield  Vestal. 

An  appraisal  of  American  business 
forecasts.  cl929.  (Studies  in  busi- 
ness   administration)  331   G87 

Gal:^zi,  Christine  Avghi. 

A  study  of  assimilation  among  the 
Roumanians   in    the    United    States. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE    LIBRARY 


199 


1929.  (Studies  in  history,  econom- 
ics and  public  law,  ed.  by  the  Fac- 
ulty of  political  science  of  Columbia 
university)  330.5  C72 

Joint  committee  on  bases  of  sound  land 
policy.  What  about  the  year  2000? 
[1929]  333  J74 

KiRK^iiDY,  Adam  Willis. 

The  romance  of  trade ;  a  survey,  com- 
mercial and  economic.  New  ed. 
1929.  330.9   K59 

I'AvixtFF,  .Joseph  M. 

The  upbuilding  of  soviet  Russia  (five- 
year  plan  for  industrial  development 
of  the  Soviet  union)      1929. 

330.947  P33 

SciiEJLFLEY,  William  H. 

Aspects  of  European  economics  and 
reconstruction.     1929.         330.94  S31 

Taylor,  Horace,  ed. 

Readings  in  contemporary  problems  in 
the  United  States,     v.  1.     1929. 

330.973  T24 

LABOR 

Anderson,  George. 

Fixation  of  wages  in  Australia.  1929. 
(University  of  Melbourne.  Publica- 
tions) 331.2  A54 

Ueese,  Charles. 

Collective  bargaining  among  photo- 
engravers  in  Philadelphia.  1929. 
(Industrial  research  department, 
Wharton  school  of  finance  and  com- 
merce. University  of  Pennsylvania. 
Research  studies)  331.88  L48 

McMuRBY,  Donald  Le  Crone. 

Coxey's  army,  a  study  of  the  industrial 
army  movement   of  1894.     1929. 

331.1   M16 

National  industrial  conference  board. 
The    five-day    week    in    manufacturing 
industi-ies.     1929.  331.81   N27f 

Watkins,  Gordon  S. 

Labor  problems.  Rev.  ed.  cl929. 
(Cro well's  social  science  series) 

331   W335I 

Wertheim  lectures  on  industrial  rela- 
tions, 1928.  1929.  (Wertheim  fel- 
lowship publications)  331   W49 


BANKING.    FINANCE 

Chapin,  Albert  Franklin. 

Credit    and    collection    principles    and 
practice.     1929.  332.7  C46 

Crowther,  Samuel. 

Money ;  how  to  make  it,  use  it,  invest 
it.     cl929.  332  C953 

Dice,  Charles  Amos. 

New  levels  in  the  stock  market.     1929. 
332.6  D54n 
EiNZiG,  Paul. 

International    gold    movements.      1929. 

332.4  E35 
Floyd,  William. 

People  vs.   Wall  street ;   a  mock  trial. 
1930.  332.6  F64 

Hazlewood,  CraigBeebe. 

The  bank  and  its  directors.     cl929. 

332.1   H43 

HoGGSON,  Noble  Foster. 

Epochs  in  American  banking.     1929. 

332.1   H71e 

Lawrence,  Joseph  Stagg. 

Wall  street  and  Washington.     1929. 

332.1   L42 

Marine  bancorporation.     Research  dept. 

A    survey    of    group    banking    in    the 

United  States.     1929.  q332.1   iV13 

Moray,  Alastair. 

The  diary  of  a  rum-runner.     [1929] 

336.26  M83 

National  industrial  conference  board. 
Cost    of    government    in     the     United 
States,  1927-1928.     19.30. 

336.73  N277c2 


State  income  taxes,  v.  1.     1930. 
336.2  N277st 


New  York  stock  exchange. 

Year  book.     1928-1929.       332.6  N568y 

COOPERATION,      COMMUNISM 
Berkman,  Alexander. 

What  is  communist  anarchism?     1929. 

335  B51 

Burr,  Walter. 

Small  towns,  an  estimate  of  their  trade 
and  culture.     1929.  334.9  B96s 

Getman,  Arthur  Kendall. 

Future  farmers  in  action.     1929.     (The 
Wiley  farm  series)  334.6  G39 


200 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


LAW.    ADMINISTRATION 

Adair,  Edward  Robert. 

The  exterritoriality  of  ambassadors  in 
the  sixteenth  and  seventeenth  cen- 
turies.    1929.  341  A19 

Baker,  Philip  John  Noel. 

The  present  juridical  status  of  the 
British  dominions  in  international 
law.  1929.  (Contributions  to  inter- 
national law  and  diplomacy) 

342.42  B16 

Carnegie  endowment  for  international 
peace.  Division  of  international  law. 
Treaties  and  agreements  with  and  con- 
cerning China,  1919-1929.  1929. 
(Carnegie  endowment  for  interaa- 
tional  peace.  Division  of  interna- 
tional law.     Pamphlet   series) 

341.2  C28 

Citizens  league  of  Cleveland.     Executive 
'board. 
Five  years  of  city  manager  government 
in  Cleveland.     1929.  q352  C5 

Duff,  Charles. 

A  handbook  on  hanging.     1929. 

343  D85 
Fleming,  Denna  Frank. 

The  treaty  veto  of  the  American  Sen- 
ate.    1930.  342.73  F59 

Geneva    institute    of   international  rela- 
tions. 

Problems  of  peace,  second  series.  1928. 

341.1   G32 
Harris,  Henry  Wilson. 

The  league  of  nations.     [1929]  (The 

New  library)                         341.1  H31I 

JOHNSEN,   Julia  E.,  comp. 

Disarmament.  1930.  (The  reference 
shelf)  355  J65d 

Maxwell,  Bertram  Wayburn. 

Contemporary  municipal  government 
of  Germany,  1928.  (University 
research  monographs)       352.043   M46 

MoYLAN,  John  Fitzgerald. 

Scotland  yard  and  the  metropolitan 
police.  1929.  (The  Whitehall 
series)  352.2  IV!93 

Newfang,  Oscar. 

The  united  states  of  the  world ;  a  com- 
parison between  the  League  of  na- 
tions and  the  United  States  of 
America.     1930.  341.1   N54 


Public    ownership    league    of    America. 
Public  ownership.    1929.      351.8  P97 

Scott,  James  Brown. 

Sovereign  states  and  suits  before  arbi- 
tral tribunals  and  courts  of  .iustice. 
1925.  (James  Stokes  lectureship  on 
politics.  New  York  university) 

341   S42 
Sly,  John  Fairfield. 

Town  government  in  Massachusetts 
(1620-1930)      1930.  352  S63 

Smith,  Darrell  Hevenor,  c6  Powell,  Fred 
Wilbur. 
The  Coast  guard  ;  its  history,  activities 
and  organization.  1929.  (Institute 
for  government  research.  Service 
monographs  of  the  United  States 
government)  353.8  S64c 

The  State  Trooper,  v.  1-9;  1924r-28. 

q352.205  S7 

Williams,  Sir  John  Fischer. 

Chapters  on  current  iiaternational  law 
and  the  League  of  nations.  1929. 
(Contx'ibutions  to  international  law 
and  diplomacy)  341   W72 

ASSOCIATIONS.     INSTITUTIONS 

Butt-Thompson,  Frederick  William. 
West  Africa  secret  societies,  their  or- 
ganisations,   officials    and    teaching. 
1929.  366  B98 

Cara'alho,  Claire,  d  Sparkes,  Boyden. 
Crime  in  ink.     1929.  364  C33 

HuRLiN,  Ralph  G. 

Some  results   of    two    years'    study    of 

family    case    work    statistics.      1928. 

(Russell      Sage      foundation,      New 

York.  Dept.  of  statistics.  Pamphlets) 

361   H96 

Lockridge,  Frances. 

How  to  adopt  a  child.     el928. 

362.7  L81 
Reed,  Prentiss  B. 

Adjustmeilt  of  fire  losses.  1929.  (Mc- 
Graw-Hill insurance  series) 

368.1   RS2 

The  Social  sei-vice  review,  v.  1-2.    1927- 
1928.  360.5  S67 

The  Spectator.   An  American  .  .  .  review 
of  insurance.  q368.05  S7 

Sutherland,  Sidney. 

Ten  real  murder  mysteries.     1929. 

364  S966 


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CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


201 


"WiiiiAMSON,  Margaretta  A. 

The  social  worker  in  group  work.  1929. 
(Harper's  social  science  series) 

361  W73 
Wolfe,  French  Eugene. 

Principles  of  property  insurance.  cl930. 
368.1  W85 

EDUCATION 

Alexander,  Thomas,  d  Parker,  Beryl. 
The  new  education  in  the  German  re- 
public.    cl929.  379.43  A37n 

Blackwell,   Jefferson  Davis. 

The  organization  and  supervision  of  vo- 
cational education  in  Maryland  coun- 
ty high  schools.     1929.      370.01   B63 

Dabwin,  Bernard  Richard  Meirion. 
The  English  public  school.    1929.    (The 
English  heritage  series)     379.42  D22 

Dyde,  Walters  Farrell. 

Public  secondary  education  in  Canada. 
j  1929.      (Teachers   college,    Columbia 

university.     Contributions  to   educa- 
tion) 379.71   D99 

Frasiek,   George  Willard   [d  others]. 
Experiments  iu  teachers  college  admin- 
istration.    1929.  370.73  F84 

Gardiner,  Mrs  Dorothy  (Kempe). 

English  girlhood  at  school;  a  study  of 
women's  education  through  twelve 
centuries.     1929.  376  G22 

Hall,  Samuel  Read. 

Hall's  Lectures  on  school-keeping.  1929. 

371   H17 
Halsey,   Heni'y  Rowland. 

»  Borrowing  money  for  the  public  schools. 
1929.  (Teachers  college,  Columbia 
university.  Contributions  to  educa- 
tion) 379.759  H19 

Hopkins,  Levi  Thomas. 

Curriculum  principles  and  practices. 
1929.  375  H79 

Johnson,  Mary  Hooker. 

The  dean  in  the  high  school.    cl929. 

379.17  J68 
KiTSON,  Harry  Dexter. 

How  to  find  the  right  vocation.    1929. 
370.01   K62h 

McKowN,  Harry  Charles. 

School  clubs,  their  organization,  ad- 
ministration, supervision,  and  activi- 
ties.    1929.  371.8  Ml 5s 


MoNTESSORi,  Maria. 

The  child  in  the  church.     1930. 

377.8  M78 
Murray,  Albert  Victor. 

The  school  in  the  bush.     1929. 

370.96  M98 
Myers,  Alonzo  Branklin. 

Training      secondary-school      teachers. 

cl929.     (American  education  series) 

371.1   M99 

National  industrial  conference  board. 
Public   education   as   affecting   the   ad- 
justment of  youth  to  life.     1929. 

370.1    N27 

Oktavec,  Frank  Leopold. 

The  professional  education  of  special 
men  teachers  of  physical  education 
in  Prussia.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  University.  Con- 
tributions to  education)       371.1   041 

Painter,  Franklin  Verzelius  Newton. 
Tvuther  on  education ;  including  a  his- 
torical introduction,   and   a   transla- 
tion of  the  reformer's  two  most  im- 
portant educational  treatises.    cl889. 
370.9  PI 41 
Pintner,  Rudolf. 

Educational  psychology.     cl929. 

370.1   P65 

PowYS,  John  Cowper. 

The  meaning  of  culture.     cl929. 

374  P88 
Ryan,  Will  Carson. 

The  literature  of  American  school  and 
college  athletics.     1929.      (The  Car- 
negie   foundation    for    the    advance- 
ment of  teaching     .     .     .     Bulletin) 
q371.1   C2b 

Sayers,  Ephraim  Vern. 

Eductional  issues  and  unity  of  experi- 
ence. 1929.  (Teachers  college,  Co- 
lumbia university.  Contributions  to 
education)  370.1  S27 

ScHWEiCKHARD,  Dean  Merrill. 

Industrial    arts    in    education.     cl929. 
370.01  S41 
Smith,  Harry  Pearse. 

Business  administration  of  public 
schools.     1929.  371.2  S64b 

Termen,  Lewis  Madison. 

The  hygiene  of  the  school  child.    cl929. 
371.7  T31a 


202 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Thomson,  Godfrey  Hilton. 

A  modern  philosophy  of  education. 
[1929]  370.1  T47m 

TiWK,  Edmund  Lewis. 

Certain  phases  of  county  educational 
organization,  with  special  reference 
to  Florida.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  university.  Contribu- 
tions to  education)  379.759  T58 

Upshall,  Charles  Cecil. 

Day  schools  vs.  institutions  for  the 
deaf.  1929.  (Teachers  college,  Co- 
lumbia university.  Contributions  to 
education)  371.9  U69 

Wood,  Benjamin  De  Kalbe. 

Motion  pictures  in  the  classroom. 
cl929.  371.3  W87 

COMMERCE.    COMMUNICATION 

Chamber    of    commerce    of    the    United 
States    of    America.      Domestic    dis- 
tribution dept. 
Retail   and   wholesale   trade   of   eleven 
cities.     1928.  q381  C4 

Public  utilities  fortnightly.     1929. 

380.5  P97 
Thoep,   Prescott  Holden. 

Stamp  collecting,  why  and  how.   cl929. 

383  T51 

TRANSPORTATION 

Blair,  Walter  A. 

A  raft  pilot's  log ;  a  history  of  the 
great  rafting  industry  on  the  upper 
Mississippi,  1840-1915.     1930. 

656.9  B63 

Herring,  James  Morton. 

The  problem  of  weak  railroads,  their 
relation  to  an  adequate  transporta- 
tion  system.      1929.  385  H56 

Hicks,  Frederick  Charles. 

High  finance  in  the  sixties.     1929. 

385  H63 
Laut,  Agnes  Christina. 

The  romance  of  the  rails.     1929.     2  v. 

385  L38 
Lubbock,  Alfred  Basil. 

The  last  of  the  windjammers.  [1927- 
29]     2  V.  656.8  L92I 

Wallace,  Frederick  William. 

Wooden   ships   and  iron  men.      [1924] 

387  W18 


CUSTOMS.    COSTUMES 
FOLKLORE 

Applegate,  Frank  Guy. 

Indian  stories  from  the  Pueblos.    1929. 

398.2  A64 
Booth,  Meyrick. 

Woman  and  society.     [1929] 

396  B725 
Hambly,   Wilfrid  Dyson. 

The  history  of  tattooing  and  its  sig- 
nificance.    1925.  391.7  H19 

HuRLOCK,   Elizabeth  Bergner. 
The  psychology  of  dress.     cl929. 

391   H96, 

LAW 

Allen,   Carletou  Kemp. 
Law  in  the  making.     1930. 

Allen,  Eleanor  Wyllys. 

The  position  of  foreign  states  before 
Belgian  courts.     1929. 

Archer,  Gleason  Leonard. 

Digest  of  criminal  law  cases.     1929. 

Baltimore.     Ordinances,   etc. 

The  Baltimore  city  code  of  1927.   1928.: 

Bates,  Lindell  Theodore. 

The  divorce  and  separation  of  aliens 
in  France.     1929. 

Boke,  George  Henry. 

Cases  in  equity,  selected  from  decisions 
of  English  and  American  courts. 
1915.     (American  casebook  series) 

BoLTE,  Edwin 

Ethics  for  success  at  the  bar.    1928. 

Byrne,  John  Elliott. 

A  manual  of  federal  evidence.     1928. 

Calhoun,    George    Miller,    c§    Delamere, 
Catherine. 
A  working  bibliography  of  Greek  law. 
1927.     (Harvard  series  of  legal  bibli- 
ographies) 

California.    Laws,  statutes,  etc. 

School  code  of  the  state  of  California 
1929,  together  with  extracts  from 
the  Constitution  —  extracts  from 
other  Codes  and  extracts  from  the 
General  laws.     1929. 


Chapman,  Clowry. 

The  law  on  advertising 


cl929. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE  LIBRARY 


203 


Chkisty,  Francis  Taggart. 
The  transfer  of  stock.     1929. 

Current   research   in   law   for   the   aca- 
demic year  1928-29.     1929. 

CusHMAN,  Robert  Eugene. 

Leading  constitutional  decisions.     Rev. 
ed.     1929. 

East,  William  Norwood. 

An  introduction  to  forensic  psychiatry 
in  the  criminal  courts.     1927. 

Frankfurter,  Felix,  &  Greene,  Nathan. 
The  labor  injunction.     1930. 

Hankin,   Gregory,   &  Hankin,   Charlotte 
Anna. 
United    States    Supreme    court,    1928- 
1929.     1929. 


Hardy,  Russell. 

Removal  of  federal  offenders. 


1929. 


Harrison,  Maurice  Edward. 

Outline  of  cases  and  other  references 
on  code  procedure  in  California.  4th 
ed.     cl927. 

HoLDEN,  Charles  Revell. 

Estates,  under  wills  and  trust  agree- 
ments.    cl928. 

HoRTON,  Guy  Bertram. 

Some  legal  aspects  of  life  insurance 
trusts.     cl927. 

Kenneson,  Thaddeus  Davis,  comp. 

Cases    on    the   law    of    trusts    selected 
I?-      from  decisions  of  English  and  Ameri- 
'         can  courts.     1911.     (American  case- 
book series) 

King,  Carol  Weiss. 

Injunctions  to  protect  civil  liberties. 
1928. 


Ladas,   Stephen  P. 

The  international  protection  of  trade 
marks  by  the  American  republics. 
1929.  (Bureau  of  international  re- 
search. Harvard  university  and 
Radcliffe  college.  Harvard  studies 
in   international   law) 


w 


Lawrence,  Fred  Foss. 

A  treatise  on   the   substantive  law   of 
equity  jurisprudence.     1929.     2  v. 

Logan,  George  Bryan. 

Aircraft  law — made  plain.     1928. 


Marvel,  Josiah. 

Delaware  corporations  and  receiver- 
ships, containing  the  general  corpo- 
ration law  of  the  state  of  Delaware. 
4th  ed.     1929. 

Melgarejo   Randolph,   Antonio   Damaso, 
ed.  and  tr. 
Divorce  law  of  Sonora,  Mexico.    cl929. 

New  York    (State)    Laws,  statutes,  etc. 
New  York  laws  affecting  business  cor- 
porations.    Revised     to     April     28, 
1929.    10th  ed.    cl929. 

Plucknett,  Theodore  Frank  Thomas. 
A  concise  history  of  the  common  law. 
1929. 

Richardson,  William  Paysou. 
Outline  of  bills  and  notes.     1928. 

Richardson,  William  Payson,  d  Hagen- 
dorn,  William  Valentine. 
Outline  of  the  law  of  suretyship  and 
guaranty.     2d  ed.     1929. 

RoBBiNS,  Lloyd  M. 

Laws  of  community  property  (Bienes 
gananciales).  Laws  of  Toro,  1505. 
1929. 

Sackett,  Henry  Woodward. 
The  law  of  libel.     1929. 


SouxE,  Charles  Carroll. 
International    law    for 
1928. 


naval    officers. 


Tremeear,  William  James. 

Tremeear's  Canada  statute  citations. 
1929. 

Walker,  Harvey. 

Federal  limitations  upon  municipal 
ordinance  making  power.     1929. 

Wettstein,  Georges,  ed. 

The  Swiss  Federal  code  of  obligations, 
indicating  the  alterations  made  in 
connection  with  the  adoption  of  this 
law  in  Turkey.      [1928] 

Whitney,  Frederick  A. 

Outline  of  the  law  of  sales.     1929. 

Williams,  Edward  Huntington. 
The  doctor  in  court.     1929. 

Williamson,  Roland. 

The  Law  library  in  the  Capitol,  Wash- 
ington, D.  C.     1929. 


204 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


LANGUAGE. 

Aiken.  Mrs  Janet   (Rankin). 

Why    English    sounds    change.      cl929. 

421  A29 
Battista,  Joseph  Lloyd. 

Essentials  of  Italian  grammar.     1929. 

455  B33 

FoERSTEK,    Norman,    d    Steadman,    John 
Marcellus,  jr. 
Sentences   and   thinking.      cl923. 

428  F65 

Fowler,     Henry     Watson,     d     Fowler, 

Francis  George. 

The  concise  Oxford  dictionary  of  cur- 

I'ent  English.     New  ed.,  rev.     1929. 

r423  F78c 

Modern  foreign  language  study. 

Prognosis  tests  in  the  modern  foreign 
languages.  1929.  (Publications  of 
the  American  and  Canadian  commit- 
tees  on   modern   languages) 

407  iviesp 

Thomson,  George  Derwent. 

Greek  lyric  metre.     1929.  480  T48 

Vander  Beke,  George  E.,  ed. 

French  word  book.  1929.  (Publica- 
tions of  the  American  and  Canadian 
committees  on  modern  languages) 

q448  V2 
Vaughan,  William  Eugene. 

Articulation  in  English  between  the 
high  school  and  college.  1929. 
(Teachers  college,  Columbia  univer- 
sity.    Contributions  to  education) 

420.7  V37 

NATURAL  SCIENCE:   GENERAL 

Chapman,  Frank  Michler. 

My  tropical  air  castle ;  nature  studies 
in  Panama.     1929.  508.73  C46 

ScovLLLE,   Samuel. 

Wild     honey,     with     reproductions     of 
etchings  by  Emerson  Tuttle.     1929. 
504  S43w 
Thorndike,  Lynn. 

Science  and  thought  in  the  fifteenth 
century.     1929. 

509  T51 

MATHEMATICS.     ASTRONOMY 

Fordham,  Sir  Herbert  George. 

Some  notable  surveyors  &  map-makers 
of  the  sixteenth,  seventeenth,  & 
eighteenth  centuries  and  their  work ; 


a  study  in  the  history  of  cartography, 
1929.  526.9  F71s 


Jeffreys,  Harold. 

The  future  of  the  earth, 
new  science  series) 


cl929.     (The 
525  J46 


McCoBMiCK,  Clarence.  f 

The   teaching   of   general   mathematics  • 
in     the    secondary     schools     of    the 
United     States.       1929.       (Teachers 
College,  Columbia  University.     Con- 
tributions to  education)     510.7  M13 

NicoD,  Jean. 

Foundations  of  geometry  &  induc- 
tion. 1930.  (International  library 
of  psychology,  philosophy  and  scien- 
tific method)  513  N63 

Proctor,  Mary. 

Romance  of  the  planets.     1929. 

523.4  P96 

Smith,  David  Eugene. 

A  source  book  in  mathematics.     1929. 

(Source  books  in  the  history  of  the 

sciences)  510  S64s 

PHYSICS.     CHEMISTRY 

Bragg,  Sir  WiUiam  Henry. 

An  introduction  to  crystal  analysis. 
1928.  548  B81i 

Clark,  William  Mansfield. 

The  determination  of  hydrogen  ions. 
3d  ed.     1928.  541.2  C59a1 

Dennis,  Louis  Munroe,  d  Nichols,  Mel- 
vin  L. 
Gas  analysis.     1929.  542.7  D41 

Robertson,  John  Kelloek. 

Introduction  to  physical  optics.  1929. 
(University  physics  series)    535  R65 

AERONAUTICS 

Hanks,  Stedman  Shumway. 

International  airports.  cl929.  ( Ronald 
aeronautics  series)  629.14  H24 

Hinton,  Walter. 

Opportunities  in  aviation.     cl929. 

533.6  H66 

HoDGiNS,     Eric,     d    Magoun,     Frederick 
Alexander. 
Sky  high.     1929.  533.6  H689 

Ramsey,  Logan  Carlisle. 

The  navigation  of  aircraft.  cl929. 
(Ronald  aeronautics)       629.145  R18 


vol.  25, 110.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


205 


Studley,  Barrett. 

How  to  fly ;  the  pilot  and  his  problems. 
1929.  533.6  S93h 

SwoFFER,  Frank  Arthur. 
Learning  to  fly ;  a  course  of  elementary 
flying  instruction.     1929. 

533.6  S979 

WiABLiCK,  William  Walter,  comp. 

Naval  aviation.     1929.  533.6  W27 

GEOLOGY.     PALEONTOLOGY 

Agar,   William   Macdonough    [d   others'], 
comps. 
Geology  from  original  sources.     cl929. 

550  A261 

Brown,    Charles    Barrington,    d    Deben- 
ham,  Frank. 
Structure  and  surface.     1929. 

551.1   B87 
Busk,  Henry  Gould. 

Earth  flexures.  1929.  (Cambridge 
geological  series)  551.8  B97 

White,  David. 

Flora  of  the  Hermit  shale.  Grand  Can- 
yon, Arizona.  1929.  (Carnegie  in- 
stitution of  Washington.  Publica- 
tion) q561   W5 

BIOLOGY 

Bateson,  William. 

Scientific  papers,  edited  by  R.  C.  Pun- 
nett.     1928.     2  v.  q575  B3 

William  Bateson,  F.  R.  S.,  nat- 
uralist; his  essays  &  addresses,  to- 
gether with  a  short  account  of  his 
life  by  Beatrice  Bateson.     1928. 

575  B32 
Fox,  Harold  Munro. 

Blue  blood  in  animals  and  other  essays 
in  biology.     1928.  570  F79 

LtjI/L,  Richard  Swann. 

Organic  evolution.     Rev.  ed.     1929. 

575  L95a 
WooDGER,  Joseph  Heni-y. 

Biological  principles ;  a  critical  study. 
1929.  (International  library  of 
psychology,  philosophy  and  scientific 
method)  570  W88 

BOTANY 

Clements,  Frederic  Edward   [d  others]. 
Plant   competition.      1929.      (Carnegie 
institution  of  Washington.     Publica- 
tion). q581.1  C6 


Freab,  Mrs  Mary  Emma   (Dillingham). 
Our  familiar  island  trees.     cl929. 

582  F84 

Maksimov,  Nikolai  Alecksandrovich. 
The  plant  in  relation  to  water.     1929. 

581   M23 

Morris,  Frank,  cC-  Eames,  Edward  A. 
Our  wild  orchids.     1929.       584.1   M87 

Pool,  Raymond  John. 

Flowers   and   flowering   plants.      1929. 

(McGraw-Hill    publications    in    the 

agricultui'al  and  botanical  sciences) 

581   P82 

Temple,  Augusta  A. 

Flowers  &  trees  of  Palestine.     [1929] 
581.956  T28 

ZOOLOGY 

Howard,  Henry  Eliot. 

An  introduction  to  the  study  of  bird 
behaviour.     1929.  q  598.2  H8 

Kearton,  Cherry. 

In  the  land  of  the  lion.    1930.   590  K24 

Morris,  Stanley. 

Bird-song,  a  manual  for  field  natural- 
ists on  the  songs  and  notes  of  some 
British  birds.     1925.  598.2  M87 

Parker,  Eric. 

English  wild  life.  1929.  (The  English 
heritage  series)  590.4  P23 

USEFUL   ARTS:    MEDICINE 
AND   HYGIENE 

Bainbridge,  William  Seaman. 

Report  on  fourth  International  con- 
gress of  military  medicine  and 
pharmacy,  Warsaw,  Poland,  May- 
June,  1927.  610.6  B16 


Butler,  Guy  Montagu. 
Modem  athletics.     1929. 


613.7  B985 


California  medical  association. 
Constitution  and  by-laws.     [1929] 

c610,6  C15c 

Davis,  Katharine  Bement. 

Factors  in  the  sex  life  of  twenty-two 
hundred    women.      1929.      (Publica- 
tions of  the  Bureau  of  social  hygiene) 
612.6  D26 

Emerson,  William  Robie  Patten. 
The  diagnosis  of  health.     1930. 

613  E53 


206 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Fisher,  Vivian  Ezra. 

An  introduction  to  abnonnal  psyclaol- 
ogy.    1929.  616.84  F53 

Haefnee,  Ralph. 

The  educational  significance  of  left- 
handedness.  1929.  (Teachers  col- 
lege, Columbia  university.  Contribu- 
tions to  education)  612.7  H13 

Heageety,  John  Joseph. 

Four   centuries   of  medical   history   in 

Canada  and  a  sketch  of  the  medical 

history  of  Newfoundland.    1928.    2  v. 

610.9  H43 

Johns  Hopkins  hospital,  Baltimore. 
The   Johns  Hopkins  hospital  bulletin. 
1925-1928.     4v.  q610.5  J 6 

Lewin,  Philip. 

Posture  and  hygiene  of  the  feet.  1929. 
(The  national  health  series) 

611.9  L67 

LuTMAN,  Benjamin  Franklin. 

Microbiology.  1929.  (McGraw-HUl 
publications  in  the  agricultural  and 
botanical  sciences)  616.01   L97 

McCoLLUM,  Elmer  Vemer,  d  Simmonds, 
Nina. 
The    newer    knowledge    of    nutrition. 
1929.  613.2  IVI129a2 

Nelson,  Louise  Anna. 

Variations  in  development  and  motor 
control  in  goiterous  and  non-goiter- 
ous  adolescent  girls.  1929.  (Uni- 
versity research  monographs) 

616.4  N42 

Pierce,   S.   W.,  pseud.,  d  Pierce,  J.   T., 


The  layman  looks   at  doctors.     cl929. 

616.8  P61 
Pieron,  Henri. 

Principles  of  experimental  psychology. 
1929.  (International  library  of 
psychology,  philosophy  and  scientific 
method)  612.8  P61p 

Thompson,  Charles  John  Samuel. 

The  mystery  and  art  of  the  apothecary. 
[1929]  615.1  T46 


Warden,  Randall  Duncan. 
An  exhibition  handbook. 


1929. 

613.7  W26 


ENGINEERING 

Agg,  Thomas  Radford. 

The   constniction   of   roads   and   pave- 
ments.   4th  ed.    1929.      625.7  A26c2 

Ashley,  Clifford  Warren. 

Whaleships  of  New  Bedford.     1929. 

q  623.8  AS 

Association  of  western  state  engineers. 
Proceedings  of  the  fii*st  annual  confer- 
ence.     1928.  q620.6  A8 


Briggs,  Henry. 
Mining  subsidence. 


1929.     622.2  B854 


Bruce,  John  M. 

Utilities      and      universal     prosperity. 
cl929.  628.1  B887 

BtTRNHAM,   Bradford. 

Outboard    motor    boats    and    engines. 
1930.  623.8  B96 

Cotton,  Harry. 

Electricity  applied  to  mining.     1929. 
(The  specialists'  series)       622.2  C85 


De  Krtjif,  Paul  Henry. 
Seven  iron  men.     cl929. 


622.1   D32 


Eve,    Arthur    Stewart,    d    Keys,    David 
Arnold. 
Applied   geophysics    in    the    search    for 
minerals.    1929.  622.1   E93 

Fleming,  John  Ambrose. 

The  propagation  of  electric  currents  in 
telephone  and  telegraph  conductors. 
4th  ed.,  rev.  and  extended.     1927. 

621.34  F59a 

Folse,  Julius  Audrey. 

A  new  method  of  estimating  stream- 
flow,  based  upon  a  new  evaporation 
formula.  1929.  (Carnegie  institu- 
tion of  Washington.     Publication) 

q627.1    F6 

Good    roads.     1926-1927.       q625.705  G6 


Ives,  Howard  Chapin. 
Highway  curves.     1929. 


625.7  195 


ScHAEFEE,  Clemens  T. 

The   automotive   mechanic's   handbook. 
1929.  625.6  S29au 

Stahl,  Charles  J. 

Electric  street  lighting.     1929. 

621.32  S78 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


207 


Steeetee,  Robert  Leroy,  c€  Lichty,  Lester 
Clyde, 
lutemal-combustion  engines.     1929. 

621.4  S91a 
Young,  Clarence  Richard. 

Elementally  structural  problems  in  steel 
and  timber.     1929.  624  Y69 

AGRICULTURE.     DOMESTIC 
ANIMALS 

Abjoenson,  Eberhard. 

Ornamental   dwarf   fruit  trees.      1929. 

634  A149 
Balls,  "William  Lawrence. 

The  development  and  properties  of  raw 
cotton.     1915.  633  B19d 

Beelee,  Maxwell  Newton. 

Marketing    purebred    livestock.      1929. 

636  B41 
Bews,  John  William. 

The  world's  grasses ;  their  differentia- 
tion, distribution,  economics  and 
ecology.     1929.  633  B57 

Holland,  Raymond  Prunty. 

My  gun  dogs.    1929.  636.7  H73 

Knapp,   Halsey   B.,   d   Auchter,   Eugene 
Curtis. 
Growing  tree  and  small  fruits.     1929. 
(The  Wiley  farm  series)       634  K67 

Osgood,  Ernest  Staples. 

The  day  of  the  cattleman.     1929. 

636.2  082 

FORESTRY 

Pack,  Charles  Lathrop,  d:  Gill,  Tom. 
Forests  and  mankind.     1929. 

634.9  P119fo 

Recknagel,  Arthur  Bernard. 

Forestry;  a  study  of  its  origin,  appli- 
cation and  significance  in  the  United 
States.     1929.  634.9  R29fo 

DOMESTIC   ECONOMY 

Allen,  Lucy  Grace. 

Choice  candy  recipes.     1930.      642  A42 

Baldt,  Laura  Irene 

Clothing  for  women ;  selection  and  con- 
struction. cl929.  (Lippincott's  home 
manuals)  646  B17a 

Goodspeed,   Helen  Crandall,   d  Johnson, 

Emma. 

Care  and  training  of  children.     cl929. 

(Lippincott's  home  economics  texts) 

649  G65 


LoviNGOOD,  Alvin. 

Apartment  house  management.     cl929. 
647.92  L91 
Lucas,  Elizabeth. 

Mrs.  Lucas's  French  cookery  book. 
1929.  641   L93 

OsBOEN,  Frederick  Arthur. 

Physics  of  the  home.     2d  ed.     1929. 
(McGraw-Hill  euthenics  series) 

640  081 

Peiscllla  publishing  company,  Boston. 
Modern   Priscilla   standard   cook   book. 
cl929.  641   P95 

Seavee,  Mrs  Frances. 

How  to  manage  personal  finances. 
cl930.  q647  S4 

VoisiN,  Gaston. 

French  cooking  for  all.    [1929] 

641  V89 

BUSINESS   METHODS 

Barnhaet,  Williamson  L. 

Practical  salesmanship.     cl929. 

658.3  B26 
Casey,  Charles  C. 

The  way  to  more  productive  selling. 
1929.     (A  Shaw  business  book) 

658.3  C33 

FoTTLEB,  Marion  G. 

How  to  write  a  business  letter.     cl929. 

658.7  F76 

GiLBEET,    Horace    Nathaniel,    d    Gragg, 
Charles  Insco. 
An    introduction    to    business,    a    ease 
book.     1929.  658  G464 

Haeing,  Chester  E. 

The  manufacturer  and  his  outlets. 
1929.  658  H28 

Lytle,  Charles  Walter. 

Wage  incentive  methods,  their  selec- 
tion, installation  and  operation. 
cl929.  658.5  L99 


Snideb,  Joseph  Lyons,  ed. 
Business  statistics.     1929. 


658  S672 


Tayloe  society,  New  York. 

Scientific     management     in     American 
industry.     1929.  658.5  T24 

PRINTING.     BOOKSELLING 

McMubtele,  Douglas  Crawford. 

Can  we  get  results  from  eye-straining 
typography.     1929.  655.2  Ml 6c 


>08 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Early   printing   in   New   Orleans, 

1764-1810.     1929.  vq655.1   M1e 


The  first  printing  in  British  Co- 
lumbia.    1929.  655.1   M16f 


The  first  printing  in  Peoria,  Illi- 
nois.   1929.  655.1   M16fi 


A    memorial    printed    by    Fleury 

Mesplet.    1929.  655.1   Ml  6m 


Modern    typography    and    layout. 

1929.  q655.3   Ml 


What   is   modern    in    tyiX)gTaphy. 

1929.  q655.3   Mlw 

Gift 

Mitchell,  Edwin  Valentine. 

Morocco  bound :  adrift  among  books. 
cl929.  655.5  M68 

Young,  John  L. 

Books :  from  the  ms.  to  the  bookseller. 
1929.  (Pitman's  common  commodi- 
ties and  industries)  655.5  Y73 

ADVERTISING.    ACCOUNTING 

The  advertising  parade.    cl930.    q659  A2 

Canning,  John  Bennett. 

The  economics  of  accountancy.     cl929. 

657  C22 
Eggleston,  De  Witt  Carl. 

Wall  street  procedure,  with  special  ref- 
erence to  brokers'  accounts.     cl930. 
657  E29w 
Hayes,  Monard  V. 

Accounting  for  executive  control.   1929. 

657  H41 

McMuBTRiE,  Douglas  Crawford. 

Selecting  the  right  type  for  your  adver- 
tising.    1929.  659  Ml 6s 

Meynell,  Francis. 

The  tyiwgTaphy  of  newspaper  adver- 
tisements.    1929.  q659  M6 

Phelps,  George  Harrison. 

Tomorrow's  advertisers  and  their  ad- 
vertising agencies.     1929.       659  P53 

RosENKAMPFF,    Arthur   Heni-y,    d    Wal- 
lace, William  Carroll. 
Bookkeeping    principles    and    practice, 
advanced  course.     1929.         657  R81 

Schmidt,  Leo  Anton. 

Mechanics  of  accounting.    1929. 

657  S353 


Tobias,  Marvin  Elliot. 

Profitable  retail  advertising.    1930. 

659  T62 
RADIO 
Duncan,  Rudolph  L. 

Radio    traffic    manual    and     operating 
regulations.     1929.  654.6  D91r 


Henney,  Keith. 

Principles  of  radio.    1929. 


654.6   H51 


Ratcliffe,  John  Ashworth. 

The  physical  principles  of  wireless, 
[1929]  (Methuen's  monographs  on 
physical  subjects)  654.6   R23 

CHEMICAL  TECHNOLOGY 

California  and  Hawaiian  sugar  refining 
corporation.  Something  about  sugar. 
cl925.  C664.1   C15 

Gift 


GiBBS,  Leo  Vernon. 
Oil  and  peace.    1929. 


665.5  G44 


Heaton,  Noel. 

Outlines  of  paint  technology.     1928. 

667.7  H44 

Sugar  [an  English-Spanish  technical 
journal  devoted  to  sugar  production] 
V.  28-30.    1926-28.  q664.105  S9 

MANUFACTURES.    MECHANIC 
TRADES 

American  leather  producers,  inc.  New 
York. 

American  leathers.     cl929.       675  A51 

AvRAM,  Mois  Herban. 

The  rayon  industry.    2d  ed.     1929. 

677  A96a 
CooKER,Ei.L,  Douglas. 

Some  notes  on  bookbinding.     1929. 

686  C66s 
Feancis-Letwis,  Cecile. 

The  art  &  craft  of  leathei-work.  1928. 
(The  new  art  library)  675  F81 

Harding,  Louis  Allen. 

Mechanical  equipment  of  buildings,  v.  1 
Heating  and  ventilation.     1929. 

690  H26a 
Levy,  Alexander  M. 

The  fabric  buyer  and  the  golden  fleece. 
cl928.  q677  L6 

Matthews,  William  F. 

Bookbinding,  a  manual  for  those  inter- 
ested in  the  craft  of  bookbinding. 
1929.  686  M44 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


209 


Plegee,  John  J. 

Bookbinding.  Rev.  ed.  of  Bookbinding 
and  its  auxiliary  braiiches.     1924. 

686  P72a 
Reinthalee,  Franz. 

Artificial  silk.     1028.  677  R37 

FINE  ARTS:    GENERAL 

In  CASSE,  Curt  John. 

The  philosophy  of  art.  cl929.     701    D82 

Faure,  £lie. 

The  Italian  renaissance.     1929. 

709.45  F26 
La  Follette,  Suzanne. 

Art  in  America.     1929.  709,73  L16 

Lemos,  Pedro  Joseph. 

Correlated  art  for  advanced  schools,  edu- 
cational art  texts  related  to  life,  book 
1-3.     1927.  q707  L5 

McAdoky,  Margaret. 

The  construction  and  validation  of  an 
art  test.  1929.  (Teachers  college, 
Columbia  university.  Contributions 
to  education)  707  M11 

March,  Benjamin. 
China  and  Japan  in  our  museums.  1929. 
709.51   M31 

Szukalski,  Stanislaus. 
Projects  in  design.     cl929.         q701  S9 

GARDENING.     CITY  PLANNING 

American  civic  annual ;  a  record  of  re- 
cent civic  advance ;  with  a  list  of 
who's  who'  in  civic  achievement,  v. 
1.     1929.  710  A51 

Hall,  Sir  Alfred  Daniel. 

The  book  of  the  tuKp.    1929.    716  H17 

Hubbard,   Mrs   Theodora    (Kimball),    c6 
Hubbard,   Henry   Vincent. 
Our  cities,  to-day  and  to-morrow.   1929. 

q710   H87 
Hurst,  Sidney  C. 

The  silent  cities.     1929.  q719   H9 

SHEa-HERD,  John  Chiene,  d  .Tellicoe,  G.  A. 
Garden  &  design.     1927.         q710  S548 

ARCHITECTURE 

American  institute  of  architects.    Arclii- 
tects'  small  house  service  hureau,  inc. 
Small   homes   of   architectural   distinc- 
tion.    1929.  q728  A51 

6 — 76092 


Arms,  Mrs  Dorothy  Noyes. 

Churches  of  France ;  with  fifty-one  re- 
productions of  etchings  and  drawings 
by  John  Taylor  Arms.     1929. 

q726     A7 

Carpenter,  H.  Barrett,  <£  Knight,  Joseph. 
An  introduction  to  the  history  of  archi- 
tecture.    1929.  720.9  C29 

Greenwood,  William  Ernest. 
The  villa  Madama,  Rome.    1928. 

q729  G8 

Hastings,  Hubert  de  Cronin,  ed. 

Recent  English  domestic  architecture, 
1929.    1929.  f728  H3 

Henderson,  Helen  Weston. 
Cathedrals  of  France.      [1929] 

726  H49 

Markham,  Violet  Rosa. 
Romanesque  France.    1929. 

723.4  M34 
Strzygowski,  Josef. 

Early  church  art  in  northern  Europe. 
[1928]  726  S92 

Taut,  Bruno. 
Modern  architecture.     [1929]     q724  T2 

SCULPTURE 

Ayrton,  Maxwell. 

Wrought  iron  and  its  decorative  use. 
[1929]  q739  A9 

Cotterell,  Howard  Herschel. 

Old  pewter,  its  makers  and  marks  in 
England,  Scotland  and  Ireland.  1929. 
q739  C8 
HuDNUT,  Joseph. 

Modern  sculpture.  cl929.  (The  new 
arts)  730  H88 

LA^VRENCE,  Arnold  Walter. 

Classical  sculpture.     [1929]       733  L41 

Thorp,  Joseph  Peter. 

Eric  Gill,  with  a  critical  monograph  by 
Charles  Marriott.     1929.     q735  G47t 

DRAWING.     DESIGN 

Bridgman,  George  B. 

Bridgmans  handbook  of  drawing.  el929. 

741   B852 
French,  Thomas  EAving. 

A  manual  of  engineering  drawing  for 
students  and  draftsmen.  4th  ed.,  rev. 
and  enl.     1929.  744  F87a2 


210 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBKARIES  [April,  1930 


LiTTLEJOHKS,  Mis  Idalia  Banche   (Hew- 
ett). 
Prints    and   patterns,    ornamental   pat- 
terns, printed  with  hand-made  tools. 
1929.     (Pitman's  craft  for  all  series) 
745  L77 
Merington,  Ruth. 

Object   drawing.      cl929.  741   M56 

Reid,  Forrest. 

Illustrators  of  the  sixties.     1928. 

q741    R3 
Sprague,  Curtiss. 

How  to  draw  silhouettes.    el929. 

q741   S76 
Stbeietoe.,  William  Day. 

Constructive  lettering.     cl929. 

q745  S91 

Walker,  Mrs  Lydia  Le  Baron. 

Homecraft  rugs;  their  historic  back- 
ground, romance  of  stitchery  and 
method  of  making.    1929.       745  W18 

PAINTING 

Allen,  Mary  Cecil. 

Painters  of  the  modem  mind.  cl929. 
(The  new  arts)  750  A42 

Bellows,  George  Wesley. 
The  paintings  of  George  Bellows.    1929. 

q759.1    B4 
Carlson,  John  Fabian. 

Elementary  principles  of  landscape 
painting.  1928.  (National  art  se- 
ries) 758  C28 

Harding,  Chester. 

A    sketch    of    Chester    Harding,    artist, 

drawn  by  his  own  hand,  ed.   by   his 

daughter  Margaret  E.  White.     1929. 

q759.1    H2w 

Rivera,  Diego. 

The  frescoes  of  Diego  Rivera.     cl929. 

q759.9   R6 
Swindler,  Mary  Hamilton. 

Ancient  painting,  from  the  earliest 
times  to  the  period  of  Christian  art. 
1929.  q759  S9 

ENGRAVING 

Currier  c£-  Ives. 

A  selection  of  lithographs  published  by 
Currier  and  Ives,  N.  Y.,  1825-1866. 
1929.  vq763  C9 

Rosenberg,  Louis  Conrad. 

L.  C.  Rosenberg,  a.  b.  e,  1929.  ( Mod- 
ern masters  of  etching)  767  R81 


Sparrow,  Walter  Shaw. 

Henry  Aiken,  with  eight  plates  in  colour 
and  sixty-four  subjects  in  half-tone. 
1927.     (The  sport  of  our  fathers) 

q760  A2 
Watson,  Ernest  W. 

Linoleum  block  printing.     cl929. 

q760  W3 

PHOTOGRAPHY.     MOVING  PIC- 
TURES 

Hays,  Will  H. 

See  and  hear.     1929.  778  H42 

McKinley,  Ashley  Chadbourne. 
Applied  aerial  photography.     1929. 

770  M15 
Seldes,  Gilbert  Vivian. 

An  hour  with  the  movies  and  the  talk- 
ies.    cl929.      (Tlie  one  hour  series) 
778  S46 
Wheeler,  Owen. 

Amateur   cinematogi'aphy.     1929. 

778  W56 

MUSIC  AND  MUSICIANS 

Berg,  David  Eric. 

Beethoven  and  the  romantic  symphony. 
cl927.  (Fundamentals  of  musical 
art  .  .  .  V.  13)  780.8  F98 

BuOKTON,  La  Verne. 

College  and  university  bands  ;  their  or- 
ganization and  administration.  1929. 
(Teachers  college,  Columbia  univer- 
sity.   Contributions  to  education) 

785  B92 

CoLEAiAN,  3Irs  Satis  Narrona,  d  Thorn, 
Alice  Green. 
Singing    time;     songs    for    nursery    & 
school.     cl929.  q784.8  C6 

Gribx!,  Edvard  Hagerup. 

Edvard  Grieg  at  home.  cl929.  (The 
Appleton  master-composer  series) 

q786.4  G8at 
King,  Charles  E. 

The  prince  of  Hawaii.     cl925. 

C782.8  K52 
LiTTLEHALES,  Lillian. 
Pablo  Casals.     cl929. 


Mies,  Paul. 

Beethoven's  sketches. 

Niemann,  Walter. 
Brahms.     1929. 


780.2  C33 

1929. 

780.2  B41mi 

780.2  881  n 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


211 


Ortmann,  Otto  Rudolph. 

The   physiological   mechanics   of   piano 
technique.      1929.  786  077p 

RiBEBA  Y  Tareago,  Julian. 

Music    in    ancient    Arabia    and    Spain. 
1929.  q780.9  R4 

KoSENFELD,   Paul. 

An  hour  with  American  music.     cl929. 
(The  one  hour  series)  780.9  RBI 

ScHAUFFLER,  Robert  Haven. 

Beethoven,   the   man   who  freed  music. 

1929.  2v.  780.2  B41sc 

Soi.LiTT,  EIrs  Edna  Richolson. 

.Mengelberg  and   the   sj'niphonlc  epoch. 

1930.  780.2  M544s 

Spaeth,  Sigmund  Gottfried. 
Tliey  still  sing  of  love.     1929. 

780.4  S732 

Swan,  Alfred  Julius. 
Music,   1900-1930.     cl929.      (The  new 
arts)  780.9  S97 

Trend,  John  Brande. 

Manuel   de   Falla   and    Spanish   music. 
1929.  780.9  T79m 

Vallas,  L6on. 

The  theories  of  Claude  Debussy.     1929. 
780.2  DPSv 

THEATRE.      AMUSEMENTS 

P>RuwN,   John  Mason. 

The  modern  theatre  in  revolt.     cl929. 
(The  new  arts)  792  B87 

PjUI'ANO,  Remo. 

I'inocchio  for  the  stage,   in  four  short 
plays  from  Collodi's  original.     1929. 

793  B92 

The   show   book   of   Remo   Bu- 

fano.     1929.  793.2  B92 

La  Salle,  Dorothy,  comp. 

Rhythms    and    dances    for    elementary 
schools,   grades   one  to   eight.      1929. 
q793.1   L3 
;  Mitchell,  Roy. 

Creative  theatre.     cl929.         792  M682 

NiMzowiTSCH,  Aron. 

My  system ;  a  chess  treatise.     1929. 

794  N71 
Pecokini,  Daniele,  co7ite. 

The  game  of  wei-chi.     1929.     794  P36 


Whitehead,   Wilbur   Cherrier. 

Whitehead's  winning  bridge.     1929. 

795  W59ww 

RECREATION 

Burton,  Reginald  George. 

Sport  &  wild  life  in  the  Deccan.     1928. 

799  B97 
Danzig,  Allison. 

The  racquet  game.     1930.     796.34  D19 

HuBBACK,  Theodore  R. 

To  far  western  Alaska  for  big  game. 
1929.  799  H875 

JKSSUP,  Elon  Huntington. 

Skis   and  skiing.     cl929.         796.9  J58 

Lyon,  William  Edgar,  ed. 

"In  my  opinion — ,"  being  a  book  of 
dissertations  on  horses  and  horseman- 
ship.    1929.  q798  L9 

MOERITT,  Henry  Edward. 

Fishing  ways  and  wiles.    1929. 

799.1   M88 
Rogers,  Frederick  Rand. 

The  future  of  interscholastic  athletics. 
1929.    (School  administration  series) 
796  R72 
Smith,  Ann  Avery. 

Swimming  and  plain  diving.     1930. 

796  S642 

LITERATURE 

Bailey,  John  Cann. 

Shakespeare.  1929.  (The  English 
heritage  series)  822.33  Dbai 

Becker,  Mrs  May   (Lamberton). 

Books  as  windows.     1929.  804  B39 

Bedford-Jones,  Henry. 

This  fiction  business.     1929.    808.3  B41 

Blunden,  Edmund  Charles. 

Nature  in  English  literature.  el929. 
(Hogarth  lectures  on  literature) 

820.9  B65 
Brad  by,  Godfrey  Fox. 

Short  studies  in  Shakespeare.      [1929] 
822.33  Dbrd 
Brewton,  William  W. 

The  South  must  publish  her  own  books. 

1928.  810,9  B84 

Browne,  Lewis. 

The  final  stanza ;  a  hitherto  unpub- 
lished chapter  of  "That  man  Heine." 

1929.  C831.75  Bbl 


212 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Bryan,  John  Thomas  Ingram. 

The  literature  of  Japan.  [1929]  (The 
Home  uuiversit.v  library  of  modern 
knowledge)  895  B91 


Buck,  Philo  Melvin. 

Literary  criticism.     1930. 


801   B922 


Calverton,  Victor  Francis,  ed. 

Anthology  of  American  negro  litera- 
ture. cl929.  (The  modem  library 
of  the  world's  best  books)     808  C16 

Carpenter,  Bruce. 

The  way  of  the  drama ;  a  study  of 
dramatic  forms  and  moods.     1929. 

808.2  C29 

Chase,  Mary  Ellen. 

The    golden    asse     and    other    essays. 
cl929.  814  C48 

Chesterfield,  Philip  Dormer  Stanhope, 
4th  earl  of. 
The  letters  of  the  Earl  of  Chesterfield 
to  his  son.    1924.  826  C52s 

Coffin,  Robert  Peter  Tristram. 

An  attic  room.     1929.  814  C67 


De  Selincourt,  Ernest. 
On  poetry.     1929. 


808.1   D44 


Deutsch,  Babette. 

Potable    gold ;    some    notes    on    poetry 

and  this  age.    cl929.    (The  new  arts) 

808.1   D48 

Douglas,  Norman. 

Birds  and  beasts  of  the  Greek  anthol- 
ogy.    [1928]  881   D73 

Garrod,  Heathcote  William. 

The  profession  of  poetry,  and  other 
lectures.     1929.  808.1   G243a 

Grattan,  Clinton  Hartley. 

Australian    literature.      1929.       (Uni- 
versity   of    Washington    chapbooks) 
820.9  G77 

Griffith,  Helen. 

Time  patterns  in  prose,  a  study  in 
prose  rhythm  based  upon  voice  rec- 
ords. [1929]  (Psychological  review 
publications.  Psychological  mono- 
graphs) q808  G8 

Grimsditch,  Herbert  B. 

Character  and  environment  in  the 
novels  of  Thomas  Hardy.     1925. 

823  H27zg 


Groom,  Bernard. 

A  literary  history  of  England.     1929. 

820.9  G87 
Herfokd,  Oliver. 

Excuse  it,  please.     cl929.        817  H54e 

KoRTE,  Alfred. 

Hellenistic  poetry.     1929.  881   K85 

Kreymborg,  Alfred. 

Our    singing    strength ;    an    outline    of 
American  poetry   (1620-1930)    1929. 
811.09  K92 
La  Brxjyere,  Jean  de. 

The  characters  of  Jean  de  la  Bruyfere. 

1929.  848  L12ch 

Lloyd,  J.  William. 

Eneres ;    or,    The    questions   of   Reksa. 

1930.  824  L793 

Mahabharata.      Bhagavadffita. 

The  Bhagavad-gita.     cl929. 

891.21   M21r 
MalonE:,  Andrew  E. 

The  Irish  drama.     1929.       822.09  M25 


Mann,  Thomas. 

Three   essays.     1929. 


834  M28 


Mickle,  Alan  D. 

Six  plays  of  Eugene  O'NeiU.      [1929] 
812  058zm 
Milne,  Alan  Alexander. 

By  way  of  introduction.     cl929. 

824  M65b 
MoRNETT,  Daniel. 

French  thought  in  the  eighteenth  cen- 
tury.    1929.  840.9  M86 

Morton,  David. 

The  renaissance  of  Irish  poetry,  1880- 
1930.     1929.  821.09  M88 

O'Brien,   Edward  Joseph   Harrington. 
The  dance  of  the  machines.     1929. 

808.3  013    I 
Overton,  Grant  Martin. 

An  hour  of  the  American  novel.     192$ 
(The  one  hour  series)        813.01  096 

Peterson,  Houston,  ed. 

The  book  of   sonnet   sequences.     1929. 
821.08  P48 

Powell,  John  Undershell,  d  Barber,  Eric 
Arthur,  eds. 
New  chapters  in  the  history  of  Greek 
literature.     Second  series.     1929. 

880.9  P88 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


213 


Priestley,  John  Boynton. 
English  humour.     1929.     (The  English 
heritage  series)  827  P94e 

Reid,  Forrest. 
Walter  De  La  Mare ;  a  critical  study. 
[1929]  821   D33zr 

Robinson,    Kenneth    Allan    [d    others], 
comps. 
Essays  toward  truth.     cl929. 

814  R662a 
Rogers,  Robert  Emmons. 
The  fine  art  of  reading.     el929. 

804  R72 
RojAS,  Fernando  de. 
Celestine;     or,     The     tragi-comedy     of 
Calisto  and  Melibea,  trans,  from  the 
Spanish    by    James    Mabbe.      1923. 
(Broadway  translations)    863  R74ce 

ussELL,  Charles  Edward. 
An   hour   of   American   poetry.      1929. 
'         (The  one  hour  series)         811.09  R96 

iSaintsbury,  George  Edward  Bateman. 
I    A    short   history    of   French   literature 
'         (from  the  earliest  texts  to  the  close 
of  the  nineteenth  century).     7th  ed. 
,         [1928]  840.9  S15s 

Shachtman,  Joseph. 

I  Elements  of  English  related  to  the 
judgment  of  poetry  in  grade  eleven. 
1929.  (Teachers  college,  Columbia 
university.  Contributions  to  educa- 
tion) 807  S52 

Sloss,  Mrs  Hattie   (Hecht),  comp. 
Certain  poets  of  importance.     cl929. 

821.08  S634 

SOLBEKG.  Victor. 

Expository  descriptions ;  a  textbook  for 

courses  in  technical  writing.     cl929. 

808  S68 

Speculum,    v.  1-3.  1926-1928.    q805  S7 

Taft,  Kendall  Bernard. 

Contemporary  attitudes.     1929. 

814.08  T12 

Topsoe-Jensen,  Helge  Gottlieb. 

Scandinavian  literature  from  Brandes 
to  our  day.  Translated  from  the 
Danish  by  Isaac  Anderson.  [1929] 
(Scandinavian  classics)       839.5  T67 

Van  Dyke,  Henry. 

The  man  behind  the  book.     1929. 

814  V24ma 


Wagenknecht,  Edward  Charles. 

Utopia  Americana.  1929.  (University 
of  Washington  chapbooks)    814  W13 

Wilson,  John  Dover. 

Six  tragedies  of  Shakespeare.  1929. 
(Workers'  educational  association 
outlines)  822.33  Dwil 

Wood,  Clement. 

Hunters  of  heaven  ;  the  American  soul 
as  revealed  by  its  poetry.     1929. 

811.09  W87h 

WooLF,   3Irs   Virginia    ( Stephen ) . 

A  room  of  one's  own.   1929.    820.4  W91 

Young,  Ella. 

The  tangle-coated  horse  and  other  tales, 
episodes  from  the  Fionn  saga.     1929. 
891.6  Y71 
POETRY 
Adams,  Leonie. 

High  falcon  &  other  poems.     cl929. 

811  A214h 
Aiken,  Conrad  Potter. 

Selected  poems.     1929.  811   A29s 

Allen,  Hervey. 

New  legends.     1929.  811   A426n 

AuSLANDER,   Joseph. 

Letters  to  women.     1929.        811   A932I 

BoDENHEiM,  Maxwell. 

Bringing  jazz !     1930.  811    B66b 

Bridges,  Robert  Seymour. 

The  testament  of  beauty ;  a  poem  in 
four  books.      [1930]  821   B85t 


Butler,  Airs  Jennie  McBride. 
My  soul  goeth  winging.     1927. 

Chalfin,  Mattie  Mabel. 
The  silent  voice.     1929. 


c811   B98 
c811   C43s 


CONKLiNG,  Mrs  Grace  Walcott  (Hazard). 

Witch,  and  other  poems.    1929. 

811   C75wi 
CooLBRiTH,  Ina  Donna. 

Wings  of  sunset.     1929.         c811   C77w 

DODGSON,  Charles  Lutwidge. 

The   collected   verse   of   Lewis   Carroll. 
cl929.  821   D64 

Donne,  .Tohn. 

Complete    poetry    and    selected    prose, 
edited  by  John  Hayward.     1929. 

821    D68h 


214 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


DrinKWATEB,  John,  £  otliers,  eds. 
Twentieth-century  poetry.     11)29. 

808.81   D78 
Faust,  Henri. 

Half-light  and  overtones.     1929.     (The 
Yale  series  of  younger  poets) 

811    F26 
Fritohf-y,  Alfred  James. 

Two  battles.    1929.  c811   F91t 

Fkost,  Frances  M. 

Hemlock  wall.    1929.     ( The  Yale  series 
of  younger  poets)  811   F9392 

Grover,  Edwin  Osgood,  ed,. 

The  animal  lover's  knapsack.  cl929. 
808.81  G883an 
Guii'EUMAN,  Arthur. 

Song  and  laughter.    cl929.       811   G96s 

Guthrie,  John  D.,  ed. 

Forest  fire  and  other  verse.     1929. 

811.08  G98 

HiGGiNSO?r.  1/rs  Mary  Potter   (Thacher) 
Fugitives.    1929.  811    H6372 


Huxley,  Aldous  Leonard. 
Leda.      [1926] 


821    H986I 


The  jade  mountain  ;  a  Chinese  anthology. 
1929.  895.1  J21 

Kipling,  Rudyard. 

Supplication  of  the  black  Aberdeen. 
1929.  v821   R57 

Manning,  Clarence  Augustus. 

An  anthology  of  Czechoslovak  poetry. 
1929.  (Publications  of  the  Institute 
of  Czechoslovak  studies) 

891.871    M28 
Morgan,  Angela. 

Creator  man.     1929.  811   M847c 

NICOLSON,  Mrs  Adela  Florence  (Cory). 
Stars  of  the  desert,  by  Laurence  Hope 
[pseud.'\  821    N65s 

O'Halloran,  Mrs  Elspeth    (MacDuffie). 
Strange  truth,  by  'Elspeth'  pseud.  1929. 

811    036 

Paget-Fredericks,  Joseph  Rous. 

Green  pipes,  poems  and  pictures.    1929. 

qc811    PI 

Palmer,  Mrs  Fanny  (Purdy). 

Sonnets  of  California.     1927. 

c811    P17s1 
Petri,  Lori. 

Fools  or  gods.     cl029.  c811    P49 


Raleigh,  Sir  Walter. 

The  poems  of  Sir  Walter  Ralegh,  edit- 
ed by  Agnes  M.  C.  Latham.    1929. 

821   R163 
RiCR,  Cale  Young. 

Seed  of  the  moon.    cl929.     811   R49see 

Riding,  Laura. 

Voltaire ;  a  biographical  fantasy.  1927. 

821  R54v 
Robinson,  Lennox. 

A  little  anthology  of  modera  Irish 
verse.     1928.  v820.08  R66 

S^vnojiNi,  Nayadu. 
The  bird  of  time ;  songs  of  life,  death  & 
the      spring,      by      Sarojini      Naidu. 
[1926]  891.4  S24bi 

Tanhauser,  Simon  Sigmund. 

Rhymes  of  the  sunrise  trail.     1929. 

811  T16 
Todhunter,  John. 

Selected  poems.     [1927]  821  T63  ! 

Van  Doren,  Mark,  c£-  Lapolla,  Garibaldi 
M.,  eds. 
A    junior    anthology    of    world    poetiy. 

1929.  808.81  V24j  , 

Wyetii,  John  Allan  Benedict. 

This  man's  army.     1929  811   W979  I 

DRAMA 

Brown,  Alice. 

The  golden  ball.    1929.  812  B877g 

Bunyan,  John. 

The  pilgi'im's  progress  of  John  Bun- 
yan ;  a  dramatized  version  of  certain 
scenes  in  Bunyan's  own  words :  ar- 
ranged by  Wilton  Rix.     1929. 

822  B94  I' 

Burke,  Edwin.  i 

This    thing    called    love,    a    comedy    in   \ 

three  acts.     cl929.     (French's  stand-   ' 

ard  librai-y  edition)  812  B959   ! 

Oanfield,  Curtis,  ed. 

Plays  of  the  Irish   renaissance,   1880- 

1930.  1929.  822.08  C22 

Oow^ARD,  Noel  Pierce.  I 

The  young  idea  ;  a  comedy  in  three  acts,   m 
cl924.      (French's  acting  edition)  • 

822  C87y 
Denison,  Merrill. 

The  prize  winner ;  a  comedy  in  one  act. 
1928.     (Appleton  shoi-t  plays) 

812  D39 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


215 


Flavin,  Martin. 

The  criminal  code.    cl929. 


812   F58c 


Lewisohist,  Ludwig. 

Adam ;  a  dramatic  history.     1929. 

812  L677 
MoLNAR,  Ferenc. 

The  plays  of  Ferenc   Moluar.      [1929] 
894.52  M72pl 
MoRKis,  Gwladys  Evan. 

Tales  from  Bernard  Shaw.     [1929] 

822  SSSzm 

MussER.,  Paul  Howard. 

James  Nelson  Barker,  1784-1S5S  ;  with 
a  reprint  of  his  comedy  Tears  and 
Smiles.    1929.  812  B255zm 

XoRRis,  Charles  Oilman. 

A  gest  of  Robin  Hood.     1929. 

c812  N85g 

Onk-aot  plays  for  stage  and  study,  fifth 
series.     1929.  808.2  058  v.  5 

Prize  plays  of  1927.     192S.    812.08  P961 

Richard  II  (Drama). 

The  first  part  of  the  reign  of  King 
Richard  the  Second.  [1929]  (The 
INIalojie  society  reprints,  1929) 

822  IVI25fr 

Shay,  Frank,  ed. 

The  Appleton  book  of  Christmas  plays. 
1929.  808.2  S53ap 

The  true  tragedie  of  Richard  the  Third. 
1594.     [1929]      (The  Malone  society  re- 
prints,  1929)  822  IVI25tru 

WiGGiN,  Kate  Douglas,  d  Crothers,  Ra- 
chel. 
Mother    Carey's    c  h  ic  k  e  n  s.      cl925. 
(French's   standard  library   edition) 
812  W65m 

CALIFORNIA    FICTION 

Garrott,  Hal. 

Suythergen.     1923.  cG243 

Norris,  Mrs  Katlileen  (Thompson) 

Passion  flower.     1930.  cN856pa 

Paget-Fredericks,  Joseph  Rous. 

Miss  Pert's  Christmas  tree.     1929. 

qcP135 
Rising.  Lawrence. 

False  youth.     1929.  cR595f 


Ryan,  Don. 

A  Roman  holiday. 


1980. 


cR988r 


ARCHAEOLOGY 

Dawkins,  Richard  MacGillivray. 

The  sanctuary  of  Artemis  Orthia  at 
Sparta.  1929.  (Society  for  the  pro- 
motion of  Hellenic  studies,  supple- 
mentary papers)  q913.38  D2 

Earp,  Frank  Russell. 

The  way  of  the  Greeks.     1929. 

913.38  E12 
Field,  Henry. 

The  Field  museum-Oxford  university 
e.xpedition  to  Kish,  Mesopotamia, 
192.3-1929.  1929.  ([Field  museum 
of  natural  history]  Anthropology 
leaflet)  913.358    F45 

Le  Coq,  Albert  von. 

Buried  treasures  of  Chinese  Turkestan. 
[192S]  913.516  L46 

GENEALOGY  AND  HERALDRY 

Dartmouth,  Mass. 

Vital  records  of  Dartmouth,  Massa- 
chusetts, to  the  year  1850.  1929. 
(New  England  historic  genealogical 
society.  Vital  records  of  the  towns 
of  Massachusetts)  929.3  D22 

Fox-Davies,  Arthur  Charles. 

Heraldry ;  a  complete  explanation  of 
how  to  obtain  a  coat  of  arms,  of  how 
to  use  one  correctly,  and  of  the 
heraldic  rules  as  they  are  being 
observed  at  the  present  time.  1927. 
929.6  F79h 
Hawley,  Emily  Carrie. 

Annals  of  Brookfleld,  Fairfield  County, 
Connecticut.      1929.  rq  929.1    H3 

IIuxrPHREY,  Grace. 

Flags ;  the  flags  of  all  the  world,  the 
new  ones  of  the  past  decade  and  the 
old,    old   ones.      cl929.  929.9   H92 

.Jordan,  David  Starr,  d  Kimball,   Sarah 
Louise. 
Your  family  tree.     1929.  c929  J82 

Kemmerer  family  association. 

Two  centuries  of  Kemmerer  family  his- 
tory, 1730-1929.    1929.        929.2  K31 
Gift. 

jNIoss.  .Tames  Alfred. 

The  American  flag :  its  glory  and 
grandeur.     cl929.  929.9   IVI91am 

Reed,  Willoughby  Henry. 

History  and  genealogy  of  the  Rood 
family.     1929.  q929.2  R2r 


216 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930j 


BIOGRAPHY:    COLLECTIVE 

De  Casseres,  Benjamin. 
The  superman  in  America.   1929.    (Uni- 
versity   of    Wasliington    chapbooks) 
920.07  D29 
Hall,  Josef  Wasliington. 

Eminent  Asians  ;  six  great  personalities 
of  the  new  East.    1929.      920.05  H17 

Head,  Richard  &  Kirkman,  Francis. 
The  English  rogue.  1928.    q923.41   H43 

Palmee,  John  McAuley. 

Washington,    Lincoln,    Wilson ;    three 
war  statesmen.     1930.  932  P17 

ToRNius,  Valerian  Hugo. 

Salons;  pictures  of  society  through  five 
centuries.     1929.  920.04  T68 


WiEGLER,  Paul. 

Genius  in  love  and  death. 


1929. 

920  W64 


BIOGRAPHY:   INDIVIDUAL 

Aggrey.     Smith,  Edwin  W. 

Aggrey  of  Africa,  a  study  in  black  and 
white.     1929.  B  A266s 

BaUac.     Gribble,  Francis  Henry. 
Balzac,  the  man  and  the  lover. 

B   B198gr 

Bashkirtseva.     Cahuet,  Alberic. 

Moussia;   the  life  and  death  of  Marie 
Bashkirtseff.     1929.  B  B299c 

Bierce.     McWilliams,  Carey. 

Ambrose  Bierce.     1929.         cB  B588m 

Brown.     Brown,  J/rs  Harriet  (Connor). 

Grandmother    Brown's    hundred   years, 

1827-1927.     1929.  B  B8794b 

Carlyle.     Dunn,  Waldo  Hilary. 

Froude  &  Carlyle.     1930.       B  C2865du 

Coke.     Lyon,  Walter  Hastings,  &  Block, 
Herman. 
Edward  Coke,  oracle  of  the  law.     1929 

B  06821 

C'oolidge.     Coolidge,  Calvin,  pres.   TJ.  S. 

The  autobiography  of  Calvin  Coolidge. 

1929.  B  0774 

Dampier.     Wilkinson,  Clennell. 

William      Dampier.        [1929]         (The 
Golden  hind   series)  B  D166w 

Da  Ponte.     Da  Ponte,  Lorenzo. 

Memoirs  of  Lorenzo  Da  Ponte.     1929. 

B  D212s 


Dickens.        Wagenknecht,      Edward 
Charles. 
The  man  Charles  Dickens.     1929. 

B  D548wag 
Ellis.     Ellis,  Mrs  Anne. 

The  life  of  an  ordinary  woman.     1929. 

B   E472 

Ellison.     Ellison,  Minnie  B.  Carson. 
Judge  John  F.  Ellison.  1929.     qcB   E47 
Gift. 

Fisher.     Bacon,      Sir     Reginald      Hugh 
Spencer. 
The  life  of  Lord  Fisher  of  Kilverstone, 
admiral  of  the  fleet.    1929.    2  v. 

B  F534b 
Foch.  ,  Aston,  Sir  George  Grey. 

The  biography  of  the  late  Marshal 
Foch.     1929.  B  F652as 

Fox.     Fox,  Richard,   ip.  of  Winchester. 

Letters    of    Richard    Fox,    1486-1527, 

edited   by   P.    S.   and   H.   M.   Allen. 

1929.  B  F793a 

Gibbon.     Gibbon,  Edward. 

Gibbon's  journal  to  January  28th,  1763, 
My  journal  l,  li,  &  iii  and  Ephem- 
erides,  with  introductory  essays  by 
D.  M.  Low.     1929.  B  G439I 

Gissing.     GissiNG,  George  Robert. 

Selections  autobiographical  and  imagi- 
native from  the  works  of  George 
Gissing,  with  biographical  and  criti- 
cal notes  by  his  son ;  with  an  intro- 
duction by  Virginia  Woolf.  [1929] 
B  G535g 
Gordon.     Gordon,  Taylor. 

Born  to  be.     1929.  B  G6657 

Graves.     Graves,  Robert. 

Good-bye  to  all  that ;  an  autobiography. 
[1929]  B  G7768 

Harte*     Harte,  Bret. 

Concerning  "Condensed  novels."    1929. 
cB  H327pa 

Herrick.     MoTT,  Thomas  Bentley. 

Myron  T.  Herrick,  friend  of  France. 
1929.  B  H  5665m 

Hugo.     ESCHOLIER,  Raymond. 

Victor  Hugo,  translated  from  the 
original  French  edition  by  Lewis 
Galantiere.      1930.  B   H895e 

Hidl.     Hull,  Isaac. 

Commodore     Hull.       1929.        (Robert 

Charles  Billings  fund.     Publications) 

B  H9132 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRAEY 


217 


Hus.     Mussolini,  Benito. 
John  Huss.     1929. 


B   H968m 


Hutchinson.     RuGG,  Winnifred  King. 
Unafraid ;   a  life  of  Anne  Hutchinson. 
1930.  B   H9752r 

Johnson.     Saxtpeter,  Harry. 

Dr  Johnson  &  Mr  Boswell.     1929. 

B  J69sa 

Kerr.     Kere,  Mark  Edward  Frederic. 
Land,     sea,     and     air :     reminiscences. 
1927.  ■  B  K41 

Lee.     Young,  James  C. 
Marse   Robert,    knight   of    the   confed- 
eracy.    cl929.  B  L479y 

Linne.    Frees,  Theodor  Magnus. 

Linnaeus  (afterwards  Carl  von  Linne), 
the  story  of  his  life,  adapted  from  the 
Swedish  and  brought  down  to  the 
present  time  in  the  light  of  recent 
research,  by  Benjamin  Daydon  Jack- 
son.    1923.  B  L7586f 

Lloyd  George.    Edwauds,  John  Hugh. 
David  Lloyd  George;  the  man  and  the 
statesman.     cl929.  B   L793ed 

London.    Rogoff,  Harry. 

An  East  Side  epic;  the  life  and  work 
of  Meyer  London.    cl930.     B  L8475r 

MacDonald.  Hamilton,  Mrs  Mary  Agnes 
(Adamson). 
J.  Ramsay  MacDonald.     [1929] 

B   M1351h2 

TiLTMAN,  Hubert  Hessell. 


J.  Ramsay  MacDonald ;  labor's  man  of 
destiny.     1929.  B  M1351t 

McKim.     MoOKE,  Charles. 

The  life  and  times  of  Charles  Follen 
McKim.     1929.  B  M  1582m 

Marlborough.    Chidsey,  Donald  Barr. 
Marlborough ;    the   portrait   of   a   con- 
querer.     cl929.  B   M3473ch 

Marlowe.     Boas,  Frederick  Samuel. 
Marlowe  and  his  circle.     1929. 

B  M349b 

Marshall-Hall.     Marjoribanks,  Edward. 

The.  life  of  Sir  Edward  Marshall  HaU. 

1929.  B   M 3693m 

Martin.     [Martin,  Michael] 

Captain  Lightfoot,  the  last  of  the  New 
England  highwaymen.     1926. 

B   M382 


Mighels.     Cummins,   Mrs   Ella   Sterling 
(Clark). 
Life    and    letters    of    a    forty-niner's 
daughter.     cl929.  cB  C9711 

Miller.     Wagner,  Harr. 

Joaquin    Miller    and    his    other    self. 
cl929.  cB  M6481w 

Mitchell.       Burr,  Mrs    Anna     Robeson 
( Brown ) . 

Weir    Mitchell ;  his    life    and    letters. 

1929.  B  IVI682b 

Montague.     Elton,  Oliver. 

C.  E.  Montague,  a  memoir.     1929. 

B   M759e 
Nation.     Asbuey,  Herbert. 

Carry  Nation.     1929.  B   N277a 

Nelson.     Forester,  Cecil  Scott. 

Nelson.      [1929]  B  N426f 

Newman.     Newman,  Frances. 

Frances  Newman's  letters.     1929. 

B  N552b 
Osbert.     Osbert  of  Clare. 

The  letters  of  Osbert  of  Clare.     1929. 

B  0814 
PilsudsM.     Landau,  Rom. 

Pilsudski  and  Poland.     1929.     B  P643 

Rabelais.  Nook,  Albert  Jay,  &  Wilson, 
C.  R. 

Francis  Rabelais,    the    man    and    his 

work.  1929.                             B  R114n 

Rathenau.      Kessler,     Hai-ry     Klemens 
Ulrich,  graf  von. 
Walther  Rathenau.     1929.       B  R234k 

Richelieu.     Belloc,  Hilaire. 

Richelieu;  a  study.     1929.       B  R528b 

Rousseau.    Weight,  Ernest  Hunter. 
The  meaning  of  Rousseau.     1929. 

B   R864w 
Ruskin.     RuSKiN,  John. 

The  solitary  warrior.     1930. 

B   R956w1 

Savonarola.     Misciattelli,  Piero. 

Savonarola,   translated   by   M.    Peters- 
Roberts.    1930.  B  S268m 

Scapini.     Scapini,  J.  Georges. 
A  challenge  to  darkness.     1929. 

B  S284 
Schurz.     Easum,  Chester  Verne. 

The  Americanization   of   Carl   Schurz. 
cl929.  B  S394e 


218 


NEWS    NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Scott.    Boas,  Mrs  Louise  Schutz. 

A  great  ricli  man ;  the  romance  of  Sir 
Walter  Scott.     1929.  B  S431b 

Sherman.    Liddell  Hart,  Basil  Heni-y. 
Sherman ;    soldier,    realist,    American. 
1929.  B  S5535I 

Stanley.     Stanley,  Lady  Augusta  Fi-ed- 
erica  Elizabeth    (Bruce). 
Later  letters  of  Lady  Augusta  Stanley, 
1864r-1876.      [1929]  B  S7873b 

Tolstoi.     Tolstoi,  Lev  Nikolaevich,  graf. 

The  lettei's  of  Tolstoy  and  his  cousin 

Countess  Alexandra  Tolstoy    (1857- 

1903),  translated  from  the  Russian 

by  Leo  Islavin.     [1929]         B  T654i 

Vanamee.     Yanamee,  Mrs  Mary  Conger. 
Vanamee.     cl930.  B  V2173v 

Wanamaker.     Appel,  Joseph  Herbert. 
The  business  biography  of  John  Wana- 
maker,   with    glimpses    of    Rodman 
Wanamaker  and  Thomas  B.  Wana- 
maker.    1930.  B  W244a 

Wayne.     Boyd,  Thomas  Alexander. 
Mad  Anthony  Wayne.     1929. 

B  W359b 

Whitman.    MoEBis,  Harrison  Smith. 
Walt  Whitman  ;  a  brief  biography  with 
reminiscences.     1929.  B  W6155m 

Wolsey.     Pollard,  Albert  Frederick. 
Wolsey.     1929.  B  W8683p 

DESCRIPTION  AND  TRAVEL: 
EUROPE 

Adams,  Almeda  C. 

Seeing  Europe  through   sightless  eyes. 
cl929.  914  A21 

Dillon,  Emile  Joseph. 

Russia  today  &  yesterday.     [1929] 

914.7  D57ru 

Hindus,  Maurice  Gerschon. 

Humanity  uprooted.     [1929] 

914.7  H66h 
Huddleston,    Sisley. 

Europe  in  zigzags.     1929.  914  H88 


In  and  about  Paris.     [1927] 

914.43  H88i 


Httkbell,  F.  G. 

The  lantern  show  of  Paris.    914.43  H96 


Linnet,  A.  G. 

The  peepshow  of  the  Port  of  London. 
[1929]  914.21   L75 

Maxwell,  Gerald. 

The  old-world  Germany  of  to-day. 
[1929]  914.3  M46 

Meaes,  Eliot  Grinnell. 

Greece  today ;  the  aftermath  of  the 
refugee  impact.  1929.  (Stanford 
books  in  world  politics)     914.95  M48 

Mtjikhead,  Findlay,  ed. 

Southern  Spain  and  Portugal  with 
Madeira,  the  Canary  Islands,  and 
the  Azores.  1929.  (The  blue 
guides)  914.6  M95 

Newman,  Edward  Manuel. 

Seeing  Germany.  1929.  (Newman 
traveltalks)  914.3  N55 

Schneider,  Herbert  Wallace. 

Making  fascists.     [1929]         914.5  S35 

Somervell,  David  Churchill. 

English  thought  in  the  nineteenth  cen- 
tury.     [1929]  914.2  S69 

Tuebebville,  Arthur  Stanley. 

English  men  and  manners  in  the  eight- 
eenth century.     1929.  914.2  T93 

ASIA 

Burr,  Agnes  Rush. 

India,  the  land  that  lures.     cl929. 

q915.4  B9 

Garratt,  Geoffrey  Theodore. 

An  Indian  commentary.      [1928] 

915.4  G23 

HosiE,  Dorothea   (Soothill),  lady. 

Portrait  of  a  Chinese  lady  and  certain 
of  her  contemporaries.      [1929] 

915.1    H825p 

MiNNEY,  Rubeigh  James. 

Shiva ;  or,  The  future  of  India.  1929. 
[To-day    and   to-morrow] 

915.4  M665 

Park,  No  Yong. 

Making  a  new  China.     cl929 

915.1   P23 

AFRICA 

Church,  Archibald  George. 

East  Afx'ica,  a  new  dominion.     1927. 

916.7  C56 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


219 


DUNDAS,    Hon.    Charles   Cecil   Ferquhar- 
son. 
Kilimanjaro  and  its  people.     1924. 

916.7  D91 

Flandrau,  Mrs  Grace  C.   (Hodgson). 

Then   I   saw  the   Congo.     cl929. 

916.7  F58 
liYDH,  Hauna  Albertina. 

The  land  of  the  Sun-god.      [1929] 

916.2  R99 

ScnwARZ,  Ernest  Hubert  Lewis. 

The    Kalahari    and    its    native    races. 

1928.  916.8  S41 

Singer,  Caroline. 

White  Africans  and  black.     cl929. 

vq916.6  S6 

NORTH   AMERICA 

Brock,  Henry  Irving. 

New  York  is  like  this.     1929. 

q917.471    B8 
Gai^ba,  Kanhaya  Lai. 

Uncle  Sham ;  the  strange  tale  of  a  civ- 
ilization   run    amuck.      cl929. 

917.3  G26 

Halliburton,  Richard. 

New  worlds   to   conquer.      cl929. 

917.2  H18 
Laut,  Agnes  Christina. 

The  overland  trail.     1929.       917.8  L38 

Lewis,   Matthew   Gregory. 

Journal    of    a    West    India    proprietor. 

1929.  (Park    street    library    of    let- 
ters, diaries  and  memoirs) 

917.292  L67 

LuDWiG,    Salvator,   archduke  of  Austria. 

Los    Angeles    in    the    sunny    seventies. 

1929.  C917.9493  L94 


Rawson,  Marion  Nicholl. 
Country  auction.     cl929. 


917.3  R26c 


Reynolds,  Helen  Wilkinson. 

Dutch  houses  in  the  Hudson  valley  be- 
fore 1776.     1929.  q917.47  R4 


Tome,  Philip. 
Pioneer  life. 


1928. 


917.48  Te.*) 


OCEANICA.     POLAR  REGIONS 

Cherry-Garrard,  Apsley   George  Benet. 
The  worst  journey  in  the  world,  Ant- 
arctic, 1910-1913.     [1929]     2  v. 

919.9  C52 


Faris,  John  Thomson. 

The  paradise  of  the  Pacific.     1929. 

919.69  F22 

HISTORY:    GENERAL 

Essays  in  intellectual  history,  dedicated 
to  James  Harvey  Robinson  by  his  for- 
mer seminar  students.     1929. 

904  E78 
Fbiedell,  Egon. 

A  cultural  history  of  the  modem  age. 
1930.  q901    F8 

Haas,  Wilhelm. 

What  is  European  civilization?  and 
what  is  its  future?     1929.     901   H67 

Hatfield,  Henry  Stafford. 

The  conquest  of  thought  by  invention 
in  the  mechanical  state  of  the  future. 
cl929.      (The  new  science  series) 

901    H36 
St.  Louis  post-dispatch. 

The  drift  of  civilization.     1929. 

901   S14 

HISTORY:    ANCIENT 

Homo,  Leon  Pol. 

Roman  political  institutions  from  city 
to  state.  1929.  (The  history  of 
civilization.  [Pre-history  and  an- 
tiquity]) 937  H76r 

Kellett,  Ernest  Edward. 

A  short  history  of  the  Jews,  down  to 
the  Roman  period.     1928.     933   K29 

Mahaffy,  Sir  John  Pentland,  &  Gilman, 
Arthur. 
Alexander's      empire.        1887.       (The 
Story  of  the  nations)  938  M21s1 

Robinson,  Cyril  Edward. 

A  history  of  Greece.      [1929] 

938  R658 
Tabouis,  G.  R. 

The  private  life  of  Tutankhamen. 
1929.  932  Til 

EUROPE 
Benns,  Frank  Lee. 

Europe  since  1914.     1930.     94o.98  B47 


Bercovici,  Konrad. 
The  crusades.     1929. 


940.4  B48 


Cartellieri,  Otto. 

The  court  of  Burgundy.  1929.  (His- 
tory of  civilization.  [Middle  ages  to 
modern  times] )  944.4  C32 


220 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Cboce,  Benedetto. 

A  history  of  Italy,   1871-1915.     1929. 

945  C93 

Davis,  Henry  William  Carless. 

The  age  of  Grey  and  Peel,  being  the 
Ford  lectures  for  1926.     1929. 

942.07  D26 

Dumas,  Alexandre. 

On  board  the  Emma,  adventures  with 
Garibaldi's  "Thousand"  in  Sicily. 
1929.  945  D88 

Geoffeet  of  Monmouth,  hp.  of  St.  Asaph. 
The     Historia     regum     Britanniae     of 
Geoffrey    of    Monmouth.      1929. 

942.01   G34hi 
Geahaii,  Evelyn. 

Albert,  king  of  the  Belgians,  an  author- 
ized biography.     1929.  949.3  G73 

Jaszi,  Oszkar. 

The  dissolution  of  the  Habsburg  mon- 
archy. cl929.  (Studies  in  the  mak- 
ing of  citizens )  943.6 '  J39 

King,  Bolton. 

A  history  of  Italian  unity,  being  a  i>olit- 

ical   history   of   Italy   from   1814   to 

-    1871.      [1924]     2v.  945  K52 

LANGEas,  William  Leonard. 

The  Franco-Russian  alliance,  1890- 
1894.  1929.  (Hai-vard  historical 
studies)  940.9  L276 

Lewis,  Dominic  Bevan  Wyndham. 

King  Spider ;  some  aspects  of  Louis  xi 

of  France  and  his  companions.    1929. 

944.02  L67 

Loth,  David  Goldsmith. 

Lorenzo  the  Magnificent.     cl929. 

945.5   L88 

Lucas,  Henry  Stephen. 

The  Low  Countries  and  the  hundred 
years'  war,  1326-1-347.  1929.  (Uni- 
versity of  Michigan  publications.  His- 
tory  and  political   science) 

949.2  L93 

LuEHR,  Elmer. 

The  new  German  republic ;  the  Reich 
in  transition.     1929.         943.08  L94n 

MacDonagh,  Michael. 

The  English  king ;  a  study  of  the  mon- 
archy and  the  royal  family,  histori- 
cal, constitutional  and  social.   [1929] 
942  MIS 


Meyendobff,       Aleksandr       Feliksovich, 
haron. 
The  background  of  the  Russian  revo- 
lution.    cl929.       (Brown  university, 
the  Colver  lectures,  1928) 

947.08  M61 
Nash,  E.  Gee. 

The  Hansa :  its  history  and  romance. 
[1929]  943.5  N24 

Palache,  John  Garber. 

Marie  Antoinette,  the  player  queen. 
1929.  944.03  P15 

Paeey,  Sir  Edward  Abbott. 

The  Bloody  assize.    1929.     942.05     P26 

Paston  letters. 

The  Paston  letters.  [1924]  2  v. 
(Everyman's  library,  History) 

942.04  P29 
SiTWELL,  Sacheverell. 

The  Gothick  north ;  a  study  of  mediae- 
val life,  art,  and  thought.     1929. 

940.1  S62 

NORTH   AMERICA 

Abbott,  Wilbur  Cortez. 

New  York  in  the  American  revolution. 
1929.  974.71  A13 

Andrews,  Mrs  Marietta    (Minnigerode). 
Scraps  of  paper.     cl929.  973.7  A56 

Barnes,  Harry  Elmer. 

The  making  of  a  nation.     1929. 

973  B261 
Bieney,  Hoffman. 

Vigilantes,  a  chronicle  of  the  rise  and 
fall  of  the  Plummer  gang  of  outlaws 
in  and  about  Virginia  City,  Mon- 
tana, in  the  early  '60's.     cl929. 

978.6  B61 

Borden,  Sir  Robert  Laird. 

Canada  in  the  commonwealth,  from 
conflict  to  co-operation.     1929. 

971   B72 

BuNZEL,  Ruth  L. 

The  Pueblo  potter.  1929.  (Columbia 
university  contributions  to  anthro- 
pology) q970.6  89 

Connecticut  (Colony)  Particular  court. 
Records  of  the  Particular  court  of  Con- 
necticut,   1639-1663.      1928.       (Col- 
lections of  the  Connecticut  historical 
society)  974.6  C75  v.22 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


221 


Draper,  Lyman  Copeland. 

King's  Mountain  and  its  heroes.     1929 
cl881.  973.3  D765 


Feost,  Holloway  Halstead. 
We  build  a  navy.     1929. 


973  F939 


Gabriel,  Ralph  Henry. 

The  lure  of  the  frontier;  a  story  of 
race  conflict.  1929.  (The  pageant 
of  America)  rq973  P1 

HoLLis,  Christopher. 

The  American  heresy.    1930.     973  H74 

Kendall,  George  Wilkins. 

Narrative  of  the  Texan  Santa  F6  expe- 
dition. 1929.  (The  Lakeside  class- 
ics) 976.4  K33a 

KiTTEEDGE,  Henry  Crocker. 

Cape  Cod ;  its  people  and  their  history. 
1930.  974.41  C23k 

Lewis,  Lloyd,  d  Smith,  Henry  Justin. 
Chicago,  the  history  of  its  reputation. 
cl929.  977.31   L67 

Polk,  James  Knox,  pres.  U.  S. 

Polk,  the  diary  of  a  president,  1845- 
1849.     1929.  973.6  P76p 


Saxon,  Lyle. 

Old  Louisiana.     cl929. 


976.3  S27 


Seymoltr,  Mrs  Flora  Warren. 
The  story  of  the  red  man.     1929. 

970.1   S52 

Trenton   historical   society,   Trenton. 
A     history     of     Trenton,     1679-1929. 
1929.     2  V.  974.966  T79 

EUROPEAN   WAR 

AsHMORE,  Edvrard  Bailey. 


Air  defence.     1929. 


940.933  A82 


Grattan,  Clinton  Hartley. 

Why  we  fought.    cl929.       940.973  G77 

GtJiCHARD,  Louis. 

The  naval  blockade,  1914-1918.     1930. 
940.91   G94 
Johnson,  Thomas  M. 

Our   secret   war;    true    American    spy 
stories,    1917-1919.      cl929. 

940.921  J  69 

La  Grange,  Clementine    (de  Chaumont- 
Quitry)  de,  iaronne. 
Open    house    in    Flanders,    1914-1918. 
1930.  940.935  L17 


Pottle,  Frederick  Albert. 

Stretchers ;  the  story  of  a  hospital  unit 
on  the  western  front.     1929. 

940.936  P87 

Young,  Arthur  Morgan. 

Japan     in     recent    times,     1912-1926. 
1929.  940.952  Y68 

GERMAN 

Anthes,  Otto. 

Heinz  Hauser.     [1927]  833  A62 

Baedeker,   Karl,   firm,   publishers,   Leip- 
zig. 
Deutschland    in    einem    bande    kurzes 
reisehandbuch.     1925.         914.3  B13d 

Baetsch,  Rudolf  Hans. 

Die  verliebten  und  ihre  stadt.     1927. 

833  B29v 
Beyerlein,  Franz  Adam. 

Kain  und  Abel.     cl926.  833  B57k 


Bloem,  Walter. 
Morderin?!     1929. 


833  B65m 


BoNSELS,  Waldemar. 

Der     wanderer     zwischen  staub     und 

sternen.     cl926.  833  B72w 

Brod,  Max. 

Die    frau    nach    der    man  sich    sehnt. 

1928.  833  B86 

BULGAKOWA,  Lydia. 

Das  studium  der  presse  in  der  USSR. 

1928.  O70  B93 

CORTI,  Egon  Caesar,  conte. 

Der    aufstieg    des    hauses  Rothschild. 

1929.  B  R847c2 


Der  haus  Rothschild  in  der  zeit 

seiner   bliite.     1928.  B  R847c3 

CouRTHS,  Frau  Hedwig  (Mahler). 
Frau  Juttas  Befreiung.     cl928. 

833  C86f 


Der   verlorene   ring.     cl928. 

833  C86 
Dreyer,  Max. 

Das  himmelbett  von  Hilgenhoh.     1928. 

833  D77 


Das  sympathiemittel.     1927. 

833  D77s 


Eheenburg,  iria  Grigorevich. 

Michail  Lykow.     cl927.  833  E33 


222 


NEWS    NOTES    OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Feuchtw ANGER,  Lion. 

Die      hassliche      herzogin      Margarete 
Maultasch.     1928.  833  F42 


Jud  Siiss.     [1929] 


833  F42j 


Fbawk,  Bruno. 

Politische  novelle.     1928'.       833  F828p 

Zwolftausend.     cl927.     832  F82a 


Frey,  Adolf. 

Der    tiermaler    Rudolf    Roller.      1928. 
(Monographien  zur  schweizer  kunst) 
q759.3   K8f 
FtJLOP-MiLLEB,  Rene. 

Der  heilige  teufel.     cl927.        qB  R22f 


Gagern,  Friedrich  von. 
Der  tote  Mann.     1927. 


833  G13 


GOETZ,  Wolfgang. 

Von  zauberern  und  soldaten.     1926. 

833  G61 
GoLL,   Frau   Claire 

Bine  Deutsche  in  Paris.     [1927] 

833  G62 

Gbegor,  Joseph,  d  Fiilop-Miller,  Rene. 

Das   russische   theater.      cl928. 

q792  08 
Griese,  Friedrich. 

Winter.     1929.  833  G84 


Grogger,  Paula. 

Das    grimmingtor.     192i9. 


833  G87 


Gross,  Fritz. 

Lenin.    Liebknecht.    Luxemburg.    1926. 

832  G87 

Handel-Mazzetti,       Enrica       Ludovica 
Maria,  freun  von. 
Deutsche   passion.      1925.        833  H23d 


Das  rosenwunder.     1929. 


833  H23r 

Hauptmann,   Gerhart  Johann  Robert. 

Des  grossen  kampffliegers,  landfahrers, 

gauklers    und    magiers    Till    Eulen- 

spiegel    abenteuer,     streiche,    gauke- 

leien,  geschichte  und  traume.     1928. 

q831    H3 


Wanda.     1928. 


833   H37w 


Henschke,  Alfred. 

Die  romane  der  leidenschaft.     cl927. 

833  H52 
Hexjbner,  Rudolf. 

Tage  in  Thule.     1928.  833  H59 


HiRSCHFELD,  Georg. 

Der  grosse  teppich.     cl928'. 

833  H669 

Hollander,     Walther     Georg     Heinrich 
von. 
Auf    der    suche.     cl926.  833  H73 

HxJLSEN,  Hans  von. 

Gerhart   Hauptmann.      el927.      (Dich- 
ter-biographien)  B   H374hu 

JxJNEMANN,  Maria  Regina. 

Die  kommilitonin.     [1926]         833  J95k 

Lebenswellen.  833  J95 


Kant,  Immanuel. 

Kritik    der    reiuen    Vernuust.       [1927] 

193  K16s 

Katzenstein,  Julius. 

Melchior.     cl927.  833  K19 

Kerch n AWE,  Hugo  \_&  others']. 

Die  militarverwaltung  in  den  von  den 
osterreichisch-ungarischen  truppen 
besetzten  gebieten.  1928.  [Car- 
negie endowment  for  international 
peace.  Division  of  economics  and 
history.  Wirtschafts-  und  sozial- 
geschichte  des  weltkrieges.  Oster- 
reichische  und  ungarische  serie] 

940.943  K39 

Kessel,   Martin. 

Gebandigte  kurven.      [1927]      831   K42 

Kesten,  Hermann. 

Josef  sucht  die  freiheit.     1927. 

833  K42 

Keyserling,    Hermann    Alexander,    graf 
von. 
Das  spektrum  Europas.     cl928. 

914  K44a 

Kohl,  Hermann,  &  others. 
Unser  ozeanflug.      [1928?] 


Kruger,  Hermann  Anders. 
Die  sieben  raudel.     cl927. 


629.13  K79a 
833  K94 


KuRTH,  Julius. 

Die    geschichte    des    japanischen    holz- 
schnitts.     1925-28.     2  v. 

q761    K96 

KuRZ,   Isolde. 

Cora.     1927.  833  K963 


Landatjer,  Georg. 
Palastina.     1925. 


q915.69  L2 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


223 


Leitich,  Ann  Tizia. 

Ursula  entdeckt  Amerika.     cl928. 

833  L533 
LijSTDENAU,  Heinrich. 

Kriminalinspektor  dr.  Stretter.  1926. 
( Sehattenbilder  des  lebens,  eine  ro- 
manreihe)  833  L74 


LoEKKE,  Oskar. 

Der   langste   tag.     1926. 


831   L82 


Lt'BBE,  Axel. 

Der  verwandlungskunstler.     1928. 

833  L92 
LUDWIG,  Emil. 

Genie   und   charakter.     1928. 

920  L94a 

Goethe ;     geschichte     eines     meu- 

schen.     cl926.     2  v.         832.62  Blul 


Kunst  und  schk-ksal.     1927. 

920.04  L94 


Meeresstille.     cl92o.        833  L948 

Der    Menschensohn.      1928. 

232  L94a 


Tom  und  Sylvester,  ein  quai*tett. 

1928.  831   L94 


WUhelm  der  Zweite.     1926. 

943.08  L94w 


Luke,  William  H. 

Das  kleinod  der  Reformation.     1929. 

238  L95 
Mathab,  Ludwig. 

Die  ungleichen  zwillinge.     1927. 

833  M42 
Matee,  August  Liebmann. 

Geschichte     der     spanischen     malerel. 
1922.  q759.6  M4 


MOLO,  Walter,  ritter  von. 
Mensch  Luther.    1928. 


833  IV172 


MuHLESTEiN,  Hans. 

Die  kunst  der  Etrusker.     1929. 

709.45  M95 
MuRON,  Johannes. 

Die  spanische  insel.     v.  1.     1926. 

833  M97 
Napoleon.     Ltjdwig,  Emil. 

Napoleon.      1928.  B   N216lucl1 


Neumann,  Alfred. 
Konigsmaske.    cl928. 


Rebellen.     el927. 
Der  teufel.     1926. 


832  N49k 

833  N49r 
833  N49 


XoDEB,  Anton. 

Henker,  lieilige,  hetaren.     1928. 

833  N76 
Pfister,  Kurt. 

Cezanne.    1927.  q759.4  C4p 


PoLENZ,  Wilhelm  von. 
Wald. 


833  P76 


PoxTEX,  Josef. 

Die  studenten  von  Lyon.     1928. 

833  P81 
Reepex",  Hans. 

Kinder  der  steppe.      [1927]      833  R32 


Rem.vbque,  Erich  Maria. 

Im  westen   nichts  neues.   1929. 


REiiME,  Karl,  ed. 

Deutschland.      [1929] 


833   R38 


914.3  •R38 


Rexkee,  Gustav  Friedrich. 

Der  sterbende  hof.     1927.        833   R41s 

Renn,  Ludwig. 

Krieg.     cl929.  833   R414 

RiEMKASTEX,   Fclix. 

AUe  tage  gloria.     cl928.         833   R556 

RiXKEFEiL,  Rudolf. 

Schlierilei.     cl926.  q398  R5 

RosELiEB,  Hans. 

Der  barbar.     1927.  833  R81 

ROSEX^BEEG,    Jakob. 

Jacob  van  Ruisdael.     cl928. 


SCHAPEE,  Edzard  Hellmuth. 
Der  letzte  gast.     1927. 


vf759.9   R9 


833  S299 


SCHiCKELE,  Rene. 

Blick  auf  die  Vogesen.     cl927. 

833  S331b 

Schmidt,  Friedrich  Georg  Gottlob. 

Beriihmte      Deutsche      neuerer      zeit, 

adapted    from    the    best    authorities 

and  edited  with  a  vocabulary.  1929. 

(Borzoi  German  texts)  438  S35 

ScHMiDTBOXN,  Wilhelm  August. 

Mein  freund  Dei.     cl927.     833  S354m 

SCHXACK,  Friedrich. 

Das  leben   der  scbmetterlinge.     cl928. 

595.7  S35 
ScHXiTZLER,  Arthur. 

Therese,     chronik    eines    frauenlebens. 
1928.  833  S36t 


224 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Sedding,  Erwin. 
Jazzyn.     cl927. 


833  S44 


Storm,  Theodor. 

Immensee.  1901.  (Allyn  and  Ba- 
con's series  of  German  texts) 

438  S88 

Steatz,  Rudolf. 

Eliza.     cl928.  833  S91e 

Steobl,  Karl  Hans. 

Zwei  Saltzenbrod.     1928.        833  S919z 

Steomer     von     Reichenbacli,     Friedrich, 
freiherr. 
Was  wird?     1919.      (Deutsches  leben) 

943  S92 

SuDEEMANN,  Hermann. 

Der  hasenfellhandler.     1927. 

832  S94ha 

Purzelchen.      1929.  833  S94p 

SusKiND,  Wilhelm  Emmanuel. 

Tordis.     1927.  833  S96 

Sydow,  Eckart  von. 

Die  kunst  der  natur^'olker  und  der 
vorzeit.  1923.  ( Propylaen-kunst- 
geschichte,   1)  q571.7  S9 

Theiss,  Frank. 

Der  kampf  mit  dem  engel.     1928. 

833  T43l< 

TiMMERMANS,  Felix. 
Der  Pfarrer  vom  bluhenden  Weinberg. 
1927.       .  839.33  T58p 

Uhruh,  Fritz  von. 

Bonaparte.     1927.  832  U58a 

Vosz,  Adda  von. 

Einer  seele  not.     cl927.       '      833  V97 

Vring,  Georg  von  der. 

Soldat  Suhren.     1928.  833  V98 

Wat.deyer-Hartz,  Hugo  von. 

Alt- Jena.     cl926.  833  W163 

Wassermann,  Jakob. 

Der  fall  Maurizius.     1928.     833  W32f 

Lebensdienst.     cl928.       834  W32 


Weege,  Fritz. 

Der  tanz  in  der  antike.     1926. 

q793.1   W3 

Wehrlin,  Artur. 

Landratten  auf  see.     [1927]     833  W41 


Wehfel,  Franz  V. 

Der  arbituriententag.    1928. 

833  W48ab 
WiCKERT,  Ernest. 

Als  verlobte  empfehlen  sich  . .  .    cl902. 
(Heath's  modem  language  series) 

438  W63 
Zahn,  Ernst. 

Brettspiel  des  lebens.    1928.    833  Z19b 


-Der  Liberi.     [1927] 


833  Z19 


Das  zweite  leben.     [1918] 

833  Z19z 
ZiMMERMANN,  Waltber. 

Exlibris  (bucheignerzeichen)   deutscher 
apotheker.     1925.  097  Z76 


ZoEGE  von  ManteufEel,  Peter. 
Konige  der  scholle.     1926. 


833  Z85 


ZwEiG,  Arnold. 
Der  streit  um  den  sergeanten  Grischa. 
1929.  833  Z973 

ZwEiG,  Stefan. 

Drei  dichter  ihres  lebens.     1928.     (Die 
baumeister  der  welt)  928  Z97a 


Volpone.     1927. 


832  Z97v 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED  DURING 
JANUARY,  FEBRUARY  AND 
MARCH,  1930  t 

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CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


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1930.    iUus. 


1930. 


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I         Same,     no.     98.       Commercial 

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I     1930.     67  p. 

7 — 76092 


Banks,  Supeeintendent  of.  Bulletin, 
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Education  Depaetment.  Biennial 
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Bulletin    no.    B— 3.      Reference 


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Bulletin   no.    G^.      Handbook 


on  continuation  education.     1930.     56  p. 
California  schools,  vol.  1,  nos. 


1-3,  January-March,  1930. 

Finance  Department.  Report  of  the 
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JanuaiT  31,  1930.    1930.    79  p. 

Indxjsteial  Relations  Department. 
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Industrial     Accident     Commis- 


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Enforcement  Division.  Labor  Laws  of 
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Institutions  Deipaetment.  Bureau 
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(new  series).  The  visiting  child  guid- 
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226 


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Legislature.  The  Senate  of  the  state 
of  California  sitting  as  a  High  Court  of 
Impeachment  in  the  matter  of  the  im- 
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Cover  title :    Trial  of  the   impeach- 
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LiBEABT,  State.  News  Notes  of  Cali- 
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1930.     128  p. 

A  partial  bibliography  on  the 


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Storer.  Reprinted  from  News  Notes  of 
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Books  for  the  blind  department. 

News  Notes.  Reprinted  from  News 
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1930.     17  p.     32°. 

Natural  Resoueces  Depabtment. 
Fish  and  Game  Division.  California  fish 
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— Fish    bulletin    no.    20. 

The  commercial  fish  catch  of  California 
for  the  year  1928.  1930.  110  p.  map. 
62  figs,  in  text. 

Same.  no.  21.     Analysis  of  boat 

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nobilis)  at  San  Pedro,  California.  1930. 
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Mines    Division.     Bulletin    no. 


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1928.     1930.     maps.    215  p. 

Chapter      of      Report 


XXV  of  the  State  Mineralogist  covering 
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of  the  Division  of  Mines,  vol.  25,  no.  4, 
October,   1929.   1929.     Ulus.     maps. 

Summary  of  operations. 


California   oil  fields,   vol.   14,   nos.   7-10, 
January-May,  1929.     Ulus.     maps. 

Professional  and  Vocational 
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1930.    13  p. 

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engineering,  p.   7. 


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nos.  1-3,  January-March,  1930.  illus. 
maps. 

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Division.  Bulletin  no.  19.  Santa  Ana 
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of  the  Legislature,  chapter  476  of  the 
statutes  of  1925  and  chapter  809  of  the 
statutes  of  1927,  December  1,  1928,  by 
William  S.  Post.  1929.  357  p.  illus. 
maps. 

Maps  in  separate  envelope. 

Bulletin  no.  21.  Irri- 
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Water     Resources      Division. 

Bulletin  no.  22,  Vol.  2.  Drawings  accom- 
panying report  on  Salt  Water  Barrier 
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Joaquin  Rivers,  California,  by  Walker  R, 
Young.    1929.    131  p.    maps. 

Water  Commission  act 

governing  the  appropriation  of  water  in 
California ;  providing  a  procedure  for  the 
determination  of  existing  water  rights; 
providing  for  the  creation  of  water  dis- 
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1930.     39  p. 

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Uniform     classification     of 

accounts  for  class  A  automotive  trans- 
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Uniform     system    of    accounts 

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corporations.     1929.     135  p. 

Secretary  of  State.  Roster  of  state, 
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of  California,  also  federal  ofiicials  for 
California.  March  1,  1930.  1930.  179  p. 
illus. 

Teachers  College,  Chico.  Circular, 
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vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA    STATE   LIBRARY 


227 


United  Spanish  Wak  Veterans,  De- 
PAETMENT  OF  Califoknia.  Proceedings 
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Bulletin,      third      series,      vol. 

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Publications.     College  of  Agri- 


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Berkeley,  January,  1930.    59  p.    illus. 

Same,   no.  486.     Pul- 


lorum  disease  (bacillary  white  diarrhea) 
of  chickens,  by  J.  R.  Beach  and  S.  T. 
MUchael.  Berkeley,  January,  1930.  31  p. 
illus. 

Same,  no.  487.     Series 


on  California  crops  and  prices :  Aspara- 
gus, by  H.  R.  Wellman  and  E.  W.  Braun. 
Berkeley,  January,  1930.    41  p.    map. 

Same,  no.  488.     Series 


on  California  crops  and  prices :  Cherries, 
by  H.  R.  Wellman  and  E.  W.  Braun. 
Berkeley,  February,  1930.    38  p.  map. 

HUgardia,   vol.  4,   nos. 


11-13,  January-March,  1930. 


Agricultural     Sciences, 

vol.  6,  no.  1.  Chromosomes  and  phy- 
logeny  in  Crepis,  by  Lillian  Hollingshead 
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January  4,  1930.    p.  1-53,  24  figs,  in  text, 
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Same,    vol.    6,    no.    2. 


Cytological  investigations  of  hybrids  and 
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Unbalanced  somatic   chromosomal   varia- 
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Textile  periods  in  ancient  Peru,  by  LUa 
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March  6,   1930.     p.   2S-56,   plates  1-48, 
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Same,    vol.    28,    no.    3. 


The  ghost  dance  of  1870  in  south-central 
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Astronomy.  Lick  Ob- 
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p.  13.3-151.     4°. 

Same,   no.   419.     Ele- 


ments and  ephemeris  of  comet  d  1929 
(Wilk),  by  Ernest  Clare  Bower  and 
Fred  L.  Whipple.  Berkeley,  January  17, 
1930.     p.  152-153.     4°. 

Same,  no.  420.     Prelim- 


inary results  on  the  distances,  dimensions 
and  space  distribution  of  open  star  clus- 
ters, by  Robert  J.  Trumpler.  Berkeley, 
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Botany,  vol.  11,  no.  16. 

Inheritance  in  Nicotiana  tabacum.  IX. 
Mutations      following      treatment      with 


228 


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Classical  Philology,  vol. 


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Entomology,  vol.  5,  no. 


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uary 25,  1930.  p.  37-88,  plates  1-^,  16 
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Same,  vol.  5,  no.  5.     A 


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The  biology  of  certain  Coleoptera  asso- 
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Berkeley,  March,  1930.  p.  105-134.  6 
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Studies  of  the  anatomy  and  histology  of 
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(Linn.),  by  Stuart  L.  Allman.  Berkeley, 
April  3,  1930.  p.  135-164,  plates  5-9, 
9  figs,  in  text.  roy.  8°. 
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Geography,   vol.   3,   no. 

5.     Summer  sea  fogs  of  the  Central  Cali- 
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Berkeley,    February   17,    1930.      p.    291- 
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• Geological  sciences,  vol. 

19,   no.  2.     The  Jurassic  rocks  of  Ash- 
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Notes   on    the   later   geologic   history   of 
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Physiology,   vol.   7,  no. 


10.  Contributions  to  tropical  biochemis- 
try and  physiology.  II.  Supplementary 
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levels  of  reduced  cooling  power,  by  E.  S. 
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Same,    vol.    7,    no.    11. 


The  absorption  of  pituitrin  by  the  stomach, 
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Berkeley,    March   6,    1930.      p.    197-200. 

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of  oxygen  consumption  of  fishes,  by  Ancel 
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Methods     in     quantitative     research     on 
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1929,  to  September  30,  1929,  by  Perry 
Byerly  and  Robert  Dyk.  Berkeley, 
March  11,  1930.    roy.  8°. 

Vocational     Education 


division.  Division  bulletin  no.  25.  Voca- 
tional-guidance series,  no.  1.  Vocational 
interests  of  high-school  students,  by 
James  H.  Bedford.  Berkeley,  February, 
1930.  55  p.  7  figs,  in  text. 
Price  25  cents. 


Zoology,  vol.  32,  no.  4. 

Osteology  of  the  California  road-runner, 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


229 


recent  and  Pleistocene,  by  Leigh  Marian 
Larson.  Berkeley,  January  24,  1930. 
p.  409-42S,  3  figs,  in  text.     roy.  S°. 

Price  25  cents. 

Same,    vol.    33,    no.    9. 

The  morphology  and  binary  fission  of 
Baresia  higemina  of  Texas  cattle-fever,  by 
Emery  Westei'velt  Dennis.  Berkeley, 
Januai-y  14,  1930.  p.  179-192,  plates 
17-18.     roy.  8°. 

Price  25  cents. 

Same,   vol.   33,   no.   12. 

Studies  on  the  permeability  of  living  cells. 
XI.  The  penetration  of  thionine  into 
Valonia,  by  Matilda  Moldenhauer  Brooks. 
Berkeley,  March  31,  1930.  p.  287-290, 
1  fig.  in  text.  roy.  8°. 
Price  25  cents. 

Same,   vol.   33,   no.  13. 

A   new    species    of   Isopod    from    Potter 
Creek    Cave,    California,    by    James    O. 
Maloney.      Berkeley,    March,    1930.      p. 
291-295,  13  figs,  in  text.     roy.  8°. 
Price  25  cents. 

Same,  vol.  33,  no.   14. 


Chamber  of  Commerce.  South- 
ern California  business,  vol.  9,  nos.  1-2, 
January-February,  1930. 

Municipal    League.      Light   on 


your  city's  affairs.     Bulletin,  vol.  7,  nos. 
4-7,  December,  1929-April,  1930. 

Richmond.    Health   Department.    An- 
nual report,  1929. 


Monthly     report,     De- 
cember, 1929-February,  1930. 

Public  Library.     Bulletin,  vol. 


16,  nos.  7-9,  January-March,  1930. 

Sacramento.     Health  Department. 
Annual  report,  1929. 

Bulletin,  December, 


A  new   geophiloid   chUopod   from   Potter 
-Creek    Cave,    California,    by    Ralph    V. 
Chamberlin.     Berkeley,  March  31,  1930. 
■p.  297-300,  6  figs,  in  text.     roy.  8°. 
Price   25   cents. 

Same,   vol.   33,   no.   15. 


An  Acanthocephalan,  Corynosoma  stru- 
mosum  (Rudolphi),  from  the  California 
harbor  seal,  by  Gordon  H.  Ball.  Berke- 
ley, March  31,  1930.  p.  301-305,  8  figs, 
in  text.     roy.  8°. 

Price  25  cents. 

Whittiek  State  School.  The  journal 
of  juvenile  research,  vol.  14,  no.  1,  Jan- 
uary, 1930. 

Published  quarterly,  subscription 
price  $1.25  a  year.  Single  numbers 
40  cents. 

CALIFORNIA  CITY  PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED  DURING  JANUARY, 
FEBRUARY  AND  MARCH,  1930 

Berkeley.  Public  Library.  Bulletin, 
vol.  14,  nos.  1-3,  January-March,  1930. 

Long  Beach.  Public  Library.  About 
books,  vol.  6,  no.  1,  January,  1930. 

Los  Angeles.  Board  of  Education. 
Educational  research  bulletin,  vol.  9,  nos. 
5-6,  January-February,  1930. 

Board    of    Water    and    Power 

Commissioners.  Twenty-eighth  annual 
report.  1929. 


1929-February,  1930. 

San  Diego.  Health  Department. 
Monthly  report,  December,  1929-Febru- 
ary, 1930. 

Chamber    of    Commerce.      San 


Diego  Magazine,  vol.  6,  nos.  1-2,  January- 
February,  1930. 

San  Francisco.  Board  of  Super- 
visors. Journal  of  proceedings,  vol.  24, 
nos.  49-52,  December,  1929;  vol.  25,  nos. 
1-6,  January-February,  1930. 

Auditor.       Annual     report     of 


financial    transactions    of    the    city  and 

county    of    San    Francisco,    fiscal  year 
ended  June  30,  1929. 

Chamber    of    Commerce.  San 


Francisco   business,    vol.   20,    nos.    1-13, 
January-March,  1930. 

— Bureau  of  Governmental  Re- 
search. The  City,  vol.  10,  no.  1,  Febru- 
ary, 1930. 

BOOKS  FOR  THE  BLIND  ADDED 
DURING  JANUARY,  FEBRUARY 
AND  MARCH,  1930 

In  European  Braille 

MAGAZINES 

Current  numbers  of  the  following: 
Braille  courier. 
Braille  mail. 
Braille  musical  magazine. 


230 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES  [April,  1930 


Braille  packet. 

Channels  of  blessing. 

Hampstead. 

HoEA  jucunda. 

Inteenational  Braille  magazine. 

LiGHTBEINGEE, 

Literary  journal. 

Progress. 

Tribune. 

MUSIC 

Braille  musical  magazine. 

In   Moon  Type 

BOOKS 

Haedy,  Thomas.  The  Trumpet  Major, 
John  Loveday,  a  soldier  in  the  war 
with  Buonaparte  and  Robert  his 
brother,  first  mate  in  the  merchant 
service,  a  tale.     8  vols. 

A  delightful  tale  of  English  country 
life  and  the  love  affairs  of  a  soldier 
in  the  war  with  Bonaparte. 

Jenkins,  Herbert  Geoege.  Bindle ;  some 

chapters  in  the  life  of  Joseph  Bindle. 

5  vols. 
Bindle    is    the    greatest   cockney    in 

fiction    since    the    Pickwick    Papers. 

He  is  a  furniture  remover !     Cockney 

dialect. 
Lenanton,  O.     The  Holiday.     6  vols. 

A   charming   story,    humorous,    and 

sentimental    in    a   light    and    cheerful 

way. 

MAGAZINES 

Current  numbers  of  the  following : 
Dawn. 

LuTHEEAN  herald  for  blind. 
Making  the  most  of  life. 
Moon  magazine. 
The  Moon,  weekly  newspaper. 
In  New  York  Point 
magazines 

Current  nvimbers  of  the  following : 
Christian  record. 
Gospel  trumpet. 
Matilda  Ziegler  magazine. 
Sunday  school  monthly. 

In  Revised  Braille 

Books  marked  c  are  printed  with  contractions 
BOOKS 

Alden,  Raymond  MacDonald.    Bag  of 

smiles. 
Full  spelling. 


cBalmer,  Edwin,  &  McHarg,  William 
Briggs.     Keys. 
A  good  detective  story. 
Hand  copied.     Gift  of  Mrs  Kate  H. 
Chalmers. 

*cBanning,  Margaeet  Culkin.    In  line 

for  something. 

Includes  The  nurse,   by   Ben  Ames 
Williams. 


cBaerie,    Sir   James    Matthew. 
Pan  and  Wendy.     3  vols. 


Peter 


cBarton,    Bruce.      What    can    a    man 
believe?     2  vols. 
Interpoint.      Gift    of    Mrs    Andrew 

Carnegie. 

cBennett,  Charles  E.  A  new  Latin 
composition.     3  vols. 

*cBlake,  Mrs  Mary  Elizabeth 
(McGbath),  &  Sullivan,  Mabgaeet 
Feances  (  Buchanan  ) .  Mexico : 
picturesque,  political,  progressive. 
4  vols. 

cBeereton,  Mrs  M.  L.  The  tablature  of 
the  Pacific 

An  original  sketch  of  early  days — 
description  of  early  California's 
development,  railroad  building,  min- 
ing,   etc. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  author, 
Mrs  M.  L.  Brereton. 

cBeown,  Lela  T.  Insurance  underwrit- 
ing, a  study  of  the  business  in  its 
relation  to  blind  agents. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Kate  M.  Foley. 
Duplicate  copy. 

cBybne,     Donn.       The     wind     bloweth. 

7  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Los  Angeles 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cCaehaet,  Geoege  S.,  &  McGhee, 
Paul  A.  Through  magic  easements. 
4  vols. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Chi  Omega 
Sorority  Alumnae,  Cleveland  Chapter. 

*cCather,    Willa   Sibert.     My   mortal 
enemy.     2  vols. 
Duplicate  copy. 

cClemens,  Cyril.  Mark  Twain  anec- 
dotes, edited  by  Cyril  Clemens, 
together  with  A  brief  sketch  of 
Mark  Twain's  life  given  for  the  Ina 
Coolbrith  Circle  in  San  Francisco, 
by  Cyril  Clemens. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Mrs  Kate  H. 
Chalmers. 


*Hand   copied.      Gift   of    San   Francisco 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 


vol.  25,  no.  2] 


CALIFORNIA   STATE   LIBRARY 


231 


cClemens,  Samuel  Langhobne  ("Mark 
Twain,"     pseud.).      Life     on     the 
Mississippi.     4  vols. 
Interpoint. 

cCbabbe,  M.  B.  Alphabetical  speUer 
showing  syllabication  and  accent. 

Duplicate  copy.     Gift  of  Mrs  H.  W. 
Bruning. 

cCkaig.  Alice  Evelyn.  The  speech  arts, 
a  text-book  of  oral  English.     5  vols. 

Interpoint. 

*cDaeeow,  Floyd  Laveen.    The  story  of 

iron  and  steel, 
j  Contains   also   Providing  the  world 

i  with    rubber,    by    Ployd    L.    Darrow; 

Why  the  sea  is  salt,  by  Donald  Kitely 

Tressler. 

oDeeping,  Wabwick.  Old  Pybus.  11 
vols. 

Hand  copied.     Gift  of  Los  Angeles 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

I  *cDetzee.  Kabl  W.     True  tales  of  the 
I  D.   C.   T.,    Selections  from.     2   vols. 

'■x-Dobie,  C  II  a  e  l  e  s  Caldwell.  The 
arrested  moment  and  other  stories. 
6  vols. 

*Febeman,  Mrs  Maby  Eleanoe  (Wil- 
KiNs).  A  conquest  of  humility  and 
The  gold. 

cGalsworthy,  John.     The  silver  spoon 

and  Passers  by.    3  vols. 

Interpoint.      Gift   of   Triad    Club   of 
New  York  City. 

'xGeeey,  M7-S  Margarita  Spalding. 
The  toy  shop. 

cGeey,    Zane. 
vols. 


The   young    pitcher.      2 


*cJoHNSON,  Martin  Elmeb.  Lion; 
African  adventure  with  the  king  of 
beasts.     5  vols. 

c  Johnston,  Mrs  Annie  (Fellows). 
In  the  desert  of  waiting,  the  legend 
of  Camelback  Mountain. 

Hand      copied.        Duplicate      copy. 
Gift  of  J.   B.  Walker. 

*eKELLEE,  Helen.  I  am  blind — yet  I 
see.  I  am  deaf — yet  I  hear,  and 
Mark  Twain  as  revealed  by  himself 
to  Helen  Keller. 

*cKennedt,  Maegabet.  The  constant 
nymph.     8  vols. 

cKrpLiNG,  RuDYABD.  Captains  coura- 
geous.   3  vols. 

cLaidlaw,  R.  a.     The  reason  why. 

Interpoint.      Duplicate    copy.      Gift 
of  Oliver  R.  Heinze. 

*cLardneb,     Ring    W.       Absent-minded 


cGuEST,  Edgae  Allen.    More  newspaper 

verse. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland. 

*cHallibuetox,  Richabd.  The  S.  S. 
Richard  Halliburton. 

cHeindel,  Max.  The  Rosicrucian  mys- 
teries, an  elementary  exposition  of 
their  secret  teachings.     2  vols. 

Hand   copied.      Gift   of  Rosicrucian 
Fellowship,  Oceanside,  Calif. 

cIrwin,  Wallace.     Lemon  verbena. 

Includes    The    stranger,    by    Frank 
Arthur  Swinnerton. 
Two  detective  stories. 
Hand  copied.     Gift  of  Mrs  Kate  H. 
Chalmers. 

"  Hand   copied.      Gift   of   San   Francisco         *  Hand   copied.      Gift   of   San  Francisco 
i^napter,    American    Red    Cross.  Chapter,    American    Red    Cross. 


Includes  "Coolidge,"  episodes  by 
Dwight  W.  Morrow,  written  and  pro- 
duced by  Will  Rogers. 

cMabie,  Louise  Kennedy.     Hearts  and 

flowers. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  San  Joaquin 
County  Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cMajoe,  Charles.  When  knighthood 
was  in  flower ;  or,  The  love  story  of 
Charles  Brandon  and  Mary  Tudor, 
the  king's  sister,  and  happening  in 
the  reign  of  his  august  majesty.  4 
vols. 

*cMabra,  W.  J.  Principles  of  business 
CO  rresponden  ce. 

C^IlLLIKAN,    ROBEBT   AnDEEWS,    d    GALB, 

Henby   Goedon.     a  first   course  in 
physics.     7  vols. 

cMoBRis,  Joseph,  d  Adams,  St.  Claie. 
The  light  of  the  world,  Selections 
from.     2  vols. 

Hand  copied  by  and  gift  of  Women 
Volunteers  of  Oakland. 

cNeidig,  William  Jonathan.     Greased 

pig. 

A  clever  detective  story. 
Hand  copied.     Gift  of  Mrs  Kate  H. 
Chalmers. 

*cNbwman,  Rahhi  Louis  Isbael.  The 
art  of  friendship  and  The  true  way 
to  happiness. 


232 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFOENIA  LIBEARIBS  [April,  1930 


tion. 


"Woodrow  Wilson,  an  appreda- 


cRemaeque,  Ebich  Mama.  All  quiet  on 
the  western  front.     3  vols. 

cRiGGS,  Mrs  Kate  Douglas  (Smith) 
WiGGiN.  Rebecca  of  Sunnybrook 
Farm.     4  vols. 

cShtxbert,  Ethel.  Stories  of  the  operas. 
4  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  San  Joaquin 
County  Cliapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

cSkebet,  Fbedekick.  Touched  in  passing. 

Includes  The  song  is  ended,  by 
Frank  R.  Addams. 

Two  unusual  life  stories. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Mrs  Kate  H. 
Chalmers. 

cSmith,  Alfred  Emanuel.  Up  to  now, 
an  autobiography.     3  vols. 

Interpoint.  Gift  of  Alfred  E. 
Smith,  in  memory  of  his  mother. 

*cSteele,  Whbue  Daniel.    Quicksilver, 

a  story. 
cStevenson,   Robebt  Louis.     A  child's 

garden  of  verses. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Los  Angeles 
Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

*cThompson,  Sylvia.  The  hounds  of 
spring.     9  vols. 

*eVANDEBCOOK,      JOHN      WOMACK.        The 

no-good   coaster. 

Includes  The  thinker,  by  Clarence 
Budington  Kelland. 

cVan  Dtke,  HeJnry.    The  mansion. 

Hand  copied.  Duplicate  copy.  Gift 
of  Mrs  J.  E.  O.  Munsell. 

cWaed,  Abthue  Saesfield  ("Sax 
RoHMEB,"  pseud.).  The  yellow 
claw.     8  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  Santa  Bar- 
bara  Chapter,    American    Red    Cross. 

cWiDDEMEE,  Mabgaeet.  The  rose- 
garden  husband.     3  vols. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  San  Joaquin 
County  Chapter,  American  Red  Cross. 

*cWiLDEB,  Thobnton.  The  bridge  of 
San  Luis  Rey.    3  vols. 

cWlle,  Feedeeio  William.  EmUe  Ber- 
liner, maker  of  the  microphone.  2 
vols. 

Gift  of  Mrs  Emile  Berliner. 

cWiLEY,  Hugh.    Black  sand. 

Hand  copied.  Gift  of  San  Joaquin 
County  Chapter,  A_merican  Red  Cross. 

*  Hand   copied.      Gift   of  San   Francisco 
Chapter,    American    Red    Cross. 

76092      5-30      1400  C 


cWistee,  Owen.  Padre  Ignacio,  or.  The 
song  of  temptation. 

Hand  copied.     Gift  of  Mrs  J.  E.  O. 

Munsell. 

*cZangwill,  Israel.  We  modems,  a 
post-war  comedy  in  three  movements 
(Allegro,  andante,  adagio).     4  vols. 

magazines 
Current  numbers  of  the  following : 
cAmeeican  review  for  the  blind. 
cThe  Beacon. 
cThe  Beaille  mirror. 
cBeaille  star  theosophist. 
cCatholic  review. 
cChbistian  record. 
cChristian  science  quarterly. 
cChubch  herald  for  the  blind. 
cGosPEL  trumpet. 
cIlluminatob. 
cThb  Lamp. 
cLuTHEEAN  messenger  for  the  blind. 

CLUX  VERA. 

cMatilda  Ziegler  magazine. 

Messengee  to  the  sightless. 

cMusiCAL  review. 

cReadee's  digest. 

Gives  resumes  of  interesting  articles 
from  various  magazines. 

cSeARC  HEIGHT. 

cSuNDAY  school  monthly. 
cWeebxy  news. 
cWee:kly  review. 

MUSIC 

cMusiCAL  review. 

In  Ink  Print 

MAGAZINES 
Current  numbers  of  the  following: 
The  Beacon. 
Outlook  for  the  blind. 
St.  Dunstan's  review. 


*  Hand   copied.      Gift   of  San   Francisco 
Chapter,    American    Red    Cross. 


Vol.  25,  No.  3  JULY  1930 


News  Notes 


OF 


California  Libraries 


IN    THIS    NUMBER-SOME   OF  THE    ITEMS   OF   INTEREST 

CUSTODIANS  MEETINGS— ALAMEDA,  SACRAMENTO,  TULARE  COUN- 
TIES. 

DISTRICT    INSTITUTES    FOR    CUSTODIANS— FRESNO    COUNTY. 

PASSING    OF    OAKLAND'S    LIBRARIAN    EMERITUS,   CHAS.   S.    GREENE. 

BOND    ISSUE    PASSED— BURLINGAME. 

NEW  BUILDINGS  OPENED— MIDDLETOWN,  ARCADIA,  PALOS  VERDES, 
MEMORIAL  AND  JOHN  MUIR  BRANCHES  OF  LOS  ANGELES, 
REDONDO    BEACH,   OAK   PARK   BRANCH   OF   SACRAMENTO. 

OTHER  BUILDING  ACTIVITIES— MONTEBELLO  BRANCH  OF  LOS 
ANGELES  COUNTY;  CLAREMONT,  SCRIPPS  COLLEGE;  A.  K. 
SMILEY    LIBRARY,    REDLANDS. 

FOR  SPECIAL  ARTICLES,  SEE  CONTENTS. 


California  State  Libra:ry 


CALIFORNIA  STATE  PRINTING  OFFICE 
SACRAMENTO,   1930 


7S215 


CONTENTS 

A.  L.  A.  GOES  WEST -__ 

SCHOOL  LIBRARY  SECTION  OF  A.  L.  A.  CONFERENCE 9i 

COUNTY  LIBRARY  SECTION  OF  A.  L.  A 

SPECIAL  LIBRARIES  ASSOCIATION 2d 

CALIFORNIA   LIBRARY   ASSOCIATION   MEETING 2^ 

MAP  OF  CALIFORNIA  SHOWING  COUNTIES 

LIST  OF  COUNTIES  HAVING  COUNTY  FREE  LIBRARIES 

LIST  OF  LARGER  PUBI>IC  LIBRARIES 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARIES— NEWS  ITEMS 

DIRECTORY    FOR    LIBRARY    SUPPLIES    AND    OTHER    ITEMS    OF 

GENERAL    INTEREST 27 

CALIFORNIA  LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION 21 

CALIFORNIA  COUNTY,  LIBRARIANS 

LIBRARY  CLUBS,  ETC 2S 

BOARD  OF  LIBRARY  EXAMINERS 2J: 

CALIFORNIA  STATE  LIBRARY 2S 

Staff,   Etc 

Departmexts 28 

Recent  Accessions   2S 

California   State   Publications   Received   During   April,    May  and 

June,  1930 33 

California    City   Publications    Received    During    April,    Mat    and 
June,  1930 

Books  for  the  Blind  Added  During  April,  May  and  June,  1930 


Issued  quarterly  in  the  interest  of  the  libraries  of  the  State  by  the  CalifornuiI 
State  Library. 

All    communications    should    be    addressed    to    the    California    State    Librai 
Sacramento,  California. 

Note. — Standing  matter  is  set  solid  and  new  matter  leaded. 

Entered  as  second-class  matter  December,  1913,  at  the  post  oflfice  at  Sacrament 
California,  under  the  Act  of  August  24,  1912. 

Acceptance  for  mailing  at  the  special  rate  of  postage  provided  for  in  Sectioi 
1103,  Act  of  October  3,  1917,  authorized  August  27,  1918. 


A.  L.  A.  GOES  WEST 

By  Milton  J.  Ferguson,  Librarian,  California  State  Library- 


How  can  one  describe  a  thing  which  be- 
gins holding  meetings  at  the  Grand  Can- 
yon in  Arizona  and,  like  an  invading 
army,  infiltrates  into  Los  Angeles,  itself 
so  widespread  that  the  census  taker  needs 
the  training  of  an  Admiral  Byrd  to  find 
his  way  home  again?  To  be  sure  the 
A.  L.  A.  did  hold  four  general  sessions 
in  the  Sala  de  Oro  of  the  Biltmore  Hotel, 
attempts,  as  it  were,  of  the  converted  to 
light  or  x'elight  their  torches  at  a  sort 
of  Sister  McPhei'son  altar;  then  to  go 
out  into  the  dark  spots  of  the  city  of  the 
Angels  and  regloiify  the  whole  place.  Sec- 
tions, affiliated  organizations  and  other 
groups  were  as  numerous  and  as  popu- 
lous as  the  bevies  of  long-winded  argufiers 
who  make  progress  through  Pershing 
Square  as  erratic  as  the  charted  course 
of  the  man  who  didn't  "go  home  'til  morn- 
ing." Argus  with  his  hundred  eyes  might 
have  served  as  a  reporter  of  the  show, 
provided  he  might  have  found  the  feet  of 
a  centipede,  with  corresponding  hands, 
and  the  ability  to  send  himself  out  in  fifty 
directions  at  once.  No,  the  A.  L.  A.  is 
no  longer  reportable,  if  it  ever  was :  we 
ought  to  come  Hollywood  on  it — grind  out 
thousands  of  feet  of  film,  and  cut  and  fit 
to  proper  length  and  audience.  What  I 
know  about  it  was  largely  told  me  by 
friends  in  a  hurry  to  get  some  place  else. 

It  is  difficult  to  say  what  actually  hap- 
pened in  Arizona;  but  the  papers  gave 
rather  full  and  favorable  reports.  In 
this  instance  no  doubt  our  national  body, 
like  Congress,  spoke  in  the  hope  that  its 
words  would  fall  on  fertile  ground  among 
the  folks  out  in  the  country.  I  solemnly 
declare  that  the  comparison  should  not 
ibe  carried  beyond  the  single  instance 
stated  above.  We  do  know  that  in  Los 
Angeles  the  wheels  began  to  turn  on 
schedule  time,  before  an  audience  which 
fiUed  the  great  HaU  of  Gold.  The  very 
first  assault  upon  the  affections — and 
credulity — of  the  conventioners  was  made 
by  the  President  of  the  Los  Angeles 
Board  of  Library  Commissioners  whose 
enthusiastic  welcome  to  the  hospitality, 
the  free  rides,  the  outdoor  stands  and  the 
(libraries  of  southern  California  could  not 
possibly  be  compressed  into  the  limits  of 
78215 


an  ordinary  speech  delivering  the  keys  of 
the  city.  It  was  not  an  ordinary  speech : 
it  was  full  of  statistics,  facts,  fancies, 
oratory,  enthusiasm,  chamber  of  commerce 
and  good  will.  And  only  Orra  E.  Mon- 
nette  could  make  it.  Shall  we  mention 
President  Keogh's  address?  No,  I  think 
it  better  not  to  try  to  set  down  its  strong 
features,  to  analyze  its  subtle  humor :  if 
you  did  not  hear  it,  you  will  want  to  read 
it ;  if  you  did  hear  it,  you  will  read  it. 

The  exhibitors  this  year  had  the  advan- 
tage of  position :  there  they  were  on  the 
several  landings  and  levels  of  the  endless 
stairway  leading  to  the  assembly  hall. 
Had  they  possessed  any  of  the  qualities 
of  the  second-hand  clothing  man  about 
whom  we  used  to  sing  in  those  good  old 
college  days,  nobody  would  have  been  able 
to  run  the  gauntlet.  There  is  no  need, 
among  librarians  I  hope,  for  any  pub- 
lisher to  have  to  cry  his  wares ;  so  it 
was  easy  to  stop  for  a  word  with  those 
friendly  fellows  who  honor  the  name 
"book  man,"  and  hard  to  keep  from  read- 
ing the  things  they  so  temptingly  dis- 
played— books  are,  I  believe,  made  to 
read.  But  there  are  drawbacks  about  a 
meeting  place  in  the  depths  of  the  earth 
when  elevators  are  not  in  use.  It  was 
well,  therefore,  that  the  exhibits,  row  on 
row,  made  one  forget  the  ups  and  downs 
of  the  day. 

Los  Angeles  has  a  new  central  library 
building  on  a  hiU.  It  is  true  that  the  hill 
is  not  much  in  evidence ;  perhaps  it  is 
more  exact  to  say  that  the  structure 
would  be  standing  on  a  hill  if  the  hill  had 
not  been  removed.  The  structure,  how- 
ever, is  the  thing;  it  is  modern  in  ar- 
rangement and  striking  in  appearance. 
Its  exact  style  may  be  in  question ;  for  I 
have  heard  it  designated  Spanish,  Egyp- 
tian and  Aztec.  Probably  Angelan  wiU 
best  describe  its  lines.  That  controversy 
need  not  worry  one  over  long ;  for  its 
uses  are  excellent  and  its  tenants  are  hos- 
pitable beyond  cavil.  Thither,  past  ex- 
hibits and  up  the  hill,  went  the  gather- 
ing of  the  first  night  for  the  annual  recep- 
tion without  which  no  A.  L.  A.  Confer- 
ence could  properly  progress.  The  halls 
rang    with    music    to    which    the    crowd 


234 


NEWS   NOTES   OP    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [Julj,    1930 


danced.  And  strange  as  it  may  seem, 
the  roster  scanned,  men  mysteriously 
arose  for  partners  to  the  femininity  of  the 
library  world.  In  Los  Angeles  not  all 
the  magic  is  confined  to  the  films  of 
Hollywood. 

Those  who  did  not  know  Los  Angeles 
were  perhaps  surprised  at  the  ease  with 
which  they  might  be  taken  for  a  ride. 
The  difference  here,  fortunately,  was  that 
contrary  to  the  rules  of  the  racketeers  the 
passengers  were  assured  a  pleasant  trip 
and  a  safe  return.  Our  southern  metrop- 
olis has  risen  in  the  world  because  of  its 
readiness  to  take  visitors  places.  When 
the  A.  L.  A.  came  the  practice  was  not 
amended.  The  Huntington  Library  with 
its  Gutenberg  Bibles  and  its  Blue  Boys 
attracted  a  daily  delegation  of  hand 
picked  librarians  with  credentials  prop- 
erly viseed.  The  Los  Angeles  County  Li- 
brary provided  four  long  distance  trips 
on  which  the  extent  of  the  field  and  the 
diversity  of  the  service  were  clearly 
shown.  As  this  feature  of  the  work  in 
California  was  presumably  one  of  the 
arguments  for  holding  the  conference  in 
Los  Angeles  it  was  a  happy  arrangement 
to  take  a  large  part  of  the  delegation  into 
the  field.  Talks  and  paper  demonstra- 
tions can  never  so  convincingly  tell  the 
story. 

When  the  traveler  goes  to  Oklahoma 
these  days  the  native  no  longer  suggests 
an  Indian  dance  by  way  of  amusement. 
Now  he  takes  you  to  see  an  oil  well  come 
in.  California  has  moved  beyond  that 
crass  materialistic  stage ;  and  while  out 
here  you  may  still  "invest"  in  land,  or- 
ange groves,  oil  wells  and  gold  mines,  the 
proper  entertainment. on  this  occasion  was 
to  bring  in  a  libraiy.  One  of  Miss  Vogle- 
son's  tours  was  thus  arranged.  The  Palos 
Verdes  branch  of  the  county  system  is 
like  the  great  estate  of  which  presumably 
it  is  the  intellectual  fortress :  it  is  artis- 
tic, unusual,  almost  unique.  The  whole 
project  is  unlike  so  much  of  the  develop- 
ment which  in  mushroom  fashion  encum- 
bers the  earth  of  a  rapidly  growing  area. 
It  has  an  old  world  air  of  substantiality, 
together  with  the  spaciousness  of  the  new. 
The  library  building  which  came  to  com- 
pletion thus  timely  was  given  the  blessing 
of  President  Keogh,  in  the  midst  of  a  wide 
circle  of  friends  who  added  their  good 
wishes. 


Another  event,  which  was  new  but 
which  was  not  down  on  the  program,  de- 
veloped because  the  representative  of  the 
ilacmillan  Company  was  alert,  and  like 
any  good  American  business  man  was  able 
to  act  promptly.  Miss  Rachel  Field, 
author  of  "Hitty :  her  first  hundred 
years,"'  had  been  selected  to  receive  the 
Newbei-y  medal  in  recognition  of  that 
delightful  doll  autobiography.  She  came 
west  by  air,  and  was  met  by  two  welcom- 
ing planes  as  she  neared  the  western  ter- 
minus. Together  the  three  machines 
hummed  homeward,  like  three  old  friends 
locking  arms  and  chatting,  as  they  walked, 
about  this  thing  and  that.  The  honor 
was  due  this  very  modest  and  charming 
author — that  is  not  the  most  remarkable 
feature  of  the  event.  Her  powers  of  en- 
durance almost  equal  those  of  mountain- 
ash  Hitty  herself.  When  a  pack  of  Los 
Angeles  photographers  gets  upon  a  sub-, 
ject's  trail  their  staying  qualities  pass  all 
belief.  When  the  writer  of  these  lines, 
an  incidental  figure  in  the  day's  doings, 
lost  consciousness  Miss  Field  was  still 
smiling  and  posing  for  just  one  more  shot. 
I  am  wondering  what  Hitty  had  to  say 
to  her  amanuensis  when  they  gained  the 
refuge  of  their  rooms. 

It  is  always  easier,  in  conventions  of 
all  kinds,  to  secure  local  speakers  than 
to  import  talent  from  distant  places.  Con- 
sequently, one  need  express  no  surprise,  in 
looking  over  the  program,  to  find  Cali- 
fornia names  showing  up  regularly.  This 
thing  we  have  been  so  proud  of,  the  so- 
called  California  system,  had  its  day  in 
court.  A  whole  general  session  permitted 
five  speakers  twenty  minutes  each  to  ex- 
pound the  virtues  of  all  the  major 
branches  of  the  service.  From  county  li- 
braries, which  have  in  recent  years  so 
clearly  demonstrated  their  applicability 
to  western  conditions,  to  public,  college, 
school  and  finally  to  that  highly  special- 
ized form  of  the  craft,  the  millionaires  col- 
lection, the  tale  of  the  libraries  was  set 
forth.  It  was  a  chance  to  ride  our  state 
hobby  that  was  appreciated  by  those  of 
us  who  believe  that  California  does,  in 
her  own  modest  way,  have  something  to 
contribute  to  the  reading  problem  of 
Amei-ica. 

Librarians  are,  of  course,  not  orators. 
That  quiet,  subdued  tone  so  assiduously 
cultivated  in  our  reading  rooms  has  diffi- 
culty, when  occasion  arises,  in  lifting  its. 


vol.  25,  no.  3] 


A.   L.   A.   GOES  WEST 


235 


volume  to  declamatory  levels.  Neverthe- 
less, librarians  do  value  a  good  speech 
when  they  hear  it.  The  Los  Angeles 
meeting  probably  presented  some  of  the 
best  oratory,  in  the  better  sense  of  that 
abused  tenn,  than  the  A.  L.  A.  has  en- 
joyed in  many  a  year.  Nor  was  all  of  it 
reserved  for  the  fireworks  of  general 
sessions,  though  that  is  the  meeting  at 
which  "speeches"  may  usually  be  expected. 
Californians  were  proud  of  the  clear-cut 
thinking  and  delivery  of  Dr  Robert  G. 
Sproul,  who  when  he  spoke  was  about  to 
step  into  the  responsible  position  of  presi- 
dent of  the  University  of  California.  The 
western  folk  were  delighted  again  to  hear 
their  old  and  fascinating  friend,  Pro- 
fessor B.  H.  Lehman  of  the  same  insti- 
tution ;  and  happy  to  have  him  discourse 
on  readers  and  books  before  the  national 
body.  And  any  and  all  "who  care  for 
sound  logic,  excellent  language  and  deli- 
cate humor  must  have  felt  happy  at  being 
present  when  on  the  last  day  at  the  final 
session  Everett  Dean  Martin  brought  the 
conference  to  a  climactic  close  in  an  ad- 
dress spirited  and  fine.  It  was,  too,  a 
demonstration  of  a  successful  method  of 
being  a  convention  to  the  last  tap  of  the 
gavel  with  a  first  day  audience  filling 
I  the  chairs.  These  talks  alone  were  worth 
the  trip ;  and  there  were  many  others 
worthy  the  closest  attention  of  any  li- 
brarian interested  in  his  job. 

However    speeches   and    even   meetings 
are  not  the  only  valuable  considerations  of 


a  conference  whether  of  librarians,  bank- 
ers or  plumbers.  Acquaintance  which  re- 
sults from  these  gatherings,  now  east  now 
west,  personal  contact,  exchange  of  ideas, 
realization  that  the  other  fellow  is  hu- 
man, fairly  sane  and  reasonably  depend- 
able, the  knowledge  that  however  widely 
dispersed  we  may  be  over  a  great  conti- 
nent we  are  all  definitely  interested  in 
many  of  the  same  things — these  are  a  few 
of  the  more  obvious  reasons  why  Ameri- 
cans hold  conventions.  A  great  deal  of 
money  is  spent  in  transportation,  hotels, 
meals,  and  a  little  in  tips ;  but  the  expen- 
diture is  justified  if  we  arrive  at  some 
understanding  of  our  fellowman,  and  he 
of  us.  Were  it  othei-Tvise,  were  it  neces- 
sary for  us  to  attend  all  the  meetings  it 
would  be  a  maddening  thing  to  be  a  dele- 
gate to  a  modem  meeting  with  all  its 
ramifications,  divisions  and  sections.  For 
example,  at  Los  Angeles,  the  program 
filled  39  pages  of  small  print ;  its  speakers 
numbered  certainly  200;  and  sometimes 
a  dozen  sections  were  going  full  steam 
ahead  on  parallel  tracks. 

The  A.  L.  A.  is  a  greater  force  than 
most  of  us  realize.  When  2100  of  its 
members  can  gather  from  all  parts  of 
the  nation  their  presence  is  a  challenge 
to  consider  seriously  the  service  they  are 
capable  of  giving,  and  is  a  promise  of 
better  things  to  come.  California  hopes 
that  fifteen  years  may  not  go  by  before 
it  is  again  honored  by  being  the  host  to 
this  group  of  optimistic  workers. 


236 


NEWS   NOTES   OF    CALIFORNIA   LIBRARIES  [July,    1930 


THE  SCHOOL  LIBRARY  SECTION  OF  THE  AMERICAN 
LIBRARY  ASSOCIATION  CONFERENCE  AT  LOS 
ANGELES,  JUNE  23-28 

By  Maegaret  GirdneR;,  Librarian,  Galileo  High   School,   San  Francisco 


The  progressive  attitude  of  the  Ameri- 
can Library  Association  toward  school 
libraries  has  been  shown  many  times  in 
the  past  by  the  frequency  with  which  the 
best  minds  of  this  section  have  been 
called  into  headquarters  for  consultation 
and  by  the  way  in  which  professional  con- 
tributions have  been  solicited.  The  year- 
books and  textbooks  published  by  the 
American  Library  Association  dealing 
with  the  problems  of  school  librarianship, 
have  been  of  untold  value.  But  a  meeting 
such  as  this  recent  conference  has  an 
even  greater  opportunity  for  influence,  as 
through  its  generous  program  of  commit- 
tee meetings,  workers  in  the  field  are 
enabled  to  meet  the  leaders  and  discuss  in 
small  groups  the  problems  which  face  us 
all.  There  can  be  no  doubt  but  that 
the  stimulating  results  of  this  conference 
will  be  apparent  in  California  for  many 
years — our  thinking  can  not  but  be  deeply 
affected. 

Nevertheless,  California  school  librari- 
ans can  take  encouragement  from  the  ap- 
proval expressed  by  the  section  leaders 
and  visiting  school  librarians.  We  have 
learned  that  acceptance  of  the  library's 
importance  in  our  educational  system  is 
as  general  in  California  as  in  many 
eastern  states,  which  we  may.  have  con- 
sidered as  more  progressive.  Through 
this  opportunity  to  compare  our  strength 
with  that  of  other  states  we  find  that  we 
measure  up  well  in  both  organization  and 
numerical  strength. 

The  program  of  the  conference  is  in 
print  and  it  will  suffice  to  point  out  the 
many  opportunities  offered  round  table 
discussion  of  the  various  special  pro- 
fessional problems.  There  was  a  ten- 
dency to  organize  into  such  groups  on  the 
basis  of  age  differences  of  children  rather 
than  on  the  basis  of  differences  in  or- 
ganization. The  program  resolved  itself 
into  divisions  of  children's  departments 
of  the  public  library  and  elementary 
school  groups,  into  secondary  schools  and 
reading  for  young  people  groups  and  into 


junior  college  and  teacher  college  groups. 
We  have  discovered,  it  seems,  that  we 
are  no  longer  so  concerned  as  to  whether 
the  work  is  being  done  by  school  library 
or  public  library.  We  are  more  con- 
cerned with  the  problems  of  what  youth 
is  reading  for  fun,  book  selection,  reading 
guidance,  and  the  means  of  attracting 
suitable  recruits  to  this  specialized  field 
of  library  work.  We  feel  deeply  indebted 
to  the  American  Library  Association  for 
providing  an  opportunity  for  public  li- 
brai-ians  and  school  librarians  to  meet 
together  and  to  discuss  problems  of  for- 
mulating standards  of  technique  and  prac- 
tice suitable  to  both. 

It  is  interesting  to  note  that  there  were 
two  new  round  tables  of  direct  import- 
ance to  our  section — the  round  table  on 
the  junior  college  which  contributed  find- 
ings so  definite  and  worth-while  that  they 
will  undoubtedly  be  published  in  their 
entirety,  and  a  round  table  in  young 
people's  reading  which  definitely  directed 
thought  toward  this  important  period  not 
adequately  filled  by  either  the  children's 
work  or  the  adult  branch  of  the  public 
library. 

The  California  school  librarians  served 
as  hostesses  and  guides  throughout  the 
convention.  They  had  an  opportunity 
officially  to  welcome  the  officers  of  the 
American  Library  Association  and  the 
visiting  school  librarians  at  a  dinner  at 
the  Beverly  Hills  Hotel  on  Tuesday  eve- 
ning. About  three  hundred  librarians 
were  present.  Miss  Laura  Grover  Smith 
arranged  the  program  and  acted  as  toast 
mistress.  Dr  Keogh,  retiring  president  of 
the  American  Library  Association,  ad- 
dressed us,  stressing  the  value  of  our 
service.  Mr  John  Curtis,  president  of 
the  Bobbs-Merrill  Company  recalled  some 
of  the  experiences  of  publishing  since  the 
70's.  Lieutenant  Duell,  Richard  Halli- 
burton, and  Louis  Bromfield  discussed 
some  of  the  points  of  contact  between 
author  and  librarian.  Mrs  Lucretia  del 
Valle  Grady,  a  descendant  of  one  of  our 


vol.  25,  no.  3]     school  library  section  of  a.  l.  a.  conference 


237 


old  Spanish  families,  closed  the  program 
Avith  a  charmingly  vivid  word-picture  of 
life  in  Spanish  California.  The  dinner 
brought  many  former  strangers  together 
and  there  can  be  no  doubt  that  it  will 
be  the  starting  point  for  many  new  and 
stimulating  professional   friendships. 

Under  the  wise  leadership  of  Miss  Cut- 
ter, a  business  meeting  terminated  the 
official  duties  of  the  School  Librarians 
section  at  this  conference.  The  section 
voted  to  establish  a  library  in  the  Rapidan 
school  SDonsored  by  President  Hoover.    A 


report  of  the  completion  of  Lincoln 
Library,  the  gift  of  the  section  to  the 
City  of  Mexico,  was  read.  The  section 
voted  to  continue  the  good  work  of  the 
school  librai*y  scrapbooks  by  building  up 
a  collection  of  fugitive  material  concern- 
ing school  library  problems  to  be  circu- 
lated similarly  by  the  American  Library 
Association. 

The  week  was  indeed  a  full  one  but 
even  though  the  hours  were  crowded,  the 
program  was  at  all  times  helpful  and 
stimulating. 


238 


NEWS    NOTES    OF    CALIFORNIA    LIBRARIES  [July,    1930 


COUNTY  LIBRARY  SECTION  OF  THE  AMERICAN  LIBRARY 

ASSOCIATION 


Monday,  June  23 ;  Tuesday,  June  24 

By  Mart  Barmbt,  Librarian,  Alameda  County  Free  Library,  Oakland,  California 


1 


It  was  with  a  thrill  that  we  realized 
the  first  national  County  Library  Section 
meeting  ever  held  in  California  was  open- 
ing. Chairman  Sarah  E.  McCardle  pre- 
sided and  the  Secretary,  J.  Elizabeth 
Olson,  was  on  duty.  The  meeting  was 
in  session  at  ten  o'clock.  Miss  McCardle 
gave  a  few  happy  words  of  greeting  and 
from  then  on  until  the  close  of  the  session 
at  12,  the  time  was  filled  with  interesting 
papers  and  friendly  discussion. 

Mrs  Julia  G.  Babcock's  subject  was 
■"What  Californians  mean  by  a  County  Li- 
brary." She  gave  a  very  interesting  def- 
inition of  library  sendee  in  Europe,  in 
the  East  and  in  the  "West.  The  stoi-y 
given  of  the  California  County  Library 
was  interesting  even  to  the  pioneers  in 
the  work  and  to  those  not  so  familiar  with 
the  work,  it  must  have  been  valuable. 
"'The  County  Library  is  a  tangible  pub- 
lic utility  which  gives  and  gives  and 
gives." 

Mrs  Beatrice  Sawyer  Rossell,  Pub- 
licity Assistant  from  the  American  Li- 
brary Association  headquarters,  gave  a 
paper  entitled  "Service  through  advertis- 
ing." Mrs  Eossell  said  "Service  through 
advertising"  is  both  the  subject  and  ob- 
ject of  the  talk.  Mrs  Rossell  wrote  to 
more  thaji  fifty  county  librarians  asking 
for  specific  infonnation  about  their  ad- 
vertising, omitting  California  counties 
only  because  Mrs  Henshall  was  to  dis- 
cuss California  publicity  when  she  gave 
her  talk.  Samples  of  publicity  and  let- 
ters which  Mrs  Rossell  had  received  wei"e 
on  display  in  the  Sala  de  Oro. 

One  of  the  questions  asked  in  the  let- 
ter was  about  free  advertising.  An  ex- 
ample iu  one  answer  was  the  story  of  an 
eight  page  library  edition  of  the  Albe- 
marle, North  Carolina,  Press.  The  sec- 
tion consisted  of  contributions  from  the 
state  library  leaders,  county  leaders,  and 
local  people  interested  in  library  develop- 
ment. There  was  so  much  material 
collected  that  the  editor  wrote  advertise- 


ments and  the  librarian  sold  them  to  pay 
for  the  extra  pages  needed.  Twenty-two 
local  firms  contributed  space.  A  typical 
advertisement  read  "You  can  get  good 
books  at  the  Stanly  County  Library." 
"Space  contributed  by  the  American  Cafe 
where  you  get  good  things  to  eat."  Even 
the  lost  and  found  column  was  used  for 
library  items.  One  read  "Lost — borrowed 
and  not  returned.  Books  that  belong  to 
the  whole  town  and  county.  Borrowers 
will  please  look  on  their  shelves  for  any 
books  overdue  and  return  them  to  the  li- 
brai'y."  Several  editorials  cordially  urged 
library  support.  library  people  iu  Albe- 
marle felt  the  results  of  the  edition  were 
highly  satisfactory. 

Book  truck  advertising  was  mentioned 
as  effective  by  10  correspondents.  Word 
of  mouth  advertising  was  mentioned  by 
many  librarians.  One  particular  libra- 
rian took  the  visitor  to  a  station.  When 
the  visitor  inquired  whether  people  were 
ever  dissatisfied  with  the  books  left  for 
them,  a  large  woman  in  apron  and  sun- 
bonnet  gave  the  visitor  a  withering  look 
and  said  emphatically  "Well,  I  guess  my 
husband  reads  all  these  books  and  I 
never  heard  him  complain  about  them." 

There  was  so  much  of  interest  and 
value  in  Mrs  Rossell's  paper,  one  would 
like  to  go  on  quoting  endlessly. 

Before  the  meeting  closed  the  chair- 
man surprised  all  present  by  calling  for 
a  standing  introduction  of  the  county  li- 
brarians of  California.  After  the  forty 
odd  were  standing  around  the  front  and 
down  the  sides  of  the  room,  a  call  was 
made  for  all  county  librarians  of  other 
states.  When  all  were  gathered  together 
it  made  a  goodly  number  of  live  wires. 

Tuesday,  June  24,  the  county  library 
group  gathered  in  the  librai'y  lecture  room 
for  its  second  session,  the  subject  of  the 
morning  being  "Some  high  lights  in  county 
library  service."  Miss  McCardle  made  a 
friendly  introduction  and  then  called  upon 
the  eight  speakers  and  each  gave  a  word 


vol.  25,  no.  3]       county  library  section  of  a.  l.  a. 


239 


picture   of   his   state's   or  county's   rural 
work. 

Ellen  Peri-y,  Greenville,  South  Carolina, 
told  of  agricultural  and  cotton  mill  dis- 
tricts and  of  the  negro  clubs  served  by  ne- 
gro attendants  through  negro  branches. 
Negroes  composed  20  per  cent  of  the  pop- 
ulation. 

Mrs  Evangeline  Berryman,  Maricopa 
County  Library,  Phoenix,  Arizona,  made 
one  see  the  typical  western  large  county 
and  its  wide  spaces.  Maricopa  County 
Library  has  been  operating  only  eight 
months  but  already  has  18  branches. 
They  serve  miners,  farmers,  homesteaders 
and  health  seekers.  There  are  three  county 
libraries  in  Arizona.  The  state  adopted 
a  county  library  law  similar  to  that  of 
California.  Two  of  the  county  libraries 
are  contract  libraries  but  Maricopa 
County  is  a  direct  county  library. 

Mr  H.  Norman  Lidster,  chairman,  Pub- 
lic Library  Commission,  New  Westmin- 
ster, B,  C,  Canada,  spoke  in  place  of  Miss 
Stewart.  In  his  talk  he  looked  into  the 
future  to  see  the  high  lights  of  county 
library  work.  He  told  of  the  experiments 
tliey  were  making  in  organizing  districts 
of  federated  municipalities  for  library 
service  similar  to  county  service. 

One  saw  the  tropical  islands  of  Hawaii 
through  the  eyes  of  Mrs  Juliet  L.  Davis, 
librarian  of  the  Maui  County  Library, 
Wailuku.  The  work  has  been  organized 
ten  years.  Books,  she  said,  reach  their 
readers  by  boat  and  sometimes  by  horse- 
back from  two  to  four  times  a  year. 
They  have  a  branch  on  Midway  Island, 
the  cable  relay  station  between  the  United 
States  and  the  Orient  and  Australia. 
This  branch  receives  shipments  of  books 
every  three  months  when  the  boat  comes 
in  for  supplies.  The  people  cable  their 
requests  in.  The  islands  are  not  so  far 
away,  she  feels. 

Mai-y  C.  Oliphant,  librarian  of  Mercer 
County,  Trenton,  New  Jersey,  said  that 
of  the  twenty-one  counties  in  New  Jer- 
sey, ten  have  county  libraries  and  it  is  the 
plan  to  establish  one  new  county  library 
each  year.  Branches  are  served  by  book 
wagons,  several  times  a  month.  Rent  of 
buildings  and  salary  of  trained  branch 
librarians  are  paid  by  the  community. 
Each  school  has  a  reference  collection. 
The  farthest  station  is  one-half  hour  from 
the  main  library. 


Mr  Clarence  Lester,  secretary  Free 
Library  Commission,  Madison,  Wisconsin, 
spoke  of  the  Commission's  very  wide 
service.  Twenty  counties  were  appropri- 
ating funds  for  county  service,  all  but  one 
contracting  with  large  libraries  for  ser- 
vice. Mr  Lester  advises  some  other  than 
political  divisions  for  library  service. 

Mrs  Lois  White  Henderson,  librarian, 
Shreveport,  Louisiana,  told  of  the  Web- 
ster Parish  Library  opening  October, 
1929,  with  the  assistance  of  the  Rosen- 
wald  fund  and  the  community.  Now  it 
has  twenty  branches.  The  Louisiana  Li- 
brary Commission  made  a  loan  of  1500 
books  to  start  it.  They  have  a  negro  li- 
brarian, a  Hampton  graduate,  who  takes 
charge