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STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR SCHOOL 
OKOTOKS,. ALBERTA 



PAIDIA — The title of our yearbook - is the Spartan Greek word for education. 



paidia 

1971-72 



A SOUVENIR RECORD OF THE INAUGURAL YEAR 
OF 

STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR SCHOOL 
OKOTOKS, ALBERTA 



i 



ALMIGHTY GOD, OUR HEAVENLY FATHER, 

WE THANK YOU FOR THIS SCHOOL BUILDING AND FOR ALL THE 
BLESSINGS OF THIS HAPPY DAY. GRANT TO ALL WHO TEACH AND LEARN 
IN STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR SCHOOL THE SPIRIT OF WISDOM AND 
GRACE, THAT WE MIGHT LEARN TO REVERENCE TRUTH, DESIRE GOOD- 
NESS AND REJOICE IN BEAUTY. BLESS THIS BUILDING AND GRANT THAT 
CHARITY, UNDERSTANDING AND TRUE LEARNING MAY FLOURISH AND 
ABOUND HERE. 

WE PRAY THAT STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR SCHOOL MIGHT BE A PLACE 
WHERE WE SEEK TO DO YOUR WILL AND TO WALK IN YOUR WAY. 
WE ASK THESE PRAYERS IN THE NAME OF JESUS CHRIST WHO IS THE 
ONE FOUNDATION AND THE CHIEF CORNER STONE OF ALL THAT WE DO. 

AMEN. 



Rev. Rodney Andrews 



The Invocation at the Official Opening of Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School, 
Okotoks, Alberta, September 18, 1971. 



3 



CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS 



(This address was given by the Chairman of the 
Board of Governors, Mr. E. David Dover, at the 
School Closing Exercises, ]une 17, 1972.) 

We have all, if we were fortunate, been in- 
spired at one time or another in our childhood or 
youth, to aspire to excellence. 

John W. Gardner in a book entitled "Excel- 
lence" writes: 

"What we must reach for is a conception of 
perpetual self-discovery, perpetual reshaping to 
realize one's best self, to be the person one 
could be." 

Why is it that a large number of young people 
never fulfil their potentialities. 

The responsibility for failure cannot be laid at 
the feet of the schools alone. The family, the 
church, and the neighbourhood must work to- 
gether to ensure the best possible climate for the 
development of our young people. 

The phrase "nuclear family", coined by 20th 
century sociologists, is becoming more and more 
common. It brings to mind the many pressures 
that society is exerting on the individual family; 
pressures which divide its members and in some 
cases threaten its very existence. 

The family is the smallest of social institutions, 
but it holds first rank in importance. We must not 
let it dissolve; not only because of its national 
importance or its religious significance, but be- 
cause by its dissolution every human being would 
lose some core of himself. 

We, as parents, are responsible for the leader- 
ship, inspiration and the well-being of our chil- 
dren. 

In the coming year I would urge all of our 
parents to become more familiar with the opera- 
tions of the school. 

I urge you to attend school functions and, 
where possible, contribute your thoughts and 
ideas for their betterment. 

I urge you to become acquainted with your 
child's teachers and together with them establish 
a growing and constructive programme for your 
child's development. 

Like the prophet of old, could I remind you 
boys and girls, your parents, your brothers and 
sisters, grandparents and other family members 
need you, your affection and concern. Your 
school needs you and you will only receive from 
it in proportion as you give to it. 

Today is the last day of school and summer 
holidays are ahead. Holidays are meant for having 
fun; for developing hobbies, making and enrich- 



ing friendships, and browning under a summer 
sun. 

I hope you will all be able to unleash your- 
selves and have a small roar this summer. The 
only stipulation could be that you must be a 
creative participator in this activity rather than a 
spectator. Your adventure should not be handed 
to you through a television set or from the re- 
served seats of a sports stadium. 1 would not, of 
course, suggest that you all would enjoy a course 
in aircraft pylon racing. Your enterprise could be 
anything from sports, mountain climbing, or 
working, to bee-keeping, reading, bird watching, 
or rewarding crafts. Whatever you choose it 
should give you a personal sense of adventure. 
The ultimate goal, our final maturity, will perhaps 
be reached when we can approach all of life with 
this sense of adventure. 

It is fitting today to recognize and commend 
the staff. 

Our headmaster, Mr. Sandy Heard, deserves a 
true vote of thanks for the enthusiasm and drive 
with which he has directed the school in its first 
year of operation in these new surroundings. 

We are fortunate to have a group of extremely 
fine teachers. Their dedication to their students is 
the very foundation upon which we stand. To 
them may I say, never be tempted to think that 
you are taken for granted. 

I would like to congratulate those students who 
will win prizes and all of those who have done 
their best. For those whose efforts have fallen 
short of their ambitions I can only say, you may 
have lost a battle but you haven't lost the war. A 
courageous effort can be as valuable as an easy 
win. 

We have seven grade 12 girls graduating this 
year. The Board of Governors would like to wish 
them every success and happiness and commend 
them for the leadership they have displayed. I am 
sure Mrs. McWilliam will be especially proud of 
their efforts and, in my opinion, Margaret, their 
success reflects your extreme dedication and re- 
sponsibility to the teaching profession. 

Ladies and gentlemen, girls and boys, let us 
band together in the adventure of developing 
Strathcona-Tweedsmuir, a school which is dedi- 
cated to excellence. 

For our part, I am sure I speak for all the 
Board, we will spare no effort to fulfil our role as 
administrators for the school. We can succeed, 
all of us together, in building a groat Canadian 
school. 



5 




W. A. HEARD 
WHAT A YEAR ! 



HEADMASTER'S MESSAGE 



benefit of their fellow man. They were given a 
special kind of education at Strathcona-Tweeds- 
muir and you will find them in all kinds of 
different roles but you can be sure they will be 
using their talents for the good of the community 
that they are in. They will be changing the world, 
making it better and making the lives of the 
people they come in contact with better for 
knowing them." 



What can I say? The usual role of the head- 
master at this auspicious occasion is to report 
on the year's activities — tell you about the 
academic honors won, the athletic accomplish- 
ments of our students, the extra-curricular acti- 
vities we took part in and plans for next year. 
It is also customary to thank the many individuals 
who have helped make the year the success it 
was; those who have donated time, money, 
gifts and counsel. I do not choose to do this this 
year, not because my gratitude on behalf of the 
school is lacking or not whole hearted, not be- 
cause we haven't won honors in many fields of 
endeavor, not because all our staff hasn't given 
more than has been required of them, but be- 
cause we have accomplished something else that 
is unique in schools. We have accomplished a 
family relationship. We have become members 
of this family by working terribly hard for some- 
thing we all believe in and thus it would prob- 
ably embarrass us all to pat each other on the 
back and publicly proclaim what good fellows 
we are. 

I choose on the other hand to speak to the 
younger members of our family and perhaps 
what I say will have meaning for us all. 

Graduating class — the 7 musketeers — where 
are you? Ah, in your proper place as always. You 
are our firsl you know and thus you have a 
special responsibility for in years to come when 
people say to us, "What does your school do 
that is special?" we shall point to our graduates. 
We must be able to say "Our graduates have 
been taught to use all of their potential for the 



All of us are constantly inundated with a 
picture of gloom and doom. Too much pollution. 
Too many births. Too many deaths. Too many 
people. Too much crime. Too many wars. This 
has had a tremendous impact on us all, but 
particularly on you, the young people. Some 
young people have met this picture by opting 
out, dropping out, escaping. But not you. You 
have accepted the challenge of your world, just 
as the parents and friends of this school accepted 
a challenge. They built a school. You are going 
to build a world. 

Seeing how this school was built is a great 
lesson. Nobody carried a placard protesting the 
old schools. Nobody even threw a bomb — there 
were several close calls. There were no sit-ins or 
strikes and not even one student's card was 
burned. Yet the old schools have given way to 
the new. This is because people legally got to- 
gether and used their minds and their resources 
and made a change. Because we live in a country 
that believes in free enterprise, it could happen. 
It could happen without the government giving 
the money. It didn't happen in one day, or one 
week or one year but with patience and per- 
severance, and hard work we are here today. 

You can do the same. There are many things 
in the world that need changing, that need im- 
proving. You can do these things. 

We will be watching you just as you were 
watched by little eyes and big ears all year. You 
set a fine example. We know we will continue to 
be proud of you. 



7 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



CHAIRMAN 

E. DAVID DOVER 
GOVERNORS 

HENRY W. ACTESON 
MRS. A. A. ARNOLD 
JOHN C. ASHBURNER 
JOHN B. ASHMUN 
JOHN BURNS 
A. GORDON BURTON 
JOHN D. FRANCIS 
MRS. W. JOHN HARVIE 
THOMAS B. HEWITT 
MRS. GERALD LOCKE 
RODERICK K. McDANIEL 
MURRAY C. McKINNON 
KENNETH M. MANNING 
BRUCE A. MACDONALD 
JOHN C. MEEKER 
MRS. HUGH C. MORRISON 
MRS. J. MORRIS PRYDE 

NORMAN L. REID 
WILLIAM A. STEWART 
JOHN H. STOREY 



9 



FACULTY 

HEADMASTER 

W. A. HEARD 
B.Ed. (University of Alberta) Alberta Teacher's Certificate 

HEAD OF GIRLS MRS. J. M. McWILLIAM, Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

HEAD OF SENIOR BOYS P. B. DITCHBURN, B.A., Dip. Ed. (University of Melbourne), M.Ed. 

(University of Calgary), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

HEAD OF JUNIOR BOYS R. H. COJOCAR, Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

THE REV. R. O. ANDREWS, B.A., L.Th., B.Th. (University of Saskatchewan). 
MISS B. BAUER, Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

G. G. BAUMAN, B.Sc. (University of Calgary), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 
J. E. BRELAND, B.Ed. (University of Calgary), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 
MRS. K. W. COSKEY, Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

I. DAWOOD, B.A. (Hons.) (University of Natal), B.Ed., U.E.D. (University of South Africa), Alberta 
Teacher's Certificate. 

MRS M. DOMONEY, B.A. (Hons.), B.Ed. (University of Saskatchewan), M.Sc. (University of Calgary), 
Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

G. D. FREIGHT, B.A. (University of Calgary), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

MRS. V. E. T. A. FRIESEN, B.A. (University of Alberta), Specialist Certificate — Speech and Hearing 
(University of Washington), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

MRS. E. HARASYMIW, B.A., M.A. (University of Alberta), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

C. J. HAY, B.A. (University of Calgary), Alberta Teachers Certificate. 

MRS. J. B. KERR, B.Ped., (University of Manitoba), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

B. KILB, B.P.E., M.A. (University of Alberta), Alberta Teacher's Certificate, Director of Athletics. 

MRS. R. MABEE, Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

MRS. H. McLEAN, B.A. (University of Toronto), M.A. (University of Calgary), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

D. R. NELSON, B.Ed. (University of Alberta), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 
J. E. SCHMIT, B.A., M.A. (Gonzaga University), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 
A. G. SEEGER, B.A. (University of Alberta), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 
MRS. M. D. STILES, B.Ed. (University of Alberta), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 
G. TAJCNAR, B.Sc, B.Ed. (University of Alberta), Alberta Teacher's Certificate. 

ADMINISTRATION 

R. RENSING, Business Manager MRS. C. j. STEIGER, Reception 

MRS. J. A. KIRKHAM, Headmaster's Secretary MRS. K. M. MARSHALL, Bookstore 

B. SILLS, Maintenance Supervisor 



11 



PARLIAMENT 



W. A. Heard 
HEADMASTER 

Elizabeth Duffin 
SPEAKER 

PARLIAMENTARY REPRESENTATIVES 



)odi Pisko 


David Thakkar 


Francine Boswell 


Lauchlin Lyons 


Ellen Ravvin 


Jason Blake 


Cynthia Heard 


David Jackson 


Ann Conway 


Russell Gregory 


Frances Amery 


Rod kirkham 


Heather Ross 


Mort Kline 


Kathy Wall 


Brian Leslie 


Louise Barlass 


Teddy Arnold 


Pamela Heard 


Bob Louisy 



George Prysiazny 
Mark Sibley 
Calvin McClary 
Dick Sherlock 



13 



THE YEAR AT STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR 



SEPTEMBER 1971 

8 Classes commence for a new school at 

a new campus 
18 Official Opening of Strathcona- 
Tweedsmuir 



OCTOBER 

6 Calgary Philharmonic Concert — 
Grades 1-8 

Glenbow Art Gallery — Grades 9-12 
l l Thanksgiving 

14 Burns' Packing Plant — Grades 1-3B 
18 Testing and Reporting Week 
29 Hallowe'en Party 



NOVEMBER 

6 Parent-Teacher Day 

8 Glenbow Museum — Grade 4 

10 Hutterite Colony, Cayley — Grades 9-12 

11 Remembrance Day 

DECEMBER 

13 Examinations commence 

17 Christmas Service and Concert 

18 Christmas holidays commence 

JANUARY 1972 

4 School resumes 
15-16 Ski Weekend I 

19 Visitors — Mr. & Mrs. D. Munn 
28 Weather Station — Grade 8B 

FEBRUARY 

4 Search Seminar — Rev. J. Jordan 

9 Weather Station — Grade 8G 

Girls' Volleyball Team leaves for B.C. 
12-13 Ski Weekend II 
17-18 Teachers' Convention 
19-20 Ski Weekend III 

FEBRUARY 

25 Search Seminar — Mayor Sykes of 
Calgary 

26 Debating Eliminations — Lord Beaver- 
brook H.S. 



MARCH 

3 Search Seminar — Dr. M. Gibson 

4 Foothills Basketball Tournament at STS 



7 Glenbow Museum — Grades 3 & 4B 

8 Calgary Philharmonic recital at STS 

9 Planetarium — Grades 6B, 8B & 8G 

10 Search Seminar — Dr. & Mrs. W. S. 
Hopkins 
11-12 Ski Weekend IV 

13 Search Seminar — Rev. Charles Walters 
15-17 Grade 9 Departmental Examinations 

17 Search Seminar — Rev. Alan Challa- 
combe 

18 Provincial Debating Championships at 
STS 

29 Easter Service. End of Term. 

APRIL 

10 School resumes 

24 Visitor — Miss J. A. Sommers, Calgary 

Public Library 
26 Glenbow Museum — Grades 3-5B 



MAY 

4-9 National Debating Seminar, 
Fort Saskatchewan 
5 Planetarium — Grades 3-5 
Talent Night 
13 STS Track Meet & School Fair 

Graduation Dance at the Palliser 
16 Golden West Ranch — Grades 11 & 12 

22 Victoria Day Holiday 

23 Visitor — Mr. Tom Baines of the River- 
edge Foundation 

24 Hutterite Colony, Brant — 
Grades 6B & 7G 

26 STS Public Speaking Contest 

27 Polo Clinic begins 

27-28 Drumhel er trip — Grade 8B(2) 

29 Visitor — Professor B. Baldwin, Univer- 
sity of Calgary 

30 Drumheller trip — Grade 7 

Visitor — Mr. Jim Rogers, archeologist 



JUNE 

2 Wyatt's Appaloosa Farm, High River — 
Grades 1-3B 

Search Seminar — Mrs. P. Bruce 
Highwood River camping trip — 
Grade 5B 
12 Examination week begins 

17 Closing Exercises 

18 Backpacking trips commence 
24 STS entrance tests 



14 



GRADE XII 



LOUISE BARLASS 




ELIZABETH DUFFIN 



n li 

MARILYN FLEMING LINDA GARSHMAN 



KATHY MacDONALD ROBYN RICHARDSON 




15 



GRADE I 




S 1! 



KELI BALDWIN 



CATHERINE McKENNA 



I Z I 

CAMERON CRAINE GABRIELE BROVEDANI JASON HARI 



s z 



JAMIE GIBSON JOHN TANTON MICHAEL THAKKAR 



16 



GRADE II 



15 



SUZANNE ABT DANIELA BROVEDANI LISA JACKSON 



Iff 




JODI PISKO MICHELE THERIAULT 



5 2 




BART BORRETT JOHN CURRIE ANDREW GIBSON RODDY HEARD 



S 2 E 




MARCO MAZZOLANI ROBBIE MORRISON TOM NELSON PAUL PROCTOR 



2 ZT 

ANDREW RAHME DAVID THAKKAR 



17 



GRADE III 




§ ^ u 

MARY ANN BROWN SARA GOLDSTEIN SLOAN PIPELLA 

ROBBY ARKLEY JOHN BILTON WINTON BORTENLANGER 

S S 2 

CONAN DALY BRUNO DE LE SALLE MICHAEL DELVES 

SEE 

KENNETH DRISDALE TIMOTHY KENNEY MURRAY LAIDLOW 

PAUL LeBLANC LAUCHLIN LYONS STERLING MOTTA 




18 



GRADE HI 



At 





CLIVE MOULDEN JED OLAFSON TAYLOR SPARKS 

2 5 2 

ROBERT STURMER LeROY THIESSEN ADAM WALKER 



GRADE IV 





FRANCINE BOSWELL KIM BRIDGEWATER CARLA HOOPER ANNE HORDOS 





DEBRA JUCHEM CATHY MACKIE KAREN MACKIE 



5 




li 

SHERRY ANN McKAY LEANNE OUGHTON FIONA TURNBULL 




GRADE IV 



H s s s 

IOHN BALLEM DAVID BAWDEN RAYMOND BIRKELAND JASON BLAKE 



£ 5 I! E 

ROBERT BRIDGEWATER GRANT DEAN CHRISTOPHER DE VETH BLAIR DOUGLAS 




PAUL GLENFIELD SIMON GOLDSTEIN TOM KRAMER MARK LeBLANC 



1! S 2 

JOHN MACKINNON STEPHEN PILLOW TIM PRESTUPA 



20 



GRADE V 




NANCY BOSWELL JENNIFER CONSIDINE SUSAN HAY 




PAMELA INNES PATRIZIA MAZZOLANI ELIZABETH MOULDEN 




5 



LESLIE OUGHTON JANICE WHITE 




ROBERT CHABROS THOMAS CHRISTIE DAVID FATHI 




1ft 



BARRY CLAUSON ROBERT GRIFFITH DAVID JACKSON 



21 



GRADE V 





WAYNE MILLICE RUSSELL MORRISON CHRISTOPHER MORTON 



2 





am 

DONALD MACKINNON DAN McWILLIAM MITCHELL RAVVIN 




2 



ROBERT SPIRO MARK VON SCHELLWITZ KING WILSON 




WAYNE WOODS 



GRADE VI 





1? 



MARY-ANNE CONSIDINE PATRICIA COOPER LYNETTE CORKIN 

GEORGINA HAINING CHERYL HAMILTON KATHERINE HANSON 





22 



GRADE VI 



0 111 

MARTHA NEWELL ELLEN RAVVIN ANN SIMPSON JACQUELINE V!NCE 



GRADE VI B(l) 



H H 1? 



m 

)EFF AGAR JOHN ARNOLD RODERICK ASHBURNER STUART ASHMUN 

1 U 21 2 

CHARLES AUSTIN TREVOR BALDING DAVID BROWN BRUCE CONWAY 





LOREN CRONE RUSSELL GREGORY BILLY GRIFFITH MARK HEARD 



RICHARD HORAN ROBERT RANKIN 



25 



GRADE VIB(2) 



JAMES KASTENS ROD KIRKHAM BILLY KREBS 





WILLIAM LYNCH JAY LYONS SANDY MORRISON RANDY MacDONALD 




2fc 



IAN McBRIDE DOUGLAS McNIVEN MICHAEL PRYOR ROBERT RASMUSSEN 



2 S fl £ 



HAMPTON RIPLEY DAVID RYAN ROBERT WALL 



ROSS WILLIS 



24 



GRADE VII 




SUSAN GREGORY BETSY HARVIE CYNTHIA HEARD AMY HEWITT 




I' A 

JENNIFER JACKSON MICHELLE JAGER MOYRA MacKINNON LINDSAY MAIR 



R W H M 



1 V 



JANE MANNING ALISON MARTIN ANN MEEKER TONI PRESTUPA 





SHELLY RAFFIN WENDY SLOAN JULIE STAPLETON 



2", 



GRADE VII 



2 E2 £ 



2 





BILLY ACTESON ALAN ALGER LORNE CHARK JOHN DOVER 



15 



SCOTT EVANS EDWARD GARDNER COLIN HAY 



It 



DOUG JOHNSON 



1 



MORT KLINE RON KLUZAK COLIN LAMB BRIAN LESTER 



2 



PHILIP MAYSON JACK MacNICHOL STEVE NEIDERMAYER FRANK RENSING 



26 



GRADE VII 



BRUCE WATSON BRIAN WHITE PETER WHITEHEAD DONALD WILLOWS 




GRADE VIII 




GRAHAM SMITH WENDELL TERRY BRENT VERNER PHILIP VINCE 





CHISTINE BAKER SUSAN BARTLEY SHAUNA BLAKE ANN CONWAY 



RUTH GRAY CYNTHIA HAYWARD GAIL HUMPHREYS SANDY KLINE 




27 



GRADE VIII 



* V 6 H 

LORI-JEAN LARSON MARGARET MaclNNES MARGARET McMICHAEL DIANE McNIVEN 

m W P 

JULIE SCOTT PATRICIA SIFTON SUE TENISON 

GRADE VIII B(l) 

H i H 3 

TEDDY ARNOLD DAVID BOLEY BOB BRENNAN STEPHEN DRYSDALE 

H 2 H H 

DICK FULLERTON BRUCE GAMMON JACK KRUSCHE BRIAN LESLIE 



28 



GRADE VIII B(l) 



DAVID LUXFORD MACKIN OXENDALE BRIAN PARKE TIM PRYDE 



Ah 




KENRIC RENSING GLEN STREET JOHN WANSBROUGH 



GRADE VIII B(2) 




4k k 



RICHARD BOYD JOHN BROWN TOM COOPER STUART CRAIG 



J2 S 




TANNEGUY de JUBECOURT ROD FRENCH BARRY GARDNER 



GRADE VIII B(2) 



9 E! n 

DOUG GEE DANNY GOLDFINCH DAVID JOHNSON BRETT KYLE 



9 a E 



BLAINE WIBER 



GRADE IX 



ill 




DOUG McKINNON BRUCE ROMBOUGH MIKE STOREY MARK TRIMBLE 




1 

FRANCES AMERY ELIZABETH ARNOTT AILEEN BLACK TARA DUNNET 



Q 



JOANNE EBSWORTH 



GRADE IX 



R ss *i n 

MARY HARVEY JANICE HEARD DIANE HUMPHREYS KAY HUNTER 



6 




CARRELL LABORET STEPHANIE LARSON 




LAURA LESLIE 




LESLIE McDANIEL 



V i ^ U 

SUE MOXON JUNE OLLERENSHAW THERESA ROENISCH SYLVIA SHERLOCK 

CAROL SHYMKA WENDY TERRY SUE TOUCHE 




5 1 



GRADE IX 



I! H 



ROSS CLAUSON MORGAN DAVIS JAY GELMON 



II 5! 

JOHN KNEBLES HARVEY LOCKE BOB LOUISY 



H 



H 

MICHAEL MORROW 




JOHN McCRUDEN KEVIN PEARSON TOM TENISON 




MICHAEL WHITEHEAD PETER WHITEHEAD FELIX VON VEGESACK 



32 



GRADE X 




MARJORIE BLIEK BRENDA HAYWARD JANE HUTCHISON PAMELA McDONALD 




P H 



EILEEN OXENDALE KAREN PROCTOR HEATHER ROSS 



H 




11 52 



IAN ATKINSON KENNETH COOKE MARK LARSEN SCOTT MATTHEWS 




§ s e 



SIMON McLEAN BRIAN MURPHY GEORGE PRYSIAZNY ROBERT WHITE 



GORDON JAGER STEVEN JOHNSON BRIAN PEACOCK TED THURSTON 



33 



GRADE XI 




34 



GRADE XI 



ffl s s 

BEN BENNETT BILL MARKS CLAVIN McCLARY 




REID MacDONALD 



ALEX McNIVEN DICK SHERLOCK MARK SIBLEY 



JONATHAN CRAWFORD 



35 



activities 




OUR TRIP TO MRS. DOVER'S 

On September 28, the Grade 5 and 6 girls, 
along with Mr. Bauman's class, the Grade 5 boys, 
went to Mrs. Dover's house in the country. It 
was a beautiful place surrounded by lovely 
bushes and some very beautiful flowers. 

We went to Mrs. Dover's by bus and on the 
way there I saw some very interesting things 
such as dairy cows, ducks and flowers. Being 
autumn, the trees looked fascinating with the 
lovely coloured leaves gently falling to the 
ground. 

While we were on our tour around Mrs. 
Dover's house, we saw an amazing sun dial. 
Mrs. Dover showed us how the sun makes it 
work. I thought it was one of the most interest- 
ing things there. 

I enjoyed this lovely "Nature Field Trip" and 
I am sure that my classmates did too and we 
thank Mrs. Dover for her kindness. I hope we 
can go to see her and her lovely house again 
soon. 

Leslie Oughton, Grade 5G 



THIS YEAR 

I have had quite a bit of fun this year at 
school. We went on an eight mile hike, field 
trips and a camping trip. The first field trip was 
to Mrs. Dover's house. She showed us her 
house and garden and we had lunch there. 
The second trip was to the Glenbow Foundation. 
We saw a movie about the Plains Indians and 
we saw a lot of Indian weapons such as bows, 
arrows and spears. The third trip was to the 
Planetarium. There was a very big projector 
there which could make you feel like you were 
turning around when it turned. It could also 
project different colours onto the screen. Our 
fourth trip was to Heritage Park where we saw 
the old town and the ranch house. 

On our camping trip we went on a lot of 
hikes and saw some prairie dogs. The Highwood 
River was very high and dirty. You couldn't 
see six inches beneath the water. We had two 
water fights and every night we roasted marsh- 
mallows. 

So, when you really think about it, this has 
been a pretty good year. 

David Fathi, Grade 5B 



I have never had such fun in all the years I 
have gone to school and I feel next year's grade 
5 will be lucky too. 

Dan McWilliam, Grade 5B 



38 



CARDINAL COACH LINES LIMITED 



RIDING ON A BUS 



I ride on bus E to STS. My bus driver is a 
lady. The teacher on our bus is Mrs. Stiles. 
I get off at the last stop and get on at the 
first stop. Sometimes Mr. Heard comes on the 



bus after school to look over us. Mr. Ditchburn 
does too. My teacher goes on bus C. 

Jodi Pisko, Grade 2G 



I like it at Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School because there is always something to do. 

Debra Juchem, Grade 4G 



Mrs. Kerr takes us for PE. She always has 
something new for us to do. At the beginning 
of the year we ran a mile every PE period. 
When winter came Mrs. Kerr taught us how to 
snowshoe and skate. When it got more than 
fifteen degrees below we came inside and had 
gymnastics. When we entered a contest every- 



body in our school did well. 

Once the weather became warm again we 
took walks to the pond and later on Mrs. Kerr 
took us tor swimming lessons in Calgary. They 
were really good. 

Debra Juchem & Leanne Oughton 

Grade 4G 




THE HUTTERITE COLONY 

On May 25 the Grade 6 boys and the Grade 7 
girls set off for the Hutterile colony at Brant. 
We stopped at the High River Park to eat lunch. 
After lunch some of us played baseball while 
others played on the swings. The busdriver 
honked his horn and we all piled in the bus. 
The next part of the drive was boring so we 
livened it up by singing songs. 

At last we arrived at the colony. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gross showed us through their home. Their 
home was plain, but it sure was clean! We saw 
their horses, cows and the feed lot. By this time 
some of us had made friends with a few of the 
Hutterite boys. 

The Hutterites have about 6,000 chickens in 
small cages. All those chickens in cages is quite 
a sight. Then we looked at the rows and rows 
of pigs. 

The Hutterites have quite modern machinery 
such as the rock picker which takes rocks off 
the fields. They have five combines and four 
trucks (but no cars). 

We then went to the school where the 
children sang a song for us. The adults had 



prepared a bite to eat. This consisted of coffee, 
water, bread and jam. The bread and jam, being 
homemade, tasted delicious! 

Then, again, we jumped in the bus, said good- 
bye and left for school. One thing about the 
Hutterites, they pay no taxes and will take up 
arms against no one. I am sure everyone enjoyed 
our trip and is hoping to visit the colony 
again. 

Russell Gregory, Grade 6B 

HAVING LUNCH AT THE POND 

After gym one day Grade 3 had lunch at the 
pond. We sat down quietly and saw the water 
move in a V shape. Then we waited quietly for 
a while and we saw a beaver. We watched him 
and then we went down to the hill to get a 
closer look. He came up closer, almost to the 
side of the shore where we were. Then he dove 
into the water. We waited but he didn't come 
out so we went back to school. 

Paul LeBlanc, Grade 3B 




STS BACKPACKERS TAKE TO THE MOUNTAINS 



JUNE 18-22, 1972 



THE BOYS' TRIP 



Backpackers: — Mr. Schmit, Mr. Nelson, Mr. 
Seeger, Mr. Bauman. 
McNiven, Sherlock, Marks, Pea- 
cock, Atkinson, Thurston, Locke, 
Louisy, Thuston, White. 

June 18 — Arrived at Highwood Crossing at 
10:00 a.m. Enthusiasm not damp- 
ened by falling rain. Made it to 
Fitzsimmon's Creek after making 
our own trail and after being ma- 
rooned in a series of beaver dams! 
All well soaked. Six miles later, 
4:30 p.m., camp struck at the foot 
of Mount Armstrong. 
At 5:00 p.m. enjoyed a chicken 
supreme entree, beef stew, a des- 
sert of sardines. 

June 19 — Warm rays of sunshine brought 
camp to life at 8:00 a.m. Clear, 
crisp air and an inspiring view of 
the valley greeted one. 
After a breakfast of apple sauce, 
porridge and hobo-brewed coffee 
we were on the trail again. Had 
lunch at Baril Creek and hiked on 
to a small lake below Fording 
Pass where we made camp. 
Louisy caught a nice brook trout. 

June 20 — Mr. Nelson's contribution of dried 
apricots to the porridge helped to 
make breakfast more palatable. 
Using campsite as a base we hiked 
to Fording Pass. A tough hike. The 
view from the summit was fan- 
tastic — glaciers and snow-capped 
peaks. Standing there on the Al- 
berta-B.C. border we wondered 
how the pioneers felt on reaching 
this spot. Amazement, enjoyment 
were written on the faces of all. 
What a magnificent spectacle be- 
fore us. Rain interrupted the re- 
turn journey for a while but no 
one seemed to mind. Discovered 
many fossils and some cairns 
which were of interest to all. 

June 21 — The long hike yesterday left all 
tired and we did not hit the trail 
till 11:00 a.m. Crossed the Baril 
and headed south. Took a few 
wrong trails, thanks to poor mark- 
ing, but returned to Etherington 



for camp. Got the tents up just in 
time. Down came the rain. Louisy, 
Atkinson, Peacock and White 
built a very good shelter of pine 
boughs. We remained dry. Rain 
cleared and after supper Mr. Nel- 
son and Mr. Bauman hiked off to 
check the mileage to the highway. 
The usual evening inspection of 
fires and tents over we bedded 
down for what proved to be the 
coldest night of the trip. 
Mr. Schmit tried to roll over in 
his sleeping bag only to find the 
bag frozen to the roof of the tent. 
Fortunately, as the morning wore 
on it became warmer and even 
comfortable. 

June 22 — Camp finally came to life at 9:30 
a.m. and we hit the trail around 
11:30. An hour later we reached 
the highway and had lunch on 
the bridge at Etherington Creek. 
Five miles of hiking and the trip 
would be over. Already plans for 
the next trip were being discussed. 
Shortly after reaching Cataract 
Creek at 2:30, Mr. Ray arrived and 
our convoy of drivers. Our first 
great backpacking trip was over. 

The backpackers extend a big thankyou to Mr. 

and Mrs. Atkinson, Mrs. Kirkham, Mrs. Schmit 

and Mrs. Seeger, Mrs. Nelson, Mr. and Mr^. 

McNiven and Mr. Ray. 




Mr. Schmit on the way up to Fording Pass. 



41 




at 2:30 we began walking around 
the lake and made 4 miles when 
down came the rain so we camp- 
ed beside a creek. Had a horrible 
dinner — chicken stew. Don't 
bother buying it if you go back- 
packing. 

Rain, rain, rain and just as we 
were packing up. The trail was 
uphill most of the time and very 
muddy. We wore our raincoats 
most of the day. We were forced 
to spend an hour sheltering under 
a tree and we were soaked, right 
down to our boots. 
Crossed a creek 13 times. Have 
34 more crossings to go! 
We built a huge fire and spent 
about 4-5 hours around it literally 
drying out. Wet tent, wet sleeping 



DIARY II — THE GIRLS' TRIP 



Backpackers: — Mr. and Mrs. Domoney, Miss 
Oyen. 

Veta Davis, Marj Bliek, Jane Hut- 
chison, Stephanie Larson. 

June 18 — Our hike began at the end of the 
parking lot at Lake Minnewanka. 
Cool, sunny weather just right for 
hiking. We stopped for lunch by 
a creek and we were all fairly hot 
and had sore backs! 
Walked about ten miles before 
we made camp and for dinner 
we had steak with mixed vege- 
tables followed by apple sauce. 
Before going to bed some of the 
girls washed their hair in the lake. 

June 19 — After breakfast, around 11:00 a.m. 

we began walking. It was hard on 
the feet as we walked over a lot 
of loose rocks and we were soon 
complaining of sore feet and 
ankles. The weather was great. 
The trail was easy enough but 
wading across a very cold river 
was hardly comfortable. We found 
a beautiful spot by the lake and 
made camp. Had a delicious chili 
for dinner. 

June 20 — Ankles were very sore this morn- 
ing. Mr. and Mrs. Domoney went 
on an 11 mile return hike to the 
park boundary. The rest of us 
stayed at the campsite. However, 



June 22 — The hardest day of all — 36 creeks 
with a temperature of between 
35° and 37°. Some we waded 
through barefoot, others we cross- 
ed on logs and stones and others 
we sloshed through, boots and 
all. 

We trekked through solid branch- 
es, snow, mud, and that water. 
In 6 hours we walked 5 1 /2 miles 
and didn't stop for lunch. The 
trip was over and what a trip. 
Thank heaven the iast mile meant 
hiking down a road. 




42 



JACK KRUSCHE RECALLS 1971CANOE TRIP 




DEBATING 



This year at Strathcona-Tweedsmuir marked 
nning oi a great new era for the school. 
\ot only did our debaters compete with con- 
siderable success but our school hosted the 
provincial debating championship in March. 

In November a group of interested debaters 
attended a Workshop at Bowness High School 
in Calgary. Here we were introduced to the 
fundamentals of public speaking and the prep- 
aration of impromptu speeches. 

We spent months practising our newly 
acquired skills and researching the topic for 
our next debating competition, the provincial 
eliminations at Lord Beaverbrook High School, 
Calgary. The topic was "That there should be 
restrictions on further U.S. investment in Can- 
ada's natural resources." Our teams consisted 
of Janice Heard and John Knebles, Dick Sherlock 
and Alex McNiven, Pamela Heard and Calvin 
McClary, and John Brown and Harvey Locke. 
Our teams won first, second and third placings 
in the novice eliminations. John Knebles was 
named top novice speaker of the competition. 
Our three successful teams had won their way 
to the provincial championships. 

March 18, the day of the provincial champion- 
ships, came around all too quickly. Gathered 
at Strathcona-Tweedsmuir were 96 contestants 
representing 28 schools from across the province 
of Alberta. As well as the large number of con- 
testants there were more than 100 judges in 



attendance and many observers. What a great 
day for STS! All our teams performed /veil and 
one made it to the quarter finals. But those 
teams from McNally were murder! Despite the 
fact that our teams did not make it to the grand 
final, John Knebles emerged as the second top 
novice speaker in the championship and sub- 
sequently represented Alberta as an observer at 
the National Debating Seminar at Fort Saskatch- 
ewan in May. Winners of the Strathcona-Tweeds- 
muir Debating Trophy and the Open Champion- 
ship were Tory Kirby and Don Whyte of Central 
Memorial High School. Tory, a former student 
and head prefect of Strathcona, was a founding 
student of our school's debating club. 

On behalf of all the members of the Strath- 
cona-Tweedsmuir Debating Club I would like 
to express our sincere thanks to Mr. T. B. Hewitt, 
Chairman of the Board of Governors during 1971, 
for his encouragement, interest, and assistance. 
I would also like to thank all members of the 
faculty who very generously gave us time to 
debate and then contributed their own time to 
judging at the championships. We pay tribute 
to Mr. Ditchburn, our coach, for his efforts on 
our behalf; for all the advice, assistance and en- 
thusiasm he communicated to us. We congratu- 
late him on the magnificently organized pro- 
vincial championships, "the smoothest operation 
in Alberta debating to date." Hail coach and we 
look forward to an even more successful 1972-73! 

JOHN KNEBLES 



44 



arts 




Happiness is love. 

John Tanton, Grade 1 
Age 6 

****t*******H ft t ****** f ************************************ t*i *t *********** **4 

My favourite toy is a dot wheels car and track. When I let it go it goes 
down fast. Oh! Look at that! Wow! 

MICHAEL THAKKAR, Grade 1 
Age 5 

A dog has all kinds of colours. 

I like brown and white and more colours too. 

Some dogs are nice and cuddly. 

PAUL PROCTOR, Grade 2 
Age 6 

My favourite toy is a train. 
I like the noise. It is a loud noise! 



GABRIELE BROVEDANI, Grade 1 
Age 5 



Well! Robin Hood was the best archer in England. Robin won the 
silver arrow at Nottingham Palace. But the sheriff outsmarted Robin. The 
men-at-arms took him away. Little John and Will Scarlett went back to 
Sherwood Forest. They had to think of a scheme to save their leader. And 
they got him back! 

DAVID THAKKAR, Grade 2 
Age 7 

Snow at last! 
I'll get my sleigh 
And now we'll put 
Our books away! 

JOHN BILTON, Grade 3 
MY WISH 

If I could have my wish, I would wish that my baby sister would behave. 
You would think that she is good, but, when I get home, things are quite 
different. 

SARA GOLDSTEIN, Grade 3 



48 




OUR SCHOOL 

Strathcona Boys and Tweedsmuir Girls 
Have a very fine new school. 
We come in buses every day 
And always keep the rule. 

There's a big ravine across the road 
With a big hill on each side. 
If we have our little sleds 
We can have a lovely ride. 

The mountains are over in the west 
They are looking up high, 
They are our true and faithful friends 
We see them in the sky. 



Grades 1 & 2 Girls 



49 



THE FLOWER SHOP 



One day when I was walking home from 
school I looked in a window and saw lovely 
flowers. 

["hen I had a wonderful idea. Why not start 
a flower shop? Other people have big ones so 
why couldn't I have a small flower shop in the 
greenhouse? 

I ran home as quickly as I could. As soon as 
I arrived home I changed my clothes and ran 
out to pick flowers. 

I picked roses, daffodils and many other 
flowers from our garden. I went inside and put 
them in water and then I took them to the 
greenhouse. 




When I had all the flowers arranged, I took 
a piece of cardboard and made a sign. It said, 
"Come In And Buy Fresh Flowers". I put the 
sign outside the gate and after a while people 
started coming in to buy my flowers. 

The next day I put out the sign again. People 
saw the sign and came in but they went away. 
I was disappointed and wondered why. I looked 
at the flowers and saw the reason. The flowers 
were withered and nobody likes withered 
flowers. 

SUSAN HAY 
Grade 5 



50 



BEAUTY is loveliness as in a double rainbow and a big waterfall. 

Beauty is a meadow of flowers. 

Beauty is no war and lots of fun with the family. 

Playing with a tiny pup is beauty and fun. 

GRANT DEAN, Grade 4 

RIDDLE 

I say S-S-S-S ! I bite people. 

Sometimes I live in a garden 

And go under stones. 

Sometimes I do not drink water 

And sometimes you will find me under leaves. 

I am a snake. 

BART BORRETT, Grade 2 
Age 7 

I went to Disneyland. I went into the haunted house and later 

I saw Donald Duck. 

I liked Disneyland. It was pretty. 

CATHERINE McKENNA, Grade 1 

HAIKU 

The small darkened cloud 
Riding the wind in the sky 
Fly with the others! 

BRIAN WHITE, Grade 7 

In the misty moon 

The light shines down on the earth 

Then it is gone. 

DONALD WILLOWS, Grade 7 

SHOWERS 

Large grey shadows gather 
All is still and quiet. 
A sharp flash, a growl 
Break the silence; 
Moisture fills the air. 

BRIAN LESTER, Grade 7 



51 



THE VOCABULARY OF 
SIXTH GRADE BOYS 



There are many things we have to learn, but 
i think we can pretty generally agree that learn- 
ing to talk is one of the most important. 

All of us begin by babbling, but fortunately, 
as we grow older, our vocabulary goes through 
some changes. For example, we spend quite a 
few years learning that it's right to say I go, but 
not I goed! I have gone and I have seen, but not 
I have went! 

By the time we get to sixth grade, we have 
these things fairly well sorted out, but there's 
no let-up. Another problem arises. It has to do 
with the generation gap. After we have worked 
so hard to learn about nouns, verbs, adjectives 
and adverbs and all this junk, our parents start 
criticizing us for not having a large enough 
vocabulary. They actually think we don't know 
enough words! 

Now this is just not true at all. We know a 
great many words, but we can only use about 
half of them in front of our parents. This is a 
real disadvantage and under these circumstances 
it's no wonder that they misjudge the extent of 
our vocabularies, especially the verb forms. 

There are a lot of verbs plus noun phrases 
which we use among ourselves every day that 



parents just may not have any idea about. That 
is because we use them selectively — which 
means when parents are not around! It's called 
group language and it has a large and colourful 
vocabulary. This language is very common among 
sixth grade boys. 

It should also be noted that many of our 
words tend to be short. I'm not quite sure why 
this is. It's just the way they come and I under- 
stand that some of them have been coming that 
way for several hundred years now. Perhaps it's 
in order to get ideas stated as quickly as pos- 
sible. 

Anyway, we do talk a lot, we don't just giggle 
and snort as some people seem to think. So 
with that much speech time and all short words 
there are many many words in action. Action is 
the proper term too as many of the words we 
use are action words. Space, unfortunately, does 
not permit me to give specific examples! 

I hope, dear reader, that I have given you 
some appreciation of the language achievement 
of grade six boys and if I contributed anything 
toward greater understanding and admiration 
of this group, my efforts will not have been in 
vain. 

BRUCE CONWAY, Grade 6 



52 



I daydream about 

travelling the world 
cooking exotic meals 

reading books on witchcraft and the supernatural 
riding and driving motorcycles — especially choppers 
thinking up no-no ideas to do or ? 
laughing, bawling, crying and other assorted and 
unsorted things 

playing with Rusty 24 hours a day 
disrupting classes, playing hooky 
making candles 

listening to good music — |anis joplin, Led Zeplin 
going downtown 
drinking coffee, tea, coke 
looking at and buying clothes 
looking at bikes and cars 
gazing out the window 
thinking. 

KAY HUNTER 
Grade 9 



WAVES 



See the waves go oh, so high, 
As it' to touch and grasp the sky. 
Then the waves cry out to me, 
Come' Come! Come out to sea. 

Then the winds come blowing like lays 
Just to see the white-capped waves. 
Then the waves cry out to me, 
Come! Come! Come out to sea. 

Oh, so lonely, so lonely am I 
To see the waves go up so high. 
Then the waves cry out to me, 
Come! Come! Come out to sea. 

RICHARD BOYD, Grade 8 



747 

Soaring high, up and over the mountains 

Like a huge bald eagle 

Eating up the distance from city to city 

Day to day with only brief stops 

Between each flight 

As it wings its way in the starry night 

Soaring high, up and over the mountains 

Each day it fights the skies in flight. 

BARRY GARDNER, Grade 8 



WAR 

The waves did splash and the winds did blow 
As the world began to fight a foe. 
The sky did darken and I did see 
The brave men going to fight at sea. 

Afraid I was as they went away 
The thought they wouldn't be back next day, 
But sure enough, again they came, 
Sailing down the narrow main. 

The sky when blue with a pale light, 
Beams over a ship in a still dark night, 
Over the mountains and over the sea 
Brings back memories of that ship to me. 

JUNE OLLERENSHAW, Grade 9 



54 



STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR 
TEACHER LEAVES SCHOOL 

By Glen Street 



OKOTOKS: Mrs. Helen McLean, the 8B(1) Lan- 
guage teacher and School art teacher, announced 
today that she is leaving Strathcona-Tweedsmuir 
School and retiring from teaching. 

The twenty-nine year old teacher announced 
the tragic news today during a school assembly. 
Later, during an interview, when she was asked 
why she was leaving, she said, "My husband 
is a heart specialist and after examining me he 
was positive that if I taught another year I was 
bound to have a heart attack." When asked 
what the cause of the heart attack would be 
she replied, "Those crazy 8B Ones. They would 
give anyone a heart attack. I have exhausted 
myself chasing Bob Brennan around the class- 
room to beat him. But you know, he lost 300 
pounds and I became a star runner in the 
process. A lot of people have asked me if I am 
quitting teaching to become a champion runner. 
I would like to clarify this. No! This is wrong. 
I am quitting so that I can become a housewife 
and because I am moving to Peterborough, 
Ontario." 

When asked why she was moving to Peter- 
borough, Ontario, Mrs. McLean answered, "Well, 
one of my students gave a speech on the Peter- 



borough lift locks and it was so interesting I 
had to go down and see them for myself. I 
talked to my husband about it and used the 
speech to persuade him. The persuasion worked 
and so we are moving to Peterborough. My 
husband is taking the car and I am running." 

Among the highlights of the language classes, 
according to Mrs. McLean, were Boley's jokes. 
The simple application of two rolls of masking 
tape took care of those. She was surprised, how- 
ever, by Arnold who thought each language 
class was one big cocktail party as he smoked 
his pen and talked. "I fixed his problem," said 
Mrs. McLean, "by buying $23.35 worth of pencils 
and making him smoke them all at once. And 
do you know he crammed all those pencils into 
his mouth!" 

At the conclusion of the interview, Mrs. 
McLean was asked if she was proud of any of 
her students. She said, "Yes, I'm Pryde of proud 
... I mean I'm proud of Pryde." 

Strathcona-Tweedsmuir is faced with a prob- 
lem. Where can we find a language teacher who 
is a good, fast, long-distance runner to chase 
Brennan next year in Grade L )>. 





"YOU'VE NEVER SEEN A CAR?" 

One day as I was getting out 
of my car a man came up. 
"Oh," he exclaimed, "what on 
earth is that contraption?" 



"It's a car," I told him. "A four 
cylinder four hundred and 
fifty cubic inch, two hundred 
horsepower car with power 
steering, power brakes and an 
automatic stickshift. It's a 
1972 Thunderbird with hook- 
er headers." 

"Oh," he said, "but how does 
it work?" 

"Well," I replied calmly, "the 
fuel is pushed into the com- 
pression chamber where the 
piston is stationary, then the 
fuel is blown up by a spark 
which pushes the piston out 
thereby moving the crank- 
shaft which moves the 
wheels." 

"Hmm," he said. "What do 
you use for fuel?" 

"Gasoline", I said, "which is a 
product of crude oil which is 
extracted from the ground." 

"Very interesting," said he as 
he climbed back into his fly- 
ing saucer to report his find- 
ings. 

BRUCE GAMMON 
Grade 8 



LIMERICKS 



I once knew a girl named Sue 

Who was as tough as the side of a shoe. 

But along came Barrier 

Who decided to marry her 

And that tamed the girl named Sue. 

MIKE STOREY, Grade 8 



There is an old lady of Dider 
Who has always wanted a spider. 
Though she tries and she tries, 
She gets only flies 
That silly old lady of Dider. 

JANE MANNING, Grade 7 



56 



sports 




1972 INTER-PROVINCIAL TOUR 
SR. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL 



Photo courtesy of The Calgary 



Herald 



FEBRUARY 9: 6:00 a.m. at Van de Venter's — fought for seats and pillows in van . . . slept 

and ate all the way to B.C. — slid all the way down Roger's Pass — arrived 
Vancouver 7:00 p.m. for great night of rest and pranks in private homes. 

FEBRUARY 10: Vancouver sightseeing: English Bay, Stanley Park, Zoo, Polo Club and stables 

— dinner on English Bay — tour York House — SPARTANS DEFEAT YORK 
HOUSE 3 GAMES TO 2, despite vigorous cheering by York House Cheer- 
leaders — night out on the town with billets. 

FEBRUARY 11: Swimming and shopping in downtown Vancouver — head for Vancouver 

Island — SPARTANS DEFEAT ST. MARGARET'S BY DEFAULT — spend quiet 
and restful night in Ferry Port before crossing Strait. 

FEBRUARY 12: Early morning Ferry ride across to Vancouver Island — watch seagulls com- 

pete in volleyball match on deck — pursued in van all the way to Victoria 
by handsome suitor — catch the sights in Victoria — arrive Strathcona Lodge 
and settle into beautiful dorms — SPARTANS DEFEAT STRATHCONA LODGE 
3 GAMES TO 1 — head over to Shawnigan Lake Boys' School to watch 
"Oliver Twist" and the boys. 

FEBRUARY 13: Relaxed morning of hiking, bike-riding, swinging, sailing and reading — 

visited private schools on the Island: Shawnigan Lake, Brentwood College, 
Queen Margaret's — SPARTANS DEFEAT QUEEN MARGARET'S — sat down 
to 14 course Chinese meal at Strathcona, prepared and served by Chinese 
students (dessert was delicious). 

FEBRUARY 14: Sneak bodies onto Ferry at Nanaimo arrive Vancouver and tear to Crofton 

House — SPARTANS DEFEAT CROFTON HOUSE 2 GAMES TO 1 — super 
night of washing greasy hair and watching T.V. in new dorm. 

FEBRUARY 15: Tour Crofton House — shopping at the big centres — go to N.H.L. Hockey 

Game between Vancouver and New York — leave Vancouver for squashed 
night in Hope. 

FEBRUARY 16: The long trip home — big landslide drops in front of us — Roger's Pass 

closed for 10 hours — arrive Calgary 1:00 a.m. 



58 



Missing: 
Finalists: 
Champions: 



Back Row (I to r): 



Front Row: 



Brenda Hayward, Robyn Richardson, Mr. Kilb (coach), Louise Harvey, Pam 
Heard 

Cindy Laatsch, Louise Barlass (captain), Bobby-Lee Courtney 
Heather Ross, Kathy Wall 
Foothills Division 

Alberta — British Columbia Independent Schools 



VOLLEYBALL 



The "Spartans" girls' volleyball team was involved in the Foothills division. It consisted ol seven 
schools; Claresholm, Vulcan, High River, Okotoks, Nanton and Turner Valley. Out of twenty-seven 
games played, we won a total of ten and lost seventeen. 

We played two exhibition games during the year, E. P. Scarlett and Central Memorial . . . we won 
one and lost the other. 

Our team was overwhelmed to be invited to the Okotoks Invitational Tournament in which we 
placed third out of eight teams. 

In the Foothills finals, we lost the series in Okotoks, and won the series at Strathcona-Tweedsmuir. 
However, we lost the title on total games. Altogether we tell it was a very good Inst year. 



BRENDA HAYWARD 



V) 



Back Row (I to r): 



Mr. Breland (coach), Simon McLean, Ian Atkinson, Ben Bennett, Dick Sherlock 
Steve Johnson, Alex McNiven, Rob Louisy 
Reid MacDonald (Capt.) 



Front Row: 



Missing: 



VOLLEYBALL 



Yes, it's another first for Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School, and our wins were few and our losses were 
many. In fact, we did not make one complete win of a five game series. Towards the end of the season, 
we were coming close to that major victory. This progress would not have been possible without our 
two patient and faithful coaches, Mr. Breland and Mr. Tajcnar. Our captain was Reid MacDonald. 

This year was a bit disappointing but next year we will be back with more spirit and more experi- 
ence. Thank you to all who assisted. 



STEVE JOHNSON 



60 



Back Row (I to r): Don Willows, Jack Krusche, Ron Kluzak, Ross Clauson, Brent Verner, Philip 

Mayson, Mr. Bauman (coach) 

Front Row: Glen Street, Dick Fullerton, Rob Louisy (Capt.), Doug McKinnon Richard Boyd 

VOLLEYBALL 

This was our first year in competitive league volleyball. Our coach, Mr. Bauman, put his time into 
developing a good team from a number of people who didn't know how to play at all. 

Although we didn't win against Red Deer Lake, we did very well in the Foothills tournament, 
coming third in our division. 

ROB LOUISY 



61 



Back Row (I to r) : 



Mr. Tajcnar (coach), Cynthia Heard, Steph Larson, Michele Jager, Sandy Kline, 
Julie Scott, Sue Moxon, Mr. Kilb (coach) 



Front Row: 



Chris Baker, Cynthia Hayward, Janice Heard, Ruth Gray (Capt.), Sue Tenison, 
Sue Touche, Mary Harvey 



Finalists: 



Foothills Division 



VOLLEYBALL 



Our Junior Girls' Volleyball Team represented our School in the Foothills tournament in High 
River. Nine teams competed against one another for the right to represent our division in the South — 
Central Alberta finals. Our team played six round-robin games before advancing to the semi-finals. 
The highlight of the round-robin games was when we triumphantly defeated Red Deer Lake. They had 
previously been undefeated in five years. In the semi-finals, we beat High River two games straight — 
that put us in the finals where we lost to Black Diamond in the final game of a best out of three match. 



RUTH GRAY 



62 



Back Row (I to r): Miss Bauer (coach), Sylvia Sherlock, Sue Tenison, Ruth Gray, Tara Dunnet, 

Mr. Schmit (coach) 

Front Row: Sue Touche, Cynthia Heard, Chris Baker (Capt.), Ann Meeker, Janice Heard 

Champions: Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School Invitational Basketball Tournament 

BASKETBALL 

The junior high "Spartans" started their first year of basketball this past season. We practised three 
times a week with coaches Mr. Nelson, Mr. Schmit and Miss Bauer. 

Our team competed as an interscholastic team in the Foothills Division, finishing with one win 
and seven losses. 

In March, we hosted an Invitational Tournament inviting Okotoks, Millarville, and Turner Valley. 
The "Spartans" played six games and came out the champions which made the coaches and players 
very happy. 

CHRIS BAKER 



63 



Back Row (I to r): Mr. Nelson (coach), David Johnson, Tom Tenison, John McCruden, John 

Knebles, Bruce Rombough, Don Willows, Mr. Schmit (coach) 

Front Row: Dick Fullerton, Doug McKinnon, Mike Whitehead (Capt.), Rob Louisy, 

Richard Boyd 

BASKETBALL 

Our basket ball season this year was a good one, considering the practising time we had. In our 
league of eight teams, we won three games and lost five. Our coaches, Mr. Schmit and Mr. Nelson, 
arranged a Strathcona-Tweedsmuir Invitational Tournament, consisting of Millarville, Black Diamond 
and Okotoks. We placed second. 

With a year of training behind us now, I am sure we will be much more victorious in the years to 
come. 

RICHARD BOYD 



64 



Back Row (I to r): Simon McLean, Ian Atkinson, Louise Barlass, Ben Bennett, Dick Sherlock, 

Mr. Kilb (coach) 

Front Row: Rob White, Pam Heard, Gord Jager (Capt.), Cindy Laatsch (Capt.), Steve 

Johnson 

BADMINTON 

In April, the Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School Senior Badminton Team made its first competitive 
showing in the Foothills Division. Although no team made it to the semi-finals, our best showing was 
made by the boys doubles team of Gord Jager and Rob White, who placed second in their league. 

Everyone participating played to the best of his ability and had a good time. 

GORD JAGER 



65 



Back Row (I to r): Janice Heard, Dick Fullerton, Sue Tenison, Rob Louisy, Ruth Gray, Mike 

Whitehead 

Middle Row: John McCruden, Sue Touche, Ron Kluzak, Ann Meeker, Mike Storey, Michele 

Jager, John Dover, Mr. Kilb (coach) 

Front Row: Scott Evans, Betsy Harvie, David Johnson (Capt.), Sue Moxon (Capt.), Don 

Willows, Cynthia Heard, Brent Watson 

Champions: Foothills Division: Michele Jager and Ann Meeker (7 Girls' Doubles) 

David Johnson (8 Boys' Singles) 

BADMINTON 

This year's badminton team played very well considering that it was our first year of competition. 
The team played in the Foothills Division tournament, competing against eight schools and 360 com- 
petitors. 

Our players finished in a very strong position with Brent Watson placing second (7 Boys' singles), 
Mike Whitehead finishing second (9 Boys' singles), David Johnson winning first (8 Boys' singles) and 
Michele Jager and Ann Meeker placing first (7 Girls' doubles). Unfortunately team co-captain, Sue 
Moxon, missed the tournament because she was playing in Europe at the time. 

DAVID JOHNSON 



66 



Mr. Bauman (coach), Simon McLean, Les McDaniel, Mike Whitehead, 

Jennifer Jackson (Capt.), Ben Bennett, Janice Heard, Steve Johnson, Mr. Seeger 
(coach) 

Miss Bauer (coach), Sylvia Sherlock, Richard Boyd, Chris Baker, Brent Verner, 
Ann Meeker, Don Willows, Betsy Harvie, Brent Watson, Cynthia Heard, 
Mrs. Domoney (coach) 

Mr. Breland (coach), John Knebles, Sue Tenison, Doug McKinnon (Capt.), 
Ian Atkinson (Capt.), Ruth Gray, Rob Louisy, Sue Touche, Mr. Nelson (coach) 
Foothills Division: Jennifer Jackson (Bantam High Jump), 

Brent Verner (800 metres Bantam) *NEW RECORD 
Doug McKinnon (Bantam 80 metres Hurdles) 
Foothills and South Central Alberta: *NEW RECORD 

Steve Johnson (Junior 120 yd. Hurdles) + NEW RECORD 
TRACK & FIELD 

Our School was well represented by the Junior Track Team at this year's Foothills School Division 
Track Meet in High River. Winners included Jennifer Jackson in the Bantam Girls' High Jump and Brent 
Verner winning the Bantam Boys' 800 metres with a time of 2:40.5, setting a new Foothills Division 
record. Another record was set in the Bantam Boys' 80 metre hurdles by Doug McKinnon with a time 
of 15.7. In the midget category, Brian Parke won the mile. These winners proceded to the South Centrals 
along with Rob Louisy who placed second in high jump and long jump. 

The results of the South Central meet were: Rob Louisy — fifth in both the high jump and long 
jump, Brent Verner — third in the 800 metres, Brian Parke — fifth in the 1600 metres, Jennifer Jackson 
— fifth in 1600 metres, Don Willows — fifth in the shot-put and Doug McKinnon fourth in the 
hurdles. DOUG McKINNON 

SENIOR TRACK AND FIELD 

Four senior boys entered in the Foothills Division trac k meet May 16, at High River. I luce ot the 
four boys placed in events. Ben Bennett placed in two events, third in disc us and javelin. Steve |ohn- 
son came first in the 120 yd. hurdles, while Simon Mclean placed third in high jump. 

Steve Johnson set one new record on his way to the Provinc ial Championships, l ust, he sen the 
Foothills Division Record in the 110 yd. hurdles with a time of I8.0. He then placed first in the South 
Central Alberta Championships, before finishing fourth in the Provinc ial Championships. The first track 
c lub ol Strathc ona- Twoedsmuir Sc hool has made a ^ood start. ATKINSON 



Back Row (I to r) : 

Middle Row: 

Front Row: 
Champions: 



67 



Back Row (I to r): 



Mr. Bauman (coach), Bob Rasmussen, Cynthia Heard, Richard Boyd, Sue 
Touche, Rob Louisy, Steph Larson, Brent Verner, Mr. Kilb (coach) 



Front Row: Janice Heard, John McCruden, Brenda Hayward, Rob White, Jennifer Jackson, 

Brian Parke 

Team Champions: Jr. High Foothills Division 

Champions: Foothills Division: Jennifer Jackson (Bantam Girls) 

Richard Boyd (Bantam Boys) 
Brian Parke (Midget Boys) 

CROSS COUNTRY 

In October our School's Cross Country Team competed in the Foothills Division Meet. The com- 
petition was held at the Okotoks High School. Results of the Division were: Jennifer Jackson — First 
and Cynthia Heard — Third for Bantam Girls; Richard Boyd — First, Bob Rasmussen — Second and 
Brent Verner — Third for Bantam Boys; Janice Heard — Fourth in Midget Girls; Brian Parke — First 
and John McCruden — Fourth in Midget Boys. In this meet our team came first out of the nine schools 
competing. 

The first seven placers went on to the South Central Alberta Championship which was also held 

in Okotoks. 

Outstanding performers were: Jennifer Jackson — Second, Richard Boyd — Fourth, Janice Heard 
— Fourth and Brian Parke — Second. 

Senior runners, Brenda Hayward and Rob White, placed in the Foothills division and the South 
Central meets, thus qualifying them to compete in the provincial finals. 

JENNIFER JACKSON 



68 




Back Row (I to r): Mr. Dawoocl (coach), Frank Rensing, Don Willows, Brent Verner, Graham 

Smith, Bruce Rombough, Brett Kyle, Phil Vince 

Front Row: Doug Johnson, Jack Krusche, Mark Trimble, Rob Louisy (Capt.), Randy 

McDonald, Jeff Agar, Trevor Balding 



SOCCER 

Our team was not in a league and only played one game against High River. We beat High River 
by a score of 3-1. We practised every Tuesday and Thursday in option period for about fifty minutes 
In the game there were no serious injuries, the only injuries were scraped and bruised shins. 

DOUG JOHNSON 



69 



Back Row (I to r): Mr. Dawood (coach), Mark Heard, Rod Kirkham, Trevor Balding (Capt.), 

Jamie Kastens, Randy McDonald, Jeff Agar, Richard Horan 

Front Row: Bill Krebs, Hampton Ripley, Bob Rasmussen, Doug McNiven, David Ryan, 

Jay Lyons, Bruce Conway 

SOCCER 

In our year of soccer we played Elbow Park School. With the great coaching of Mr. Dawood, we 
had a successful year. Since it was our first year in progress, we did not play many games, but next year 
we are planning to Join the Separate School soccer league. In all, we had a good year. 

MARK HEARD 



70 




Back Row (I to r): Mr. Breland (coach), Stu Ashman, Rod Kirkham, Randy McDonald, Richard 

Horan, Trevor Balding, Jamie Kastens 

Front Row: Mark Heard, Bob Rasmussen, Bruce Conway, Hampton Ripley, Bill Krebs, 

David Ryan 

Missing: Bob Rankin 

FLOOR HOCKEY 

During our year's activities in Physical Education, we played a lot of floor hockey with Mr. Bre- 
land coaching us. We did a lot of practising until finally he arranged for us to play floor hockey against 
St. Raymond School. In all of the games we played, we defeated them 15 to 12 on total score. 

BRUCE CONWAY 



71 



STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR AWARDS 
1971-1972 



ACADEMIC PRIZES — Outstanding Achievement 


Grade Four Boys 




in 


a Particular Area 


Mathematics/Science 


Kramer 
Mackinnon II 


Grade One Girls 






Blake 


Honour Work 


Amy Smith 


Social Studies 


LeBlanc I 


Good Effort 


Keli Baldwin 


Physical Education 


Blake 


Honour Work 


Catherine McKenna 


Grade Five Girls 




Grade One Boys 




English/Social Studies 


Patrizia Mazzolani 




Mathematics/Science 


Leslie Oughton 


Most Improved Student 


Craine 


Special Projects 


Nancy Boswell 


Grade Two Girls 




Special Projects (Oral) 


Susan Hay 


Participation 


Michele Theriault 


Grade Five Boys 




Honour Work 


Lisa Jackson 


M r 1 H St H 
os mprove u en 


Griffith 


Honour Work 


Daniela Brovedani 


English/Social Studies 


Mackinnon I 


Honour Work 


Jodi Pisko 


Mathematics/Science 


Fathi 


Great Effort 


Suzanne Abt 


Special Projects 
Theology 


Morrison II 
Fathi 


Grade Two Boys 




Physical Education 


Jackson 


Most improved Student 


Morrison III 


Grade Six Girls 




Mathematics 


Thakkar 1 




French 


Borrett 


Most Improved Student 


Patricia Cooper 


Physical Education 


Currie 


English/Social Studies 


Martha Newell 




Mathematics/Science 


Jacqueline Vince 


Grade Three Girls 




Special Projects 


Katie Hanson 


Mathematics 


Sara Goldstein 


Leadership Potential 


Ellen Rawin 






Social Studies/English 


Sara Goldstein 


Grade Six Boys.(1) 




Notebooks 


Leanne Oughton 


Ashmun 




Reading and Literature 


Grade Three Boys 




Social Studies 


Conway 




Mathematics/Science 


Gregory 


Most Improved Student 


Olafson 


Art 


Brown II 


Reading 


Drisdale 


Notebooks 


Balding 


Diligence 


Motta 


Grade Six Boys (2) 




Grade Four Girls 




Reading and Literature 


Morrison I 


Social Studies/English 


Debra Juchem 


Social Studies 


Macdonald 


Mathematics 


Debra Juchem 


Mathematics/Science 


Lynch 


Theology 


Debra Juchem 


Notebooks 


Ryan 



72 



Senior High School Awards 

Mathematics 



Science 
Social Studies 
English 

Special Projects 
Most Improved Stud 
French 

OTHER PRIZES 

Canoe Club Badges 
(1971) 



Horsemanship 

Public Speaking 
Kirby Cup 
Burns Cup 

Performing Arts 

Library Assistance 



Cindy Laatsch 
Cordon Jager 
Cindy Laatsch 
Gordon Jager 
Pamela Heard 
Calvin McClary 
Karen Proctor 
Karen Proctor 
ent Alex McNiven 
Kathy Wall 
Alex McNiven 

Calvin McClary 
Dick Sherlock 
Ted Thurston 
John Rooney 
Brian Peacock 
Tom Cooper 
Donald LeFaive 
Jack Krusche 
Philip Brown 
Mark Heard 
Rod Kirkham 
Bob Rankin 
Bill Rankin 
Jane Hutchinson 
Michael Pryor 
Michael Thakkar 
Mark Heard 
Karen Proctor 
John Knebles 
Linda Garshman 
(Rensing Cup) 
Pat Sifton 
Shauna Blake 
Ann Conway 



AWARD OF EXCELLENCE 
Physical Fitness Award 



Jennifer Jackson 
Cindy Laatsch 
Robyn Richardson 
Rod Kirkham 
Dick Fullerton 

SPORTS PRIZES 

ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENT — 

Outstanding Physical Education Student 

Grades One - Three Girls Mary Ann Brown 



Grades 


One - Three Boys 


Jed Olafson 


Grades 


Four - Six Girls 


Leanne Oughton 


Grades 


Four - Six Boys 


Rod Kirkham 


PROFICIENCY PRIZES 




Grade 


One Girls 


Catherine McKenna 


Grade 


One Boys 




Grade 


Two Girls 


JUUI rlSKO 


Grade 


Two Boys 


Bart Borrett 




Three Girls 




Grade 


Three Boys 


Paul LeBlanc 








Grade 


Four Boys 


S^mon Goldstein 


Grade 


Five Girls 


Leslie Ou hton 




Five Boys 


D^av'icl Fathi 00 


Grade 


Six Girls 


lac ueline Vin 




Six Boys (1) 


Russell Gre or^ 


Grade 


Six Boys (2) 


William L^nch^ 


Grade 




lennifer lack on 




c 

Seven Boys 


B^ian tester ^ 


Grade 


Eight Girls 


Ann Conwa 


Grade 


Eight Boys (1) 


Dick Fullerton 


Grade 


Eight Boys (2) 


lo'hn Brown 0 " 


Grade 


Nine Girls 


Janice Heard 


Grade 


Nine Boys 


Johnt<nebles 


Grade 


Ten Girls 


Karen Proctor 


Grade 


Ten Boys 


Gordon Jager 


Grade 


Eleven Girls 


Annabelle 






Hunnerfauth 


Grade 


Eleven Boys 


Dick Sherlock 


Grade 


Twelve Girls 


Elizabeth Duffin 


Junior 


High School Awards 





Mathematics 



Social Studies 



English 
French 



Russian 

Home Economics 



Moyra Mackinnon 
Brent Verner 
Jane Manning 
John Brown 
Ann Conway 
Brett Kyle 
Brian Lester 
Jennifer Jackson 
Doug McKinnon 
Janice Heard 
lohn Knebles 
Carol Shymka 
Joanne Ebsworth 



73 



STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR AWARDS 
1971-1972 



HONOUR PINS 

Catherine McKenna 
Amy Smith 
Lisa Jackson - Chain 
Jodi Pisko - Chain 
Daniela Brovedani 
Sara Goldstein - Chain 
Mary Ann Brown 
Debra Juchem - Chain 
Leanne Oughton - Chain 
Nancy Boswell - Chain 
Leslie Oughton - Chain 
Susan Hay 

Jacqueline Vince - Chain 
Susan Gregory 
Jennifer Jackson - Chain 
Jane Manning 
Moyra Mackinnon - Chain 
Ann Conway 
Gail Humphreys 
Janice Heard - Chain 
Karen Proctor 
Heather Ross 
Pamela Heard 
Annabelle Hunnerfauth 
Cindy Laatsch 
Elizabeth Duffin - Chain 
Patrizia Mazzolani - Chain 
Gabriele Brovedani 
John Tanton 
Michael Thakkar 
Bart Borrett 
Roddy Heard 
Marco Mazzolani 
Tom Nelson 



HOUSE CHAMPIONSHIP — HEWITT CUP 

Burns House 



Andrew Rahme 
David Thakkar 
John Bilton 
Conan Daly 
Kenneth Drisdale 
Murray Laidlow 
Paul LeBlanc 
Lauchlin Lyons 
Clive Moulden 
Leroy Thiessen 
Simon Goldstein 
Mark LeBlanc 
John Mackinnon 
David Fathi 
David Jackson 
Russell Morrison 
Donald Mackinnon 
Stuart Ashmun 
David Brown 
Bruce Conway 
Russell Gregory 
William Lynch 
Colin Hay 
Brian Lester 
Philip Mayson 
David Johnson 
Dick Fullerton 
John Brown 
Doug McKinnon 
John Knebles 
Jack Krusche 



HOUSE LETTERS 
Buchan House 

Junior Girls 
Junior Boys 
Senior Girls 
Senior Boys 



Lisa Jackson 
Bart Borrett 
Jennifer Jackson 
Brent Verner 



Burns House 

Junior Girls 
Junior Boys 
Senior Girls 
Senior Boys 



Dover House 

Junior Girls 
Junior Boys 
Senior Girls 
Senior Boys 



Howard House 

Junior Girls 
Junior Boys 
Senior Girls 
Senior Boys 



Sara Goldstein 
David Thakkar 
Janice Heard 
John Knebles 



Jacqueline Vince 
Jamie Gibson 
Heather Ross 
Douglas Johnson 



Janice White 
Tommy Nelson 
Karen Proctor 
Donald Willows 



MOST VALUABLE PLAYERS — 
Greatest Contribution to Sport 

Grades 7 - 9 Girls 
Grades 7 - 9 Boys 
Grades 10-12 Girls 
Grades 10-12 Boys 



Jennifer Jackson 
Doug McKinnon 
Cindy Laatsch 
Steven Johnson 



STRATHCONA AWARD — DILIGENCE 
(Burns Cup) 



Christine Wilderman 



OUTSTANDING ATHLETE (Woods Trophy) 
Ability, Sportsmanship, Team Play 

Louise Barlass 
Robert Louisy 



CITIZENSHIP (Tanner Cup) 



Alex McNiven 



74 



We thank our Year Book 

Contributors 
Dr. & Mrs. P. B. McKenna 
and 

Our Advertizers 



76 




The 

ROYAL BANK 
salutes the graduating 
class of 
Strathcona -Tweedsmuir 
School 
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