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This yearbook was a cooperative effort of not only the 
Yearbook Committee, but some members of the staff, with- 
out whose help this yearbook would not have been possible. 
First and foremost we must thank Mrs. Bartel, our "staff 
advisor". This woman managed to survive long meetings 
and personality clashes throughout the year with a smile. 
Her advice was always beneficial, and her baseball bat 
even more effective on the "artists" of the bunch, who 
needed their "space" to ponder the imagery which we were 
striving for with this book. Thank you, too, to Mrs. 
Owens, whose help with the Elementary section and with 
the organization of the Yearbook was invaluable. Thanks 
must also go to Mr. Keller, our "man about town", who not 
only contributed his action photos, but managed to remain 
calm as conflicting orders came in for developing. Your 
time and talent has been greatly appreciated. 





EDITOR 



Table of Contents 



PAGE NUMBER 



HEADMASTER'S MESSAGE 6 

ELEMENTARY 10 

ELEMENTARY LITERATURE 20 

LITERATURE 27 

JUNIOR HIGH 43 

SPORTS 51 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION 70 

ACTIVITIES 75 

SENIOR HIGH 91 

COMMITTEES 99 

GRADUATES 107 

STAFF 161 

PRIZE GIVING 169 

ADVERTISING 174 



5 



HEADMASTER'S MESSAGE 



Paidia 86 marks the fifteenth year of Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School. 
The record of this eventful year has been prepared, once again, by a dedicated 
group of Grade 12 students who have worked hard to provide us all with a 
memorable souvenir of the people and activities that made the year such a special 
one. 

During this year the School celebrated some of its history. The 
eightieth anniversary of the founding of one of our predecessor schools, 
St. Hilda's, was observed. The centenary of the completion of the CP Trans- 
continental railroad was reenacted by Lord Strathcona's great-grandson who came 
to S.T.S. to present gold spike awards, on behalf of the alumni, to the School's 
major benefactors. 

In addition to our grand occasions were other major events: the first 
Endeavours Programme, Marti-McKay Week with artist-in-residence Kitty Pryde, our 
production of "Anything Goes", the entertaining Speech Day with its stormy 
debate: "A woman's place is in the home" - a topic argued so many years ago at 
St. Hilda's. There were the Grub Days, Students' Council contests and elections, 
Science Fair and the musical ride performed by the Lord Strathcona Horse. Our 
basketball and volleyball teams travelled far and wide competing against other 
schools and our track and field stars achieved regional and provincial 
recognition . 

As one looks through these pages the most important feature of all our 
events at school is the people participating in them: the students and staff. 
This participation and interaction become the significant memories of school, 
those which we carry with us throughout our lives. 

I thank the editors and yearbook staff for helping to preserve the 

memories . 



Peter B. Ditchburn 
Headmaster 




id 





ELEMENTARY 




Grade 2 

Front Row 
Stephen Mannix 
Greta Rognoni 
Oliver Spackman 

Zaria Hamer 

David Howard 
Angus MacKenzie 
Andrea Brown 
Christopher Milne 
Middle Row 
Erin Eisenberg 
Sonya Lowe 
Xanna Waugh 
Courtney Ropchan 
Erin Holcomb 
Claire Thompson 
Back Row 
John Zaozirny 
Christopher Harrison 
Jeffrey Horan 
Mrs. Jenny Owens 
Cameron Proudfoot 
Stephen Wiesenthal 
Sam Elmore 



Grade 1 

Front Row 
Alicia Johnston 
Neema Charania 
Ariane Francis 

Whitney Finch 
Araylea Waters 

Laura Milinusic 
Erin Kaiser 
Andria Chimienti 
Middle Row 
Cory Sine 
Christian Johnsen 
Robert Miller 
Michael Holcroft 
John Hankinson 
Jason Simon 
Conor MacLean 
Back Row 
Christina Towle 
Corene Grams 
Sara Hewitt 
Whitney Lowden 
Jenny Perkins 
Jacqueline Burns 




12 




Grade 3 

Front Row 
Steven Oh 
Robbie Masters 
Jenny Chouinard 
Arthur Poon 
Andrew Clark 
Katherine Lai 
Jeffrey Neuss 
Grant Crowther 
Middle Row 
Louis Williams 
James Harrison 
Erin Galvin 
Rhiannon Clarke 
Arvin Poon 
Danny Sekhon 
Back Row 
Robert Delf 
Jeffrey Bowen 
Samantha Tabbitt 
Mr. Steve Diskin 
Jessica Holcroft 
Tamiz Kanj i 
Scott Anderson 



13 




Grade 4B 

Front Row 
Patrick Mitchell 
Michelle Wong 
Rishi Verma 
2nd Row 
Heather Kirk 
Steven Bartel 
Katka Smira 
Tara Habijanac 
Jamie Couinard 
Lisa Ricketts 
Middle Row 
Kern Shepherd 
Marte Towle 
Matthew Koning 
Michael Forbes 
Shayna Andersen 
Cameron Tedford 
Back Row 
Jessica Baert 
Julian Oh 
Monica Sekhon 
Mrs. Alice Wyatt 
Dominique Keller 
Gregory Darou 
Jilla Mawer 



Grade 4A 

Front Row 
Latif Walj i 
Rhiannon Owens 
Molly Gillespie 
Katie Eberts 
Ria Paul 

Steven Patterson 
Middle Row 
James Francis 
Mackenzie Harvey 
Erin Thompson 
Phillipa Vass 
Arliss Abrahamson 
Christy Greene 
Richard Lengkong 
Danny Baillie 
Back Row 
Grant Farn 
Charles Mannix 
Ian Armitage 
Mrs. Lois Harvey 
Kyle English 
Christopher Cully 
Nathan Cronin 




14 




Grade 5A 



Front Row 



Ryan Crowther 
Andrew Kirker 
Gerrard Lewis-Steer 
Claire Owens 
Emeline Lamond 
Tim Spedding 
Alan Yeung 
Alim Mitha 
Middle Row 



Jennifer Rocker 

Lee-Noelle Schneider 

Brandy James 

Mimi Watkins 

Jill Baillie 

Heidi Dinning 

Back Row 

Stephen Caplan 

Ilja Herb 

Gabe Freedman 

Mrs. Pamela Perkins 

Christian Steinbock 

Jeffrey Davis 

John Palmer 



Grade 5B 

Front Row 
Pat Stewart 
Andrew Tavender 
Tyler Pichach 
Jennifer Tottenham 
Jeffrey Hodorek 
Matthew Milinusic 
Middle Row 
Heather Lorfing 
Kathy Bartel 
Sarah Hawitt 
Duntin Hunter 
Emily Hamer 
Nairn Ali 
Back Row 
Clarke Hanna 
Aaron Kirkham 
Kern McMurtrie 
Miss Linda Wiggins 
Stephen Adams 
James Hall 
Karim Nogas 





Grade 6B 

Front Row 
Stewart Worth 
Christopher Peacoct 
Patrick Young 
2nd Row 

Jennifer Upitis 
Michael Lane 
Kathleen Cronin 
Amy Eisenberg 
Robert Cropp 
Stephanie Brown 
Middle Row 
Rachael Owens 
Roxanne Elenko 
Danielle Keller 
Abigail Kinch 
Katie Stewart 
Chandra Mannix 
Back Row 
Andrew Knowles 
Matthew Burns 
Travis McConnell 
Mr. Gary Bauman 
Ryan Honey 
Drew Hyndman 
Mark Perkins 



Grade 6A 
Front Row 

Michelle Chouinard 
Andrew Mitchell 
Ryan McCallum 
Christina Zolotas 
Ashley Skiber 
Hartley Sirkis 
Roger McClary 
Angus Turner 
Middle Row 
Kevin Spear 
Erin MacDonald 
David Votypka 
Robert Pierce 
Rachael Scott 
Robert Scott 
Back Row 

Jacqueline Westly 
Adam Forseth 
Chelsea Kirkpatrick 
Miss Home 
Nancy Angus 
Hamish McKellar 
Charity Nufer 
Absent 
Clint Sello 




16 



UNICEF Canada Chairman, Greta Timmins, thanks the Elementary School 
Hallowe'en contributions, when over $500 was raised UNICEF. 



for their 




Some of the winners at Elementary Speech Day 



Some of the Elementary Science Fair winners who went on to compete 
Calgary Youth Science Fair in April. 



Mme. Goldsworthy with Grade 6B at Heritage Park 
Some Grade 3 students at Elementary Sports Day 



SPRING 



by Christian Johnsen 
Grade 1 



Spring is a time to play 

I love Spring. 

I like to see baby animals. 



SPRING by Erin Kaiser 

Grade 1 

Spring is a happy feeling 
For fun it is my favorite 
season. It's a good time 
to lie in the sun. I 
like to hear the birds 
sing and smell the pretty 
flowers in the sun. I 
like to see baby fish 
swimming in a pool and 
rabbits hopping up and down 
on the grass. That is all 
for today. 

SPRING by Corene Grams 

Grade 1 

Spring is a time to play . 
I like to fly a kite and 
^ee green grass 
and plant vegetables. 



W ISH UPON A STAR By Cameron Proudfoot 

Grade 2 

When I am in the city 

Where the bright lights glare, 
Stars are not as pretty 

Even though I stare. 
When I am in the country 

The lights are not as bright 
That's what makes my pretty star 

A wonderful sight. 



THE COBRA by Oliver Spackman 

Grade 2 

The cobra roams the jungle quiet as can be. 
Faster faster through the grass the cobra slides. 
Then he sees a man. He slides and he takes a bite. 
When the man falls, the cobra slides away. 



20 



ELEMENTARY POETRY CONTEST 



DIVISION I 

WISH UPON A STAR By Louis Williams 

Grade 3 

I wished upon a star one night, 
And there is was, sparkling bright. 

It looked so lonely against the vast sky, 
It almost made me weep and cry. 

I wondered if my wish would come true, 

As I wished upon a star that seemed so blue. 

I uttered a prayer to the lord above, 
Who has in his heart mercy and love. 

I wished the star had more of its kind, 
So it won't be lonely for me to find. 

Suddenly the sky was lit, 

With stars, like jewels, bit by bit. 

I saw my wishing star grow brighter and brighter, 
Which made my heart lighter and lighter. 

Then I wished upon this star of mine, 

To make all my wishes fall in line. DIVISION II 

War Against The Night By Jeffrey Davis 

Grade 5 

As darkness slowly creeps across the sky 
Covering the earth with a thick, black coat, 
I watch the sun retreating to the west, 
Fearfully surrendering to the night. 

The wary sun decends to the horizon 

Illuminating the sky around dark, lingering clouds 

The night travels mercilessly on, 

Dragging its eerie gloom behind it. 

Night time has taken over fully, 
Shielding the light of the now desperate sun. 
Spirits of darkness haunt the earth, 
Working for their tragic lord. 

Finally, the sun victoriously breaks through, 

Its rays dancing through the darkness. 

With renewed strength light penetrates the darkness, 

Signalling nature to begin the new day. 



THE NIGHT SKY 

I looked up in to the starry sky. 

I saw a rocket go sailing by. 

I wondered if it was Saturn 5. 

I wondered if there was anyone inside. 

Someday maybe I'll make the trip 

Inside a great big rocket ship. 

Then I won't be standing here, 

I'll be way up in the atmosphere. 



By Rob Delf 
Grade 3 



By Danny Baillie 4A 




CHALLENGER 



By Patrick Mitchell 
Grade 4 



The families were watching and shouthing "Hooray!" 

Then the Challenger blew up on that terrible day. 

The seven brave astronauts, two women five men 

That the world will never ever see again. 

President Reagan said to the nation, 

"It's no comfort to say there's an investigation." 

He said "We shall miss and never forget." 

"But future space heroes will conquer space yet. 



POEMS 

NERDS 
NIBBLE 
NOISELESSLY • 

TINY 

SOUR 

FRUITY 

HARD 

NERDS, 



NERDS 

SMALL, CRUNCHY 
SOUR, FRUITY, FAT 
THEY LOOK QUITE FUNNY 
NERDS. 

SMALL 
STINKY 
QUIET 
FURRY 
SKUNKS . 

SKUNKS . 

LITTLE, STINKY 
FURRY, PLUMP, QUIET. 
THEY SMELL VERY GROSS. 
SKUNKS . 



THE SWAN 

By Heather Lorfing 

The forest was quiet. The leaves were green 
but there was a light frost. In the middle of 
a pond there was a beautiful swan. Her neck 
was long and graceful. As she glided around, 
the animals stopped and came closer and closer 
to the pond. Then all of a sudden they bowed 
their heads. For she was the queen of swans. 
Slowly, very slowly, they walked away. Then 
she swam to the shore of the pond. Gradually 
she went to sleep. Her time had come. 



FEELINGS By Nairn Ali 5B 

I ran my legs still sore from running 

But still, I felt like a bird flapping its wings. 

I sat down, still excited from my escape. 

All this time I was a prisoner, but now I m Free. 

The feeling just to roam around with my people, 

in my own world. 

I'm free. 



A WORD FROM THE FORGOTTEN 

5B 

I saw a wolf just the other day, 

And what he had to say made me think very hard. 

He had a bushy tail and fur. 

That reminded you of your mother's fur coat. But 

those eyes! Those eyes, those eyes. 

The way they shone and showed sadness, happiness, 

and secrecy, all 
At the same time. 
He said to me, 

"What are you doing here man? 

You don't belong, the woods are for us animals, 
And us alone." 

"But what is wrong with me here, dear wolf? 
I am part of the world too." 

"Ah, yes, but you have chosen to be not part of u 

You have chosen to ignore us. 

So go! And take man with you." 

I walked slowly home, very sad, very sad. 

By Kathy Bartel 5B 



LANTERNS 



Once upon a time Billy sat on his bed. The window was full of 
sparks. Granny! Billy called out. He pointed at the window. 
"Those are fireflies," said Granny. They have lanterns on their 
tails that shine." "I would like one," said Billy. "Well, you 
might have a new lantern because your birthday's coming soon." 
And when his birthday came, he opened a present. It said "To 
Billy Love Granny." You know what it was? Yes a lantern. 



He shoved a package into my trembling hands. It was soaked. I started to 



open it, feverishly, quickly. Eventually a ship's log fell out. I started to read: 
"June 18, 1749 Storm hit at reefs on Seagate. Marianna grounded..." 

The entry suddenly ended. By now I was in a state of terror. Today was 
June 18, 1949. 

I looked again at the stranger. He said, "I was the cabin boy". The sky 
lit up with lightning and he was gone. Another flash of lightning, and I caught a 
glimpse of an 18th century square-rigger ship sinking slowly beneath the waves. 

"Wait", I yelled, and ran out the door. 

A sudden rocking of the earth made me fall down. I realized I was on the 
Marianna ! 

The ship was tilted dangerously towards the bow. I heard men's screams as 
the sea lashed at the ship. The sails and rigging were down, and most loose 
objects were sliding into the sea. A sense of panic overwhelmed me. I hung to the 
side, lighting for my life. A huge wave tipped over the ship. It was sinking fast 
now. Another wave hit the ship and carried me overboard. 

I knew I had gone too far... but I tried to swim. Huge waves pounded over 
me. With a last tremendous burst of energy I pushed myself towards the shore. 

I don't know how I made it. I just remember clambering up a rocky beach two 
miles from the house. I went to the road. It wasn't tarmac, but rough rocks! 

It hit me like a wave. I was stranded in the 18th century. But I went to 
the house that I knew was mine. I am now my own great-great-great grandfather. I'm 
going to write my adventure down and put it where it will be discovered by myself in 
200 years time. 



By 



Sonya Lowe 
Grade 2 



A STRANGER AT THE DOOR 



By Robert Cropp 6B 



23 




Grade 3 students admire the Elementary School's first art acquisition, 
framed poster, presented by the Headmaster in 1986. 



FROM THE DESK OF THE PRIME MINISTER 



The prime minister is the most powerful figure in Canadian 
politics, however, with this power comes responsibility. 
Responsibility not only to one's own cabinet ministers, political 
party or fellow members of parliament but to Canada. As head 
of the federal government, the prime minister may institute, 
although not single handedly, two main forms of legislation as 
part of this responsibility, domestic and foreign policy. As 
prime minister I feel that part of this responsibility is placing 
the domestic affairs of the nation before foreign affairs because 

it is a futile effort to legislate foreign policy if the domes 
tic affairs of the country are not in order. I also feel that 
it is crucial for any prime minister to have a dream or ultimate 
goal for Canada. Pierre Elloit Trudeau had a dream which was 
fulfilled when the Canadian Constitution was returned to Canada 
from Great Britain. My dream for Canada is to alleviate the 
animosity between the French and English cultures of Canada 
which has existed since Confederation, proving to the world 
that Canada is truly a bicultural nation. I realize that this 
is a difficult goal for which to be striving for and its potential 
certainly will not be fully realized even if I do serve several 
terms in office. As well, I will not govern blindly, solely 
with this dream in mind, ignoring other obvious problems, but I 
plan to institute numerous reforms, both in domestic and foreign 
areas, which will improve our nation. Domestically, I have six 
new policies, only two of which will pertain directly to improved 
French and English relations. I have five foreign policies which 
I feel are necessary for this nation. Every prime minister who 
has served a term in office will, if they are honest, admit that 
while the best interests of Canada were of paramount importance 
to them, the chance of not being re-elected because of legislated 
policies, is always in the back of their minds. Therefore, as 
I plan to spend successive terms in office, I have designed my 
policies with the interests of Canada in mind, to be of benefit 
to as many of the populace as possible. 

Domestically, I have placed my policy ideas in the order 
of their importance. My first would be in regard to family 
allowance reform. I propose that the average Canadian family 
of four, earning a combined income of more than forty thousand 
dollars perannum, should not receive the family allowance. 
Naturally, the cut off point of forty thousand dollars per year 
would have to be adjusted accordingly for families with more 
than four members. The millions of dollars saved from this cut 
back will be applied in other areas to finance my reforms. Secondly, 
as part of national dream, I would commence a nation-wide 
tourism campaign, encouraging Canadians to vacation in a region 
of Canada that they perhaps have never seen before. As well as 



seeing new areas of Canada, Canadians vacationing m their own 
country, would not have to deal with the high exchange rates 
if, for example, they were to vacation in the United States. 
Furthermore, it would improve relations between the different 
regions of Canada, while investing the money in Canada, thereby 
strengthening the economy. As a part of the national tourism 
policy, I would also include a clause providing funds for French 
and English exchanges across the country. Not only student 
exchanges but adult exchanges because I feel that the Canadian 
youth has more respect for biculturalism than do the adults of 
this nation. Thirdly, I would promote bilingualism. Canada 
has two official languages and to some extent now and certainly 
in the future, being bilingual is a neccessity if you want to 
do any kind of business in eastern Canada. Positions in the 
government, lawyers, policemen, top executives and even teachers 
in the eastern part of Canada need to be bilingual to be effec- 
tive in their respective occupations. So why do I need to be 
bilingual? Ask Westerners. The answer is that one never knows 
when one may be called upon to work in eastern Canada. Canada 
is officially bilingual and therefore, every Canadian should 
have at least some basic knowledge of French. This will also 
improve relations between the English and the French, if the 
Francophone see the Anglophones trying. 

Therefore I propose that any undergraduate student wishing 
to graduate from a post-secondary institution, regardless of 
the faculty, should be given an oral French examination which 
will be set by the education ministers of all the provincial 
governments. The exam can be taken at any point during an 
individual's undergraduate but must be passed with a grade of 
fifty-five per cent or better in order to receive one's degree. 
Fourthly, to encourage investment in Canadian companies, I would 
render dividends from these companies tax free. This would 
increase financial backing for Canadian companies, thus allowing 
them to expand and therefore creating more jobs. However, should 
an individual be receiving dividends from a foreign company, 
these would be fully taxable. Fifthly, to decrease the political 
gap between the federal and provincial governments, I would 
institute a policy calling for annual meetings with all the 
provincial premiers. There would be no particular agenda except 
to discuss current issues affecting the provincial and federal 
jurisdictions.. This will aid in unifying the two levels of 
government and provide for more open relations, improving the 
quality of government for all Canadians. The conferences would 
commence the first year afetr my election and be hosted each 
year by a designated premier in his respective capital city. 



These premiers' conferences would occur in the east one year 
and the west the following year. Co-operation between these 
two levels of government could prove beneficial as well in 
providing an example for the world to emulate. The last of 
my domestic policies is in regard to the new Canadian Charter 
of Rights and Freedoms which was recently institutued. Section 
15-1 of the charter deals with discrimination and lists the 
forms of discrimination which are legally prohibited, as follows 

"in particular without discrimination based on race, 
national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age, 
or mental or physical disability." 

(Section 15-1, Canadian Charter 
of Rights and Freedoms.) 

I propose that a new form of discrimination should be 
added. That is one of discrimination based on sexual orienta- 
tion. Quebec is the only province in Canada which prohibits 
discrimination based on sexual orientation in the work place. 1 
I feel that this is a federal responsibility and it would be 
fairly simple process to add sexual orientation to the list 
of Rights and Freedoms. 

To conclude, domestically I propose six policies; family 
allowances reform, a national tourism and adult exchange 
program, promoting bilingualism , rendering dividends received 
from Canadian investment tax free, establishing annual 
conferences between provincial premiers and including a 
clause for homosexuals in the Canadian Charter of Rights and 
Freedoms. These programs should be advantageous to lower 
income groups, the average Canadian, the French speaking 
Canadians, the unemployed, the business community, the prov- 
incial governments and the homosexual community respectively. 
Providing benefits for such a wide cross section of Canadians 
would hopefully ensure my re-election while improving the 
uqality of life in Canada. Thus I may serve Canadians through 
another term in office to continue my struggle to unite French 
and English Canadians. 

After dealing with Canadian domestic affairs, I would 
move on to foreign affairs. In this area, I have five policies. 
The first policy concerns sanctions and I should like to quote 
an old expression to describe my policy, ... "not necessarily 
sanctions, but sanctions if necessary." Prime Minister Mackenzie 
King used a slightly different version of this expression to 
describe his conscription policy during World War II. To 
expand, I do not support Prime Minister Brian Mulroney's backing 
of U.S. sanctions against Libya; however, I strongly support 
sanctions against South Africa, a policy not instituted by 
the present government. I feel that South Africa is infringing 
on the rights of the majority black population and therefore, 



should have sanctions imposed upon them. In this case, I 
would impose both economic and diplomatic sanctions. The 
withdrawl of our ambassadors and cutting all economic ties 
with the nation will not have an immediate nor drastic impact 
on South Africa; however, it may inspire other countries to 
impose sanctions as well. 

Secondly, I would institute a policy of free trade with 
the United States. Although this policy has been criticized 
because many people feel that Canadian companies cannot pos- 
sibly compete with the U.S. companies, I feel that in the short 
term some jobs may be lost; however, in the long term, Canadian 
companies will improve their productivity greatly due to 
American competition and therefore, will be able to compete 
effectively in the world market. Because Canadian companies 
will be competing in the world market, they will have the 
financial means to expand, thereby creating more job opportun- 
ities. In addition, critics of the free trade policy feel 
that Canada will become another American state. This is a 
pessimistic view and does not take into consideration the great 
patriotic and cultural ties that the people of this country 
have. Canadians will never become part of just another 
American state. Thirdly, I propose that Canada, in particular 
myself as Prime Minister, should be actively involved in the 
peace talks between the United States and the Soviet Union. 
Canada is in a very critical military position between these 
two super powers and therefore, should control its own destiny 
by contributing to detente. I feel that a summit should be 
arranged and held in Canada every two years into my first term, 
between the heads of governmentsof the U.S., the U.S.S.R. and 
myself. Fourthly, I would like to institute a policy of 
agricultural exchange between the underdeveloped nations of 
the world and Canadian farmers so that these countries may 
gain some form of self-sufficiency. Famine relief alone can- 
not save the world's hunger problem, The people of these 
underdeveloped nations need to learn how to farm effectively 
for themselves. Canadians would be excellent teachers. Finally 
I feel that the Canadian Armed Forces should be updated in 
order to fulfill our committment to NATO and become a better 
ally. Canada m ust not be totally dependant on American 
military support. I do not believe that we should construct 
nuclear weapons; however, the equipment of our troops must 
be updated if we are going to be an effective ally. 

In conclusion, my foreign policies deal with the 
following; sanctions against South Africa, free trade with 
the United Sates, active involvement in the U.S. - U.S.S.R. 
peace talks, agricultural exchanges and finally updating 
the Canadain Armed Forces. 



As prime minister, I will do my best for this country 
and I hope to see my dream of peaceful co-existence bewteen 
the English and French speaking Canadians a reality. 



Christy Worsley 



1906 Locke Essay Contest 
Winner. ch r j St y\)/ ors | e y 



32 




Senior High 
Locke Poetry Winner 

North Ribbon Creek 

And then, the sun grinned 
And the mountains roared, 
Clouds sat patiently on the brink 
Where the short grass grew. 
The greens of the forest 
And the blues of the pond, 
Seemed to cringe from 
The great rock amplitheatre . 
Instantly the dirt and rock 
Became the solitary medium. 
And as the sun was turning colours 
On the tin roof of the shack, 
The clouds plunged over the brink 
With flowing whiteness. 

The clouds covered the sky within reach 
And continued to churn and twist. 
The waterfall spray, momentarily 
Illuminated by a break in the clouds, 
Danced with a sort of random movement 
And then quickly retreated. 
As the sun was becoming older, 
The clouds pulled themselves lower, 
Beams of light hit the 
Rolling underbellies as they 
Cascaded over the brink 
And flowed down the valley. 
Everything, at last, radiated 
Orange, yellow and pink hues 
And the clouds appeared to move closer 
Gold was seemingly the only thing in the place. 
Brilliant, screaming with pride, the sun went down. 
Then it quickly became cold and I was alone. 

Gordon Laird 




33 



Junior High 
Lock^ Poetry Winner 



AT NIGHT 



Silently, I step into the night 

A velvet, ebony cloak has covered the sky 

And from it peer down the stars like the moon's 

Reflection off a black cat's eyes 

The gnarled trees join hands above me 

And I walk under the archway 

Into a sorcerer's land 

The dead leaves crackle beneath my feet 

Like the excited chatter of miniature goblins 

A veil of fog hangs ominously over the lake 

Giving it the misty look of a witch's potion 

From it emerges the shadow of a bird 

As it lets out a shrill wail 

And plunges into the darkness 



Shaun O'Brien 



34 



Cream Coloured Paper 



A pile of pages ahead 

My scratches and scribbles on top 

Half a head, a dog's face 

Some arms, some legs 

Crippled positions, grotesque 

Nothing appeals, nothing worthwhile 

The page, now folded shows blank once more 

One more chance to produce 

A scribble, a scratch, anything? 

. . . Nothing . . . 
Thrust inot the smoldering cinders 
Flames spotlight and illuminate 
Cream, Amber, Scarlet 

Cream wheat harvested by a wrinkling blackness 
Leaving behind a delicate sea of charcoal waves 
A pencil drawn face confronts death 
Regrets. Powerless I observe 
An idea, a creation, unloved 
Gone . 

Michealine Ahern 



The Daffodil's Gala Event 



Their satin emerald dresses 

Float among their fair, dainty features 

Whose heads nod gently 

As if dancing 

In a crowded, delicately fragranced ballroom 
Among other friendly mirthful faces. 

Their fluffy, flaxen hair 
Intertwines among their slim bodies. 
They drink in the scented aroma 
Of each other. 
They nibble on time; 

Hoping to remain as they are ... forever, 
Being caressed by the whispering breeze. 

The dancing comes to an abrupt halt, 

Their swaying, rhytmical bodies 

Become silhouettes against the rosy sky. 

Their darling, miniature faces stare into emptiness 

And their dazzling gowns 

Becomes leaves of green. 

They are shy daffodils in an 

Over-weeded garden . . . 

Only their fairy fragrance remains. 



Julie Nedham 



Senior High Poetry 

Fray ing-Broken Apron Strings 



Shoes 



While the TV plays 
its endless 
trash , 

my mind, finds 
a place to 
run 

and be at peace. 

new shoes- 
happiness 

the other worn out- 
tired- 

of fighting. 
Something original 
finding similarities 
forgetting pain 
and sorrow 
not realizing 
these shoes will wear 
too . 

the TV buzzes 
and I rise to 
retire and dream. 



Scot Stanfield 



Seven stitches in my brittle sleeve 
Asking questions of what we believe 

Can you court with repitition? 

I fear I may shatter with indecision 

Foraging for words that will bend straight 
Expression shards by those who manipulate 

Walking away without callous 
Splinter may cut into I of us 

David Morton Lanier 



Regret 



out 



Have you ever felt helpless? 
Have you ever wished to go back 

and try again? 
I want another chance 
If only I knew then- 
What I know now. 

Caroline Pierce 



The Flower 



The flower hides her head from the world, 

Fearing what may be revealed. 

Will the sun be out? 

Might its rays scorch or burn? 

Or will there be rain, 

To tatter her petals? 

Or wind, casting dust upon her bedraggled figure? 
The flower regretting her decision 
To come out into the world, 
Folds, once more, into a bud. 

Christine Varnam 



36 



THE FLYING PIANO 

It was 19U2, and there was virtually no light in the 
village of Berwyn , in County Clwyd, Wales. Light could 
be seen from the air, which would invite danger from 
German bombs. There was a thud, and an angry exclamation. 
"This must be the sixteenth time I've fallen in the gut- 
ter," grumbled Michael Fotheringay. 

"You must have a boring life, if all you have to do 
is count the number of times you've fallen over," remarked 
Thomas Mcintosh, smiling in the darkness. The two (Foth- 
eringay and Mcintosh) had been going on like this all 
day. In general, they didn't really get along. 

After what seemed like hours, Mcintosh, Fotheringay, 
and their companions, Derek Durant and Patrick Gilespie, 
arrived at the Longbow, one of Berwyn 's best pubs. The 
four men entered, each ordered a pint from Owen, who 
owned the Longbow (no one had ever heard his last name; 
for all they knew, he didn't have one). 

"Hello, you lot. Haven't seen you around for a while," 
said a familiar voice as another person came into the 
pub . 

"Hello, Mr. Llewellyn," the four greeted the Welsh 
farmer politely, "how've you been?" 

"Oh, fine, fine, can't complain. Do you need any- 
thing this week?" Fod rationing was another of the war's 
little inconveniences, and each of the four had, on 
occasion, purchased black market eggs, butter, and other 
foodstuffs from David Llewellyn. This time, however, 
they declined the offer. The farmer was not offended. 
"That's fine, then. You just let me know when you want 
anything." 

"When are you having the farewell bash for Colonel 
Robertson?" The four men were scientists at the military 
research centre which was either half a mile or one mile 
(depending on if you went to the front gate or not) from 
Berwyn. Roland Robertson was the commanding officer of 
the centre, but he was being transferred , much to the 
regret of the scientists and military personnel who 
worked there. So, when the party had been suggested, 
everyone agreed, enthusiastically and at once. Owen 
had offered the saloon bar of the Longbow at a very 
reasonable price. The party was to be in five days, 
next Friday at half past eight, and they told David 
Llewellyn this. 

"And what are you having as entertainment?" asked 
the farmer. 

"We're not sure, really," said Mcintosh, "but we 
thought we'd have a sing' song, if we could get a piano, 
and then just leave it up to everybody else. Owen doesn't 
have a piano though." 

"Can't afford one," said the bartender. "In case 
you haven't noticed, there's a war on." Hurriedly 
they explained to him that there was nothing he could 
do about it, and of course they didn't expect him to go 
out and buy a piano. 

"I say," said Patrick Gilespie excitedly, "isn't there 
a piano in the mess hall at the centre?" 

"I already thought of that," said Fotheringay, "but 
how would we get it out and bring it here?" 

"couldn't you just ask ..." David Llewellyn broke 
off in mid-sentence. Of course they couldn't ask, if 
the party was to remain a surprise. 

"it can't be done," said the pessimistic Fotheringay 
glumly. 

Thomas Mcintosh had other ideas, "Yes it can. There 
must be a way." 

Fotheringay saw his chance. "I'll bet you a fiver 
that you can't get that piano out of the mess hall and 
bring it here before the party." 

Mcintosh considered. "You're on," he said softly. 

Fotheringay decided to stuy in the pub, and the other 
three scientists left him there, talking to David 
Llewellyn. Mcintosh, Durant, and Gilespie talked as 
they walked down the darkened street. 

"Hate to tell you this, Thomas, but I have to agree 
with Michael. There's no way you can get something as 
big as a piano out of a guarded compound without some- 
one noticing. " 

"I tell you, it can be done!" Mcintosh insisted. 

"How?" 

"I haven't the Toggiest idea, but I'll think of some- 
thing." 

****** 



How could you get a piano out of a guarded compound 
without being noticed, thought Thomas Mcintosh the mext 
morning as he cycled four miles from his home to the 
front gate of the research centre's compound, which 
encompassed twenty acres of land. 

Mcintosh, unlike the other scientists, did not live 
in Berwyn. He lived with his wife Margaret and his two 
daughters, Penelope ( Penny ) and Elizabeth (Lizzie), in 
a group of what were originally farm-workers cottages. 
Other occupants of these houses were two farm workers 
and their families, and Mrs. Griffiths. 

The cottage next to Mcintosh's house was missing a 
chimeny pot, the result of Mcintosh's effort to teach 
three year-old Penny to shoot an air gun. He couldn't 
remember what he'd been aiming at in demonstration, but 
he had knocked off the chimney pot. Penny had asked, 
"What now, Daddy?" and Mcintosh, deciding that discretion 
was the better part of valour, had simply told her to 
run. Tough they couldn't possibly know that Mcintosh 
had shot their chimney, the neighbours regarded him as 
an eccentric. 

Mrs. Griffiths was what many people would have viewed 
as a 'sweet old lady'. The people in the cottages, and 
at the research centre, thought differently. In their 
opinion, Mrs Griffiths would have been better off in 'he 

army. She was very patriotic, but slightly mis- 
guided, and once she had decided that something was a 
threat, she would not rest until that 'threat' had been 
eliminated. Take the Pickright boxes, for example: the 
Pickright boxes were wooden packing crates that had once 
contained gunpowder. There was a pile of these boxes 
(from the research centre), about twenty feet high, in 
the centre of the group of cottages, which were arranged 
in a semi-circle. The Pickright boxes were very useful ; 
people used them as firewood or scrap lumber, but Mrs. 
Griffiths was convinced that the Germans were building 
a tunnel under them, and was constantly telling the 
scientists (particularly Mcintosh, because he lived con- 
viently close to her) to warn Roland Robertson that they 
were all going to be killed. "One day that woman is 
going to do something really dangerous,' tought Mcintosh 
as he neared the gate. 

He submitted to the guards' search and entered the 
gate, shivering slightly in the early December cold. 
He smiled, remembering the ducks. Behind the Mcltosh's 
house was a small pond, the home of six white ducks. 
The pond had frozen over not long ago, but the ducks, 
not being of high intelligence, had tried to swim in it 
anyway. Mcintosh laughed as he thought of how they slip- 
ped and slid around on the ince, looking for the world 
like they were tabogganning! Ladies and gentlemen, intro- 
ducing Mcintosh's famous acrobatic ice-skating ducks! 

Aware that people were watching, Mcintosh put the 
ducks out of his mind and entered the lab. 

****** 

When he returned home, Mcintosh locked himself in his 
study, and tried to figure out a metod of getting the 
piano out of the research centre. Getting it out of the 
mess hall would be no problem; it would be getting it 
out of the compound that would be hard. He couldn't 
take it through the gate, because everyone was searched 
before entering and leaving the compound, and a piano 
was too big to conceal, so it would have to be over the 
fence. A piano would have to weigh ... about one t- 
housand pounds, and the fence was twelve feet high and 
topped with barbed wire. One couldn't easily pick up 
the piano and lift it over. He began to think that 
Michael Fotheringay was right. It couldn't be done. 

'Wait a minute,' he thought, 'I'm a scientist. Why 
don't I think of something scientific?' Easier said 
than done. Some sort of pulley system? No, it couldn't 
lift the weight. A forklift? It would make too much 
noise, unless he could put an electric motor in it. No, 
not enough time, anyway, it couldn't lift it over a 
twelve foot fence. Wait, maybe he was approaching it 
from the wrong angle. He needed something that could 
lift the piano, from above, over the fence, and deposit 
it on the other side. Something lighter than air. 
Lighter than air? That was it? He smiled because it 
was so simple, really. A balloon, powered by some sort 
of gas, coal gas, most likely, the lab had an ample supply 
of that. A balloon, much like the barrage balloons around 
the airports, with wires strung between them, intended 



37 



to tangle up enemy planes and cut off their wings. A bal- 
loon, to lift the piano over the fence and win the bet! 

Such a balloon would have to be - he did a quick cal- 
culation - thrity feet in diameter! That was the end of 
that idea. It would be too big to handle safely, too 
big to be inconspicuous. He tried to think of an alterna- 
tive, but the balloon idea still appealed to him. Was 
there any way he could use a smaller balloon? He remember- 
ed the sport of balloon-Jumping, banned in 1936, because 
of the danger involved. Balloon-jumping participants had 
been harnessed to gas balloons. The balloons were of such 
a size that if the balloon-jumpers simply stood on the 
ground, they would remain there, but if they jumoed up, 
the balloon would carry them up as far as fifteen or twenty 
feet. The sport had been banned because the balloons kept 
getting caught in high-tension wires. These facts were 
interesting, but were they useful? Yes, they were. If 
Macintosh recruited Derek Durant and Patrick Gilespie, 
the three of them could, with the use of long poles, lift 
the piano over the fence with the help of the balloon, 
rather than the balloon lifting the piano itself. This 
would enable him to use a smaller balloon, say ... twenty 
feet in diameter, a much more reasonable size. Also, if 
he were to put a wagon or truck on the other side of the 
fence, to create a raised surface, he wouldn't have to 
worry about bringing the balloon down the whole twelve 
feet. He could attach the piano to the balloon with 
straps used to hoist things into boats - what were they 
called? His mind was filled with ideas. This was absurd, 
but it was just absurd enough to work! 

****** 

The next day, one day closer to Friday, the day of the 
party, Thomas Mcintosh told his plan to Derek Durant and 
Patrick Gilespie. Both were doubtful. 

"A balloon, Thomas? Lift it with a balloon?" exclaimed 
Gilespie incredulously (and loudly). 

"If you say it a bit louder, they'll be able to hear 
you on the continent!" 

Gilespie lowered his voice, "To lift a piano, the bal- 
loon would have to be ..." He broke off, whipped out a 
pencil, and began to calculate furiously. "How much does 
a piano weigh, anyway? Say about half a ton - that would 
make the balloon ..." 

"... thirty feet in diameter," supplied Durant, who 
had just finished the figuring in his head. 

"We can use one with a twenty-foot diameter, if we help 
it," said Mcintosh quietly. 

"Help it? What do you mean 'help it 1 ?" demanded Gil- 
espie . 

"Wait! I see what you mean," said Durant. "If we lift 
the piano, the balloon wil] lift it too, and , together, 
we can get it over the fence!" His face broke into a 
slow smile, then a grin, then a laugh. "Thomas, you're 
a genius!" 

Gilespie was still doubtful. "What happens when it's 
over the fence? Do we drop it? Did Fotheringay specify 
the condition the piano had to be in? Will you win the 
bet if it's smashed into ninety-seven pieces? What if 
the balloon is too big, and it lifts the piano before we 1 
re ready? It could float across the channel! It could 
land in Germany! We could start a whole new trend in 
bombs! We could win the war by dropping a piano on 
Hitler!" He stopped, breathless, giving the others a 
chance to speak. 

Mcintosh was used to Gilespie 's spiels, and therefore 
ignored him, though the notion of a piano dropping out 
of the sky onto the head of Adolph Hitler was slightly 
amusing. Quickly, he explained his idea about the eleva- 
tion on the other side of the fenc e, "... a wagon, per- 
haps, with something soft in it, for the piano to land in'.' 

Gilespie put the picture of Hitler's unusual demise 
out of his mind. "Hay!" he said. 

Mcintosh and Durnat turned to him and siad, simultan- 
eously, "Yes?" 

"Not hey ! HAY ! With an A! If we filled the wagon with 
hay, it would be soft. We could borrow the wagon, some 
ahy, and a horse from the farmer LLewellyn, and then just 
drive the horse into Bervyn, with the piano in the wagon." 

They had to admit that it was a good idea, and decided 
that it was exactly what they would do. They would ask 
the fanner for the equipment and plan the borrowing of 
the piano for Friday night, at about half past six. 
Luck was with them, for the research centre already had 
several rubber frame balloons (the balloons were rubber , 
not the frames) in the supply building, for some obscure 
experimental purpose. Maybe it work afetr all. 

********* 



On Thursday, Thomas Mcintosh talked with David Llewellyn. 

"A horse, and a wagon full of hay? And why do you 
want that, now?" 

"Hard to explain, Mr. Llewellyn," said Mcintosh, not 
wanting to get the farmer involved, "but how about if I 
buy a pound of butter and two dozen eggs at the regular 
price, and throw in a pound, say, for the rent of the 
wagon. We'll have it only for one evening." 

"The normal price, and a pound extra? That's enough 
explanation for me, anyday. I can drop Nell and the wagon 
off at the centre, if you like." 

"Thanks," said Mcintosh, and told him where and when. 
********* 

Friday night slowly rolled around. 

********* 

It was Friday night. Mcintosh, Durant, and Gilespie 
had stayed late at the centre, and the plan was that the 
three of them would assemble everything, then Durant would 
leave the compund and cycle to where Llewellyn's horse, 
Nell, was tied to the fence. Mcintosh and Gilespie would 
push the piano and the balloon over the fence , with 
Durant helping from the other side. When the piano was 
safely in the wagon, Mcintosh and Gilespie would leave 
and cycle around to meet Durant, whereupon they would all 
drive to town in the wagon (with the piano). 

The research centre sits on twenty acres of barren land 
in the Cambian mountains, its front gate one mile from 
the village of Berwyn. It consists of an olf farmhouse, 
now the administration building, a mess hall building, 
formerly the barn, a laboratory, and twenty feet from the 
laboratory, a supply building. These four buildings are 
arranged in a square formation, with administration in 
the upper right-hand corner, followed, respectively and 
counter-clockwise, by the other three structures. There 
are no real roads, just two tracks inside the compound. 
One runs around the perimeter, just inside the twelve-foot, 
barbed-wire fence. The other runs from one side to the 
other, at right angles to the front gate. This track runs 
between the four main buildings and the munitions bunkers, 
from west to east, or east to west , depending on how you 
look at it. The whole compound is draped with camoflage 
netting, and the front gate is rigidly guarded. 

The area of fence chosen for lifting the pianoover was 
on the east side, a mile from the gate, and a half mile 
from Berwyn . 

The three ha no trouble getting off of the mess hall 
floor onto the dolly they were using to roll it outside. 
Mcintosh had thought to bring a car jack, and with its 
aid, getting the piano onto the dolly was a piece of cake. 
They rolled the piano out of the mess hall , and around 
the buildings , so that it rested between the laboratory 
and the supply building. Mcintosh opened the supply 
building, to get the balloon and harness, which he plac ed 
by the piano, while Durnat went into the lab to attach 
a hose to one of the gas valves. He passed the hose 
through the lab window, and climbed out after it. Mcintosh 
attached the free end of the hose to the balloon. The 
balloon began to expand. Patrick Gilespie nervously lit 
a cigarette. Melnotsh caught the smoking match before 
it hit the ground, while Durnat hissed, "What have you 
got against life? If you want to commit suicide, leave 
us out of it!" 

The balloon, unhindered, continued to expand. Grey 
and swelling, it reminded Mcintosh of something from 
the Staurday pictures: "The Blob That Ate Berwyn". Idly 
he wondered how long it would take to reach its twenty- 
foot capacity. It was then that he became aware of their 
first problem: the space between the buildings was only 
twenty feet wide! Would the ballon get stuck? Mcintosh 
held his breath untilit was clear that the balloon would, 
just barely, fit in the space. He realized that, in his 
worry, he had failed to notice that the balloon was 
floating away! He made a dive for it and held it while 
"urant and Gilespie fastened it to the piano with the 
harness, and tied on guylines for them to hold, to help 
keep the rig on the ground. 

Derek Durant departed, to go to the wagon, and Mcintosh 
and Gilespie wheeled the piano across the compound, aware 
of the pull of the balloon and the danger of being seen. 
******** 



36 



When McINtosh and Gilespie arrived at the fence, they 
were relieved to see the faint outline of a horse and wagon. 
"Thank God Llewellyn didn't forget, but what's that on 
her head?" queried Gilespie. 

"It looks like...," Mcintosh, who hadn't been all that 
worried about the farmer's memory squinted at the horse, 
" ... Oh ... Oh! It's Derek's hat!" 

That was exactly what it was. Durant, apparently wor- 
ried that the carthorse would panic if she saw the piano 
and balloon descending, had cut holes for the horse's ears 
in his hat, and Nell was wearing it proudly and would be 
unaware of what was happening abover her (because of the 
hat ' s brim) . 

After congratulating Durant on his ingenious idea, 
Mcintosh handed him one of the guylines, thus insuring 
that the balloon wouldn't float away (however amusing Gil- 
e^pie's idea of winning the war had been, it defeated the 
purpose). Mcintosh and Gilespie then began to lift the 
piano, using the poles they had brought with them. The 
balloon made it quite easy to lift the thousand-pound 
instrument . 

It was when the balloon and the piano were over the 
fence, and on their way down to the wagon, that an event 
which caused yet another panic occurred. 

Suddenly, the three scientists heard the unmistakeable 
sound of a police car's siren. The three were absolutely 
frozen with panic. Had they been seen on the compound? 
Had someone overheard their plans? Mcintosh visualized 
the scene : "Honestly, officer, this piano belonged to 
my great-grandfather, and I can't imagine what it was 
doing here . I was just taking back what's rightfully 
mine. It's a family heirloom." Some excuse. "Thomas 
Mcintosh, you have been found guilty of stealing a piano. 
I sentence you to life in prison." Mcintosh did not relish 
the thought. Then, he realized that it was all very far- 
fetched. Heaven forbid! He was beginning to think like 
Patrick Gilespie! Still, he supposed that this was still 
theft, and they still could be arrested. Besides, he 
would loose the bet, and Fotheringay would never let him 
hear the end of it. The siren grew louder. Mcintosh 
tought , "Any minute now ..." 

The police car passed right by the fence with no 
hesitation', so close to the scientists that they could 
see the bol letters POLICE on its side, even in the dark- 
ness. They breathed a unanimous sigh of relief, and won- 
dered what the alarm was. Now, they could afford to 
wonder. However, they were in a hurry now, having been 
delayed, though only slightly, so Durant loaded the piano 
into the wagon (Nell had not moved once, even during the 
tense moments), and released the balloon. Mcintosh and 
Gilespie hurried round to meet him, and the three drove 
to Berwyn . 

******** 

Only when he arrived at the Longbow (at 8:15) did Mc- 
intosh find out why the police car had passed the centre. 

While her husband was executing the abduction of the 
centre's piano, Margaret Mcintosh was disturbed by the 
bark of Jock, the Mclntoshs' red and black Scottie dog 
(he was red and black because Lizzie, after a trip to the 
zoo, had remembered the coloring of a baboon she had seen, 
and tried to copy the dog). When Margaret heard the dog's 
bark, she went to the door to let him in. It was thAi 
that she noticed that the Pickwright boxes were on fire. 
A twenty foot pile of flaming wood is usually quite dan- 
gerous, and because it was wartime, and then.- was no light, 
the fire would act as a beacon for enemy planes, making 
it doubly dangerous. The Mclntoshs had no telephone, so 
Margaret cycled three miles to Berwyn to telephone the 
nearest fire department (Berwyn had no fire brigade), 
forgetting that, because of clothes rationing, she had 
a large, red, heart shaped patch on the seat of her punts. 
How embarrassing! It was later discovered that Mrs. Gri- 
ffiths had set fire to the Pickright boxes, to 'get the 
Germans", fulfilling Mcintosh's prophesy thut one day she 
would do domething really dangerous (Mrs. Griffiths, sat- 
isfied that the Germans were all dead, ceased to bother 
anyone -nd lived happily ever after; she may still be alive 
today) . 

Thomas Mcintosh laughed hard when he heard this story, 
but he laughed even harder at the look on Fotheringay ' s 
face when he walked into the pub and saw the piano, and 
the hardest of all when Fotheringay gave him his well- 
earned five pounds. 

Michael Fotheringay never found out how they got the 
piano out of the research centre, und, until now, the 
story has never been told. 



WINNER 
LOCKE 
SHOW STORY 
CONTEST^ 

KATIE HARSE 



(Jc High) 




39 



THE FATAL CIRCLE 

From his perch atop COLUMBIA'S radar mast, Colin Harquay 
could clearly see the approaching vicar. To Harquay's 
eyes, Mr. Evan Mannering was among the finest examples of 
Just what a newly ordained cleric should strive to equal. 

Mannering was a very elderly man who looked older. He 
was frail in appearance but not fragile. He walked with 
an absent minded gait that seemed to follow an undetermined 
path, his thin hands, perpetually interlocked at the level 
of his chest, were alwuys fumbling with each other; desperate 
to be doing something, but never quite certain what. He 
was sweet and gentle of manner, always smiling, always 
ready to abandon any of multitudinous ongoing projects for 
long enough to offer someone the few kind words that they 
desired. In the twenty years since Mannering had first 
arrived at Chale (pronouced 'shale'), Harquay had never 
seen the kindly vicar cross, never even heard him raise 
his voice to another under the most antagonizing of cir- 
cumstances . 

Harquay also admired the man for his various endeavours. 
Never before Mannering' s arrival on the Isle of Wight had 
the farming village of Chale hosted such a lengthy list of 
Church sponsored clubs and projects. Classical Music Appre- 
ciation Society, Jazz Aprreciation Club, Church picnics, 
Church socials, Annual Shakespeare play, Youth Orchestra... 
and umpteen dozen other things. Mr. Mannering personally 
organized them all, with inexhaustible reserves of energy 
and incorruptible patience. 

It was because of these merits that Harquay had asked 
Mannering up to Cowes for the day. It was in Cowes that 
Harquay berthed his yacht, and to here that he had invited 
Mannering and a few others for a 'Bon Voyage' luncheon, 
before beginning the long and arduous trek across the 
Atlantic . 

It seemed Mannering was to be the first arrival. Har- 
quay almost burst out in hysterics as he noticed the poor 
fellow's befuddled and intimidated expression. What made 
it funny was the fact that Mannering was gazing at the 
sixty or so power and sailing yachts from a stretch of dock 
not thirty feet from the COLUMBIA'S gangplank. 

"Mr. Mannering!" Colin hailed. "This one!" 

The expression of relief that washed over Mannering's 
face triggered a wide and sudden grin on Harquay's lean 
and boyish face. He left his maintenance check and clamber- 
ed down the mast, then went down to the main deck Just as 
the smiling minister had reached the head of the gangplank. 

"Oh, hello, Lord Harquay!" I am delighted to have the 
opportunity to see you before you sail to America. I must 
say, this ship is most impressive! Do you think I might 
sit down? I'm afraid this sudden heatwave had caught me 
unready, and I can't take heat as I used to, you know." 

Harquay led him into the air-conditioned saloon, gestured 
to a chair. 

"Would you like a cold drink? I've just about all there 
is going in the fridge." 

"Oh, Thank you ... very much ... eh, I'll just have some..." 
Mannering's fingers flicked nervously as he thought. "What 
was the French sounding stuff you gave me the other day . . . 
Ummm, pernod, parrot, poirot...?" 

"Perrier? Yeah, there's some here somewhere." He with- 
drew from the room. Mannering looked around the well appoint- 
ed main room of the yacht. According to Mrs. Carneau, wife 
of the Harquay family solicitor, none of it had come from 
his father's funds, the vessel had been purchased solely 
by Harquay himself, whose only traceable earnings had been 
from a six year stint in the Royal Navy. 

Despite Mannering's displeasure in lending credence to 
idle rumour, the theory of the old Chale gossips, that 
young Harquay was 'up to no good abroad', seemed more and 
more plausible. Mannering had vowed to himself that before 
Harquay sailed for America, he would have the sternest of 
conversations with him concerning his means of self-support. 

"One Perrier." 

"Ah, thank you, Lord Harquay. Most kind." 

"Don't mention It," Harquay was looking out the window. 
(Is that how you describe it on a boat? It was certainly 
no porthole . ) 

"Will you excuse me for a moment, another guest is 
arriving." For the second time, Harquay left the room. 

Mannering took a long appreciative draw on the Perrier. 
The boy's accent wa3 decidedly odd, too. The son of an 
Earl should not have a dialect that is corrupted by cockney 
and Americanese. These oddities were most likely acquired 
during his inexplicable years of absence from the Isle 
of Wieht. Nobodv had seriouslv exDect.ed him to return. 



(though his family regularly received letters), yet, one 
day, six years to the day afetr he vanished, there he was 
at the door of the Vicarage, smothered by a silly grin as 
he pumped the Vicar's hand enthusiastically. 

"'Alio, 'ow are you this morning, then, Mr. Mannering.* 
Those were his first words in Chale since he was isxteen. 
Public opinion then had been that he was simply pursuing 
a young man's adventure. At least, that was the concensus 
until an Interpol agent popped up at the Harquay household, 
asking that, the family follow Colin' s activities a liitle 
bit more closely. He was two steps from the boiling pot, 
and seemed to be jumping over it with unwise regularity. 

"Mr. Mannering, may I present Miss Nora McBride," liar- 
quay was leading a positively devastating young woamn into 
the saloon . 

Miss McBride was certainly one of the most beautiful 
girls poor Mr. Mannering had ever seen. Unfortunately, as 
he knew from read in;; the papers, she was also a political 
activist fighting the reunion of Ireland 

For a fleeting moment Mannering wondered if Harquay was 
working for the I.R.A. 

Miss McBride shook his hand, smiling constantly. She 
was definitely exceedingly attractive. She was medium 
height, very slim, and marvelously well figured. She wore 
jeans and a sleeveless shirt, her skin hosted quite a num- 
ber of freckles and when she spoke it was with that wonder- 
fully sing-song lilt produced only by the Southern Irish. 
"Delightful to meet you I'm sure." 

Mannering greeted her in kind; perhaps with less vigour J 
than Miss McBride. 

"So whn ' re you sailing, Colin?" Mannering silently 
wogdered what her relationship to Colin was. ■ 

They sank into a sea of pre-lunch chit-chat, while wait- I 
ing for the Scott Masons to arrive. 

*** *** *** 

They had seen McBride board the vessel, they could see 
the other two guests aproaching it now. Once they were on 
board, Flaherty could take the boat and remove McBride 
extremely fast . He had analyzed the backgrounds of all 
four presently on board, none boasted any record of skills 
or activities indicative of fighting skill. Although, with I 
an earl's son and a baronet on board, he expected a fair 
amount of, "Now see here, old chap," and "I say," not to 
mention the famed and fabled, "Now look here, we're EnglishJ 

Flaherty laughed out loud, earning add looks from each 
of his three companions. 

"Are you all right now, Micheal?" Benjamin Halloran 
voiced the common query. 

Micheal Flaherty chuckled. "Sorry, I was just thinking." 1 

"Come as a bit of a surprise, did it then, Mikey?" jab- 
bed Malcolm Shaw. He was the single soutnerner amongst 
the four Irish Republican Army operatives in the car. 

"Okay, Sir Scott-Mason and wife are on board," Sally 
Knox tried to bring the three back to the matter at hand. 
"Remeber, now, no shooting, no noise, and Malcolm, I beg 
y'now, no jokes. They don't do much to intimidate victims 
y'konw." She was out of the car now, feeling in her purse 
to ensure that the .32 Beretta was still there. Mikey and 
Benji both ahd MAC-10's, concealed under bulky coats made 
incongruous by the intolerable and quite uncharacteristic 
heat. The final memeber of the little squad, Malcolm Shaw, I 
had both a .1*5 Bren Ten and fully automatic Uzi. 

On board COLUMBIA, Nora McBride was making clear , rather! 
heatedly, to Mrs. Scott-Mason, that she did not support the I 
I.R.A. ; 

"Y'see, y'r attitude about Ireland is exactly why I 
disapprove o'them. All the I.R.A. have achieved is t'make 
th'English respect us even less than they used to - not t' 
mention that I personally find their methods very nasty." 
(At this point, Jennifer Scott-Mason, wife to Sir Godfrey, 
did try to Step into the conversation, but wasn't quite 
quick enough. The Irish do tend to speakas though their 
tongues were about to lose a train. ) 

"And I must say, I've never quite understood the logic I 
o'the mind as'd say blowin' up Harrods'll make'm give Ire- I 
land back... The I.R.A. 're just a bunch o'mad terrorists 
who really don't care a wee fig about their country, so 
long as they get some blood, a headline, and a beer, the 
I.R.A. don't care what happens to who ... I mean as sure 
as the sky's blue, the grass is green an* little^fishies 
swim in the ocean, they're all as mad a 'atters! 

"That is a fascinatin' view for a traitor t'have! SallJ 
snapped harshly as she thundered into the saloon, leading 



i sh 



her mini-army, who had already exposed their rather intimi- 
dating weapons for all to see. None present were particular- 
ly surprised when the Baroness released a scream, but they 
were a bit shocked by the ferocity with which Sally struck 
her across the face. Sir Godfrey Scott-Mason lept resolutely 
to his feet. 

"Now see here ..." Mikey could only stop himself from 
laughing by forcing the man violently into his seat. 

"More words are death!" snapped Sally Knox. 

Charming, thought Harquay to himself. He rose leisurely 
to his feet. 

"Will you be staying for lunch? I have rather an impres- 
sive pasta casserole in the oven, or a drink perhaps?" (He 
chuckled silently), "How 'bout a lovely cup of tea?" 

Using his MAC-10 as an extension of his fist, Flaherty 
silenced Harquay by applying the weapon to his stomach with 
more entusiasm than was really necessary to silence the 
offensive Englishman. 

"You!" Sally Knox pointed with her Beretta. The ob- 
ject of her imperative was Nora McBride. "You're coming 
back to jolly ol' Ireland with us. We've heard just a 
little more slander from you than we like. You're a traitor 
to the Republic. Now stand up!" 

"I'll take orders from the foul likes o' you just a lit- 
tle bit after Hell freezes over!" Nora stood, her blood 
temperature rising with acceleration that rivalled that of 
an ascending missile. "Ye stand there, calling me a traitor 
t'Ireland, yet where're you? Filing petitions? Organising 
rallies o' protest? Nay, yer here, beating up innocent by- 
standers! 

"Last year yc tried t'blow up how many people? What ve 
you achieved, with all eyr bloodshed and car bombs? T can't 
believe you're standin'air calling me traitor when you defy 
not just reason, but yer faith. You're madder'an my 
drunken Daddy sober!" 

"While you make speeches, slander your countrymen and 
work against having a United Ireland, we've let th'Britis 
governomtti know we're serious!" 

"Ireland's been lettin' people know we're serious since 
Lizzy 1 started giviii' our land away in l600! Lettin' people 
know yer not happy doesn't change it. You've got t'talk 
and make people concentrate on what yer sayin', but it's 
hard for them to listen when they're thinkin' that by a count 
o'ten there'll be another bomb goin' off!" 

"Oh, shut up! I didn't come here to hear a sermon, I came 
here to get you. So come, or I'll shoot you here and now!" 

Mannering seemed genuinely upset by the unusual goings-on. 
Harquay was watching the varbal combat with much enthusiam. 

"May I make an observation?" he asked amiably. 

"What !?" 

"You'd look much more menacing if you waved your guns about 
with a tad more vigour." 

He suddenly found the world had taken a ruther hurried 
spin, and he was now gazing stupidly at the ceiling. He was 
in one Hell of a lot of pain from where the butt had zapped 
him on the chin, but the object had at least been achieved. 
He was on the floor, better, he was on his back, treated with 
a fine view of the saloon ... but damn this bloody pain! It 
took a great deal of stamina to keep himself from the welcom- 
ing bed of unconciousness that invited to remove him from the 
range of all this nonsense. 

Nora McBride had been hauled to her feet by Flaherty, and 
was being dragged to the door, but not without protest. 
Shaw was forced to come to his aid. 

Sir Godfrey did what any red-blooded Englishman would do, 
he stood up and siad, or rather, blustered, "Hurt that girl 
and I'll ... I'll ... 

"Sit down! Or die! Your choice!" Sally was getting very 
angry. 

'"Thou shalt not kill'. That is, I believe, a dictate 
common to both your faith and my own." Mannering had stood 
up, hands fingering uncertainly at his lapels. "'Thou shalt 
not kill'. If you are not traitors, then how can you pos- 
sibly Justify your threats to us? Ilmmh? How? I'd be 
fascinated to hear." 

Harquay knew well Mannering' s power of speech. He might 
Just clear this up. 

"We are in the right! We are fighting for Ireland!" 
Benjamin repeated from memory as much as conviction. 

"You misunderstand me, my friend," Mannering sank to his 
chair, crossed his legs and continued. 

"I didn't ask whether or not you are right. I asked, as 
I recall, (and please correct if I am wrong), I asked how you 
could Justify the killing, not how you could Justify your 
cause." 

"We kill because no one will listen to our plea3." 
The Vicar went on, "Have you exhausted all other means of 
persuasion? 

"Yes, we have," Benji wondered whether or not he should 
Just shoot the silly fool now and be done with it. Sallv 



noticed that Flaherty was listening far too closely to the 
Vicar's words. 

"Miss McBride seems to differ with you on that point, 
young man. She feels there is still a- chance for this whole 
matter to be solved ... without blood." 

"She doesn't know what she is talking about. She just 
wants to prevent us from doing what we have to do." 

"She doesn't know what she is talking about? I suppose, 
therefore, that you do?" 

"Of course!!" asserted Malcolm. 

Mannering smiled benignly. "How can you know if she doesn' 
Who announced that you're right, and she's wrong?" 
"We know!" 

"So does she! What makes you different?" Mannering's 
voice was gaining power. If there was to be violence, then 
it would come soon. The terrorists were becoming extremely 
agitated. Harquay found strians of Henry Mancini's 'Experi- 
ment in Terror' trickling through his mind. This most cert- 
ainly was. 

"Who told you that you're in the right?" Mannering was 
pressing. Rather hard. Shaw was applying pressure to the 
trigger, not enough to squeeze it mind; but enough to make 
it extremely advisable not to have it pointing at anybody. 

Harquay 's hand tensed under the settee at his right. 

"Talk doesn't work! We are fighting fer Re-union the only 
way we can! Why can't you understand that?" protested Shaw. 

"Then why can't you appreciate that Miss McBride feels 
the same, and that neither you lot nor her can be absolutely 
certain as to which way works until one of you succeeds?" 
Mannering stood again. 

Harquay could feel Mannering's next words before the 
Vicar's mouth opened. It was the question that proved the 
turining point in any negotiation of this nature. It was like 
death, the question was inevitable, but still to be dreaded 
more than nearly anything else. The music in Harquay' s mind 
quickened. His right fist clenched ... Here it came... 

"Perhaps, then," Mannering said by means of prologue, 
"You should agree to disagree until such time as you can 
assert your different theories ... In the meantime, why not 
put down your weapons ...?" 

Flaherty looked at Benji Halloran , who looked to Sally, 
who looked to Shaw. They could all see the value of what 
Mannering had said. They believed adamantly in the Justifi- 
cation of their cause, but it was an inbred conviction propa- 
gated by propaganda as much as by reason. 

It was time for a serious rethinking of matters. All four 
felt the same, except, unfortunately, for Shaw. Unfortunate, 
because, unlike the others, he was a fanatic. 

He shot Mannering in the stomach, the .h'y bullet carrying 
the poor pastor to the rear of the saloon and bringing him 
down with a large crash. 

Even as that bullet had left the chamber, Harquay had 
produced the stainless steel Smith & Wesson from beneath tin- 
sofa and let off the first nine millimetre bullet. Tragically 
Benji had out htought him and moved with lightning speed to 
disarm Shaw. Lightning travels faster than bullets, and tin- 
former was in Harquay's line of fire before the bullet had 
completed its Journey. Benji was hitting the floor ns Shaw':-. 
Uzi sprayed the entire saloon with offerings of death, the 
Baronet and hi:; wife fortunately had the presence ol* mind to 
duck, t Ihip leaving the saloon itself to suffer most. 

McBride wis gone, hauled unwillingly from the craft by 
Sally Knox and Micheal Flaherty, both inwardly cursing their 
foolish acceptance of the Vicar's words ... There was no 
reason for that bloody Englishman to have shot poor Benji. 

They raced along the length of the pier, the sound of Mal- 
colm's rattling sub-machine gun stopping soon after their 
departure, as Shaw, too, abandoned the boat and tried to make 
good his escape. 

Harquay had already lept over the side of his yacht, for- 
tunate, as Shaw was busy raking the gangplank with bullets. 
Shaw tired of this activity quickly, and continued to run. 

Harquay flew after him. He could see in the distance that 
Flaherty and Knox were making for a blue Ford Anglia, he made 
that his destination, too, as he wished to prevent Nora McBrid 
abduction. It was paramount objective. If the I.R.A. people 
abandoned her, he would not pursue them. Except for Shaw. 
Shaw he would kill. And probably feel extremely satisfied 
in so doing. 

His progress was hindered abruptly and painfully as he 
passed the far side of a workman's shed. The first thing 
was the unmi staleable shape of an Uzi diving into his gut, 
the second was the same device coming down rather forceful ly 
on his upper back. Not too surprising, the combination had 
him faced down on the hard planking of the docks. 

He didn't fuss about rolling over, he simply pointed the 
Smith & Wesson over his shoulder and squeezed the trigger. 
Twice. Then he rolled over abruptly, confirming that he had 
in fact achieved something other than vandalism of a shed. 



Sliding down that wall was Shaw, his neck made one Hell 
of a mess by the two nine millimetre shots. The bullets 
had clearly passed right through .there were bullet holes in 
the wall of the shed, and between them lay a grisly trail 
Of flesh and blood, testament to Harquay's superior skill 
in a grim trade. Had it not been for the further pressing 
matters, Harquuy would have taken the bullets from the wall 
to prevent the lads from forensics placing them to his gun. 
As it was, he was on his feet rushing for the pale blue An- 
lia, where McBride was not faring to badly. Flaherty was 
sitting on the ground, face screwed up with pain, his hands 
protecting his crotch for further abuse. McBride and Sally 
Knox were fighting for possession of a handgun. The scuffle 
was moving at breakneck speed, each seizing the uppcrhand 
from the other on nearly every count. 

In n flash, McBride was on her back, Sally still standing, 
(Tun in hand, tlarquay held his gun two-handed, and took 
Sally Knox down. As this happened, Flaherty plunged into 
the Anglia and took off for the hills. 

Harquay ran back to the shed to retrieve his slugs, and 
dig the imbedded bullets from the shed. He then rejoined 
Nora McBride, Nora was sitting beside the corpse, sobbing. 
Whereas the sight of Shaw's body seemed justifiable, the 
si *ht of ;'ally Knox's mutilated chest sickened him. He 
wis siek, net fir from where Nora had thrown up. 

Redeeming his composure, he rolled the corpse over, there 
were three exit wounds from his assault, both under the right 
arm. He retrieved his other slugs and returned with Nora 
to the yacht. The Baronet reported the Vicar dead, and lis- 
tened attentively to Harquay's brief, terse instructions. 

When the local constabulary arrived, each substatiated 
the other's report of the facts; Mr. Nannering had talked 
all but Flaherty into surrendering, he had taken off leav- 
ing blood and mayhem in his wake. 

The truth, of course, was that none of the four really 
knew what had happened. They just knew that four people had 
died around them. 

By the time the police had departed, the nighthad fallen, 
and the pasta casserole had spoiled irrevocably. 

Harquuy had no qualms, moral or otherwise, about having 
lied to the police. All justice necessary had been served, 
Flaherty would in all likelihood be found, (even if he were, 
the prosecution would have no leg to stand on), and any in- 
vestigation into what started what (had the plain truth been 
related) would take and waste so many years as made it point 
less and damned inconvient for all. No, Harquay's conscience 
was clear, in all regards except those of Benj i and Sally, 
whose names he did not know. They had become martyrs 
in their own cause, and by no fault other than their own 
snese of patriotism. 

Harquay didn't dwell on it, though. He was a firm believer 
in 'what's done is done, and can't be changed', so it took 
only a few hours to wipe personal guilt from his mind, al- 
though the sadness at the day's miserable events had stain- 
ed his psyche, and it would probably take years to wash the 
stain out. Like blood. 

Before he and his wife left, Sir Godfrey came to Har- 
quay and gave his hand a shake. He thanked him for saving 
he and his wife's lives. 

"At least the good guys one, eh, Harquay, old boy?" 

It took a while for Harquay to choose an answer. Finally, 
he said, 

"I suppose that all depends upon who the good guys were..." 

"Don't be foolish, man!" With that, he re-entered the 
saloon. Nora had just filled two glasses. She looked pos- 
itively done in, she handed him a glass. 

"I think a drunken stupour is in order, Collie, cheers,". 
He drained half of his glass. 

He tbok a breath and polished it off. "Here, here!" he 
said . 

*** »** 

The next day, the papers were filled with reports of the 
brutal I.R.A. attack on helpless Englishmen, the cold-bloo- 
ed murder of a poor vicar, the heroic defiance of the noble 
English people, who created such unrest amongst the Irish 
that they started killing each other like a bunch of 
bloody fools. 

A young couple on their way to the Shakespeare festival 
at Stratford-Upon-Avon read the coloured report. 

"You know Melanie," commented Simon. "Someone should 
execute those bloody Irishmen beofre they start a damn war!" 
His wife agreed. 

Simon decided that if they came across any Irishmen today, 
he would spill something all over him. A small token, per- 
haps, but at least it would let the bloody Irish know' 
how the the English felt!! 



42 



WINNER 
LOCKE 

SHORT STORY 
CONTEST 
Chris Emperr 



(Sr. High) 





7A 

Top Row 

Mrs. Goldsworthy 
Brett Habijanac 
Alexandra Luckhurst 
Nadia Herb 
Jeremy Vass 
Penny McDermid 

Middle Row 
Susan Wiesenthal 
Jonathan Mawer 
Chelsea Pichach 
Leigh Hodorek 
James Jackson 
Shannon Young 

Front Row 



Melissa Darou 
Robert Lamond 
Andrew Brooks 
Cameron Baker 
"eter Yates 



73 

Top Row 
Mr. Or st en 
Ryan Si/lor sky 
Terri Blumes 
Rupert Evans 
David Caplan 
Ryan Horn 
Jory McMillan 

Middle Row 
Eric Hyndman 
Laura Sharp 
Geeta Verma 
Karen Neuss 
Julie Bretz 
Jenny Yeung 

Front Row 
Carol Engstrom 
3illy Zimmer 
Megan Mackenzie 
Steven Feick 
Cathy Schultz 




44 




8A 

Top Row 
Mr. Blais 
Cyrus Ameli 
Dean Burns 
Nicholas Tabbitt 
Anton Wootliff 
Peter Hoang 
Scott Davis 

Third Row 



8B 



Top 



(ow 



Kenneth Douglas 
Mary Hankinson 
Thijs Spoor 
Alexander Elmore 
Paul McGrath 
Sus annah Pierce 
David Pierce 

Third Row 



Rob Culver 
Giles Langley 
Dara Sutton 
Gianoula Kousinioris 
Parry Johnson 
Mark Adam 

Second Row 
Jennifer Wood 
Shaun O'Brien 
Stephanie Smith 
Poxanne Wong 
Elizabeth Empett 
Julie Ned ham 
Paulose Paul 

Front Row 
Julian Bromwich 
Rodney Evans 



Mrs. Collier 
Penny Benson 
Sabrina Grobler 
Dana Mend ham 
Mary Angus 
Cynthia Feth 

Second Row 
Mark Beat tie 
Jeff Gibb 
John Berlett 
Jack Schneider 
Travis Smith 
Brett Polloway 
Michael Lemon 

Front Row 
Grady Galvin 
Shannon McDonough 
Kent Crosland 



46 




8C 

Top Row 

Stephanie Angus 
Stacy Hyndman 
Jennifer Whyte 
Kari Towle 
Andrea Hay 
Tanya Maier 
Ms. Lemieux 

Middle Row 
Ralph Fitzgerald 
Alanna Abrahamson 
Scott Lemieux 
Brett Matthews 
Cheryl Zimmer 
Mark Pirie 

Front Row 
Peter Stewart 
Guru Gunaratnara 
Matthew Tedford 
Raj Gohill 
Judd Palmer 
Lucas Daniels 
James Young 
Edoardo Bardana 





47 




9A 

Top Row 
Scott Harkness 
Alison Cassidy 
David Mackenzie 
Ben Redwood 
Jason Dodd 
Colin McCormick 
Mrs. Bartel 

Third Row 
Sayeeda Nathu 
Susan Elloitt 
Jennifer Pierce 
Holly Sillabeer 
Cathy Graham 
Alanna Cap lan 

Second Row 
Nicole Beaudry 
Victoria Douglas 
Micolletta Kousi: 
David Chouinard 
Andrew Sharp 
Geoffrey Upitis 
Brian Wood 



or : s 



9B 

Top Row 

Michael Kirker 
Geoffrey Kneller 
Christopher Curra, 
Jeffrey Kahane 
Sean Honey 
Doug Laird 
Mr. Wilson 

M iddle Row 

thryn Dundas 
Stephanie Jardine 
Jeremy Green 
Ian Kirkpatrick 
Michael ine Ahern 
Gillian Selby 

Front Row 



Matthew O'Brien 
Monica Ward 
Carrie Allen 
Faye Sidorsky 
Mai Pedersen 
Fionnuala Cosgrave 
Katie Harse 
Sarah Waddock 



Front Row 
Lisa Hadway 
Marayka Waters 
Jessica Peters 




48 



== 

Top Row 
Mr. T.unn 
Matthew McKay 
Benjamin Eisner 
Pieter Grobler 
Joel Hodorek 
Rob Laird 
Andrew Romocki 
Mr. Taylor 

Middle Row 
Jodie ~Thornhill 
Shawna Darou 
Cherlyn Cameron 
Lisa Fortems 
Willa Griffin 
Katie Bawd en 
Krysta Ewens 

Front Row 
Craig Steinberg 
Stephan Leach 
David Miles 
Christina Rogona 
Sasha Bateman 
Samantha Loucks 
Karen Pochailo 



SPORTS 




Junior Boys' A' Volleyball 




R. Laird, M. Kirker, I. Kirkpatrick, 

D. Laird, C. Curran, Mr. Colborne, 

B. Wood, D. Miles, S. Harkness, 

A. Elmore, P. Huang, G. Upitis. 



The Junior "A" Boys had one of the best seasons in seven 
years, winning the Foothills Divisional Trophy and placing third 
in the South Central Zone. The unique characteristic of this 
team stems from the fact only two of the players on this 
year's team, are returning players and five of the team members 
had failed to make the team in previous years! The boys played 
as a team throughout the season and thanks are extended to paren 
for their support at several tournaments. 



Coach: Mr. Colborne 



Giles Langley, Steven Feick, Mrs. Rodney, Eric Heinman 
Brandon Delf, Mark Pirie , Mark Beattie, Jack Schneider. 



In regular season play the team was undefeated in five 
matches. At the Foothills West Division Tournament 
STS placed first. Finalists from Foothills West and 
East met in the championships on November 28th, winning 
the first game of the match, but losing the next two. 
On the whole, it was a very enjoyable and successful 
season and thanks are extended to the team members. 

Coach : Mrs . Wendy Rodney 



Junior Girls' A' Volleyball 




C. Cameron, A. Cassidy, S. Elliott, N . Beaudrv, L. Hadway, Mrs. Goldsworthy. 

D. Mendham, S. Angus, M . Angus, C. Allen. 



The Junior "A" team had a very successful season. In early October the girls 
participated in an invitational volleyball tournament at the University of 
Calgary and, in spite of challenging competition, made it to the finals of the B 
division where they lost in the final match to St. Stephen's. In divisional 
finals they lost only to Red Deer Lake School, 13:15. Congratulations to team 
members 



Mr. Blais, S. Pierce, J. Nedham, D. Sutton, S. Smith, L. Hodorek, 
P. McDermid, A. Lockhurst, S. O'Brien, S. Wiesenthal , C . Pichach. 



The Junior Girls completed their season at a November 
tournament. Although they did not finish in the standings, 
all of the girls improved their skills significantly. The entire 
team should be congratulated for their entusiastic and 
dedicated commitment to the team. 



Coach: Mr. Blais 



Senior Boys' Volleyba 




Mr. Freight, A. Griffin, C. Kraychy, D. Langley, 
J. Fraleigh, S. MacPherson 

B. Feick, S. Rozsa, R. Zeilstra 

C. Ashley, J. Fitzgibbon, J. Morberg. 



The senior boys' volleyball team had a very successful season 
this year at STS. They were sponsored by three staff members - 
Mr. Blais, Mr. Ditchburn and Mr. Frieght. The team was inspired 
by a very talented group of grade 12 students. In league play 
they were undefeated in the Foothills Division. One of the high- 
lights of the year was winning the tournament held at Hanna. The 
team missed going to Provincials by losing only one match in the 
zone play-offs. Congratulations on a great season!!! 



Coach: Mr. Freight 



Senior Girls' Volleyball 




B.R. S.Mercer, J.Thomson, B.Faenzi, C.Angus, C.Pierce, J.Hewson 

F.R. K.Singh, L.Turnquist, C.Jensen, M . Stevens , S.Murray, Mr. Orsten 



Rookie Coach Mr. Sandy Orsten attributes the team's success this season to the 
players themselves. Veteran members included Michelle Stevens (Captain), Barb 
Faenzi , Julia Thompson, Caroline Pierce, Sue Murray, Jennifer Hewson, Linnea 
Turnquist and Catherine Angus who shared skills and experience with new team 
members Chantel Jensen, Sarah Dover, Kiren Singh and Melanie Mercer. Every girl 
contributed her best effort to the experiences of the season. Strong and weak 
games alike were permeated with a spirit of sportsmanship and fun. The team 
finished fourth in its division, fourth out of ten in zone play, and fourth 
overall in the independent schools tournament for four western provinces held at 
Brentwood College, Vancover Island in October. Mr. Orsten extends thanks and 
congratulations to the team. 



Junior Boys' TV 



i 

Basketball 




Mr. Schmit, D. McKenzie, I. Kirkpatrick , A. Elmore, S. Honey, 
C. Curran, P. McGrath. 

S. Leach, M. O'Brien, P. Hoang, R. Gohill, P. SanAgustin, 
P. Johnson, S. Harkness 



The Junior High Boys fielded a well-rounded team this 
year with considerable experience. Chris Curran, Sean 
Honey and Steven Leach who were starters in Grade 8, 
returned to form the backbone of a team that earned a 
9-win 2-loss record. Scott Harkness and Matt O'Brien 
rounded out the starting five and added both consistency 
and hustle. Sean Honey led the team in scoring, Chris 
Curran in rebounds, Scott Harkness in assists, Matt 
O'Brien in steals and Steven Leach just led the team! 
Our super-subs this year were Ian Kirkpatrick and David 
McKenzie, both of whom started several games and demon- 
strated the value of a good bench, as did Parry Johnson. 
Continued improvement and intelligent basketball char- 
acterized this team that won the Foothills League title 
and scored at least two points. Next year, Paul McGrath, 
Alex Elmore, Raj Gohill, Peter Hoang will anchor what is 
becoming another Spartan tradition: a truly fine Spartan 
Basketball Team. 



Coach: Mr. Schmit 



Junior Boys' 'B' Basket ball 




J. Schneider, R. Evans, J. Berlett, P. Stewart, 

B. Mathews, J. Gibb, K. Douglas, M. Pirie, 

M. Tedford, R. Fitzgerald, A. Brooks, S. Nichol. 



This team came into being because a lot of Junior High boys 
wanted to play basketball. These boys wanted to play a great 
deal. They came to practice regularly, they accepted last minute 
schedule changes, and learned "the joys of winning, the agony 
of defeat." Mostly though, we just had fun. 

Best of luck next year, 
Mike Budd 



Junior Girls' 'A' Basketball 




C. Cameron, L. Fortems , Mrs. Rodney 

S. Angus, D. Mendham, M. Waters. 

L. Hadway, A. Abrahamson, S. Elliott, 

A. Cassidy K. Beaudry. 



This has been a very successful season. In League play, 
STS won four and lost two games. After advancing through to the 
semi-finals, the championship game was lost to Red Deer Lake 
School. The majority of the contests were won or lost by 
less than five points which provided exciting moments for both 
players and spectators. Parents, especially our most dedicated 
fan , Mrs. Cameron, are thanked for attending games. 



Coach: Mrs. Wendy Rodney 



Junior Girls'^' Basketball 




44-C. Jardine, S. O'Brien, 7-S. Hyndman, 12-R. Miller, 11-P. McDermid, 
21-C. Pichach, 8-S. Rossa, 31-L. Sigurdson, 5-S. Viesentahl, 10-L. Sharp 
9-S. Meuman, 15-B. Varnara, Mrs. Harvey. 



Our Junior High girls Basketball team was an enthusiastic group of Grade 7's and 
8's. Over the season they remained a positive cooperative group who became 
skilled players. These girls were certainly S.T.S. emissaries that represented 
our school in the best possible fashion. 



Senior Boys' Basketball 




B.R. D.Singh, G.Achilleos, C.Ashley, W.Baehre, J. Fitzgibbon , M.Dobell, 
J . Morberg . 

F.R. Mr. Johnson, S. Leach, M.White, S.MacArthur, J.Fraleigh, C.Kraychy, 
D.Langley, S.Rozsa, L.Turnquist, M. Perron, Mr. Adams. 



The Senior Spartans enjoyed their best season ever, 
starting the season by winning the Foothills League 
tournament at both the Varsity and Junior Varsity 
levels. In December the boys defended their title 
and again came away victorious with Marc Dobell and 
Jay Morberg selected tournament All-Stars (Marc Dobell 
was also chosen as Outstanding Player at the tourna- 
ment) . At the Claresholm tournament in January the 
Spartans were victorious and Jay Morberg and Marc 
Dobell were again named to the Ail-Star team. First 
rate competition was provided at the Chestermere 
Invitational Tournament and to wind up the season 
the team travelled to Hawaii to play in exhibition 
games against five different independent schools. 

Coaches: Mr. Don Johnson, Mr. Pat Adams. 



Hawaii 




Senior Girls' Basketball 




nr. Liuiiiuy , u.uj.iJ.j.j... 
C.Wuensche, Mr. Taylor 



The 1985-86 version of the Senior Girls' Basketball 
team had a very successful season with an overall record 
of thirteen wins and four losses. The highlight of this 
year was the perfect record in regular season league play, 
eight wins - zero losses. The team was lead by the 
strong play of high-scorer and joint guard, Catherine 
Angus, who was well-supported by a great team effort. 
The team was well-balanced with four grade twelves, 
four grade elevens and three grade ten girls. Things 
look well for the 1986-87 season. 

Coach: Mr. Lorfing 



Junior Field 



Hockey 




J. Carter, L. Hadway , C. Wuenche , S. Angus, A. Hay, D. Mendham, 

M. Pedersen, T. Maier, Mine. Collier. 

S. Elliott, S. Young, P. McDermid, J. Nedham, S. O'Brien, J. Bretz, 

B. Varnam. 



The Junior Girls' Field Hockey Team had a very 
successful season this year. They won their games 
against Bishop Carroll, St. Francis, the Junior Boys 
and won twice against the Calgary Juniors. 

We entered two tournaments, in the first we played only 
one game against Western Canada and lost the game, follow- 
ing the best of five penalty strokes tie-breaker. 
The remaining games were cancelled due to bad weather. 

Having played five games in one day, the girls won the 
second (a 7-aside) tournament at the University of 
Calgary . 

Thank you all for your enthusiastic participation. 

Coach: Mme . Collier 



Senior 



Field 



Hockey 




Mrs. Fitzgerald, S. Kent, P. Kousinioris, T. O'Brien, C. Pierce, 
J. Murray, V. Wilson, J. Hewson. 

M. Stevens, S. McDonald, C. Jensen, K. Hawitt, M. Fudge, A. Umar. 
A. Pedersen, K. Angus. 



The team participated in the Calgary Ladies League, "B" Section, for 
the first time. This meant a regular weekly game and the girls 
played extremely well. in their first competition of this kind. 
Unfortunately the City of Calgary School Girls' Tournament was 
snowed out after only one game, something we weren't expecting in May! 




C.Wallat, K.Singh, M.Mercer, C.Wuensche 
A.Romocki, S. McDonald, L.Turnquist, M.Stevens 
M.McLaws, V.Wilson, C.Jensen, C.Pierce 
C.Angus, S.Beattie, S.Murray, J.Hewson 

C.Kraychy, D.Langley, S.Mercer, Mr. Colborne , C.Ashley 



Junior Track & Field Teams 



Rugby 




Mr. Thompson, J. Waddock , F. Brooks, V. Elenko, R. Wiessenborn , 
S. McDermid, R. Zeilstra, A. Griffin, D. Lanier, A. Ferguson, 

C. Ashley, J. Fraleigh, Mr. Budd. 

J. Steadman, J. Curran, G. Kneller, J. Lewis, R. Laird, J. Morberg, 

D. Luft, B. LeBourveau, D. Laird, R. Tidswell, J. Hodorek, G. Laird. 

Jay Morberg, the First XV Captain writes: 
Our season started off with an experience building 
tour of the West Coast. Although losing both games, 
the team was given a real taste of competitive rugby. 
The team came home and won five straight, only to 
lose the final game of the season to the STS Alumni. 

Without a doubt the season highlight was an impressive 
second place finish in the Calgary School Boys Seven 
A Side Tournament, in which the team was forced to 
play against schools two to three times their size. 

The backs, led by Cameron Ashley and John Fraleigh, 
were a group of hard working, anxious young players, 
providing a backbone to the team. 

The forwards, consisting of such dynamos as Gord Laird, 
Dave Lanier and Sean MacPherson, put their heads down 
and drove forward time after time, never looking back. 

Thanks to Mr. Thompson and Mr. Budd, who were instru- 
mental in achieving the team's goals for this season. 



69 




The 1985-86 O.E. Class 

Standing L-R: Vince Elenko, Jeff Curran , Tara O'Brien, Mark Miller 

Jennifer Hewson, Steve Merecer, Andrew Wilson 
Kneeling L-R: Shelley Beattie, "Verge " Lynch, Darren Cooper 

While the enthusiam of this diverse group wavered at times, 
they always maintained their sense of humour. Whether silently 
struggling up a scree slope, or reflecting privately in their 
diaries, these people have had many personal triumphs this year. 
Above all, they have shown compassion. They personify personal 
growth . 




Ski Touring Option 

Despite quite a range of experience, this year's group 
selected a demanding traverse of the Wapta Icefields. Buoyant 
enthusiam and excellent leadership by the students combined with 
gourmet meals to make this one of the most satisfying trips ever I 
Jodie, Alison, Sue, Flapper, Dave, Gord, Doug, Russ, Aenea, Mike 
and Jo. 






Mountaineering Option 

They did it, because it was there (almost)... 
Grade 12 's ranging from "Hoopsters" to "Granolas 
braved the elements of high altitude adventure 
on the first P.E. 12 trip of the year. A super 
experience for all, so tie off that prusik, and 
watch out for that crevasse. 



Rockclimbing Option 

"An belay", "Falling!!" "Great Job!" 
"Tension!!" "Secure" "That was fun!" 
Well done Caroline, Davide, Jodie, 
Flapper, Leslie, Al , Michelle, Wolf, 
Gord, Meredith, Tim and Rob. 




The First Ever and Likely-To-Be-Repeated School Trip Exchange 
with Rosseau Lake College 

"We understand that you do some ski touring at your school." 

"Yes, we could set up a canoe/sailing trip in return." 

"You want to know who our best looking guy is? For Emily???" 

"You take girls on your trips? Really???" 

"Nice tracks! Nice slides! Nice hosts! Nice songs!" 

"You guys just gotta come back and see us!" 

"Are we going to return their visit?" 

Gord, 'Chelle, Sue, Doug, Jo, Al , Mort , Andy, Lev;, Craig, Anthony, 
Graham, Dave, Pete and Mike say it's up to you! 




Jnr. High Wilderness Travel Program 
"Can we hike? Can we ski? Can we paddle?" 
Yes, we can I We learned it in Junior High. 
Here's to good ol ' what 1 s- ' is-name that 
pulled down the Grade 11 's tent on Whaleback 
Ridge with W.R. And here's to the 9A's 
who survived the annual freak spring snow- 
storm with Mr. Lunn. Here's to Hark for 
not beating up Mr. Budd after getting dunked 
in the river, and to Mr. Nelson for planning 
the pizza supper on the 7C ski week. 
Here's to Jennifer's lightweight meals and 
all the people, young and not so young, who 
shared the fun together. 



MARTI M C KAY WEEK 




Artist in Residence Kitty Pryde demonstrates water colour techniques to 
Grade 4 students during Marti McKay Week. 



The third annual Marti McKay Artist-in-Residence 
program featured Canadian water colourist, Killy 
Pryde . 

During the week of February 24-28, Kitty worked with 
the students, both individually and in groups. Elem- 
entary students learned new techniques of colour 
application, using SDonges, toothbrushes and salt 
while the older students were introduced to new 
pencil applications and water colours of still life 
and landscapes. 

Thank you Kitty for a very successful Marti McKay week 
that has tremendously enhanced our fine arts programme. 



QUEBEC TRIP 




On May 15, despite the worst snow storm of the year, 27 
Grade 7 students, accompanied by Mrs. FitzGerald, Mrs. Collier, 
and Mr. Tottenham, took off for a five day visit to Quebec City. 
The purpose of the trip was to expose the students to the French 
language and culture in an authentic environment. 

The group stayed in the Chateau Laurier, a modest hotel 
within walking distance of the old part of Quebec City. 

We visited many places of intrest, including the Citadelle, 
the Musee du Fort, and the National Assembly, to mention but a 
few. 

On the Sunday we went on a full day trip which brought us 
to the Montmorency Falls, Ste. Anne de Beaupre, and finnaly to 
the He d 1 Orleans. On the way we stopped at a cabane a Sucre 
for homemade bread, maple syrup, and butter. What a treat! 

We visited some interesting restaurants including " Aux 
Anciens Canadiens " where we tried some quebecois cuisine, la 
tourtiere. On our last evening we went to " Au Chalet Suisse " 
for fondue bourgiguonne , this was good fun, and delicious! 

Highlights of the trip included a caleche ride (despite 
wind and rain) , and a scavenger hunt during which the students 
had to find all kinds of information, from statues and buildings 
in Old Quebec. It was also fun to see the movie " Rose Bonbon " 
( " Pretty in Pink " ) , in French. 

All in all, the trip was very successful and we all had a 
good time. 



77 



SPEECH DAY 




Hecklers at the very 
contraversial debate 



Speech Day 1986 



A speaker about to orate 

On a subject profound and ornate, 

Felt his knees go slack 

And his memory black, 

While his body began to vibrate. 

Mr. J. Schmit 




"Oh Tovald, I don't believe any 
longer in wonderful things hap- 
pening . " 




"I... I... I think I forgot my lines!" 




"It is through the arrogance and 
ignorance of men that women have 
been unable to realize their 
incredible potential in society!!" 




"Most women are losers!" 

Sigmund Freud 



Melvin Belvin Fellsharpe: Chicks dig me!" 



79 




s 



T 



M 



A 



S 



C 



O 



Once again, our annual Christmas Concert, directed by Mrs. 
Biollo, was a great success. Our gymnasium was filled to capacity 
as parents and relatives came to see what has become one of our 
most entertaining evenings. 

The performances were comprised of grades one through twelve. 
Highlights include the grade ten Santa'3 Gone Hip and who could 
forget the Evangelical Skit performed by Mrs. Fitzgibbcn ' s Senior 
Drama Class 1 All elementary students participated in singing, 
play acting, recorder or choral speech. The final touch was 
our 'Staff Choir" - a beautiful endinq to a Christmas eveninq. 



N 



C 



E 



T 




80 




Student Art 



Jodie Finch 




In November 19 8 5 the new Endeavours Programme at S.T.S. was launched. 
The programme , which was recommended in the "Towards the Year 2000" 
Report of the Board's Academic Committee, was designed to provide 
students and teachers with learning opportunities not directly 
related to the classroom and to offer interaction with different 
environments . 

Students themselves were involved in all phases of planning, design- 
ing and selecting options for the programme. Teachers assisted 
students with ideas and preparations. Parents made suggestions and 
offered assistance with contacts, introductions and arrangements. 
As a result, students were able to participate in a wide range of 
extra-curricular activities, pursuits and a few exotic trips to a 
variety of locations. 

For the first year, it was decided to limit the programme to two 
days, or, using the Remembrance Day long weekend, five days. Between 
November 7th and 11th, teachers and students in small groups gained 
new perspectives in many new ventures, most of them "on location". 

An evaluation conducted at the end of the pilot programme has pro- 
vided valuable feedback from parents as to future directions and 
content. Parents and students alike proclaimed Endeavours a great 
success and we look forward to next year's Endeavours Programme. 




Marine Biology & Sailing, B.C. 
Business Trip, Toronto, Oshawa 
Culinary Arts, Calgary 
Oregon Marine Biology 

Veterinary Medicine, Calgary & Edmonton 

Sports Medicine, Calgary 

Broadcasting, Calgary 

Museum Visits, Drumheller, Calgary 

Eastern Canada & Universities 

Photography, S.T.S. 

Theatre Workshop, Calgary 

Theatre Tour, Toronto 

Gulf Island Expedition, B.C. 

Small Appliance Repair 



Mr . Adams , Mr . Lunn 
Mr. Ditchburn 



Mme. Collier 
Mr . Cumming 
Mr. Nelson 
Mr. Lorfing 
Mrs. Bartel 
Mr. Wilson 
Mrs. Stewart 
Mr. Keller 



Mr. Tottenham 

Mrs. Fitzgibbon, Mr. Cojocar 



Mr. Johnson 
Mr. Koning 



34 



Junior High 



The Keeper Connection (Zookeeping) 
Art in Calgary 

The Sky's the Limit (Aviation ground school) 
Bachelor Survival I 
Bachelor Survival II 
Theatre Adventures 
Click I (Photo tour) 

Click II (Photo tour + astrophotography) 
Games of Skill 
0C0 Press Release 

Junior/Senior Resuscitation Award 
Hunter Training Program 
Fitness Inside Out 

Atlantis on your Mind (Skin diving and pre-scuba) 




Mr. Blais 
Mr. Orsten 
Mr. Thompson 
Mrs. Fitzgerald 
Ropchan 
Hewson 
Schmit 
Mr. McConnell 
Mr. Taylor 
Freight 
Ro ney 
Budd 
Mile Lemieux 
Mr. Colborne 



Mrs 
Mrs 
Mr. 



Mr. 
Mrs 
Mr. 





ANYTHING GOES 






Angel singing with the Porter 




Billy Crocker 
Hope Harcour. 
Peno Sweeney - 
Mccn face Ha r: i 



THE CAST 

- Aenea Palna 

- Al :son Pcsg 
Anna Catkins 

n - L lewe Llyn Turnomst 
Evelyn Oakley - Quyn.1 Phi'lliai 
Mrs. Harcour- - Kat;« T3vender 
KJi ..tr.ey - Alec Fera-ison 
Bonnie - Jen.-.iJer Pierce 
Anqels - Enily Griffin 

Mere i i th Laurence 
Marya P:f£er 
Captain - Chris E^pf-.c 
Purser - Andrew Wi 1 son 
Ch inese Conve r t s - Bret t Lebourveau 

Grahan Young 
Reporter • Taye Sidorsky 
Carte ra^or* an - S^sar.nah Pierce 
Steward * Nicholas Tabbitt 
B i shop - Joe I Hodore/". 
Dancers - Beth Aspinall 
Calia Brasso 
Cheryl Dooley 
Monique Mills 
Caroline Pierce 
HicheUe Ste-zens 
Valerie Wilson 
Stacy Roxsa 



Andria Si 



Andrew Brooks 
Na !ia Herb 
Kar; Horn 
Ciota Kojsiniori 
Alex LucVhurst 
Me^an MacKenz le 



THE CHOffl'S 
Sarah ^acOonald 
Karen Meuis 
Shaun O'Brien 
Paulose Paul 
Anne Marie Petersen 
Debbie Polloway 
Shannon Young 



Cathy Schu'.tx 
Thiis Spoor 
Dan* Sutton 
Brmda Varnam 
Geeta Verria 
Christy Worsley 



Acconpanist - Arnold Pierce 

Husic Director - Mrs. Suzanne Biollo 

Director/Producer - Mrs. Cathy Mtiglbbon 



Moonface gambling with Chinese converts 



8/ 



Strathcona-Tweedsmuir experienced at first hand , pride in the 
history of their school and country during the visit of Donald 
Euan Howard , fourth Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, arriving 
with an honour guard from Lord Strathcona' s Horse regiment and a 
Scottish piper in full regalia. 

In a ceremony full of colour and tangible emotion Lord Strathcona 
recieved an engraved "gold" railway spike,- the first ever "Last 
Spike Award", presented by the School's Alumni Association to 
commemorate the historic occasion of his visit. 

Seven other gold spikes were presented in recognition of the 
contributions of some of the special people to the life of STS. The 
awards were to Barbara and J.C. Anderson, the late W.H. Atkinson, 
the Cross family, Dr. Mary Dover, OBE, the Eric Harvey family, 
the Mannix family and John A. Scrymgeour. 




SENIOR HIGH 





10A 

Top Row 
Mr. Lorfing 
Brett LeBourveau 
Serge Laifer 
Michael Vervena 
Jason Steadman 
Michael Bryden 
Mr. Johnson 

Middle Row 
Sibylle Baehre 
Krystina Romocki 
Melissa McLaws 
Annelise Pedersen 
Beth Aspinall 
Melanie Mercer 

Front Row 
Eera Jadav 
Karen Hawitt 
Akin JeJe 
Ross Sunder son 
Graham Young 
Anna Watkins 
Julie Carter 



10B 



Top Row 
Mr. Colborne 
Drew Jackson 
Richard Wiessenborn 
Scott McArthur 
Fraser Brooks 
Marcus Perron 
Mr . Adams 

Middle Row 
Sharon Kent 
Mary Laing 
Mary Lawrie 
Karen Scoulding 
Beth Lyndsay 
Leanne Creed 

Front Row 
Francesco Vinci 
Michael Blumes 
Far id Mahmud 
Jason Lewis 
David Wood 
Martina Vicha 




92 




Ilk 

Top Ro w 
David Leach 
Cheryl Dooley 
Dimitrios Giannoulis 
Raimond Zeilstra 
Rob Martin 

Middle Row 
Anne-Marie Lynch 
James Carswell 
Katie lavender 
Chris Empett 
John Selby 
Axel Fehres 

Front Row 

Panagiota Kousinioris 
Marnie Fudge 
Andrea Olah 
Robin Tidswell 



11B 

Top Row 
Brian Elloitt 
Steve Mercer 
Jean-Pierre Buysschaert 
David Singh 
Emily Griffin 
Andrew Cotterhill 
David Feick 

Middle Row 
Amy Chu 

Catherine Angus 
Barb Luckhurst 
Andrew Wilson 
Tara O'Brien 
Erin Malone 

Front Row 
Stephanie Miles 
Aisha Umar 
Sarah Dover 
Sarah McDermid 




94 



11C 

Top Row 
Vince Elenko 
Monique Mills 
Cameron Ashley- 
Alec Ferguson 
Linnea Turnqulst 
Randall Moore 

Middle Row 
Jennifer Hewson 
Meredith Laurence 
Neil Ellerington 
Mark Miller 
Shelley Beattie 
Darren Cooper 

Front Row 
Christina Riccuiti 
Brian Nichol 
Jeff Curran 
AnneMarie P rider sen 
Sonja Kljucec 





95 



Grade 9 Grad Committee 




Grade 12 Grad Committee 




B.R. V.Wilson, C.Pierce, D.Polloway, M.Piffer 

F.R. T.Burek, C.Taylor, L.Kende, C.Worsley, M.Dodd 



Yearbook Commitree 



Mark Piche, Michelle Stevens, Valerie Wilson, David Lanier, 
Christy Worsley, Scot Stanfield, Alison Ross, Kari Horn, 
Gord Laird, Tanya Burek, Doug Luft. 

Here they are, the group responsible for PAIDIA 1985-86. 
They knew you'd love it 



Students' Council 




B.R. J.Fralie'gh, L.Turnquist 

F.R. M.Laurence, L.Kende, S.Beattie 



Musical Chairs 
Airband 



King of Hearts 
Queen of Clubs 



This year's Students' Council thought it would be nice 
to have a few contests, and stuff like that, above the 
regular activities, such as our ill-fated dances and 
grub ("non-uniform") days. We had fun putting them 
on and (it seems) they were fun to participate in as 
well. So the following is a list of the events and 
their winners: 



Mark Beattie 

Katie Tavender 
Anne Lynch 
Emily Griffin 
Shelley Beattie 
Tara O'Brien 

Jeremy Green 

Pennv McDermid 



Pudding Eating 



Baby Race 



Hairy Legs 



Lisa Had way 
Scott Harkness 
Susan Elliott 

Ray Zeilstra 
Cam Ashley 
Robin Tidswell 

Brian Elliott 



Students' Council also started a memorial order to 
celebrate the help given by certain members of the 
community. One person was inducted this year: 

Royal Order of the 

P. Flamingo Ken Headrick 

Thanks for a great year. 

Lew Turnquist 

Students' Council President 



104 



Prefects 




M.Stevens, L.Turnquist, D.Lanier, S.Alexander 



105 



The Fanatics 




Doug Luft, Alastair Griffin 

David Lanier, Gord Laird, Sean Macpherson 



Why did we do it? 

The newspaper. The school publication. The rumour rag. The namifesto for molestation. 
The outlet for obscurity. The Fanatic. Was there a reason for its existence? 

Perhaps it was the lure of power, of gaining control over our young readers' minds and using 
it for our own means. Perhaps it was from a pure love of literature, of prose, humourous 
or otherwise, and of poetry. Perhaps it was an excuse to be weird, to gain attention and 
to momentarily hold it. Perhaps it was for the large amounts of praise bestowed upon us. 
Perhaps it was the late nights spent at Rainbow Lithographers and in the school computer room. 
Perhaps, it was all the fun and jokes we had in the brotherhood of the Fanatic; for being a 
Fanatic is more than just punching keys. Perhaps, just maybe we did it for the school, in the 
attempts to better its atmosphere. Or maybe we didn't do it for any reason. 



Or maybe it was for the chicks! 




GRADUATES 






Graduates 






George Achilleos; 


(19 79- 


1986) ( 


born 


June 15th 19 6 8 




Sarah Alexander; 


(1982- 


1986) , 


born 


May 2 3rd 19 6 8 




Alex Aspinall, 


(1981- 


1986) , 


, born 


October 20th 1968 




Wolf Baehre; 


(1979- 


1986) , 


born 


October 2nd 1968 




Davide Bardana; 


(1978- 


1986) , 


, born 


August 29th 1969 




Russell Berscht; 


(1982- 


1986) 


, born 


May 7th 19 6 8 




Tanya Burek; 


(1983- 


1986) 


, born 


February 12th 1986 




Marc Dobell; 


(1979- 


19 86) 


, born 


January 2 3rd 19 86 




Meredith Dodd; 


(1984- 


19 86) 


r born 


February 16th 1969 




Barbara Faenzi; 


(1975- 


1986 ) 


, born 


May 9th 19 6 9 




Brian Feick; 


(1983- 


1986 ) 


born 


May 17th 19 6 8 




Jodie Finch; 


(1985- 


19 86) 


r born 


February 24th 1968 




Jeff Fitzgibbon; 


(1981- 


1986) 


, born 


February 8th 1968 




John Fraleigh; 


(1980- 


19 86) 


, born 


February 19th 196 8 




Alastair Griffin; 


(1981- 


1986) 


, born 


January 29fii 1968 




Colin Hart; 


(1983- 


1986) 


, born 


April 10th 1968 




Kari Horn; 


(1982- 


1986) 


, born 


September 18th 1968 




Ghantel Jensen; 


(1976- 


1986) 


, born 


June 12th 1968 




Tim Kearns; 


(1981- 


1986) 


born 


June 16th 196 8 




Leslie Kende ; 


(19 7 7- 


1986 ) 


, born 


July 20th 1968 




Cameron Kraychy; 


(1979- 


1986) 


r born 


April 18th 1969 




Gordon Laird; 


(19 81- 


1986) 


r born 


December 23rd 1967 




Dominic Langley; 


(1982- 


19 86) 


born 


April 1st 1968 




David Lanier; 


(1983- 


19 86 ) 


, born 


June 10th 196 8 




Fong Ling Law; 


(1985- 


1986) 


r born 


February 1st 1967 




Doug Luft; 


(1983- 


1986) 


, born 


May 2nd 1968 




Sean MacPherson; 


(1981- 


1986) 


, born 


November 8th 19 68 




Robert McBean; 


(1978- 


1986 ) 


, born 


September 20th 1969 




Jason Morberg; 


(1981- 


1986) 


born 


July 16th 1968 




Susan Murray; 


(1982- 


1986) 


, born 


July 13th 1968 




Aenea Palma; 


(1978- 


1986) 


, born 


August 28th 1968 




Quynn Phillips; 


( 1978- 


1986) 


, born 


August 19th 1968 




Mark Piche; 


( 1982- 


1986) 


born 


June 27th 1968 




Caroline Pierce; 


(1975- 


19 86) 


born 


February 16th 1968 




Marya Piffer; 


(1983- 


1986 ) 


born 


February 9th 1969 




Debbie Polloway; 


(1981- 


1986) 


, born 


February 8th 1969 




Alison Ross; 


(1983- 


1986) 


, born 


November 10th 1968 




Scott Rozsa; 


(1978- 


1986 ) 


, born 


May 31st 1968 




Nina Sharpe; 


(1984- 


1986) 


born 


January 9th 1968 




Scot Stanfield; 


(1981- 


1986) 


, born 


March 4th 19 6 9 




Michelle Stevens; 


(1974- 


1986) 


, born 


August 12th 1986 




Joe Szabo; 


(1983- 


1986) 


, born 


March 17th 19 5 8 




Claire Taylor; 


(1977- 


1986) 


, born 


March 26th 1968 




Julia Thomson; 


(1984- 


1986) 


, born 


May 10th 1968 




Llewellyn Turnquistl980- 


1986) 


, born 


fluy list jlu Ijdo 




Christine Wallat; 


(1980- 


1986) 


, born 


October 25th 1968 




Valerie Wilson; 


(1977- 


1986) 


, born 


August 13th 1968 




Christy Worsley; 


(1980- 


1986) 


, born 


February 26th I960 





108 



*xrm HOT! 





Hawaii nalivc 



;ar yout^ 

1AXIMUM SPEED 




******* 







> 




THE BIG, THE FAST 
AND THE BURLY 

- featuring 

: George 

Achilleos: 





Rebel 



THE INVASION 
OF THE 




LOCKHEADS 



BY GEQRGE / 
I THINK HE'S GOT IT ' 




The woods are lovely, dark and deep, 
But I have promises to keep, 
And miles to go before I sleep, 
And miles to go before I sleep. 

Robert Frost 




Oh, give us pleasure in the flowers today; 
And give us not to think so far away M 
As the uncertain harvest; keep us here 
All simply in the springing of the year. 

Robert Frost 





Sarah 
Alexander 



Alex Aspinoll 




Sow an act and you reap a habit, 
habit and you reap a character, 
character and you reap a destiny 





WE ARE 
ALL PART 
OF THE 5KY, 
MORE 50 THAN 
OF THE GROUND 

JOHN AND YOKO 

ONO ~ 
27 MAY. 1979 




\ 




IT'S FUN 




More Dobell 



octallp incorrect 






I 




Nay, never once to feel we are alone, 

While the great human heart around \_) 

us lies: Q 

To make the smile on other lips our -J 

own, ~j 
To live upon the light in others' eyes. Q 

Archibald Lampman 





f k V 





It's in the fight, in the striving, 
in the mountains unclimbed that 
fulfilment lies. 

Merle Chain 




Support what is right, oppose what is wrong; what you think, 
speak; try to satisfy yourself, and not others; and if you are 
not pooular, you will at least be respected; popularity lasts 
but a day, respect will descend as a heritage to your children. 

T.C. Haliburton 



Mah'a Application 





t 4 m. ** 



I ■ 

To k 
the 
unab 
eras 




— 



now a man nowadays is above all to know 
element of irrational in him, the part he is 
le to control, and which he would like to 
e from his image of himself. 

Andre Malraux, Anti-Memoirs 





John 
Fraleigh 




Surfing isn't just a hobby; 
It's a way of life. It's a way 
of looking at that wave and 
saying, "Hey bud, let's party.' 





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Jeff Spiccoli 



Leslie 
Kende 



He discovered that while he 
sat helplessly musing he had 
also been writing as though by 
automatic action. . . He could 
not help feeling a twinge of 
panic... for a moment he was 
tempted... to abandon the 
enterprise altogether ... He 
did not do so, however, 
because he knew that it was 
useless . 

George Orwell 1984 



If I could, yes I would 








Fong Ling Law 



Sean 
MecPherson 






ach phase of nature, while not 
invisible, is yet not too distinct and 
obtrusive. It is there to be found when 
we look for it. Nature is like a silent 
'out sympathizing companion in whose wL 
company we can walk and talk, or be 
silent . 

Henry David Thoreau 





Quynn 
Phillips 





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Caroline Pierce 



Happiness in this world, ^ v ^ g 

When it comes, comes incidentally 
Make it the object of pursuit, 
And it is never attained. 




Success is a journey not a destination. 

Jack Miner 



Deborah 
Polloway 





It is easier to go down 
a hill than up but the 
view is from the top. 




AVAILABLE 

SOON: 

The P6but Alburn Rom * 




rnuvatm 



4 



;-;!?• - 

fjpve fts a dream th 
[lway*s -hang ontp ; 
iatll'11 always r 

>au]J Weller 




My Ever Changing Mark£ 



SCOT STANFIELD 



Your Due Jockey 








Claire 
Taylor 



You are only what you are when no one is looking 

Bob Edwards 




One o'f ; the blessing of being a humorist 
is that all your mistakes , pass off as jokes 

' ' '' <• Peter McAr thii£ k 



Valerie Jane Wilson 



True friends visit us in 
prosperity only when invited, 
but in adversity they 
come without invitation. 

Theophrastus 




Oh the promises our teachers made 
If we worked hard, if we behaved 
So the graduations hang on the wall 
But they never really helped at all 
Mo they never taught us what was real 

Billy Joel 



v 



The roots 
of education 
are bitter, 
but the fruit "* 
is sweet. 
Aristotle 





Thanks For Friendship; 
KH , TB , CT , DP , MD , CL , SW , RW , TW , LS 



Siocey 
Chrisrina 
Worsley 



...and then a big wind gus 
came along ...it wasn't my 
fault... my poor friend! 

kar i 



ftE YOURSELF TONIGHT! 

annie lennox 




Valedictory 

I am happy to have this opportunity to recognize the value of the 
education I have received during my twelve years at Strathcona Tweedsmuir 

School. 

Perhaps the most obvious asset of any education is the accumulation 
of knowledge towards the development of our intellect. However, I believe 
the most important aspect of education is the formation of lasting attitudes. 

Growing up in the unique atmosphere of S.T.S. we have had the opportun- 
ity to develop intellectually, physically and spiritually. The school's 
curriculum has enabled us to obtain a balanced education with enriched 
activities to help us form attitudes. These attitudes, though, were not 
always easily achieved, yet ultimately were worth their effort. How many 
times have we asked ourselves: "Why am I putting myself through this?". 
Then with the help of teachers, parents or close friends, we realized that 
new attitudes require this intensity if they are to be worth maintaining. 

The school gave us a set of guidelines, but allowed us to develop our 
own ideas in order to add excitement. It becomes particularly exciting when 
one is attempting to lead a peer group over an avalanche slope. One ponders 
the decision of whether or not to cross. Upon asking the old wise one for 
advice, you receive the response "I don't know. What do you think?" This 
gives rise to the emotion of fear, never mind new attitudes. What it does 
accomplish, though, is that through these endeavours, and many others at S.T.S. 
we were always encouraged to experiement, be creative and test our skills. 

Over the years, the staff members have demonstrated their attitudes in 
hopes that we, the student body, would absorb them. Mr. Taylor taught us 
to appreciate opera music in order to soothe us while we sang and conjugated 
Latin verbs. The old attitude that haste makes waste seems utterly false 
to Mr. 0, for if one could talk fast enough, six lessons could be squeezed 
into the time span of one; while other teachers have engendered a more 
realistic attitude: that at times our intellect appears to be inferior to 
that of a guinea pig. 

Within the walls of S.T.S. there is also an intermural programme. Often 
teachers will join students in the particular sport they are playing. However, 
I must comment that an overly zealous attitude in retrieving a volleyball can 
cause undue harm to the seams of one's lower attire - eh, Mr. Budd?! 

The guinea pig class of 1986 has endured many unique and different ex- 
periences together, ranging from the new endeavours programme to weekend 
volleyball and basketball tournaments. In the past the class of 1986 has 
had to deal with many controversal situations. Always the student body has 
remained calm, cool, and corrected. 

In conclusion, I hope that in the future the graduating class of 1986 
will remain calm and cool, yet "self directed". 



158 



Michelle Stevens 
Valedictorian 



Our teachers... 






our teachers are 
ready and awake... 



Whether it be at work... or at play... 





Whether it be at the office... 



to greet you with 
a smiling face I 




our teachers are 
always there . . . 



'/T 

or in the mountains 



to help us make it 
through the day!! 



161 




Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School Faculty 
1985 - 86 

HEADMASTER 
Peter B. Ditchburn 
B.A., Dip. Ed. (University of Melbourne), 
M.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 

G. D. Freight, B.A. (University of Calgary), A.T.C, Diplome (Tours) 

Director of Administration 
G. G. Bauman, B.Sc. (Michigan), M.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C, 

Head of the Elementary School 

C. J. Hay, B.A. (University of Calgary), A.T.C, 

Head of Senior High School 
Mrs. C. M. Fitzgibbon, B.A. (University of Toronto), A.T.C. 

Head of Junior High 
C J. Tottenham, B.A. , M.A. (University of Toronto), A.T.C 

Director of Admissions, Department Head, Modern Languages 
P. R. Adams, B.P.E. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 

Department Head, Science 
Ms. S. A. Bartel, B.Ed., (Calgary), A.T.C. 
Mrs. S. Biollo, B.Ed. (University of Alberta), A.T.C. 

Department Head, Music and Drama 

G. L. Blais, B.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C 

M. J. Budd, B.P.H.E., B.A. (McMaster University), B.Ed. (University 
of Western Ontario), A.T.C. 

Department Head, Outdoor Education 
R. H. Cojocar, B.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 

Department Head, Art 
W. Colborne, B.P.E. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 
Mrs. M. Collier, B.A. , H.Dip.E. (University of Ireland), A.T.C. 
W. G. Cumming, B.Sc, B.Ed., (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 

Department Head, Computer Studies 
S. J. Diskin, B.A. (University of Winnipeg), B.Ed. (University of 
Calgary), A.T.C. 

Mrs. Z. M. FitzGerald, B.A. (Mod.), H. Dip. Ed. (University of Dublin), A.T.C. 
Mrs. S. L. Gibson, B.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 
Mrs. J. M. Goldsworthy, B.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 
Mrs. L. A. Harvey, B.A. (University of British Columbia), A.T.C 
Miss J. E. Home, B.Ed. (University of Alberta), A.T.C. 

D. S. Johnson, B.P.E. (University of Calgary), A.T.C 

M. Keller, B.Sc. (University of Arizona), M.Sc (University of Calgary), A.T.A. 

H. Koning, B.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 

Department Head, Mathematics 
Mrs. M. E. Laughren, B.A. , B.Ed., (University of Alberta), M.Sc. (University of 
Calgary) , A.T.C. 

Mile C. M. Lemieux, B.Ed., B.A. (University of Saskatchewan), A.T.C. 
W. E. Lorfing, B.S.Ed., M.Ed. (University of Georgia), A.T.C, D.F.C. 
J. R. Lunn, B.Math (University of Waterloo), A.T.C 
Mrs. F. MacLean, B.A. (University of Alberta), A.T.C. 
J. H. McConnell, B.A. (University of Calgary), A.T.C 

Head of Guidance 
Mr. D. R. Nelson, B.Ed. (University of Alberta), A.T.C 
J. H. Orsten, B.Sc, B.Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C 

Mrs. J. Owens, B.A. (Hons.), (Birmingham University), Cert. Ed. (Cambridge 
University) , A.T.C. 

163 



- 2 - 



Mrs. P. L. Perkins, B.P.H.E., B.Ed., (University of Saskatchewan), B.A. (Carleton 
University), A.T.C. 

Assistant to the Head of the Elementary School 
Mrs. W. Rodney, B.P.E., B.Ed., (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 
Mrs- P. Ropchan, B.Ed., Dip. Ed. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 

Librarian, Department Head 
J. E. Schmit, B.A., M.A. ( Gonzaga University), A.T.C. 

Department Head, English 
Mrs. B. E. Stewart, B.A. (Bishop's University), A.T.C. 

W. P. Taylor, B. Comm., Dip. Ed. (McGill University), B.A. (Sir George Williams), 
A.T.C. , C.C.T., Department Head, Timetabling; Coordinator, House System 

C. K. Thompson, B.P.E., M.Ed. (University of Calgary), Cert, in Education, University 
of London, A.T.C. Department Head, Physical Education; Director of 
Athletics 

Miss L. C. Wiggins, B.A. , B.P.H.E. (Queen's University), B.Ed. (York University), 
A.T.C. 

B. Wilson, B.A. (University of Manitoba), A.T.C. 

Department Head, Social Studies 
Mrs. B. Wyatt, B.Ed., Dip. E.C.S. (University of Calgary), A.T.C. 



ADMINISTRATION 

Ms. S. Andrew, Receptionist 

Mrs. L. Clarke, Library Assistant 

B. E. Duclos, B.A. (Queen's University) 

Director of Development 
Mrs. L. Garland, Secretary 

Mrs. S. Hamer, B.Sc. (Hons.), University of London, 

Kings College, Development Assistant 
Mrs. B. Hewson, Secretary 
W. Kelm, CM. A., 

Business Manager 

MAINTENANCE AND TRANSPORTATION 



H. Bradish B. A. Sills 

A. & H. Fulmek G. Sproat 

K. R. Headrick D. Wakelam 

M. Langley 



164 



20 Years 




Mr. Robert "Bob" Cojocar came to Strathcona after four years on staff 
at Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario. At that time, 1966, 
the headmaster of Strathcona School for Boys was Alfred M. Howard, who 
was replaced the following year by Mr. Sandy Heard. There, Mr. Cojocar 
taught Grade 5 in the gymnasium and classroom facilities at the River- 
view United Church in Britannia. 

In 1971, when the Tweedsmuir girls teamed up with the Strathcona boys 
in the present location, Mr. Cojocar was Head of Junior Boys and taught 
Grade 6 in the new Co-ordinate School. Besides coaching skiing at the 
School, Mr. Cojocar was a prime mover in initiating the STS riding 
programme in the early 1970' s when the facilities of the Graham Ranches 
in Millarville were made available. Among his achievements, Mr. Cojocar 
travelled to Mexico as an alternate member of the Canadian Equestrian 
Team for the Summer Olympics in 1968, he studied art history in Rome in 
1976 and in 1980 travelled to Japan to study woodblock printing techniques. 
Mr. Cojocar is now Head of the Art Department. 

The STS staff is seen here honouring Bob Cojocar' s twenty-year landmark 
with a special party in April. 




165 



Congratulations 



Three staff members have completed fifteen years of service and we extend our 
congratulations to them: 



Congratulations to Mr. Michael Keller, who has been granted a sabbatical 
for 1986-87. 



To the staff who have left Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School in 1986 we express 
appreciation for their service and their many efforts on our behalf. we wish 
them all the very best for the future. 



Mr. Bill Cumming is a seven year veteran of S.T.S. who has taught senior 
Chemistry and was basketball coach and tour organizer for rugby and basketball 
trips. Mr. Cumming was also coordinator of Computer Studies at S.T.S. and 
advisor to many Grade 12 Graduation committees. Mr. Cumming has been appointed 
to Deerfield Academy, Massachusetts. 



Mr. Garry Bauman 
Mr. Jack Hay 
Mr. Brian Sills 



Head of Elementary School 
Head of Senior High School 
Maintenance Department 





166 





Mr. Jo Lunn has taught mathematics and computer science at S.T.S. since he joined 
the staff, after leaving St. Andrew's, four years ago. Mr. Lunn was also 
actively involved in the Outdoor Education and Tripping programme. Mr. Lunn is 
moving to Vancouver and he has been appointed to the staff of the new Collingwood 
School . 



Mrs. Cathy Fitzgibbon has completed five years on the staff. In addition to 
teaching English and Drama, Mrs. Fitzgibbon was Head of Girls then Head of Junior 
High School. Mrs. Fitzgibbon produced Variety Night (1983, 1985) Annie Get Your 
Gun (1982) My Fair Lady (1984) and Anything Goes (1986). She has been appointed 
Vice-Principal of Havergal College, Toronto. 




Mr. Mike Budd has taught Social Studies, Physical Education and Outdoor Education 
since joining the teaching staff in 1980. He became responsible for the Outdoor 
Education and Tripping program. He leaves us to become the Director of Outdoor 
Education at Appleby College in Ontario. 

167 



Mrs. Margaret Collier taught junior and senior high school French during her one 
year at the school. She was also assistant coach of the girls' hockey team. 



Mrs. Beverley Dusseault joined the office staff in 1983 after being at the Golden 
Secondary School for many years. Affectionately known as "Mrs. Bird" 
Mrs. Dusseault turned the bookstore, "Strathcorner" , into an exciting place to 
shop and to visit. She resigned in December to take an extended tour of New 
Zealand, Australia and Asia. 



Miss Pam Lyken joined the office staff in 1984 and worked on accounts while doing 
her accounting courses. A keen motorcyclist, she gained fame after being 
selected as a "stunt man" for the movie Rad which was filmed in Calgary. She 
resigned to move to England to live and to work in more films. Miss Lyken was 
affectionately known as "Chicken Lyken". 



Bon voyage to Mr. Sandy Orsten, 
who will be teaching at Wesley 
College, Melbourne, Austalia, as 
an exchange teacher during 1986-7. 



168 



A. PROMOTION CERTIFICATES 

All students in Grades One, Two and Three. 



B. HONOURS CERTIFICATES 

Grade Four: Arliss Abrahamson, Jessica Baert, Danny Baillie, Christopher Cully, 
Grant Farn, Michael Forbes, Christy Greene, Mackenzie Harvey, Tara 
Habijanac, Richard Lengkong, Patrick Mitchell, Ria Paul, Lisa Ricketts, 
Kern Shepherd, Katka Smira, Erin Thompson, Marte Towle, Rishi Verma, 
Latif Walji, Michelle Wong. 

Grade Five: Nairn Ali, Jill Baillie, Kathy Bartel, Rodney Brown, Ryan Crowther, 

Jeffrey Davis, Sarah Hawitt, Ilja Herb, Andrew Kirker, Emeline Lamond, 
Kern McMurtrie, Alim Mitha, Karim Nogas, Tyler Pichach, Jennifer 
Tottenham, Alan Yeung. 

Grade Six: Robert Cropp, Roxanne Elenko, Andrew Knowles, Roger McClary, Andrew 

Mitchell, Rachael Owens, Clint Sello, Ashley Skiber, Angus Turner, 
Jennifer Upitis, Jacqueline Westly, Christina Zolotas. 

Grade Seven: Laurie Brown, Melissa Darou, Steven Feick, David Grout, Brett Habijanac, 
Nadia Herb, Leigh Hodorek, Robert Lamond, Alexandra Luckhurst, Penny 
McDermid, Rebecca Miller, Karen Neuss, Scott Nichol, Chelsea Pichach, 
Laura Sharp, Brenda Varnam, Getta Verma, Susan Wiesenthal, Billy Zimmer, 

Grade Eight: Alanna Abrahamson, Stephanie Angus, Edoardo Bardana, Penny Benson, 
Ralph Fitzgerald, Sabrina Grobler, Guru Gunaratnam, Mary Hankinson, 
Peter Hoang, Stacy Hyndman, Scott Lemieux, Dana Mendham, Julie Nedham, 
Shaun O'Brien, Judd Palmer, Paulose Paul, Stephanie Smith, Travis 
Smith, Thijs Spoor, Anton Wootliff, Cheryl Zimmer. 

Grade Nine: Carrie Allen, Shauna Darou, Kathryn Dundas, Pieter Grobler, Lisa 
Hadway, Katie Harse, Stephanie Jardine, Geoffrey Kneller, Steven 
Leach, Samantha Loucks, Colin McCormick, David McKenzie, Matthew 
O'Brien, Tina Ragona, Patrick San Agustin, Holly Shillabeer, Sarah 
Waddock, Brian Wood. 

Grade Ten: Dana Arnell, Sibylle Baehre, Alexander Baldwin, Douglas Brown, 

Catharine Farn, Eera Jadav, Sharon Kent, Scott McDermid, Melissa 
McLaws, Krystina Romocki, Christine Varnam. 

Grade Eleven: Catherine Angus, Jean-Pierre Buysschaert, James Carswell, Amy Chu, 

Brian Elliott ,Marnie Fudge, Jim Giannoulis, Emily Griffin, Jennifer 
Hewson, Panagiota Kousinioris, Meredith Laurence, David Leach, Erin 
Malone, Sarah McDonald, Brian Nichol, Tara O'Brien, David Singh, 
Katie Tavender. 

Grade Twelve: Sarah Alexander, Alex Aspinall, Wolf Baehre, David Bardana, Russell 
Berscht, Leslie Kende , Rob McBean, Alison Ross, Claire Taylor, 
Llewellyn Turnquist, Christy Worsley. 



170 



C. SUBJECT AWARDS 



ART 


Grade 


10 


: Karen Scoulding 


Grade 


11 


Celia Brasso 




flra rip 


X — 


► 1_ d 1 1 Y Cl d li j. e rv 








CLASSICS 


Grade 


8 


: Shaun O'Brien 


Grade 


9 


Katie Harse 


COMPUTER 














STUDIES 


Grade 


11 


: Jim Giannoulis 








DRAMA 


Grade 


1 0 


A1 py Ralrlwin/ Ann a 


Wa t~ Icin s 








KJ L dUC 


I 1 

X X 


Fm l 1 v Hri f f l n / T^"^ t 

LjIIIXX V UL XI L 111/ lVd L 


tp a/p n ri p t* 
xe idvcuuci 






ENGLISH 


Grade 


7 


Chelsea Pichach 


Grade 


8 


Shaun O'Brien 






Q 

y 


T^" a f~ Vi t* \rx\ W \ in a Q / 
rvcl l_ 1 1 X j Ll UU.IlU.clo/ 


Li L dUC 


1 0 

X \J 


A 1 p v R .a 1 H l n 

il_L e 2\. DalUWlll 








Katie Harse 










Grade 


11 


Katie Tavender 


Grade 


12 


Tanya Burek 


FTNF ARTS 




7 

/ 




Grade 


8 


Ni rhol pc? Tphhi t t 

lil-LUUXdO I dU U X L L 




Grade 


9 


Jennifer Pierce 








FRFNPH • 


Crarip 

U L due 


7 


iidU J- cl uci u 


vjj i_ d Ll e 


8 

LJ 


j_ eiiii y ucuouu/ i m k i lh i 




UL uUC 


Q 

J 


IN. a. L1C i Id L o C 


LJ i_ CX Ll e 


1 0 

X \J 


Mp 1 1 QQ;3 MpT PWQ 

l le -1 LOOu ULLdWO 




Grade 


11 


Tara O'Brien 


Grade 


12 


Alison Ross 


MATH 




7 
/ 


Mp 1 n cca T^^iT"r>ii 




8 

L> 


Shaun D'Rripn 

l. 1 1 la 111 I \J UL i-CU 




Grade 


9 


Colin McCormick 


Grade 


10 


Sibylle Baehre 




Grade 


11 


Brian Elliott 


Grade 


12 


Rob McBean 


OUTDOOR 

\J\J -L \-J \J L/ IV 














EDUCATION 


Grade 


11 


Tara O'Brien 

j_ CJ. i_ CJ. vy 1_J J. J— V— L L 








PHY9TPAT 














EDUCATION 


Grade 


7 


Eric Hyndman/ 


Grade 


8 


Dana Mendham/ Shaun 








Penny McDermid 










Grade 


J 


L/ -i_ o ci Liauwa y / 


Grade 


1 0 


Rrpf-f T pRnnrupflii / 

U L C L L LiCUUUl V CCIU/ 








Lisa Fortems 






Scott McDermid 




Grade 


11 


Catherine Angus 


Grade 


12 


Gordon Laird/Sarah 


O Vw< J_ Lj IN V_» l_j 


\J L clLlfc; 


7 


MoT n c c a Ha rnn 


\J L clLlfc: 


8 
o 


P ' j v y \ r Tnhncnn 
r d L Ly JL/lllloULl 




Grade 


9 


Katie Harse 








BIOLOGY 


Grade 


1 0 

X l/ 


Phn* Qf i tip \/ o T"n ^ m / 

Lv 1 1 L X O L 1UC V d L 1 1 Cl 111 / 


U I dUC 


1 1 

X X 


Tim 0,1 xmnnnl 1 q 

O -LIU UXdllllUUl -LO 








M p 1 ~i cqp Mr*T ^itaTq 

UCXlODd ULLdWO 










Grade 


12 


Sarah Alexander 








CHEMISTRY 


Grade 


1 0 


Mpl "i ccp Mr*T ^U7Q 

i ll 1 i rjrjii l 1L Ljdwo 


U I dUC 


X X 


Tim n i ,^ n n n 1 1 1 i q / 

vJ -LIU UXdllllUUl-lo/ 














Tara O'Brien 




Grade 


12 


Leslie Kende 








PHYSICS 


Grade 


1 0 

X w 


Qli^ y~ cw\ o tt t 

J 1 Id 1 U ll [ < 11 L 


vJ L dUC 


1 1 

X X 


Ti ni Hi ^nnnul i q 

J 1.111 vJldllllUUl J-O 




u l due 


X t- 


T p c 1 i' p \<{ t\ r\ & 








SOCIAL STUDIES 


Grade 


7 


Chelsea Pichach 


Grade 


8 


Paulose Paul/ 














Shaun O'Brien 




Grade 


9 


Katie Harse 


Grade 


10 


Alex Baldwin 




Grade 


11 


Tara O'Brien 


Grade 


12 


Sarah Alexander 



171 



THE DOROTHY GOLDSTEIN MEMORIAL PRIZES: Awarded for proficiency in Maths and Science 
Junior High: Katie Harse Senior High: Leslie Kende 

THE OUTDOORSMAN: Awarded to the Senior High student who has shown outstanding 

ability and leadership in Outdoor pursuits throughout the year. 

Gordon Laird 

OUTSTANDING ATHLETE: 

Junior High: Susan Elliott Senior High: Catherine Angus 

Sean Honey Jay Morberg 

D. HOUSE AWARDS 

Junior High School BURNS HOUSE 
Senior High School DOVER HOUSE 

S.A. Heard Trophy (Elementary) HOWARD HOUSE 

E. PROFICIENCY AWARDS 



Grade 


1 


Araylea Waters 


Grade 


2 


Sonya Lowe 


Grade 


3 


Samantha Tabbitt 


Grade 


4A 


Christopher Cully/ 












Danny Baillie 


Grade 


4B 


Tara Habijanac/ 


Grade 


5A 


Jeffrey Davis 






Kern Shepherd 








Grade 


5B 


Karim Nogas 


Grade 


6A 


Roger McClary 


Grade 


6B 


Robert Cropp 


Grade 


7A 


Melissa Darou/Nadia Herb 


Grade 


7B 


Karen Neuss 


Grade 


7C 


Laurie Brown/Scott Nichol 


Grade 


8A 


Shaun O'Brien 


Grade 


8B 


Thijs Spoor 


Grade 


8C 


Judd Palmer 


Grade 


9A 


Pieter Grobler 


Grade 


9B 


Katie Harse 


Grade 


9C 


Samantha Loucks 


Grade 


10 


Melissa McLaws 


Grade 


11 


Jim Giannoulis/ 


Grade 


12 


Sarah Alexander 






Tara O'Brien 







F. SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES 

The Staff Bursary Judd Palmer 

W.A. Heard Bursary Annelise Pedersen 

W.H.H. Tidswell Memorial Scholarships 1986-87: 

Pieter Grobler 
Stephen Leach 
Sean Nixon 
Holly Shillabeer 
Aisha Umar 

Douglas Chapman Memorial Bursary Brian Nichol 



172 



THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH AWARD: In order to be eligible for ibis award, 
a student must complete requirements in four areas: service, expedition, 
skills and physical fitness. 
Aisha Umar 



MAJOR AWARDS 

.The Mrs. A.E. Dunn Trophy 
The S-TS Junior High Trophy 
The Junior High Spirit Award 
The Buchan Trophy 
The Neil McQueen Memorial Award 
The Margaret Cameron Memorial 
The David Pike Memorial 
The Strathcona Award 
The Tanner Cup 
The Howard Trophy 




Rachael Owens 
Lisa Fortems 
Tori Douglas 
Susan Elliott 
Doug Luft 
Christy Worsley 
Alastair Griffin 
Marya Piffer 
Lew "urnquist 
Sarah Alexander 





THANK YOU 



We wish to express our grateful thanks to all the people and companies who, 

either by advertising or sponsoring pages have helped us to make this year's 

PAIDIA possible. Some have asked to remain anonymous, others may have 

contributed after our publishers' deadline and could not be acknowledged on 
this page; all these we thank just as warmly. 



Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


F.H. Baehre 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


G. Bardana 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


C. Burek 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


L. Dodd 


Dr. 


and 


Mrs . 


P.G. Finch 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


I.G. Griffin 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


O.K. Horn 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


R.P. McBean 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


A. Palma 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


P. Piffer 


Ranger Oil Limited 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


G.D. Ross 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


D.R. Sharpe 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


W.P. Taylor 


Mrs 


. Barbara 


Wallat 


Mr. 


J.W 


. Wilson 


Mr. 


and 


Mrs . 


R. Worsley 



174 



Mount Royal 
Village 



8 




(on rhe pork at eighth street and seventeenth avenue 



south west) 



175 



CARDINAL 

Coach Lines Limited 



Congratulations to the graduating students, 

faculty and staff. 

Best wishes for continued success in the future 




aliutn 



3374-6 Yonge Street 482-1905 
TORONTO, ONTARIO M4N 2M7 



coiiimcMj o 




TORONTO 



176 



MILLER & BEAZLEY 
LIMITED 



INSURANCE 



230 - 999 - 8 STREET SW 
CALGARY , ALBERTA 
PHONE 229 - 0466 

ESTABLISHED IN CALGARY 
1913 



You don't have 
to be Jewish 




to eat at 




Deli & Bar 




Murray Jiomes Inc 

"'Designing 'Tor 'TamiW Living" 



'Brian Stfurrav 



Box 9137, Stn. "F" 
Calgary, Alberta 
T2J 5S7 



Telephone 
256-1929 
279-7858 



Look to the future for success! 




t Cooj Inn Lie 



Complete Printing Services 



"Instant Printing" 
Phone (403) 287-3290 



929 - 42nd Ave. S.E. 
Calgary. Alta. T2G IZ1 



On the corner of 5th St. 
& 12th Ave. S.W. 234-7605 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 
TO THE 

1986 GRADUATING CLASS OF 
STRATHCONA - TWEEDSMUIR 



GEX RESOURCES LTD. 

10201 - Southport Road S.W. 
Calgary, Alberta T2W 4X9 
Phone: (403) 258-1335 





Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 

Paul N. Kruychy, P. Eng., President 
Carol A. Krachy, V t cu-Prea idem 



May all your dreams become realities 




ctepw 



is pleased to wish the 
Grade Twelve Graduates 
well in their future endeavours 




Lotepro is an Engineering Firm providing Process Design, Engineering, 
Procurement and Construction Services to the Petro-Chemical, Chemical, 
Petroleum, Natural Gas and Mineral Industries 



<&(^&Dfc& PLANTS LIMITED - USINES LOTEPRO LIMITEE 

510-808 4th Avenue S.W. Calgary. Alberta T2POK4 1403)262 2106 




Juvenile Diabetf 
Fbundation International 

M17. 9880 ■ 1A Stnwt 8.W., Cstgiry, Albert* T2H 0G3 
(«3) 255-7100 




Juvenile 

Diabetes 
Foundation 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 1986 GRADUATES 



Sponsored by J. Thomson 



Congratulations to the Grads 
Best Wishes for the Future 



Greetings and Salutations! 

The Douger and the Bear 
congratulate the Class of 
1986 on an absolutely 
splendid year, in the hopes 
that they too will eventually 
graduate . 




m PULSONIC 

GEOPHYSICAL 

LTD 

255-2820 

Providing a 
FULL RANGE OF 

— GEOSCIENCE DATA 
PROCESSING SERVICES 

— DIGITAL CABLE 
MARINE ACQUISITION 

Suite 700 
10201 SOUTHPOFtT RD. S.W. 




..Mil 



" THE SECRET TO SUCCESS IS CONSTANCY TO PURPOSE." 



BENJAMIN DISRAELI 
1804-1881 



Best Wishes to all Graduates, 




PANCON 



PAN CONTINENTAL OIL LTD. 

1500 BOW VALLEY SQUARE III 
255 - 5th AVENUE S.W. 
CALGARY. ALBERTA T2P 3G5 





The Strathccma Tweedsmuir 
& St. B.Ma!s 
Akirnni Association 





CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 86 



BEST WISHES FOR FUTURE SUCCESS 



TO THE 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION S NEWEST MEMBERS 



132 



Thanks 

5Tj Porenrs GSrudenrs 



for shopping 
wirh us!! 



Saudis Styfes 

bodies <lA/eQA Sdftd. 

(Dfcotofcs, <J(tao 

^fiom? 928-4 71 I 



Desr Wishes 

to off rhe students ! 




CAREER 
PLANNING 

by INDUSTRIAL 
PSYCHOLOGISTS 

A comprehensive program of aptitude 
testing ana professional guidance to 
persons seeking: 

• suitable academic or career 
choice 

• greater career satisfaction 

• continuing career growth 

Thorne Stevenson & Kellogg 

MonoQement Consultants 
lO'tO Bow Valley Square II 
205 - 5 Avenue S W 
Coigory. AJberta T2P 2V7 
Phone 269-4976 



THOMAS J. WALSH, Q C.- 
ROBERT C. SMITH, QC 
DOUGLAS R. BOUEY - 
H CAMERON MACDONALD 
GERARD M MEAGHER 
ELAINE L LENZ 
RAYMOND G HUNT 
WILLIAM T SPENCE 
WILLIAM B STINCHCOMBE 
MICHAEL W BROWN 
M JANINE ELLIOTT 
BRIAN P. RURKA 
PATRICIA L. BLOCKSOM 
ANNE J BROWN 
PETER E HAYVREN 
* DINOTIS PROFESSIONAL 



ROBERT A M. YOUNG, Q C 
ROBERT J WILKINS, Q C." 
GORDON J BURRELL - 
JAMES N. SHAW 
DOUGLAS 1.0. MCLEAN 
JAMES R. KITSUL - 
ROBERT R HAGERMAN 
FREDERICK R FENWICK 
NORMAN MALONEY 
PAUL A MIRABELI.F 
BRIAN D EVANS 
D ROBBBEEMAN 



CORPORATION 



2800. SOI ■ OTH AVENUE S W 

CALGARY. ALBERTA 
T2P4A3 

TCLSPHONC 267-8400 AttCA COOK *03 
TWX 610 821 4 382 
TSUIX 03 823781 
TCLCCOPICR 204-04OO AREA COOK 403 
CABLE AOORESS "BARRSOL" 



183 



The Worsley Family 

wishes to extend congratulations 
and best wishes for future 
success, to the graduating 
cbssof 1906! 






Congratulations 

and 
Best Wishes 
to the 

1986 Graduating Class 
of 

Strathcona - Tweedsmuir 
★ ★ ★ 

Rainbow Lithographers 
Ltd. 

Calgary, Alta. 276-3977 




Q KENNELS LTD. 



Congradulations To The Class of '86! 



ERIC L HARvlE, O C . LL.O 
(1892 1975) 



J E A MACLEOD. O C XL D (1878 I966| 



R J BURNS. O C 

D G MART O C 

J S BURNS 

W MIROSH 

J H COLEMAN 

E A LEEW 

A. G. VICKERY 

P K MATKIN 

W C HUNTER 

J T RAMSAY 

D A GUICHON, JR 

J P MCMAHON 

M J SMEPPARO 

A S RUPAHOFF 

H. E MACKJCHAN 

L M V1NER 

J A DIXON 

J M MCVICAR 

G K L SO 

J n PAULUS 

E J O WIL SON 



C M LEITCH. O C 
HON D P HAYS 
G F DIXON 
D A GRAHAM 
T E HIRST 

V A MacDONAI. D 
S G RABY 

H A JACOUES 

w H TUEH 

W G BUCHAN TrnRELL 
K J LOGAN 
J M HORLH'.K 

V E HOWARD 
R L CULTON 

C L K HIGGINS 
A S BILDY 
R N AVERY 
R N Fitl.LINGI ON 
S M MA rTn r wS 
L J STRAPP 
DOWNF 



D 



K S DIXON. O C (1915 1982) 

J C F CASFY. OC W 

J J MARSHALL. OC. R 

K B POTTER A 

B D SHERMAN D 

D A McGILLIVRAY E 

D L BAXTER A 

C M JONES D 

J G HANLEY J 

J G MCK EE G 

G r FAASS J 

K E JOHNSON A 

J D GENASKF R 

G R BENNETT C 

G M POEL MAN S 

P M KL OHN D 

C R THOMSON L 

R P BORDFN N 

P A MCCIJNN C 

J R BELL M 

H RAE JOHNSON J 
JAR RANKIN 



C A «AE. O C 



H BONNE Y, O C 
G ROWLEY 
D MACLEOD 
H WATKINS. 
J BROWN 
G LOVE 
G DAVIET. 
I PAPKFH 
F GRAHAM 
J PARK 
R ROBEF- TSON 
H BOERS 
W BERAPD 
B CHISHOLM 
A SIBBALD 
CHOW 

A ARMS THONG 
G YODER 
T A CAMPEE LL 
R J BLACKMER 



ISOO HOME OIL TOWER 
324 a r « AVE S w 



T2P 222 

TELEPHONE (003) 267 8222 
TELECOPIER (403) 261 5973 
CABLE ADDRESS ' MACLEODIXN 
ALBERTA DOCUMENT EXCHANGE No 9 
TWX 6iO 82i «»670 
TELEX OS S25503 



185 



SheD Salutes 

a class of 

distinction 




QmqratuIatioii5 to tfic 

5trduicona- Tvoeecbmuir 
Schools Oass of 56/ 

Shetf wishes you best of 
on uour next move fbruKirxl 




GOOD LUCK TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 19 86! 




1 he Glcnmoie Club 

21 21 98 Avenue S.W . Calgdry, Alberid 72V 4So (403)281-4481 



You're a great class '86! 
Go for it in the years ahead. 
We expect good things from 
all of you. Good luck!!! 

The parents of one of you 



187 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 1986 GRADUATING CLASS!! 



The standards which you have set while at S.T.S. will 
long be remembered and the excellence of your achievements 
will carry you forward into a challenging and rewarding 
future . 

Good luck and best wishes! 
BLACKLEAF PETROLEUM COMPANY 




Stuart Olson 

General Contractors/Engineers 



CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF "86" ! 



1822 - 10th Avenue S.W. 
Calgary - Alberta 

T3C - 0J8 
Phone 244-9711 



188 



The Polloway family congratulate 
the Class of 1986 on a 
well-earned graduation. 






Sterling Homes 



D,v. 8 ,on ot MENNO DEVELOPMENTS LTD. 

#300, 5819 - 2nd STREET S W. 
CALGARY, ALBERTA T2H 0H3 



BEST WISHES TO THE 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1986!! 



CHRIS J. BUREK 
Manaqer 



BUS. 253-7476 



SPECIALISTS IN COMMERCIAL AND 
INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS AND COMPUTER 
SUPPORT SYSTEMS 



ISOTEC 



LTD. CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
636, 11th AVE S.W , CALGARY, ALBERTA T2R 0E2 
TELEPHONE (403) 237 7288 



"The reward of a thing well done is to have done it." 

Ralph Emerson 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE 19 86 GRADUATING 

CLASS OF S.T.S. ! ! ! 



189 



BRITANNIA BOY'S AND 
YOUNG MEN SHOP 



824 -49 AVE. S.W. 243-7653 
President - JACK PEPPER 
HOURS MON. TO SAT. 9-5:30 FRIDAY 9-9 P.M. 

THE STYLE SHOP FOR BOYS 
AND YOUNG MEN 
SIZES 8 to 42 

Slim, Regulars, Huskies 



"THE SECRET TO SUCCESS IS CONSTANCY TO PURPOSE." 



BENJAMIN DISRAELI 
1804-1881 



Best Wishes to all Graduates, 



PAN CONTINENTAL OIL LTD 

PANCON 



1500 BOW VALLEY SQUARE III 
255 - 5th AVENUE S W 
CALGARY. ALBERTA T2P 3G6 



190 




Ingress Logic 

SYSTEMS LIMITED 

636 - 11th AVE. S.W., CALGARY, ALBERTA 
T2R 0E2 TELEPHONE: (403) 264-7393 



COMPUTERIZED SYSTEMS FOR CARD 
ACCESS CONTROL OF PREMISES. 



"Antiquitas Saeculi Juventus Mundi" 
(The age of centuries is the youth of the world) 

Francis Bacon 

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE STS GRADUATING CLASS OF 1986!! 



Morberg 
Holdings Ltd. 

Securities Consultant 
and 

Financial Analyst 

Fred Morberg - President 
Okotoks, Alberta 
938-7290 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 
GRADUATING CLASS OF 19 86! 




I NORTH 
EASTERN 

DRILLING LTD. 



GEORGE S. WARD 

PRESIDENT 

NORTHLAND BANK BUILDING 
2401 - 520 FIFTH AVENUE S.W. 
CALGARY, ALBERTA T2P 3R6 

BUS: (403) 265-6361 
RES: (403) 281-8072 



191 



AUTOGRAPHS 



7 



Published by: 

JOSTENS/ NATIONAL SCHOOL SERVICES LTD. 
Winnipeg. Manitoba, Canada