Skip to main content

Full text of "Report .."

See other formats


1027.5773 

I29r 

1913/1914 

c.3 




>mher 31, 1914 







Map showing location of traveling libraries. 
September 1, 1913, to December 31, 1914. 
























Schnepp & Barnes, State Printers 
Springfield, III. 

1915 





REPORT 


OF THE 


Illinois Library 
Extension Commission 


September 1, 1913 - December 31, 1914 




ILLINOIS STATE LIBRARY 



11ET 0153 


OLTE 4 


Spring-field, Illinois 






















ILLINOIS LIBRARY EXTENSION COMMISSION. 


MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. 

Hon. Lewis G. Stevenson, 

Secretary of State , Chairman, Springfield. 
Mrs. Eugenie M. Bacon, Decatur. 

Mr. Joseph H. Freeman, Aurora. 

EXECUTIVE STAFF. 

Anna May Price, Secretary. 

L. Ruth French, Librarian. 

Esther Skoog, Stenographer. 


Headquarters, State House, Springfield. 






LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 


Springfield, Illinois, December 31, 1914 . 
To Honorable Lewis G. Stevenson, Chairman of Commission: 

In compliance with the Revised Statutes of Illinois, chapter 128, 
section 11, I herewith transmit the report of the Illinois Library 
Extension Commission covering the period September 1, 1913, to 
December 31, 1914. 

Anna May Price, 

Secretary and Director of Library Extension. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2017 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Alternates 


https://archive.org/details/report1913illi 


ILLINOIS LIBRARY EXTENSION COMMISSION. 


The following report of the Illinois Library Extension Commis¬ 
sion covers the period from September 1, 1913, to December 31, 
1914. 

The headquarters of the commission since its establishment in 
January, 1910, had been in the basement of the Public Library at 
Decatur. In January, 1914, they were moved to Springfield and now 
occupy rooms in the State House. 

At the same time the following changes were made in the execu¬ 
tive staff: Miss Anna May Price was appointed organizer; Miss 
Eugenia Allin, librarian, and Miss Esther Skoog, stenographer. The 
title of organizer was later changed to that of secretary and director 
of library extension. 

Miss Allin resigned her position the last of July to accept the 
position of librarian with the James Millikin University, Decatur. 

The commssion was fortunate in securing as a temporary assistant 
Miss Katherine Searcy, formerly reference librarian of the University 
of Texas. On account of illness m her family, Miss Searcy was 
forced, to resign her position. November 9, Miss Ruth French re¬ 
ceived an appointment under civil service as permanent assistant, tak¬ 
ing the place made vacant by Miss Allin. 

An increase in the biennial appropriation, small though it was, 
and the addition of two members to the staff, have given the oppor¬ 
tunity to accomplish more efficient work. The commission has 
endeavored to enter into all of the library activities of the State and 
to‘ally itself with every organization that might cooporate in furthering 
the work. Chief among these has been the State Federation of 
Women’s Chibs. Items have been published in the Illinois Club Bulle¬ 
tin offering assistance to individual clubs in making out their programs 
and in lending books and reference material for papers. Ninety-five 
federated clubs being located in towns without any library facilities, 
their cooperation has been solicited in the endeavor to establish public 
libraries. 

The library extension committee aided the commission by a gift 
o‘f two sets of the Woman Citizen’s Library, a collection of modern 
dramas, and $54.00, which was expended for new books of which 
the commission stood in great need. 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES. 

In order to get into closer relations with the public libraries and 
to gather the data necessary to enable the commission to answer the 
many questions as to what was being done by the libraries in the 



8 • 

State, a questionaire was sent out covering the subjects of appropria¬ 
tions, expenditures, building, hours, number of volumes, circulation 
and staff. This information is now appended to this report. 

Daily, monthly and annual statistic blanks have been distributed 
to all libraries that the annual report to the commission may be of a 
uniform character. 

There are now in Illinois two hundred and twenty-two public 
libraries. One hundred and sixty-one of which are free tax sup¬ 
ported city, village or township libraries. Seven of these—Brookfield, 
Buda, Carmi, Greenfield, McLean, Mason City, and Wilmington— 
have been added during the last year. McLean and Wilmington are 
township libraries. 

There are eleven endowed libraries. These libraries receive little 
or no support from the cities but have, been established through the 
philanthrophy of public-spirited citizens. They are nevertheless quite 
free to the public and serve their communities in the same way as do 
the tax supported libraries. 

The Stinson Memorial Library at Anna, opened July, 1914, is 
the gift of Captain R. B. Stinson. He made a bequest of $50,000 to 
the city for the establishment of a free public library. The money was 
allowed to accrue until there was sufficient interest to erect a $25,000 
building and open a library of twenty-five hundred well selected 
volumes. 

In addition to these there are six communities which have voted 
a library tax or appropriation but have not yet opened libraries. 
Aledo, Chillicothe, and Wyoming voted a township tax and are wait¬ 
ing to construct buildings before opening libraries. Abingdon and 
Marion voted a city tax and have also their buildings under con¬ 
struction. 

The city council at Auburn appropriated $600 for a library, ap¬ 
pointed a board of trustees and a librarian, but has not yet estab¬ 
lished a library. 

Under the auspices of library associations, parents and teachers 
organizations or women’s clubs, libraries have been opened in DePue, 
Grant Park, Hinckley, Keithsburg, Kinmundy, Morton, Pecatonica, 
Sheldon, Thomson, and Virden. These libraries are supported by sub¬ 
scriptions and ‘donations, but the books and all library privileges are 
quite free. These additions increase the number of association and 
subscription libraries to forty-three. Many of these are hoping to 
induce their city or township authorities to levy the proper library 
tax with the next annual assessment. 

Two hundred and twenty-two public libraries would not seem an 
unworthy number when it is compared with the reports of neighboring 
states: Wisconsin, 167; Indiana, 145; Missouri, 39; Iowa, 152. Yet 
it remains an undisputed fact that there are seventeen counties in 
the State without any public library, and that fifty-two cities with a 
population of 2,000 or more are also without a library of any kind. 

. NEW BUILDINGS. 

The commission has purchased a number of copies of books of 
plans of library buildings. These are loaned to library boards, for 


9 


their consideration before drawing up the specifications for their 
own buildings. 

The secretary has been very pleased to look over plans that have 
been submitted and to make such recommendations as seemed ad¬ 
visable. The advice of the commission has been sought many times 
concerning lighting systems and proper library furniture. 

Anna.— The building which was erected from the bequest of Cap¬ 
tain Stinson cost $25,000. The architect, Walter Burley Griffin, has 
designed a particularly harmonious and artistic building. It was 
opened in July. 

Brookfield.- —The Brookfield Public Library was opened July 27. 
The building, the gift of the Carnegie Corporation, cost $10,000. 

Delavan.— The new building which was dedicated November 7 , 
1914, is the gift of the Carnegie Corporation. $10,000 covers the 
cost of the building and the furniture and fixtures. The site was 
given by J. W. Crabb. a citizen of Delavan. 

Glen Ellyn.— The library was opened the 1st of September, 
1914. The cost of the building, $10,000, was donated by the Carnegie 
Corporation. The site, valued at $2,000, was purchased by the club 
women of the village. 

Metropolis.— The Carnegie Corporation gave $ 9,000 for a new 
building, which has just been completed. 

Morris. —December 5, 1913, the Morris Public Library was dedi¬ 
cated. The building cost $12,500 and was given by the Carnegie Cor¬ 
poration. 

Park Ridge.— Park Ridge has a new Carnegie library which was 
opened December 6, 1913. The building cost $7,600. 

NEW BUILDINGS UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 

Abingdon. —A lot and $10,000 have been given by John Mosser 
for a library. The plans have been accepted and the building is under 
construction. 

Aledo.— The Carnegie Corporation has given $10,000 for a building, 
the site has been purchased and plans for building are under consid¬ 
eration. 

Belleville.— The plans of Otto Rubach for a $ 40,000 library 
have been accepted and the builders’ contract let. The building is the 
gift of the Carnegie Corporation. 

Carmi.— The Carnegie Corporation gave $10,000 for a building. 
Clifford Shopbell was chosen architect. The building is almost com¬ 
pleted. 

Chilli cotite.— A site for a library has just been purchased and 
negotiations are being made with the Carnegie Corporation for money 
for a building. 

Downers Grove.— $8,500 has been given by the Carnegie Corpo¬ 
ration for a library. The plans for the building have been accepted. 

Marion.— The plans for a library by Clifford Shopbell have been 
accepted. The Carnegie Corporation has given $18,000 for the 
building. 

Toulon.— Harry Aldrich has been chosen architect to present 
plans for the new $10,000 Carnegie building. 


10 


Wyoming.— The new Carnegie Library was planned by Reeves 
and Boilie. The building cost $6,000 and is almost ready for occu¬ 
pancy. 

GIFTS. 

Carlinville.— Mrs.' Susan Dick has given $8,000 and a site for a 
library building to the Carlinville Library Association. 

Minonk. —$20,000 and a lot have been left from the estate of 
David Filger for the purpose of a public library. The money is 
reported as not being available at present. 

LIBRARY VISITS. 

The secretary has during the year made fifty-one visits to librar¬ 
ies, meeting with the librarians and the trustees to discuss ways and 
means of increasing the efficiency of the libraries. She has made 
fifteen public addresses, for the most part in communities wishing to 
create an interest in favor of establishing public libraries. She has 
conducted five library institutes and with the help of her assistant has 
organized six public libraries. 

ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARIES. 

To all new libraries established during the last year the commis¬ 
sion has furnished a list of books for first purchase and a list of sup¬ 
plies needed for organization. In addition it has directed and assisted 
in the organization of the following libraries: Anna, Brookfield, 
Sheldon, Virden, Waverly, and Wilmington. The organization 
includes classifying the books and making the accession record, charg¬ 
ing system, and shelf list. 

Whenever the library is of sufficient size and the librarian is 
capable of continuing the work, assistance is given in cataloging. 

LIBRARY INSTITUTES. 

Four library institutes were held during the last year—at 
Kewanee, Gilman, St. Charles, and Jacksonville. Each conference was 
well attended by the librarians and library trustees from the surround¬ 
ing towns. The sessions extending over one or two days were devoted 
to papers and general discussions of the following topics: Use and 
care of periodicals; children’s books; methods of local library exten¬ 
sion ; books for the small library—what, where and how to buy; 
reference work, and technical processes. The Library Institute has 
proved one of the most efficient means of stimulating interest and 
furthering the work of the public libraries. 

The expense of these institutes to the amount of $42.19 was borne 
by the Illinois Library Association. 

PUBLICATIONS FOR DISTRIBUTION. 

The following publications have been purchased in quantities 
for distribution among the libraries in the State. 

A. L. A: Book-List. 


11 


Baldwin, Library Service. 

Brown, Buying List of Books for Small Libraries. 

Brown, Directions for the Librarian of a Small Library 

Eastman, The Library Building. 

Hadley, Why Do We Need a Public Library? 

Hall, Vocational Guidance Through the Library. 

Hewins, Books for Boys and Girls. 3d ed. rev. 

Jones, A Thousand Books for the Hospital Library. 

Olcott, Library Work With Children. 

Stanley, 550 Children’s Books. 

Stearns, Essentials in Library Administration. 

Vitz, Loan Work. 

Walter, Periodicals for the Small Library. 

Wire, How to Start a Public Library. 

COMMISSION PUBLICATIONS. 

Report of the Commission, September, 1910-1913. 

Leaflet No. 2. How to Establish a Free Public Library in Illi¬ 
nois. 

Leaflet No. 3. List of Books to Buy for Children. 

TRAVELING LIBRARIES. 

When the Library Extension Commission was established in 1909 
the Federation of Women’s Clubs turned over to the commission its 
entire collection of traveling libraries. They had been circulated a 
number of years and the books were necessarily very much worn; 
many of them had to be discarded. The commission appropriations 
for the first four years were too small to admit of the purchase of 
books, so the old ones were mended and circulated as formerly. 

This year the commission felt that it must have some new books, 
especially those suitable for children and young people. Consequently, 
from the still meager appropriations, 2,600 volumes were purchased. 
These included on^ hundred books of current interest and late fiction 
and twenty-five hundred volumes which were made up into collections 
of twenty-five books each to circulate in the rural schools of the State. 

Articles were printed in the School News calling the attention of 
the teachers to the fact that they could have the loan of one of these 
school libraries as well as a general collection of fifty volumes, for 
the payment of transportation charges only. The idea was not only 
to provide books for the children, but for the grown people also and 
thus help to make the school house a social center. The result has 
been that there have been many more requests than it has been able to 
grant. 

Many demands have come from libraries, women’s clubs, debating 
societeis and individuals for special material. These have all been 
filled as far as possible, borrowing from the other libraries in the 
city when the commission collection did not contain books on the 
subject. When the material could' not be furnished, reference lists 
have been sent with directions where the books or magazines might be 
purchased. 

The women’s clubs of the State have availed themselves of the 
offer of the commission to assist them in arranging their programs 


12 


for the year. Copies of these programs are kept on file in the office 
to be loaned to other clubs. 


SUMMARY OP TRAVELING LIBRARY LOANS, SEPTEMBER 1, 1913— 

DECEMBER 31, 1914. 



Requests. 

Vols. 


Requests. 

Vols. 

Rural communities.. 

57 

2,772 

Individuals. 

. 26 

67 

Public libraries. 

Schools—Rural and 

39 

1,383 

Institutions . ... 

. 2 

100 

Village. 

Study clubs. 

,.. 108 

4 

2,775 

155 

Total . 

. 236 

7,252 


STATE FAIR EXHIBIT. 

Through the courtesy of the Department of Public Instruction, 
space was granted the Library Extension Commission for an exhibit, 
at the State Fair. 

Samples of the traveling libraries, rural school collections and 
children’s books were placed on exhibition. Copies of all the com¬ 
mission publications were distributed. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

The twenty-one charitable institutions of Illinois are under the 
supervision of a State Board of Administration. Each of the three 
penal institutions is governed by its own board of commissioners. 

Some of the institutions have large libraries, which are classified 
and catalogued and are administered by librarians who give their 
entire time. Institutional librarians are civil service appointees. 

Most of them, however, have collections of books arranged in no 
particular order and looked after by some member of the staff. 

The Board of Administration has empowered the Library Exten¬ 
sion Commission to select lists of books for purchase for the various 
institutions. The commission has further cooperated by loaning trav¬ 
eling libraries to the Kankakee State Hospital. 

STATE ASSOCIATION. 

The Illinois Library Association met in Springfield, October 
21-23, 1914. It was one of the largest meetings that has been held 
for some years. An exceedingly good program had been prepared. 

Meeting in Springfield, it gave the opportunity for many librarians 
to visit the headquarters of the commission. 

SUMMER SCHOOL. 

The University of Illinois conducted its regular six weeks’ 
course in library training, June 22 to July 31. Twenty-five librarians 
from public and college libraries in the State attended. 

LIBRARY LEGISLATION. 

Illinois has no minimum library tax. The maximum rate is one 
and two-tenths mills for a library in a city with population from 1,500 










13 


to 100,000 inhabitants. Cities with a population of over 100,000 may 
not levy a tax to exceed six cents on the one hundred dollars. A 
village or township may levy two mills. It is hoped to pass a bill 
increasing the rate to two mills on the dollar for all cities with less 
than 100,000 population, during the present Legislature. 

Under the present law the largest unit which may levy a library 
tax is the township. There are seventeen counties in the State which 
do not have township organization. In these counties only city and 
village libraries may be established. A one and two-tenths mill tax in 
the cities may provide funds sufficient to maintain a small library, but 
there are no villages with an assessed valuation large enough to raise 
by a two mill levy, money sufficient to create any kind of a library. 
Not only these villages but the rural communities surrounding them 
must depend upon traveling libraries from the commission. Most of 
these counties are in the southern part of the State. The distance is 
far from Springfield and the freight is high. 

A county library law would provide for an assessment over the 
entire county. The rate could be lower by reason of being collected 
from a larger territory. A main library should be established in the 
largest and most centrally located city with branches or deposit stations 
in the smaller towns and villages. ( Small collections of books should 
be loaned to all the rural communities and library privileges extended 
to every man, woman and child in the county. 

Another library law which should be enacted is one analogous to 
that under which the township high school operates. Such a law 
would allow several adjoining townships to unite in levying a library 
tax. There are cases in Illinois where villages are located in parts 
of two townships. The village tax would not support a library. 

The only feasible thing to do would be for the townships to join 
in establishing a library. This they cannot do under the existing law. 

It is greatly desired that the coming Legislature will enact laws 
providing for an increase in the mill rate for public libraries in cities; 
a county library law and one that will allow two or more townships 
to unite in levying a library tax. 


14 


FINANCIAL REPORT. 


February 1-December 31, 1914. 

Salary Fund. 

RECEIPTS. 


[Jnexpended appropriation 


$5,158.22 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Secretary . 

Assistant. 

Stenographer . 

Temporary assistants 


Balance 


$1,306.65 

732.50 

660.00 

130.40 


$2,829.55 

2,328.67 


$5,158.22 


General Fund. 

RECEIPTS. 


Unexpended general expense account. 2,670.90 

Receipts for drayage . 50.02 

Gift Illinois Federation of Women’s Clubs . 54.00 

Donated by Illinois Library Association . 42.19 


Total .$2,817.11 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Books .....$1,557.81 

Freight and drayage (including moving from Decatur).. 90.14 

Postage . 135.48 

Library institutes. 42.19 

Traveling expenses . 340.13 

Decorating room. 159.00 

Shelving. 58.60 

Pamphlets for distribution and office supplies.... 98.75 


$2,482.10 

Balance .. 335.01 


$2,817.11 





























STATISTICS OF SUBSCRIPTION LIBRARIES, 1914. 


15 


-d ;dS > S 


& <Vt r 


pi O hrl H 


t-j 1 *" 5 rt 


:Q 

>,'§.SS 


pa PS ” •" p <v 

gj- 


gd53«<Hg 

+P 00*00 CO CO OO b 
p Pi Pi Pi p 2 


2 ^ rf 

z£ma 


2.% 

£2c»<» 
2 <U P p 

HESS 


a3 

£ 2 
< 2 


^■g 


c3 

w 

ctf 

to «J pp 


o P< 

a <u 

- r d 0) 
2 <1 OO Jj 

9 <U^ 

2 *3*2 


,• oj . o 

U] xs a ^ 
- o >& 
ai «h2 

a a! So 
W _, <wa 
v §£«< 


cti Pi 

SSCP 


„ dl'CoS <D O CCj Pi 

N hlHD* ^ ^ W S 


3 


£8E§8 

oca 
*■« cc co 


O O CO > O 
2828*° 


2 > 


26 


5828 

lO iO (M LO 


1-OXO 

CCOOO 

OiCtO 


)OOOXCOOOX 
) -t- OC IO r-< OlOr- 
) CO 1-0 CD ic -t< ?> -f o 




y§ s 
p d p 

&,»o 


_ <u 

ci £ 

g>8 

^ PI 


gad 

2 s2.es 
Sgh» 
«5°o 


s«I 

rt +-> rM 

Q CO OO 

<upp 


o o 


OO 

88 


0) <u 

0) d> 
p Sh 

HH 


1 ) 0 ) <v 

d) (U !L> 
o Pi Pi Pi 

EHEH 


W(DO-+K*«Kf: 
XOP-^CS- 

Maxaaaaaai 


wum 
<V (V (V <v 
p p p p 

EHHH 


So 


;2888£88S8 

iTHlOOD'fXXrHlO 


d nj^ 
or ■ 




oSa.g*§2^stl 

d d Pi d 0 ) 0 ) P 


oi 

ri H Pi 
g'd c d aJ d 
s o ■— TP Q, O 
<?P3dL2 


CD >C N 
00 — 0 
O ID O 


80808 R 88 

OCOOh iffOii 


o d 


E d 


^cRd- 


e^sISfL; 


IlSlilll 


CO 

d 

gcp 


jdgg o' 0 2 S 2 > o 


« C ni niDDD - - „ - _ _ _ 

^ffloooooQQHHkOaEEWWWEHHHSSSElz 


rj fH r& ** r 

I«S-S : 

S S®s 

o S'C’S 


3§ri§ 

•h ►> o xn 

to pi y o 
_ o cci^iPP 

CPHpacapa^r/)^ 


d >> 


fip u 
d . yo <« 
o » v 


*Interest on $600.00. tPlus $2.50 per month. fFrom township. 

















































































































































































































































ana municipal aclmimstration. A special lecture describing this part 
of the work of the survey is sent with this collection. 


"0 

P 


CO 

P 

oJ 


o 

o 

£ 



P 

© 

- 4- 5 

o 

d) 


o 

o 

p 

<D 

43 

•H 


CD 

ttf- 

cti 

CO 

CO 

CD 

P 

P, 

X 

CD 


Springfield Survey Slides 


The Illinois Library Extension Commission has made a 
collection of forty slides, illustrating the exhibit of the Spring- 
field Survey, which was made under the direction of the Russell Sage 
Foundation* The slides selected represent city and county adminis¬ 
tration) schools, social center, play grounds, city planning, health 
department, recreations* juvenile court, etc,, all of which may be 
quite as applicable to other communities as to Springfield, A des¬ 
cription or explanation of the slides accompanies the collection, 

A smaller collection has been made containing only 17 
of the slides which relate to the public schools, correctional system 
and municipal administration, A special lecture describing this part 
of the work of the survey is sent with this collection. 

Either collection will be loaned for two dollars and 

expre ssage,