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THE 


HMLECTRICALIL REVIHW. 








AUGUST 9, 1918, 


No. 2,124 





Vou. LXXXIII. 





ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 


Vol. LXXXIII.) CONTENTS: August 9, 1918, (No, 2,124, 


Page 
Efficient Publicity Work ... soe eee ~_ wes eco. 191 
* All's Well that Ends Well” 122 
Economic Policy ... , 123 
Patents and Enemies oes _ one —_ owe ~-— 
An Electrieally-Welded Ship (illus.) ... eve eee oe «300 
The Future of Coal Using, by W. H. Booth ... eee we 125 
Mining Electrical Engineering, by C. Jones (illus.) ... we whet 
Relay Automatic Telephones at Australia House (illus.) 127 
Legal eee coe ooo ose ost a _ ua I 
War Items ... eee eve ove ove oes on oo. 
Correspondence— 
The Nottingham Super-Power Station ... eee soo «180 
Instruments for Central Station Switchboards ... a 
Trade Unions: Past, Present and Future ... ane —_. ae 
Motor Problems _ eee eee eee a oe 
Business Notes eve ov eco ove eee eve oe Fea 
Notes eee eee eee woe eco eco eee coe §6=2185 
C.ty Notes ... eee one eee ove eee ove ne 
Stocks and Shares ... ose eee eco eco oe oe 166 
Exports and Imports of Electrical Goods during April, May, 
and June, 1918 ... _ eco ° coe ao 


The Education and Training of Engineering Apprentices, by 
P. H. 8. Kempton (concluded) ... on se ons a See 


Tar Oil as a Motor Fuel (il/us.) ... ham = wt wa 2 
Trade Statistics of India ... a“ see aes bias we. 
Foreign and Colonial Tariffs on Electrical Goods iad coe ©6144 


New Patents Applied for, 1918 ... ove ove eee cco «(346 
Abstracts of Published Specifications ... eco eee ooo 244 
Contractors’ Column on an --- Advertisement page xxii 


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EFFICIENT PUBLICITY WORK. 

DURING the progress of the war, journals which represent 
industries that are of direct importance in connection with 
the production of war requirements are, for various reasons, 
debarred from particularising achievements which, under 
normal conditions, it would be to the advantage of those 
engaged in such industries to be acquainted with. Such 
journals have had added to their accustomed responsibilities 
certain very essential functions, which they perform in the 
interests of the Allied 


cause and in the interests of 


their industries, and their usefulness is recognised in 
Government quarters as was never the case before the war ; 
but, for obvious reasons, there are accumulating to be 
described and discussed, in times of greater freedom, when 
initiative may be exercised under less restraint, what are 
really arrears of very useful matter. It has been one of the 
responsibilities of editorial life during the war to practise a 
ceaseless vigilance in order to prevent the appearance of 


To the 


enterprising newspaper alwayson the look-out for really useful 


matter which could be of assistance to the enemy. 


matter, it is naturally a great disappointment to have to 
refrain from publishing such material when it has been 
offered. In most cases, however, we believe that the duty 
has been faithfully and loyally carried out—though not by 
any means always—because of the earnest desire of the 
Press to hasten the defeat of the enemy. 

The present handicap, however, will come to an end 
sooner or later, and it appears to us important that if there 
is any weakness anywhere which will prevent the publication 
in the technical Press of the facts concerning the abilities 
and achievements of British electrical and engineering 
manufacturers, steps should be taken to remove it. now. 
Both during the war and for several years preceding it, 
we frequently drew manufacturers’ attention to their own 
unfavourable position in comparison with German com- 
petitors in this matter. The British method often seemed 
to be to hide the manufacturers’ light under a bushel by 
adopting a definite policy of secrecy concerning their opera- 
tions, so that their home competitors should not know what 
they were doing, or else there was an apathy concerning 
publicity which let sach matters “ drift.” a 

There were some brilliant exceptions—but they were 
rare, and we could count them upon our fingers. We 
remember other cases where information was flatly refused 
to the Press for fear anything should be given away ; 
where we were definitely asked to certain 
items ; where there was no time to spare to collect data ; 
or where there was a disposition to help, but no efficient 
assistance available for securing essential material from a 
firm’s own documents. We believe that the war has 
brought a new atmospherd and a greater desire for efficiency 
which will obviate some of these difficulties in future ; but 
what will help the situation more than anything else is the 
adoption of a fully enlightened policy on the part of the 
individual manufacturer under which he will co-operate 


sup} ress 


[121] 











122 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [vol. 83. No. 2.124. Aveusr 9, 1918. 





with the Press through his own efficient representatives. 
We use the plural intentionally, because it is not upon 
what we have come to regard as the “ publicity man” that 
the responsibility for shortcomings has always rested. 
Some of these representatives have. been, in our estimation, 
“poor things,” it is true—quite incapable of efficiently 
carrying out their duties in co-operation with the 
Press ; others have been first-class men, but—lIsraelites 
in Egyptian bondage - they were unable to make bricks 
without straw, because those to whom they ought rightly to 
have been able to look for sections of the material necessary 
for making the complete record, were not possessed by the 
same appreciation of the importance of publicity as, or were 
less energetic than, the * publicity man.” 

The subject is of some considerable importance in con- 
nection with our aft€j-the-war industrial activities. There 
is no doubt whatever that German propaganda methods will 
have to be very carefully watched by the Press. We know 
something concerning their methods of the past—good 
and bad ; the. former contain points which British manu- 
facturers would do well to copy, for there was no indis- 
position in Berlin and elsewhere to furnish through a well- 
organised literary and photographic department, or through 
recognised literary correspondents, descriptive accounts of 
inventions and installations which, because of their 
technical and industrial value, were of interest 
to British readers. Of their future methods we 
cannot gather as much information as we should 
desire all at once, but we have learned some of the 
possibilities, and to these we may refer later. But while we 
shall require to exercise great care, in order that their ends 
may not be unconsciously served, there is, as we say, 
one thing that is immediately possible, and that is, that 
individual manufacturers adopt a large-minded policy, and 
improve their own facilities.for meeting the requirements. 

Speaking broadly, it must be stated frankly that for 
many years past the possibilities of commercial publicity 
propaganda, as a means of securing a firm hold on the 
markets of the world, though frequently urged upon the 
mind of the British manufacturer and engineer, have been 
followed up too apathetically, and, in consequence, with 
disappointing results on the whole. 

The attitude of mind which has resulted in this apparent 
indifference, and even hostility, jo methods which are 
logically in keeping with the general growth in knowledge 
and education the world over, may have an easy ex- 
planation from the British standpoint. We cradled the 
world’s industries in the past ; we built for the world and 
instructed it ; we occupied a position of splendid industria! 
isolation, and the world came to us; but nowadays the 
foster parent is surrounded by a numerous thriving progeny 
—self-reliant peoples to whom British prestige is a memory 
rather than a reality—and this, we are afraid, many of our 
manufacturers and engineers are only just beginning to 
realise. ~ “ Brown and Smith,” who 60 years ago were as 
well known in Australia as they were in Sheffield for the 
excellence of their, gsteelware, seem still to be under the 
impression that because they are even better known in 
Sheffield to-day, therefore their reputation in Australia and 
elsewhere is similarly enhanced. 

The utter fallacy of this short-sighted attitude—based on 
the supposition that “because you know, everybody else 
knows ’’—is only too evident. —e 

The Australians went to Brown and Smith 60 years ago 
because there was no one else to go to, and, no doubt. they 
got good value for their money, and the firm established a 
corresponding reputation ; but the Australian of 60 years 
ago is no more, and the * reputation” is in process of being 
snowed under by the insistent claims and pushfuil methods 
of more energetic present-day rivals. 

Anyway, a reputation needs careful nursing, or its owner 
is like to find it wearing away in course of time. and this is 
precisely what is happening to many British reputations— 
heirlooms of a. bygone generation, valued only by the 
owner and forgotten by the world. Government trade de- 
partments have scen this during the war, and as a result 
have advised our manufacturers, at all costs, to keep repre- 
sentatives at work in the different markets so as 
their firm’s memory green. 


to keep 


Publicity propaganda is the simple and obvious method, 
and in many cases the only method, of telling the younge1 
generation what you have done, are doing, and are going to 
do; in no other way can the modern business world be 
reached. To the engineer particularly it should appeal, as 
his products are too bulky and too costly to carry round in 
the traditional carpet bag. 

We believe that in many cases where there is a tendency 
among the engineering fraternity to disparage publicity work 
of the best kind, this is, as suggested above, due to the short- 
sighted views held by the works staffs, on whom the publicity 
men are generally dependent for information. It is to be 
feared that some of these gentlemen suffer, perhaps uncon- 
sciously, from distorted vision ; it may be that like a certain 
famous Admiral they apply their telescope to a blind eye 
when they view the world—a comparatively small place, 
by-the-bye, which surrounds the works—and it is quite 
certain that they do not realise that they may turn out the 
finest product on earth and yet’ eke out a bare existence, 
because they are comparatively unknown. 

In any case, it is up to the works to back up the efforts 
of their own publicity branch, if they have one, in every 
possible way, and thereby stimulate the selling of their pro- 
duct, to which their own cussedness is perhaps the only 
obstacle. 

Needless to say, we have the greatest respect for the 
technical work of our engineer designers and constructors, 
and their environment affords some excuse for a limited 
view of life, but that they are hopelessly wrong in adopting 
this attitude goes without saying. 

It would probably be of immense value if our construc- 
tional staffs could be better informed on the selling side of 
their business—the salesman has hold of the right end of 
the telescope, and is usually under no misapprehension as to 
the necessity of spreading the fame of his firm in every 
available market and by every available means ; but, so far 
as publicity is concerned, he finds shoal water—if not a 
sunken reef—when he approaches the works, and it is a 
very much overdue and frequently unrecognisable craft 
which gets clear—if, indeed, it ever does get clear ! 

We do not wish to inquire who is to blame, so much as 
to suggest to those whose duty it is to set the matter right 
that they should urge their staffs to show a befitting spirit 
of publicity enterprise. 








SHorTLy after the outbreak of war, a 

“All's Well that ‘ sip: Pee 
Ends Well,” c¢Ttain organisation for which we have 
great respect, but which shall be nameless, 
issued circular letters to its members on a matter of interest 
respecting its membership. As a result of exchange of cour- 
tesies, there were indications of repentance at leisure. Much 
had to be excused in those days, for everybody was more or 
less under the influence of excitement, and it fell to our lot 
to persuade our readers to stay their hand and not to be 
precipitate in posting suggestive or angry letters, even if 
they must wvife them. To-day, when we are all four 
years older, and when the times are quite serious enough 
from every point of view, there may be war-weariness in 
some quarters—it may even affect some who are either con- 
nected with, or somehow or other dependent upon, the elec- 
trical industry—but there is no excuse for hurried communi- 
cations now. Yet when they have been issued without full 
consideration, it is quite fitting that history should repeat 
itself. and that repentance at leisure should follow the 
issuance of some humorous and, therefore, easily mis- 
understood, some crude and, therefore, ill-thought-out, 
“ Notes on Advertising.” The circulation of the following 
explanatory or corrective missive spares us the necessity 
for dealing with this matter in detail, as we suggested we 
might require to do. It has been sent to many of our 
friends in the industry, and while it is not always easy to 
get on the heels of. a terminological imexactitude, we are 
content to say that “ All’s Well that Ends Well.” We 
cannot very well describe the original circular as a 
* Midsummer Night’s Dream”: we should be inclined to 


) 


regard it as an April Nightmare. It certainly is “ Love's 








Labou 
f wh 
Associ 
really 


At 
Advert 
and th 
which 
Public 

At 
Associ 
Journ 
etter 
count: 
ietter 


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Vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveust 9, 1918.) THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 123 








Labour Lost.” In any case, it was a * Comedy of Errors ” 
f which we cannot for a moment believe the important 
Associations saddled with the responsibility for it wer 
eally the originators. 

COPY. 


NOTES ON ADVERTISING. 


Memorandum of Conference 
held on July 9th, 1918 


At the end of April a circular-letter. headed “Notes on 
Advertising,” was circulated by the British Engineers Association 
and the British Electrical and Allied Manufacturers’ Association 
which Associations are amongst the founders of the Industria 
Publicity Service, Ltd. 

\t a conference on July 9th between representatives of thess 
Associations and the British Association of Trade and Technical 
Journals, Ltd., it was pointed out that certain statements in this 
etter were considered to be prejudicial to the trade Press of this 
ountry. As this was contrary to the intention of the circular- 
etter in question, it was agreed to make the following joint 
supplementary announcement 

1. That although the paper situation is serious, there is no 
intention to publish trade journals fortnightly instead of 
weekly. 

2, That the cost of printing has now increased by 75 per cent.. 
and the priceof paper by 600 per cent. or 700 per cent.. and 
the increase to the cost of production fully justified the 
proprietors raising the advertisement rates or reducing 
the size of space. 

The trade Press of this country is acknowledged by the Ministry 

National Service to be of National importance, and in this 
respect is classified with the daily newspapers. It is in the interest 
of British manufacturers that trade journals maintain their publi 
cations at their present high level, in view of the important part 
which they must necessarily take in the renewal of commercial 
enterprise and reconstruction at the close of the war. 





Ir is satisfactory that British manu- 
facturers have received from the lips of 
the Prime Minister and of Mr. Bonar 


Economic 
Policy. 


aw a more detailed declaration than has hitherto been 
found possible concerning our economic policy. Anxieties 
regarding affairs in France have so engrossed the attention 
of the Ministry since March last that it is only now, when 
the outlook has improved owing to the carrying of certain 
legislative measures and the fuller intervention of American 
forces, that ideas have been able to take anything approach- 
ing definite shape. The policy of Preference within the 
Empire has been adopted, as already stated; but beyond 
that, little that is yeally definite can be said,.because the 
actual decision must be arrived at in consultation with the 
United States of America, as well as with the British 
Dominions. Mr. Lloyd George and the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer have, however, said enough to show that so 
far as they are concerned the industries of the British 
Empire will be protected against the future assaults of the 
enemy. The Prime Minister is very emphatic in the de- 
claration that the industries essential from the point of 
view of national defence and security must never again be 
allowed to be weakened. Mr. Asquith, Sir A. Stanley, Mr. 
Runciman, and others who have filled profninent Ministerial 
posts during the war have said the same thing again and 
again—indeed, we think there could hardly be a dissentient 
voice from any true loyalist on such a point as that. The 
present interference with trade, imposed under the extreme 
necessities of unparalleled conditions, must not be continued 
any longer than is absolutely essential to efficient return to 
industrial order, but Mr. Lloyd George adopts the view of 
Dr. Addison and other advisers that there must be a 
measure of control until the transition period is passed. 
We believe that manufacturers in their hearts recognise 
that necessity when they urge in the .interests of 
real industrial progress and security the removal 
of the irksome restraints and _ interferences which 
have irritated and handicapped them for so long. 
Capital and Labour are both agitating for their 
freedom ; both object to too much control. The former 
expresses itself in orderly fashion, while the latter breaks 
out occasionally with strikes against limitations’ of its 
liberties and against embargoes. We all want to get back 
to normal freedom of operations just as soon as ever it can 
be arranged—it is the independence that is in the very 


blood of the British Democracy that thus expresses itself. 
Mr. Lloyd George’s hope that the Mother Country and the 
whole Empire will remain with the Allies in an indissoluble 
partnership after the war is shared by all who have th 
interest of world freedom at heart, and we believe it to be 
inevitable that an economic policy shall be developed 
between all which will enable us to share in Peace the bene- 
fits of common understanding. But the predominant-intlu- 
ence on the situation is the fact that America is completels 
with us in the war, and we have so to frame our economic 
policy in conjunction with her that harmonious relations 
shall be perpetuated. Mr. Lloyd George is ** very hope ful” 
that when America is ready to express herself there will be 
found to exist a ground for complete agreement between us. 
Taken in conjunction with these sentiments, we find Mr. 
Bonar Law’s declaration and observations equally accept- 
able as part of a whole policy— presumably developed as far 
as it is possible to develop it at this juncture, as one of the 
matters which must inevitably come before the electorat 
in the course of a few months, when we have to elect a new 
House of Commons and new Ministers to decide the terms 
of Peace and to carry us, we trust, through the first few 
years of reconstruction. 


> . In our issue of July 12th we stated that 
atents an ’ 


the Government were seriously considering 
Enemies. : 


the question whether the payment of fees 
for the maintenance of enemy patents in this country and 
British patents in enemy countries should be allowed to 
continue ; on July 19th we recorded the fact that the Board 
of Trade, no doubt instructed by the Cabinet, had summarily 
prohibited such payments. It was an accomplished fact, 
and nothing could be done but accept the decree as such, 
sut was it a wise step? We wonder whether the Govern- 
ment secured the advice of competent men before making 
this unexpected and drastic change in procedure, which may 
have far-reaching and highly disagreeable consequences. 

According to a statement made in the House of Lords, 
the revocation of the licence relating to the payments to, and 
on behalf of, enemies, will not have the effect of annulling 
the 944 enemy applications for patents which have been 
filed and accepted since the outbreak of war. No other 
country except, perhaps, Russia, has cancelled such appli- 
cations. All of them are, or will be, vested in the Public 
Trustee, who can grant licences to British subjects, if 
required ; their future treatment depends upon the terms of 
peace. 

Lord Somerleyton, speaking for the Board of Trade, said 
that the withdrawal of protection from inventions in such 
cases would mean a scramble by each country for the inven- 
tions of the other; Lord Armaghdale,° who raised the 
question, held that the object of these patents was to impede 
British industry. Both seem to have overlooked the fact 
that the prime purpose of granting Letters Patent is not to 
create a monopoly for the inventor, but to secure to the 
public the benefit of inventions. An invention that is not 
patented may prove as useless to the public as to the inventor, 
for manufacturers will not put down costly plant to exploit 
an unprotected invention. It is desirable, therefore, that 
inventors, whether British or foreign, should be encouraged 
to apply for Letters Patent, in order that licensees may have 
protection for their outlay. If enemy applications wer 
cancelled, reprisals would certainly follow, and British appli- 
cations for patents in enemy countries would be annulled ; 
neither side would benefit. 

During the war royalties payable to enemy patentees 
have been lodged in the hands of the Public Trustee in 
this country; presumably a similar arrangement obtains 
in enemy countries, and the disposal of these funds will b 
a matter for the Peace Conference. If no such reciproca! 
arrangement existed, it would obviously be out of the 
question to pay any part of such funds to the enemy. 

As the Board of Trade representative remarked, the 
subject is hedged round with difficulties, and no step 
should be taker without the fullest consideration of the 
interests concerned, and the U ssible results of such action. 











124 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [vo'. 83. No. 2,121, Aveusr 9, 1918. 





AN ELECTRICALLY-WELDED SHIP. 


PARTICULARS are now available of the interesting—and 
completely successful—experiment in rivetless shipbuilding 
carried out at a shipyard on the South-East Coast. The 
first steel vessel constructed entirely without rivets was 
recently launched in the presence of Lord Pirrie, the Con- 
troller-General of Merchant Shipbuilding, and other 
representatives of the Admiralty and the War Office. She 
has since been in service with full cargo during exceptionally 
rough weather, and has answered satisfactorily in every way 
to the severe tests imposed. . 

The object of the experiment, to which considerable 
importance was attached by shipbuilding authorities, was to 
prove the ability of welded construction to withstand the 
strains peculiar to a ship at sea. This principle having 
been established, it is not proposed altogether to dispense 
with riveting, which in certain sections is cheaper and 
quicker than welding ; it is intended, however, that future 
vessels should be a combination of riveting and welding. The 
United States Shipping Board, for instance, having been in 
close touch with the experimental work, is making arrange- 
ments for the construction of a number of 10,000-ton 
standard ships in which the use of rivets will be reduced 
to 2) per cent. of the number originally required. 

The recent progress achieved in electric welding by means 
of the flux-coated metal-electrode process, and its successful 
use at Admiralty Dockyards and elsewhere in the construc- 
tion of fitments and superstructures of various vessels, led 
to permission being obtained for the erection of a standard 
barge, with riveting eliminated and electric welding sub- 
stituted throughout. Such a craft is exposed to considerable 
rough usage in dock, besides being subjected to severe 
towing strains. In order to utilise material already avail- 
able on site, this barge differs in no way from the standard 
riveted type with lapped joints, excepting that the hull- 
plates were arranged for clinker build and plate edges 
joggled to permit horizontal downward welding, in order to 
reduce the amount of overhead work, which is more difficult 
to execute. 

The vessel to be welded was 125 ft. between perpen- 
diculars and 16 ft. beam, with a displacement of 27% tons. 
The hull was rectangular in section amidships, with only 











Fic. 1.—ViIEw ALONG DECK OF VESSEL, SHOWING JOINTS IN 
DECK PLATING AND HATCHWAY COAMINGS. 


the bilge-plates curved. It was built up of 71 transverse 
frames, and contained three bulkheads, those fitted fore and 
aft being watertight and the one amidships non-watertight. 
The shell-plating was } in. and ,'; in. thick. All joints 
were lapped in the manner described. 

Curiously, the first day’s work was poor, thgugh all the 
operators were first-rate men. with extensive experience of 
electric welding in shops, minor repairs, and structural work 
at shipyards. This was probably due to the novelty of the 
undertaking and to the position—lying flat on the kee]l— 
which they had to adopt to get at the joints. In a few 
days, when the men became accustomed to the job, the 
speed and quality of the work improved to equal workshop 
standard practice. With the more difficult welding. such 
as the vertical butt joints on each shell-plating, and over- 
head work undeyneath the keel and on bilge-plates, it was 
noted that the quality of the welds was excellent. For this 


overhead work special electrodes were employed, and proved 
well worth the slightly increased cost. All water-tight 
joints up to and including the underside of bilge-plates were 
continuously welded both inside and outside, the other 
watertight joints being welded continuously on one side 
and tack-welded on the other. On the shell-plating, the 
continuous welding was on the outside in all cases. For 
internal non-watertight joints and frame construction, tack 
welding was adopted, the length of welding being carefully 
calculated to give a margin of strength over a similar 
riveted joint. 

Taking all positions of work into consideration, tli 
average speed was 4 ft. per hour at the commencement, 
while towards the end of the work an average of 7 ft. an 
hour was easily attained. 

As to the comparative cost of the electric-welded and 
riveted barge, in labour, 245 man-hours were saved in 
construction, which can easily be improved on in future 


t 








Fig. 2.—INTERIOR OF VESSEL, SHOWING ATTACHMENT OF SID! 
AND BILGE PLATES AND LONGITUDINAL STRINGERS TO 
TRANSVERSE FRAMES. 


work. More than 1,000 lb. of metal was saved, owing to 
the absence of rivets, but greater economy will result when 
the design is modified to suit electric-welded ship construc- 
tion. The total cost of welding was £301, detailed as 
follows : electrodes, £178 ; electrical energy, £61 ; men’s 
time, £62. 

It is realised by Admiralty experts that the proportion of 
cost for electrodes is high, but this is mainly due to the 
present limited demand. Demand and competition will 
have the usual effect, and should reduce the cost of this 
item by at least 60 per cent. It will then be possible to 
build a vessel of this size with an estimated saving of from 
25 to 40 per cent. of time and about 10 per cent. of 
material. 

As a result of this demonstration, a new design of barge 
has been prepared, in which it is proposed to incorporate 
electric welding and riveted construction to the following 
extent :—7o be Welded: Coamings, shell seams to frames, 
deck butts to beams, bulkheads (including boundary bars), 
keel plate butts to be welded overlaps, and after shell-seams 
welded.—7Zo be Riveted: Floor riveted to frames, beam 
knees to frames and beams, frames clear of shell seams. 








Standard Magneto Drive-shaft and Coupling Dimen- 
sions in America.——At the recent summer meeting of the American 
Society of Automotive Engineers, the report of the Engine Division 
of its Standards Committee was adopted. It was stated that the 
nominal drive-shaft diameter and length and the distance from 
the drive-shaft to the magneto shaft end for agricultural tractor 
engines had already been standardised. In order to complete the 
present standard the following were recommended :—(1) The 
magneto drive-shaft shall be of selected cold-rolled material, } in 
nominal diameter. The diameter limits at the coupling end shall 
be 0°750 in. and 0°749 in.; (2) couplings for engine magneto 
drive-shafts shall have bore limits of 0°7505 in. and 0°7495 in, and 
shall be fastened with a key. In placing the limite on coupling 
bores it was ascertained that standard reamers had a tolerance of 
plus or minus 0°0005 in. It will be noted that a coupling with a 
0°7495 in, bore is a press fit of 0°0005 in. on a shaft 0°750 in. in 
diameter. ,This is the extreme case, and is not considered objection- 
able, but preferable to a loose fit with a larger coupling. 








Vol. 8: 





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Vol. 83. No. 2,124, AuGusT 9, 1918.] 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 


125 





THE FUTURE OF COAL USING. 


By W. H. BOOTH. 


THE Interim Report of the Reconstruction Committee 
dealt with the question of power almost entirely from the 
old-standing view-point of the man who wishes to manu- 
facture energy in the shape of electricity, and to sell it as 
such. One of the objects of. the Committee appeared to be 
to increase the amount of power used per head of the 
working population, so that output per head may be increased 
and wages may be higher—all of which, of course, pre- 
supposes an agreement with Trade Unionism that the wilful 
restriction of output which prevailed prior to the war, and 
still exists to a large extent, shall cease. But the Com- 
mittee further desires that the increase of output shall take 
place without any increase in coal consumption—a corsum- 
mation devoutly to be wished, and only to be reached by 
an utter abandonment of the parochial methods hitherto 
obtaining. 

The report makes a certain limited reference to the 
possible conservation of the valuable by-products which 
may be obtained from coal, in the shape of oils, motor spirit, 
&c., before using such coal as fuel; but the matter is left 
quite open, and no line is indicated on which such by-products 
should be conserved. Thus the question of the future 
motive power of a heat-electrical works is left open as between 
steam and internal-combustion engines. Thus we are not 
carried much further along the road of economy, and the one 
anticipated factor in arriving at a better economy is nothing 
more than our old friend the big power station with huge 
geyerating sets. With a maximum boiler efficiency of 
80 per cent., a thermodynamic efficiency of 20 per cent., 
a conversion efficieney of 90 per cent., and a transmissiog 
efficiency of 80 per cent., the overall efficiency is 114 per 
cent., and it is extremely doubtful of realisation. The 
Committee’s anticipated figure is 1°54 lb. of coal per 
H.P.-hour delivered at the consumers’ terminals, or 11°8 per 
cent. if the coal value is taken at 14,000 8.TH.U. per Ib. 

Assuming that the Committee’s figure of 1°54 lb. of coal 
van be made good, or 21,560 B.TH.U. per terminal u.P.-hour, 
and. that a fifth-ef this is lost up the chimney and even 
20 percent. of the remainder isconverted into electrical energy, 
the heat in the steam will be 17,248 units, and the heat in 
the condensing water will be 13,800 units, or practically 
two-thirds (64 per cent.). Apart, then, from the possible 
salvation of by-products by some system of low-temperature 
distillation and the use of the caked residue under boilers, 
there would still be lost two-thirds of the heat value of the 
fuel, and, with a distillation system for residuals, there 
would be large volumes of non-condensable gases of more 
than ordinary producer-gas heat potential to be consumed 
in metallurgy if possible, or, failing convenient disposal, by 
gas ehgines producing electrical energy and feedimg into 
the mains. Here there are at once found side by side the 
steam turbine and the large gas engine, for only gas engines 
of large power would, it is presumed, be regarded as 
practicable. 

If gas engines should be selected for the main power 
units, their coal consumption per terminal H.P. would not 
amount to more than 1 lb., seeing that the efficiency of a 
gas producer should exceed that of a boiler, and that the 
efficiency of the gas engine, if not yet more than 25 per 
cent., or thereabouts, may be anticipated to become 30 per 
cent. when the fuel is fed to the engine on the Diesel 
principle of high-pressure pure air compression, with fuel 
added into this compressed air by a separate compressor. 
In this case, therefore, there would still remain waste heat 
to the amount of 9,200 B.TH.U. per terminal H.P.; this 
waste heat being about equally divided between the exhaust 
gases and the jacket water. 

Is this vast amount of waste heat to be saved? Is it worth 
saving? Is it possible to save it? These are questions 
which should not be summarily dismissed in a non possumus 
attitude, as they represent what will be the national 
burden of responsibility for, in each case, about two-thirds 
of the heat value of the fuel used, though for the gas engine 
the total fuel is assumed at two-thirds that used by the 
steam engine, and the waste heat is, therefore,, four-ninths, 


The problem in some respects is an easier one with steam 
power. 

However regarded, the problem of saving the waste heat 
is apparently one which puts the big power. station out of 
consideration if the enormous amount of waste heat can be 
usefully conserved, 

If it cannot so be conserved, and it is somewhat to be 
feared that this is likely to be the attitude of the big-station 
advocate who will not listen to anything which would put 
the big station out of the field, there still remains the 
question whether the super-station is altogether advisable. 
The presence of a super-station means an enormous concen- 
tration of coal transport facilities, and it represents also an 
easy target for an enemy. International compacts would be 
unavailing; it would be fatal to generate energy at so few 
points that concentrated aeroplane attacks could seriously 
disorganise any large fraction of our manufacturing capacity, 
and what. would be the effect of a possible invasion which 
might sever the main transmissions ? Whether regarded 
politically, technically, or economically, the problem 
demands much .careful thought and very open minds. It 
cannot be dealt with in an off-handed manner by any pre-final 
ideas as to means or systems, for the possible thermal and 
chemical economies are vast indeed, and unless future wars are. 
to be rendered impossible, the national safety must come first. 

There does not seem to be much information of a reliable 
order on the question of the heat consumption of a household 
or an individual, apart from what is represented by 
electricity. ' 

Probably no electric light company can state the total 
number of persons served by it, though this may, perhaps, be 
approximated as five times the number of dwelling houses, 
which surely is known to some accuracy. It should, there- 
fore, be possible at once to state the electrical consumption 
per head in various classes®of residential areas. Given a 
means of so arranging electrical supply that waste heat 
can be supplied to all households concerned, it would seem 
that on a sound system of heat distribution within a limited 
radius an enormous fuel economy would be secured, for the 
great fuel consumers are the fires in living rooms and the 
kitchen range, both of which appliances send not far from 
95 per cent. of their heat up the chimney. 

Is electricity to be sent out at a cheap rate from huge 
Stations, or from smaller stations exposed to less danger of 
interruption ? In this second case it would almost appear 
that no, great effort need be made towards motive efficiency, 
for the heat demand would probably outrun the heat supply. 

Real economy would result from a central communal 
heat supply, and electricity would be a secondary product 
to heat, or might very easily become so, and one result of 
this would be that simpler and cheaper machinery might be 
used. The writer has supplied such cheap machinery when 
salled on to pump water at 50° F. to be used in a swimming 
bath at 70°. The wasteful little steam engine with a sur- 
face condenser could only heat the water to 60°, and further 
direct boiler steam, added the other 10°. Engine economy 
would have been wasted capital. It is to this end that 
central house heating should aim ; and with this to consider, 
and the possible superiority of low-pressure boilers and 
simple machinery, the actual overall economy would be 
enhanced, for the cost of attendance, repairs, oil, and waste 
would all be minimised. With the super-station the present 
wasteful domestic fuel problems would continue. 








Electric Vehicle Progress.—According to the Electric 
Vehicle Section of the N.E7L.A., New York, the Norwegian Govern- 
ment has placed initial orders with American manufacturers for 50 
heavy-duty electric trucks, to be used in various communities for 
the distribution of food which must be distributed in such a way 
as to avoid waste and spoilage and to assure minimum transporta- 
tion costs. In Norway, gasolene, when procurable, costs $1 per 
gallon and electricity 2 cents per KW.-hour. The electric vehicle 
successfully competed with the gas car when gasolene cost 15 cents 
per gallon and electricity 5 or more cents per KW.-hour. Many 
Norwegian cities have adopted electric vehicles, large orders being 
placed with American manufacturers. Electric trucks are also being 
successfully operated by a number of commercial concerns, and 
demands for electric passenger cars are in excess of shipping 
facilities. ‘ 

The Gloucester E,L. Committee has decided to purchase an electric 
lorry for handling coal and ashes 


D 








126 


‘THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918. 









MINING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING,” , ; 


By CHRIS. JONES, M.I.E.E. 





Ir has for some years past been recognised that electrical 
power is the motive power par excellence for mining work, 
and that an efficient and reliable supply of electricity is in- 
dispensable to the prosperity of these industries, and with 
the progress of time the successful working of our mineral 
fields will more than ever be dependent on transmitted power. 
It is, therefore, of vital importance that those of us who 
ure engaged at home should exert every effort towards in- 
creasing the efficiency and reducing the cost of generating, 
distributing, and applying the electrical power in mines and 
kindred industries, at the same time aiming at the mainten- 
ance and improvement of safety, simplicity, and reliability. 

This paper will be confined to a consideration of the elec- 
trical system. 

The question of a standard frequency is of great import- 
unce, especially so in view of the linking-up proposals of 
various supply systems. While frequency changers are suc- 
cessfully in use at collieries in this country, the writer 
thinks that they are best avoided, as ‘they introduce high 
expenditures and extra plant upon which the supply of 
power will be dependent. The three-phase, 50-period, system 
has proved sufticiently flexible to be: used for all colliery 
purposes, the great advantage being that with this periodi- 
city, speeds up to 3,000 k.P.M. can be obtained as a maximum 
of 1,500 R.p.M. for 25 periods. The increased speed range 
not only results in economy in working and lower cost, but 
allows more latitude in design. The increased speed is of 
great advantage for centrifugal pumps, which are very promi- 
nent on a large scale in the South Wales coalfield. With 
inotors of moderate power suitable for single reduction haul- 
age gears, it is found that with 50 periods the cost is high, 
the power factor poor, and the space occupied large com- 
pared with 25-period motors, so that 25 period has its advan- 
tuge for such gears, but the tendency to-day is to introduce 
double reduction gear or tandem sets, owing to the width 
occupied by single reduction, so that the effect of squeeze 
may be minimised. The %-period supply is, however, 
adopted in some districts, and is to be commended if speeds 
above 1,500 R.P.M. are not required. 


Should there be a public power supply station near to the, 


colliery, it is well to adopt the periodicity of that supply, 
because it can then be used as a stand-by. In some cases 
the shutting down of generating plants may be effected at 
times of light loads when such plants are working unecono- 
uiically. There is also the possibility of surplus supply being 
available from the colliery exhaust and mixed pressure sets. 
This could be fed to the mains of the power company with 
advantage to both parties. “ 
The question of power factor is one that calls for special 
consideration, inasmuch as it has not received the attention 
it merits. When laying or carrying out extensions, it is 
highly important that the question of power factor should 
be kept well to the front, in order to permit of the highesé 
possible power factor being obtained, as it is from a point 
of view of a power company and those who are supplying 
their own power, a matter of real importance, as it vitally 
affects the capital. expenditure in the items of generators, 
transformers, and mains. There is no doubt that many 
alterations in existing lay-outs can be made which will have 
the effect of largely improving present power factor condi- 
tions. Any alteration in tariff which would place a premium 
on high power factor would undoubtedly result in an all- 
round improvement. There are but few power supply com- 
panies that will offer any inducement te improve the power 
factor, the cost being the same whether it is 0.5 or 0.9 p.f. 
The lower the power factor the higher the current for a 
given useful load, and consequently: the greater the c’R 
losses, the increased losses being inversely proportional to the 
square of the power factor. A low power factor is due to 
the magnetising currents of power transformers, especially 
when lightly loaded. This is of importance, and is increas- 
ingly so the larger the plant under consideration. Low power 
factor is also due to induction motors, which is the most 
prolific of all sources. The low power factor must not be 
attributed to the makers as not being able to supply a motor 
of high vower factor. This is quite practicable, but it may 
entail a higher price than is warranted by the benefit derived 
to stipulate for much higher valves-than manufacturers’ stan- 
dard. The question is one for the -user to decide as to what 
he has to sacrifice in order to obtain a high power factor 
moter. The point apart from the design which requires 
emphasising, and Which has often a larger influence on the 
nower factor of the power consumed by the motor installation, 
is the installing of motors for certain work much larger than 
they need be. The power factor of the average load taken 
hy such motors being at once reduced. This was the ten- 
dency when changing from steam to electric, especially so 
when using the old original mechanical devices. There is 
nothing really gained bv adopting such a policv, but quite the 
reverse. as one of the chief advantages of the induction motor 
is its powér to meet any overload without damage so long 


* Proceedinas, South Wales Institute of Engineers. Vol. 
Abstract, 


84, No. 2 





= 


as it is not overheated. Of course, the size of motor must 
never be cut down sufficiently to prevent its being able to 
stand up to the maximum momentary torque impressed on i* 
in ordinary working, but it is often possible to use a motor 
which is very much smaller than would be necessary if the 
overload had to be kept within, say, twice full load. An example 
of such a case is a punching machine, where the power fluc- 
tuates over a long range. In such a case the maximum torque 
obtainable from the motor is generally the limiting factor, 
and even if the maximum power required is two or three 
times the output of the motgr at its continuous running 
rating, the motor will never be fully heated. It is, therefore, 
very necessary when selecting motors to analyse each parti- 
cular type of work, and to ascertain what the heating effect 
on a motor will be, and whether this heating effect is the 
limiting factor in deciding on the size of the motor to be 
chosen, or whether the maximum torque fixes the limit. If 
a careful analysis is made in this way, not only is it possible 
to reduce the cost of the motor considerably without in any 
way reducing the reliability of the plant, but the power factor 
of the average load taken by the motor will be kept at a 
relatively high figure. 

It has been the practice of some makers to offer liberally 
rated motors in order to withstand the permissible tempera- 
ture rise, at the expense of low power factor. Another factor 
is that motors of different sizes are standardised, and_ this 
practice is to be recommended in collieries having a large 
number of motors. An alteration in the amount of air gap 
in an induction motor does not sensibly alter the cost, and 
produces more effect on the power factor than any slight 
changes in the design; but an important practical feature is 
introduced, due to the greater risk of breakdown with small 
clearance, and it is essential to bear in mind and to recog- 
nise that the induction motor is essentially a high-speed 
machine. The slower the speed the higher the cost, com 
bined with lower efficiency and power factor. It is an advan- 
tage to employ, if possible, a few large motors in preference 
to a large number of small ones. Another cause is the strain- 
ing for too low temperature rise. It is, however, advisable 
to compromise between high efficiency, power factor, and 
reliability. The author finds that coal-cutter motors give a 
reasonable power factor, considering the size of air gap and 


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Fig. 1. Fig. 2. 
Fic. 1.—ARRANGEMENT OF STATIC CONDENSERS TO IMPROVE 
; Power Factor. 
Fic. 2.—CxHaracteristic Curves or THREE-PHASE INDUCTION 
Motor, SHOWING CONDENSER EFFECT. 


its reliability. In cases where a motor will operate on 4 
fluctuating load, and run light for long periods, the selection 
of the highest speed and lowest horse-power is of special 
importance in view of the large current taken at reducea 
loads. 

It is essential that the apparent efficiency of motors be as 
high as possible in order that the plant be profitably loaded 
to the highest possible extent. The apparent efficiency is the 
product of actual efficiency and power factor, and therefore 
represents volt-ampere input, and as the capacity of a gene- 
rating station and distribution system is limited by the K.v.a. 
output, the matter is of the greatest importance. The author, 
however, strongly urges that the power factor of installation 
be improved by adding devices which are available for powet 
factor correction. It is gratifying to find some “‘ go ahead” 
colliery owners who have appreciated its importance, and it 
is by such ventures that the best improvements can be 
effected. Some collieries decided to improve the power factor bs 
the installation of static condensers. Fig. 1 shows the outline 
of the system, the condensers being fixed at sub-stations at end 
of feeders, in order to effect the saving in feeders, &c., these 
being placed on 600-volt, 50-cycle circuits. Some of these have 
been in use for three vears, and up to the time of writing 
not the slightest trouble has been experienced with any of 
them, and in some cases they are fixed underground. the 
maintenance costs being approximately nil. Others are being 
installed on in-bve feeders, which will reduce the line cur- 
rent of a particular feeder, and obviate the necessity of pur- 
chasing larger cable. There is a great deal to be said in 











Vol. 


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Vol. 83. No, 2,124, Avausr 9, 1918.] 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 127 








favour of this type of appliance, as they can be fixed across 
motor terminals in-bye in mines without the slightest diffi- 
culty. Fig. 2 shows the effect of a 59 mfd. capacity con- 
denser on a 20-H.P. motor; the results are self-explanatory. 

The introduction of these condensers effected the shutting 
down of a 200-Kw. set and a boiler, the one set being able 
to do the work, the saving effected having more than com- 
pensated for the initial outlay. It is important to take the 
greatest care in not introducing too much capacity on the 
system, otherwise trouble may arise due to resonance effects 
At the present time 3,000-volt, 50-cycle condensers are in use 
successfully. 

Use may be made of phase advancers, such as that of 
Prof. Kapp’s patent vibrator. This is in use successfully on 
large motors, and there should be a good field for its applica- 
tion where there are a number of motors, and where there 
is a D.C. supply available. This latter requirement is perhaps 
the chief drawback to its use in-bye in mines. 

The advancer may be used as a slip regulator, which has 
been done by the American Westinghouse Co., in connection 
with a rolling mill motor of 2,600 H.P., which is now capable of 
being overloaded to 4,000 H.p. The inventor of this advancer 
has also patented an advancer of rotary type, but has not 
made one yet on aceount of the war interfering with private 
work, and he instanced to the writer a case where he had 


59 ANS Phe Prase 


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Figs. 3 & 4.—D1aGraMs or CONDENSER CONNECTIONS. 


worked out a design for a 400-H.P. mill motor, consuming 
about a quarter million units a year. The saving in cost of 
current (£4 per annum on K.V.A. basis plus 4d. per unit of 
power actually used) is about £1,000, which is more than the 
cost of the phase advancer, so that the speculation would 
have been a most profitable one to the consumer, and of 
great advantage to the supply company. Use may also be 
made of rotary converters and synchronous motors for the 
improvement of power factor. The latter may be used as 
rotary condensers in the same manner as spare alternators, 
which can be dismantled from the prime mover. Syn- 
chronous motors may well be applied for the driving of 
mechanical equipment. In these cases mechanical work is 
obtained at the saine time that the power factor is improved. 

Cases may be cited where savings of £20 to £40 per week 
have been effected on small installations, by the improve- 
ment of power factor. If hy careful attention to details the 
consumer improves the power factor of his plant‘an arrange 
ment to the mutual benefit of both parties could be arrived at. 

The modern practice is to earth the neutral point of alter- 
nators on all systems, and this is best done through resist- 
ances, as it provides a means of protection to the plant, and 
is an Insurance against serious interruption of supply. The 
earthing resistance should be designed to pass sufficient cur- 
rent to operate with certainty any automatic protective device 
on the machines or feeders; it is essential that the resistance 
be so rated to carry the maximum current continuously for 
two minutes without being destroyed. The claim of advo- 
cates of the insulated system, that this system may be 
worked with one phase earthed, is void, in view of the auto- 
matic isolation of a faulty feeder, in the event of a fault occur- 
ring, as called for in the Home Office Rules. The claim also 
that two overload trip coils only are required is also uncalled 
for under certain conditions. With earthed neutral and protec- 
tive leakage trip gear, two overload coils only are required. 

Where automatic generator switches are used, it is now be- 
coming the practice to earth several running machines, so 
that during the existence of an arcing fault on the system, 
the serious risks which eccompany the breaking of the earth 
connection may ke avoided. With machines having sepa- 
rate resistance between mid-point and earth, switches are 
not required in the earth connections>and the current which 
circulates between the machines is minimised. This system 
may be considered expensive with a number of machines, 
the mid-point may be connected to earth bar, and from bar 
through resistance to earth, and if the machines are of 
similar’ designs they may be paralleled on to a common 
earth bus-bar. 

The writer has, however, met with cases where, owing to 
so much difference in design, the circulation of excessive cur- 
rent through the common connection made it imperative to 
use two bars. In a case where non-automatic generators are 
employed it is only necessary to earth one running machine. 
When the neutral points of machines are not accessible, and 
in a case where a number of small machines which will not» run 
together successfully although the neutral may be accessible, 
an artificial neutral] may be introduced by connecting a three- 


phase star reactance to the main bus-bar. _ 
opinion that future legislation will make it compulsory to 


The writer is of 


earth the neutral of a mining installation, in order that leak- 
age protective gear may be universally adopted. 


(To be continued.) 








RELAY AUTOMATIC TELEPHONES AT 
AUSTRALIA HOUSE. 


Just over four years ago (July 10th, 1914) we described the 
new automatic telephone system, consisting entirely of relays, 
of Messrs. Betulander and Palmgren. We are now enabled, 
by the courtesy of the Relay Automatic Telephone Co., Ltd. 
owners of the patents outside Sweden. to describe an ex- 
change on this system for inter-office communication _— - 
they have installed at Australia House, which was visited | 
the King on Saturday last. 

The equipment of the exchange, which has been working 
for over .twelve months, is for 80 lines, but the racks fitted 
provide for 200. At present 74 telephones are in use. That 
such installations are valuable labour-savers may be gauged 
from the fact that these 74 telephones make nearly 600 calls 
per day. 

The automatic exchange is located in a small room on the 
fourth floor, from which 11 10-pair lead-covered cables radiate 
to eight distribution boxes fitted in convenient parts of the 
uilding. From these distribution boxes, a twin lead-covered 
cable is run to each telephone. The cables and the office 
wiring are of 10-lb. conductors, enamelled, cotton-covered 
and waxed, and lead-covered. Use is made generally in 
cabling of the ventilation ducts over the corridors, and of 
two ventilation shafts, one on the Strand side, and the other 

















Fic. 1.—Susscriser’s TELEPHONE. 


on the Akiwych side of the building. Ample provision is 
made in the cables to the distribution boxes for future 
growth, the single-pair cables being run as new telephones 
are fitted. This arrangement gives great flexibility, and 
especially facilitates the removals which take place in large 
oftice blocks, owing to re-arrangements of staff with the 
growth of the business. In such cases, an official can retain 
his original telephone number, which is a great convenience. 
In some cases, where two officials share a room, but where 
the traffic doesnot warrant two lines being run, instruments 
are fitted in parallel in order that either can use the tele- 
phone without leaving his desk. 

The system which has been installed is unusually interest- 
ing from the fact that all the operations of number-selecting 
and connecting, ringing, and disconnecting, are performed 
by simple telephone relays of the same kind as those usually 
employed in ordinary manual telephone exchanges. None 
of the more or less complicated electromechanical switches 
usually essential to an automatic ‘tceaieme system are en- 
ployed. The maintenance charges of such apparatus are 
claimed to be very low, because mechanical wear and tear 
has been reduced to a minimum. The relay armatures work 
on a substantial knife edge, and have a movement of less 
than 1/32 inch. Relays require no oiling or cleaning. 

The requisite energy for talking, signalling, and operating 
the relays is obtained from a small 24-volt battery of accumu 
lators, which are fitted in duplicate to enable one set to be 
used whilst the other is being charged from the electric 
supply main 











128 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [Vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918, 





7 


_ The telephones in use are of three patterns, of which one 
is shown in fig. 1, adapted for table or desk use. This figure 
also shows the very convenient form of directory that is 
provided. The other patterns are respectively a wall set and 
a special form of desk set embodying a hand combination 
telephone. 

Fitted to each instrument is a dial, by the manipulation 
of which connection may be had with any other number on 
the system, in the usual way. if the wanted number is 
‘engaged,”’ an intermittent buzzer sound is heard in the 
telephone. The caller replaces his telephone on its rest, and 
calls again later. 

Fig. 2 shows a general view of the plant at Australia 
House. Unit construction is employed, the relays being 
mounted and wired in groups. It is claimed that this simpli- 
fies the installing of the apparatus, and facilitates extension 
by units of ten lines, without interfering with the existing 
equipme nt. 

‘ig. 3 shows the simple unit with which the relay system 
is built up. 

Primarily the subscribers are divided into 5-line groups, 
each having access to a number of links which are common 
to both outgoing and incoming calls. In practice, two 5-line 
groups are assembled on a common frame to form a 10-line 
unit. Almost all the wiring is done in the works, leaving 
a minimum number of soldered connections to be made 
on site. ‘ 

We will suppose that subscriber No. 281 calls subscriber 
No. 347. When No. 281 takes his receiver off the hook, the 
line relay associated with his line closes a circuit resulting 
in the first available connecting relay energising and con 
necting No. 281 to, say, link 1, which it is assumed is dis- 
engaged, while at the same time a connecting relay is 
energised and connects link 1 to OUT trunk 2. A relay at 
the A and B feed of OUT trunk 2 now energises, also the 
cut-off relay of No. £81, which releases the line relay. 

No. 281 now proceeds to dial for No. 347. When the dial 
plate is released for the hundreds impulses, OUT trunk 2 





wr 


sergnreiie 


i 


i ee Me 





Aarne 











Fig. 2.—Retay AvuTOPHONE EXCHANGE FOR 200 LINES 
(80 LINES EQUIPPED). 


will at the first impulse obtain exclusive connection with 
selector 1, if it is disengaged, via selecter connector 1. * 

The dialling of the three digits will set a train of impulse 
relays in the selector which act as intermediaries to energise 
particular relays for the required hundred, ten, and unit, 
and in conjunction with a group of relays, call the marker, 
establish a marking circuit, particular to No. 347, terminating 
on the connecting relays of that line. 

As a result the connecting relay on the first idle link, say, 
No. 1, in the 5-line unit, which includes No. 347, will 
energise, also an associated relny, connecting No. 347 to 
link 1, and link 1 to IN trunk t. 

At the same time, a coniecting relay in the trunk-con- 
necting group will energise and connect OUT trunk 2 to 
IN trunk 1, completing the connection between Nos. 281 
and 347. 

When the connecting relays have energised, the selector 
connector No. 1 on OUT trunk 2 de-energises and releases 
the selector and marker for other calls 

At the A and B feed ringing is then connected to the 
called line, and is cut off immediately the called subscriber 
answers. The two subscribers are connected by a ‘ Stone” 
system transmission circuit. 

The connection is released by the opening of the holding 


circuit of the connecting relays when the calling eubscriber 
hangs up his receiver. If, however, the called subscriber 
hangs up first, the connection will be Ps elon after a delay 
of approximately one minute, provided that the caller has 
not cleared in the meantime. 

It is understood that this delayed release by the called 
subscriber is provided where the plant is unattended, and 
that a back release alarm can be fitted instead if required. 

If the wanted number is engaged, the selector and marker 
release and busy-back are connected to the calling line at 
the A and B feed. 

A thermostatic timing device is fitted to each OUT trunk 
to notify faults or errors in dialling and to restore the relays 
to normal under abnormal conditions. 

Provision. is made at the selectors to render ineffective 
accidental impulses sent by the subscriber’s switch-hook. 





aA A 








eg * 


ly ést sags RY pitk a ee SRK See ii bedi Tse. 














Fic. 3.—One oF THE RELAYS. 


The operation of the system is remarkably quick ; within 
a second of the completion of the dialling the bell is ringing 
at the called subscriber’s station, or the ‘engaged ”’ signal 
is given at the calling station. Thanks to this feature, and 
to the fact that the ‘selecting apparatus, when it has com- 
pleted a connection, is instantly set free to take another, 
only two selectors are needed for the operation of this 80- line 
exchange. Faults are exceedingly rare, owing to the perfec- 
tion of modern relays, and attendance thus forms a trifling 
item. The simplicity and flexibility of the system are also 
great advantages. 








LEGAL. 


Rio Tinto Co., Lrp., «. A. E.G. Execrric Co., Lap., ann 
\. E.G. Exectric Co., ot v. Rio Tinro Co., Liarp. 
(Consolidated.) 

Mr. Muir Mackenziz, High Court Official Referee, on 
July 30th gave judgment in these cross actions, which com 
menced @ July Ist, and lasted 14 days, and which related 
to the supply of machinery for the extraction of copper from 
the ore of the Rio Tinto mines. The A.E.G. Co. clanned for 
the supply of a turbo-blower, and the Ric Tinto Co. claimed 
damages for the failure of the machine to do the work re- 
quired of it, and for consequent loss of profit. 

The OrrictAL REFEREE, in giving judgment, explained the 
causes of action and how the proceedings had arisen out of 
the award of the arbitrator. A tender for the new blower was 
sent in by the defendants and accepted, and an order was 
given for it in July, 1913. The reason. why the completion 
and trial of the new blower could not take place at first was 
that the whole of the plant had not been delivered owing 
to the late delivery of the plans. The declaration of war 
affected the situation of both parties in many ways. In 
November, 1914, the defendants asked for a cheque for £1,154, 
being the amount of the second instalment. After February 
7th, 1915, the whole plant was ready, subject to a few 
small matters being put right, but defendants declined to 
send an erector unless the second instalment was paid. The 
plaintiffs desired to use the blower, and after communica 
tions by letter and by telegram an erector was sent from the 
Spanish company. On July 2ist, when everything was ready, 
the defendants withdrew their erector. Against this . the 
plaintiffs protested, but he did not return. On August 9th, 
the plaintiffs at the mines proceeded to prepare the machine 
for starting up. The trial was continued at various dates to 
September 8th, when at a Speed of 1,350 r.p.m. the plant 
broke down. The defendants were not then informed of 
anything that had taken place. At an interview presided 
over by a Board of Trade supervisor, an agreement was 
arrived at that the defendants should send out a man forth- 
with to start up the machine, and as soon as it was working 
commercially the second iistalment should be paid. On 
September 26th Mr. Dafty arrived at the mines, and found 
~_ the shaft was bent. A new shaft was made and sent out, 
and the blower with the new shaft was afterwards tried 
when alterations had to be made in order to raise the critical 
speed above the working speed. Again it broke down, and 
a new shaft had to be sent out, which worked satisfactorily 

The first claim he had to deal with was that of damages 
for breach of contract. The arbitrator had found that there 
was a radical defect in design—that the critical speed was too 
much below working speed. The blower was not in con- 
formity with the contract, and in that regard the plaintiffs 





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Vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aucust 9, 1918.] 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 129 





were entitled to recover damages for breach of contract unless 
important defences prevailed. One of these was that plain- 
tiffs deprived the defendants of the opportunity of making a 
trial, and by starting the blower themselves they had freed 
the defendants from their contract. In July, 1914, the plain- 
tiffs were not ready to make the test, and ‘defendants’ man 
who would have made the test was withdrawn. Taking the 
findings of the arbitrator, it had been established that the 
delivery of the requisite documents had been delayed for 
more than three months, and that by reason of that delay 
defendayts were unable to complete the work within the 
time specified by the contract. The defendants had com- 
plained of the delay, it was true, but he could not find that 
that should in any way relieve them of their liability for failure 
to deliver the blower according to contract. The defendants 
had in their favour the finding of the arbitrator as to the 
starting of the machine. They said they ought to have 
received the second instalment before the starting up, but in 
that they were not justified. As to the allegation of fraud, 
the evidence fell far short of establishing any case of fraud 
in the representations made. He decided that the defendants 
had broken their contract by supplying a blower the design 
of which was radically defective and by reason of the defect 
it would not do the work required of it. The plaintiffs were 
entitled to damages in respect to that. 

Dealing with the various heads of damages claimed, the 

REFEREE said the most important was the claim for £180,000 
for loss of profit, &c., as to which he found that it was not 
recoverable. The plaintiffs- would recover damage to an 
amount to be assessed hereafter, and the defendants on the 
counterclaim would be entitled to £1,757. The costs of the 
action must be the plaintiffs’, except so far as regarded the 
issues upon which they had failed. The costs of the counter- 
claim would, under similar conditions, be awarded to the 
defendants. ‘The costs of the arbitration ought to be the 
plaintiffs’, except so far as they were increased by issues in 
which they had not succeeded. He would not draw up any 
order as to costs until the matter came before him again on 
the assessment of damages. 

A stay was granted for ten days from the commencement 
of next sittings pending any application for appeal. 





R. Barrett & Son, Lrv., v. WytHe SmMirH. 


In the City of London Court, on August Ist, before His 
Honour Judge Rentoul, K.C., an action was brought by 
plaintifis, brass founders, Beech Street, Barbican, E.C., 
against defendant, an electrical engineer, 32, Park Road East, 
Acton, to recover £64 lls. 3d. for making lids for air-vane 
time- limits (electrical machinery) which defendant had con- 
tracted to make for Siemens Bros. Dynamo Works, Ltd., 
Stafford. The claim was admitted, but defendant raised a 
counterclaim and set-off for £217 6s. as damages which he 
had lost through being unable to carry out his contract 
with Messrs. Siemens. Mr. Samuel Duncan appeared for the 
plaintiffs and Mr. G. A. Scott for the defendant. Mr. Scorr 
said that the claim was made up of £77 13s. 9d., less 
£13 2s. 6d., for which credit was given. The credit was for 
400 lids of gun-metal appliances for the electrical machinery. 
The total order was for 500 lids. Plaintiffs delivered 100 
which were all right, but 400 were faulty, and had never 
been delivered in the condition that they should have been 
in. The result was that the defendant had lost the profit 
on 400 machines. Mr. Dtncan said plaintiffs offered to replace 
the lids complained of with others, and after awaiting de- 
fendant’s convenience plaintiffs never heard any more. Mr. 
Scott said that as it happened, Messrs. Siemens were going 
to take the parts objected to, and utilise the material. There- 
fore the defendant would abandon the £210 upon the 
counterclaim, but he persisted in the rest of the counter- 
claim. Mr. Smith, the defendant, was called in support 
of the counterclaim. Mr. Duncan said there was no 
evidence of loss of profit occasioned by the plaintiffs’ default. 
The JupGe found for the plaintiffs for £64 lls. 3d. on the 
claim and counterclaim, with costs. 








WAR ITEMS. 


H. Traun & Sons.—The “ Times ” publishes the follow- 
ing under the title ‘‘ Keeping Alive an Enemy Business ’’ :— 
‘Sir Albert Stanley, replying to Sir Leicester Harmsworth, 
states that the business of H. Traun & Sons, manufacturers 
of ebonite and vulcanite goods, of 25, Goswell Road, E.C., 
was ordered to be Wwound-up on December 2lst, 1916. Messrs. 
Winter and Almenrider, naturalised British subjects of 
German origin, who had acted as manager and assistant 
manager of the. business, had begun to carry on a similar 
business in partnership in January, 1985, at the same address 
under the name of ‘ Winter & Co.,’ and there seems no 
doubt that this course was taken partly with a view to the 
business of Traun & Sons being resumed after the war. He 
has no information of the firm’s having received contracts 
from any Government department, and proposes to refer the 
case again to the Advisory Committee as soon as the amend- 
ing Bill now before Parliament has become law.” 


Exports to China.—The *‘ London Gazette ” for August 
Ynd contains a further list of persons and bodies in China 
to whom exports may be consigned 


** Liberty,’’ not ** Bosch.’’—Although the importation of 
American Bosch magnetos into Australia is not prohibited, 
the machines will not in future be allowed entry into the 
Commonwealth under that name; they will be, however, 
allowed in under the name of the Liberty ma; gneto. The 
factory in which they are made is no longer in Bosch 
hands, it having been taken over by the American Govern- 
ment. 

Part-Time Work of National Importance.—The Ministry 
of National Service has circulated a letter to Tribunals point- 
ing out that in granting exemption to men on condition that 
they took up part-time work of national importance, this had 
been met by the men joining the special police, but it was 
found in several instances that the number of special police 
exceeded the pre-war number of regular police. This was 
certainly a waste of man-power. In the centrally situated 
boroughs employment could be found in factories which pro 
duced munitions and manufactured articles (other than 
luxuries) for the community. It was suggested that in each 
borough part-time committees should be appointed, which, 
with a knowledge of local conditions, should be able to place 
the labour. The committee should have upon it representa- 
tives of the employers and the workmen. Some manufac- 
turers might at first be found prejudiced against the employ- 
ment of part-time labour, but the calling up of men to the 
Colours was making them realise the necessity of using it, 
whilst those who had tried it had been satisfied. 

American Determination.—.\ correspondent has favoured 
us with a copy of a letter received from the president of 
several large engineering works in the United States, from 
which we make a fairly full extract. The letter was written 
on June 12th, 1918 :— 

‘We have been going through difficult times. The U.S.A. 
should have entered the war before,\but that is now ancient 
history. The question immediately ahead of us is—what do 
the Allies expect of the U.S.A.? I am going to answer this 
question, and in so doing I am going to leave myself open 
to the charge of exaggeration. There is nothing which you 
can ask of us which we will not give. The scope of our pre- 
paration is too gigantic to be grasped by any one mind. We 
are in this war to stay with our last dollar and our last man. 

‘ENVery manufacturing concern in the United States that 
can by any means manufacture war supplies is doing so. If 
a concern cannot manufacture war supplies, it is difficult or 
impossible for them to operate at all. Their labour is taken 
from them, they cannot get coal, and they cannot transport 
their product. We ourselves are building four times as 
much apparatus as we built three years ago; every dollar for 
war purposes. 

‘Tf necessary we can and will put in the field ten million 
men. We are going to build aeroplanes as Ford turns out 
automobiles. One day several years ago, Ford turned out 
five thousand automobiles in one day. 

‘We are voluntarily giving up food in order that our 
Allies may have enough. The preliminary crop reports in- 
dicate the largest wheat crop we have ever grown, with all 
other grains proportionately heavy. As for taxes, I have not 
heard a single man complain, although I know a number 
who are paying out within a few days, June 15th, to be 
exact, 60 per cent. of their income. The tax for next year 
will be much heavier. One of my companies has been 
obliged to pass its dividends on account of taxes, and it is 
doing so gladly. Believe me, the enthusiasm in this country 
is something immense, and there is a moral and spiritual 
uplift among our boys that is very remarkable, and a finer 
lot of chaps than we are sending to France never trod shoe 
leather. We have a few slackers, but they are very few. 
When you think what a mixed population we have, I think 
it is very remarkable that the country should stand so 
unanimously behind the President. 

‘ Every ship that comes into or leaves our ports has a 
wireless equipment which includes one or more circuit 
breakers. One company is turning out one thousand circuit 
breakers a month, and has received orders for circuit breakers 
for sixteen battleships, to say nothing of the submarine 
equipment on which we have been at work for three years. 

The one thing we fear is a German peace offensive. We 
do not want to have to tackle this kind of job again. We 
want to put the’ Hun on his back and cut his throat. We 
have a saying that the only good Indian is a dead Indian, 
and we feel the same way about the Hun. Who is responsible 
for the magnitude of our plans I do not know. We are 
building plants for the manufacture of guns, which plants 
will not turn out a single gun within 18 months. 

‘It is the very immensity of the work we have undertaken 
which has made us slow, if we have been slow, which I am 
not prepared to admit. We nae hardly be expected to know 
what was going on in Russia, but England and France should 
have known, and her downfall should have been pate 
But this, like our own tardiness'‘in getting into this fight, 
now ancient history, and we have got to do our best with 
conditions as we find them. 

‘Our President talks about making the world safe for 
democracy. This is not the idea of the man in the street. 
He does not give a damn for democracy; he wants to make 
the world decent for old men and boys and for women and 


? 











180 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [vol. 83. No. 2,124, Avausr 9, 1918, 





children to live in. To accomplish this, he is prepared to 
fight indefinitely. 

‘The information outlined above comes from one who is 
in a pretty good position to know what is going on. 


H. R. Merton & Co., Ltd.—It is stated that the above 
company has issued a writ against Mr. W. M. Hughes, the 
Australian Prime Minister, on account of recent speeches con- 
cerning the company. 

In Parliament on Monday, in reply to questions regarding 
the company, Sir A. Stanley, President of the Board of 
Trade, according to the Times, ‘said :— 

The Metalgesellschaft formerly held a large number of 
shares in Henry R. Merton & Co., Ltd., but does not now 
hold any shares; the Australian branch of the company has 
been closed, but I have no information as to the African 
branch. The present directors of the company are S. Baer, 
H. Gardner, W. Gardner, O. Lang, E. R. Merton, and M. 
Wilson. German subjects have an indirect financial interest 
in the company through the holding of 11,875 shares by a 
Swiss company which is believed to be under German con- 
trol. I understand that the company is not now doing any 
work for the Government. Under the provisions of the Non- 
Ferrous Metal Industry Act the company will not be able to 
trade in non-ferrous metals without a licence, and I may 
inform the hon. and gallant member that in _ this case the 
Board of Trade have refused to grant a licence. 

A writ for libel has also been issued on behalf of the com- 
pany against the Daily Mail. 


Exemption Applications.—Before the Bucks. Appea: 
Court, the National Service representative appealed against 
the exemption granted to R. H: Philpott (47, Grade 2), 
electrician on the Tyringham Estate, on the ground that the 
electric supply of Tyringham House was not of national im- 
portance. The certificate was amended to exemption until 
September 24th or the man doing work of national import- 
ance for 36 hours weekly. 

At Reigate, conditional exemption has been granted to Jas 
Seagrave (50, grade 2), stoker and driver at the -Corporation 
Electricity Works. 

Wilts Appeal Court has. granted exemption until August 
30th, pending protection, to Mackenzie, electrician, 
with Messrs. Harris & Co., of Calne. 

ochdale Tribunal, on the recommendation of the Advisory 
Committee, has given exemption until November 30th to 
W. Ridgley (83, grade 3), motorman on the Corporation 
tramways. ° 

Colchester Tribunal has granted conditional exemption to 
E. P. Harvey (grade 3), engaged at the tramway depdét of 
the Corporation. 

At Dover, on July 31st, the Cupeetinn Tramways Depart- 
ment appealed for G. F. Howard (35, C2), fitter, employed 
in the repair of traincars. The manager said that the man’s 
work was necessary for the public safety, and he could do 
with three or four similar men’if he could get them. Three 
months, subject to substitution, were conceded. 





CORRESPONDENCE, 


Letters received by us after 5 P.M. ON TUESDAY cannot appear until 
the following week. Correspondents should forward their communi- 
cations at the earliest possible moment,” No letter can be published 
unless we have the writer's name and address in owr possession, 


The Nottingham Super-Power Station. 


The various announcements that have appeared in the 
technical Press re the report of the specal committee ap- 
pointed by the Nottingham Corpé@ration to prove the advan- 
tages of their city as a suitable site for a super-station are 
very inter resting, and are indeed a ‘ shaking among the dry 
bones.’ 

Why should the most antiquated and inefficient station in 
the Midlands suddenly think itself sufficiently capable and 
experienced to be able to design, equip, and run a national 
power house, and to supply the surrounding towns and cities 
who are now generating at higher efficiencies and lower 


» costs? 


The records of the towns it is intended to absorb are as 
follows :— 


Units gen.- Works Av. price Units per 

Town. in millions. costs. Coal. obtained, head. Profit. 
Chesterfield ... 2°3 oO "BI 145 38 + 1,800 
Mansfield... 206 lt ‘48 19 16 + 1,600 
Lincoln aes 63 “84 “hy 1°22 90 + 3,130 
Loughboro ... 15 ‘86 «6°39 «1°26 68 — 877 loss 
Leicester ove 525 141 ‘65 2°13 22 — 764 ,, 
Kettering ... 24 #148 j“55A 1°43 78 + 616 
Burton eee 4°0 74 = Rl 1°37 72 + 3,011 
Derby eee 12°18 “72 “43 1°21 80 + 2.600 
Nottingham... 14°77 «1340 62° 31 + 5,300 


After twenty years’ experience, Nottingham (with the 
exception of Leicester) is the highest town for works costs, 
coal, &c., it runs non-condensing, has over thirty sets, and 
only one larger than 450 kw. Charges are higher, units sold 


per head disgracefully low, -and this year it has not even 
managed to make both ends meet. 

Such a record surely does not warrant the neighbouring 
towns being handicapped by having to take supply from a 
station to be managed by such a Committee, even if they 
have the river Trent and a coal mine in the front garden. 


Pickle. 





Instruments for Central-Station Switchboards. 


1 see that Mr. Nield’s reply to my letter is mostly insinua 
tion, all of which is entirely baseless. L am not ouf to sell 
(or buy) any particular make of meter, but only to obtain 
the best for the purpose. Further, I have never known 
# good case improved by the sort of methods he adopts, and 
Ll am not going to presume on your space further than to 
say that I gave the particular items of our tests in which the 
two types showed a divergence, except that we found that 
an intense focal magnetic field could not be made to affect 
the mercury meter (on account of its good shielding), but 
did seriously affect the Aron meter if not maintaited con- 
stant in position and strength for the complete cycle (21 
minutes), or multiple thereof. His ** random shot’ about 
increasing voltage is quite wrong; I give the worst condition 
of the two. I sunmply mtervened in this matter to explain the 
tests which someone else quoted; time and paper are too 
precious to allow of my saying more, and as far as I am con- 
cerned the matter is closed. If rival manufacturers like to 
have a scrap, let them—I do not pose as anyone’s champoin. 

E, Fawssett. 

Newcastle-on-Tyne, August 3rd, 1918. 





It is unfortunate that ‘‘A.M.I.E.E.”’ ever wrote his criticism 
of Mr. Stubbings’s article in the tone he did, for he should 
have borne in mind that on the face of it, it was an out-and- 
out condemnation of the oldest and most scientific of the 
watt-hour meters on the market. That this condemnation 
is not justified is shown by, the fact that my sales of the Aron 
clock-meter were, in 1917, twice those of 1916, a state of 
things which I believe has not been equalled by any other 
meter manufacturer. 

As the one who entered into the negotiations for the Aron 
Meter Co., with Mr. Fawssett, I must beg to differ from him 
as to the general trend of his observations,’ particularly as 
ey damage our reputation, but have no consequences for 
1im 

He suggests that he started the test with a bias in favour 
of the Aron meter, but when [ called on him for the first 
time, over six years ago, he refused to. have anything to do 
with the meters, as he said he had tested them years before 
and would not touch them again. It is worth while noting 
that Mr. Fawssett had one of our samples 18 months, and 
then had not time to test it, although it was in his test room 
until a few months before the above tests took place. When I 
was asked to supply the meters we were given two weeks to 
deliver them,-and I protested that this was not long enough, 
particularly as we wished to try some experiments to reduce 
the temperature coefficient, and we prefer to-run the meters 
longer than this before delivering. 1 was then told that this 
was all the time allowed, and we decided to risk sending 
two meters on the distinct understanding that no temperature 
tests should be taken into account (although such have been 
mentioned in the correspondence), for we can supply a whole 
current type meter with absolutely negligible temperature 
coefficient, and hoped to make the shunted type as good. 

Mr. Fawssett’s statement about taking every precaution to 
ensure accuracy should be qualified, for in the first series of 
tests [ strongly objected to our meters being placed above 
the adjusting resistance, which I believe carried 300 amperes 
at times developing a fair temperature. 

After seeing the results of the first tests, I asked to with- 
draw the two meters, for, seeing that the temperature coeffi- 
cient of one meter was twice that of the other, I came to the 
conclusion that there was some thing radically wrong with 
the one meter. 

Now to show where the bias, if any, comes in, I was told 
we could have the meters back for correction, and we had 
them back for some weeks, although in the first instance 
only two weeks could be given for delivery. The other make 
of meters were sent back and altered in design according to 
Mr. Fawssett’s own specification, embodying, I believe, one 
of his temperature adjustment patents. 

Because of a report I sent in to my firm as to the way I 
considered ‘‘ the wind to be blowing,’ and as we were very 
busy with actual war orders, nothing was done with the 
two meters until the last moment, and then they were over- 
hauled, but we could not keep them long enough for “ run- 
ning together ” tests. 

I consider that Mr. Fawssett has been guilty of a serious 
breach of faith in mentioning the question of ‘temperature 
coefficient when it was expressly understood that we were 
not to bother about making any adjustment for this till 
afterwards. It did not occur to us until too late that if the 
temperature was allowed to vary, the meters would not run 
together if they had different coefficients, for we thought 
wrongly that the temperature would be kept constant. 

As this is the! second time that harm has been done to our 
business through a one-sided report from the same source 
being -allowed to filter through the same channel, I strongly 





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Vol. 83. No, 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918] THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 181 








protest against it in this case. I have had sufficient experi- 
ence with every type of meter on the British market to be 
able to bring enough evidence to damn every one if it is 
only presented in a certain way. 


A. E. Jepson. 
Southport, July 30th, 1918. 





Trade Unions: Past, Present, and Future. 


I have read ‘ Electrical Fitter’s’’ letter, and am glad to see 
he has decided to become a trade unionist if the trade union 
is solely made for him, and to conduct and carry out his 
ideas of policy and politics. 

1 can fully understand that it is useless for him to try and 
bring about reforms in the present trade unions, for time 
and experiefice count in all things; besides, his policy is 
wrong, for all unions adopt the policy of the majority, and 
are not governed by one, as “* Electrical Fitter ’’ would have 
it. 

If he is qualified, it will be very easy for him to join one 
of the present trade unions, with his spark of patriotism and 
average intelligence; he will find the former qualification in 
a larger form than a spark amongst trade unionists, and as 
to the latter, if he uses it, he will find he has been labouring 
under a delusion, or has been speaking of things he knows 
nothing about. 

With regard to the movement for helping and lifting pur- 
poses, I take it that ** Electrical Fitter ’’ means better moral, 
social, and economic conditions, also better wages, for that 
is the best way of helping or lifting the worker I know of; 
well, for his edification, it is one of the present trade unions 
he is seeking. 

As to some of the present labour movements being out to 
assist the aliens, especially of the enemy variety, if ‘* Electrical 
Fitter ’’ is referring to strikes that have taken place during 
this war, for his information all strikes since August 4th, 
1914, have been unofficial and against the leaders; it is silly 
for anyone to expect trade unions to be free from Bolchies, 
conchies, and aliens, for these are still at large, even in the 
Government’s employ. 

‘“*A fair day’s pay for a fair day's work.”” This is the busi- 
ness deal between the employers and trade unions; the trade 
unions state your rate of pay, and the employers see that 
you do the work. 

Finally, if ‘* Electrical Fitter ’’ still finds he is not being 
catered for in one or two@f the present trade unions, it- may 
be an association he is seeking, not a trade union. 


J. W. Woolley, E.T.U. 
Whitley Bay, August 3rd, 1918. 
[This letter has been shortened.—Eps. Exec. Rev.] 


Motor Problems. 


The interesting article appearing in your issue of the 2nd 
inst. has raised considerable comment, and as one who has 
endeavoured to bring about a satisfactory state of affairs in 
relation to an economical and reliable design of variable-speed 
induction motor for application to my “‘ Paragon”’ thermo- 
electric ship propulsion system, and with my thermo-electrifi- 
cation traction system for railways, I am very interested in 
your valuable and instructive remarks, whch are highly 
appreciated. 

Your article is timely in every respect, as there is no ques- 
tion in all the commercial field of electrical power engineer- 
ing, which is so pregnant with great possibilities as that of 
the production of a reliable and satisfactory variable speed 
induction motor for general purposes. 

Think, Sirs, of the thousands of tons of fuel per year’ that 
it is possible to save, in the event of a suitable type of motor 
being brought forward. In every direction in which you can 
look, the want of this essential motor is noted. 

I am pleased to inform you that I have now developed a 
type of short-circuited induction motor which promises to be 
of high importance in many directions, permitting the appli- 
cation of polyphase alternating current in fields heretofore 
entirely given to v.c. machines. It has high power factor, 
and reduced weight per horse-power at given 1evolution 
speed, and can be operated on the ‘* Paragon ’’ variable fre- 
quency system at any of a continuously variable speed; I 
believe that it produces the ideal means of operating, not 
only ordinary industrial machinery, but also meets the press- 
ing demand for a suitable marine motor for ships’ plant, 
besides being certainly interesting from traction aspects. 

: William P. Durtnall. 

London, §8.W., August 4th, 1918. 


[This letter has been shortened.—Eps. Etec. Rev.] 





With reference to the problem which, in your leader of 
August 2nd, you commend to inventive readers, may I 
point out that the Igranic Electric Co., of London and Bed- 
ford, have standardised several patented devices which dis- 
pose of the difficulty you named. , 

The simplest is their vibrating relay, which can easily, and 
at comparatively trifling expense, be incorporated with their 
leaflet No. 200 single-handled combined starter and regu- 
lator, which appears to be the type your article specifically 


referred to. The function of the vibrating relay, which has 
its operating coil in the motor circuit, so that it is sensitive 
to conditions which affect the motor, is to automatically 
prevent the too quick insertion or too quick short-circuiting 
of field regulating resistance, no matter how quickly the 
controlling handle may be moved, in either direction. It 
consequently prevents flashing over, by avoiding the too 
sudden strengthening of the shunt field. 

The Igranic leaflet No. 36 inching starter is equally effec- 
tive in avoiding the evil you described, because the instant 
that any backward movement of the starting handle is made 
the circuit of the motor is opened. When this feature is 
added (as it often is) to the leatlet No. 200 combined starter 
and regulator named above, the difficulty that you have 
named does not arise, because the circuit of the motor is 
opened before any of the regulating resistance is cut out of 
circuit. 

Of course, merely opening the motor circuit does not neces- 
sarily produce a quick stop if the machinery possesses con 
siderable inertia, but if a solenoid-controlled brake be added, 
in which the solenoid circuit is opened and closed simul- 
taneously with the motor circuit, the kinetic energy can be 
quickly dissipated. 

On the other hand, one might ask, why should an attempt 
be made to stop the motor as quickly as the machine that 
it drives? Are there not many machines (as, for instance, 
newspaper printing presses) which possess so much internal 
friction that they would quickly stop if relieved from the 
effect of the inertia of the armature of the motor? In 
Igranic electrical equipments for large newspaper presses, 
the press is connected to the motor by a magnetic clutch, 
which is de-energised when the motor circuit is opened, with 
the result that the stopping of the press is not in any way 
delayed by the inertia of the motor armature, and the press 
consequently can be stopped in the very shortest time that 
is consistent with safety. 

Another instance where quick stopping is essential in 
emergency is in connection with rubber mills, and for driv- 
ing these it is common practice to use a magnetic clutch be 
tween the motor and the mill, controlled. by a switch which 
can be instantly opened by any operative at any one of a 
group of mills. A solenoid brake is a standard combination 
with Igranic clutches,.and immediately an emergency arises 
any operator opens his switch, and all the mills are stopped 
in the shortest period possible. The Igranic Co., in one of 
their pamphlets, give an instance of a 200-8.H.p., 590-R.P.M. 
motor installed in the plant of a large rubber company to 
drive three rubber mills 20 in. and 22 in. by 60 in. Without 
the clutch brake attachment it was found that on opening 
the motor circuit the drive roll periphery travelled 276 in. 
before coming to rest. The same group of mills, when fitted 
with the clutch brake arrangement, were stopped with a 
recorded travel of 4°in. on the drive roll periphery after the 
time of opening the safety switch. 

This method not only ensures a quick stop without the 
electrical disadvantages you described, but it also relieves 
the motor from the heavy mechanical stresses which must be 
set up when an attempt is made to stop very quickly a 
heavy armature that is rotating at a high speed. 

It is an advantage, too, to place the means of stopping at 
the disposal of more than one person. Experience has 
proved that in applying a safety cut-off device te rubber 
machinery the machinery should be grouped; that is to say, 
the safety cut-off for one rubber mill should. be controllable 
from a number of other mills, because when a workman is 
caught in machinery he seldom retains sufficient presence 
of mind to avail himself of the safety devices which have 
been installed for his protection. It is found that, where 
magnetic couplings have been installed, workmen at adjoin- 
ing machines are usually the ones to cut off the power and 
bring the machinery to rest. 

Jno. T. Mould. 


London, E.C., August 7th, 1918. 


. 


———————ES__— 


BUSINESS NOTES. . 


Excess Profits Duty.—The Board of Referees have 
refused an application by the Quast-Arc Co.. Lrp., and the QuasI- 
Arc Co. (FRANCE), Ltp., of 103, Cannon Street, E.C., for an in 
crease of the statutory percentage as respects “the manufacture 
and sale of electrodes for electric working of iron and steel com- 
prising metallic cores with blue asbestos yarn insulators.” 


Sports at Chelmsford.—The result of Crompton’s, 
Hoffmann’s, Marconi’s, and National Steam Car United Works’ 
Sports and Féte, held on July th on _ the Wood Street 
Grounds, Chelmsford (by kind permission of Crompton's Club), 
was a net profit of £305—a record. The Committee has allo- 
cated £155 to the Chelmsford V.A.D. Hospital and £150 to the 
Essex Regiment Prisoners of War Fund. The handsome balance 
was helped considerably by Messrs. Godfrey & Sons supplying all 
tents, &c., free of charge, and by the valuable help rendered bv 
Capt. C. E. Ramsden. of the ASC. Mr. Percy G. Cheverton acted 
as hon. secretary and treasurer, 














132 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [vol.83. No. 2,124, Avausr 9, 1918. 





Ignition Magneto Manufacture in Sweden.—In addi- 
tion to the Prior Co. mentioned in a recent issue, ignition mag- 
netos for use on motor vehicles and aircraft are now being 
manufactured in Sweden by the Svenska Elektromagneter Aktie- 
bolag, of Amal, and the Svenska Verktygsmaskiner, Swenson & Co., 
of Stockholm. ° 


Liquidations.—DeEvonrortT and District TRAMWAYS 
Co.—Winding up voluntarily, Mr. P. N. Gray, Manchester Hotel, 
Aldersgate Street, E.C., as liquidator. Meeting of creditors, 
August 9th. 

BrRowN-BAYLEY’s STEEL Works, Ltp.—This company is 
winding up for the purpose of reconstruction. 


The British Engineers’ Association and Economic Policy. 
~—The British Engineers’ Association has placed before the War 
Cabinet, the Imperial War Council, and the Heads of Government 
Departments a resolution placing on record its grave concern at 
the delay of the Government in making public the economic policy 
which is to be adopted by this country after the war. On behalf of 
the industry that it represents, the Association urges that such a 
declaration should be made at once, in order that this country may 
be prepared and properly organised to take its place in the economic 
struggle which will arise at the close of the war, and for which 
the enemy countries have been systematically and energetically 
preparing for some time past. The Association feels very strongly 
that unless the Government declares its policy this country will be 
at a serious disadvantage with competing countries after the war. 
It is stated that any further delay on the part of the Government 
will tend to increase the feeling of distrust and apprehension which 
is at present making itself felt throughout the country and the 
Dominions, and that the Government, having received reports of 
the yarious Committees and Commissions set up to deal with the 
questions which will arise at the close of the war, including the 
Report of the Lord Balfour of Burleigh Committee on ‘ Commercial 
and Industrial Policy After the War,” is now in a position to 
declare its policy. The Association states that, having fully con- 
sidered the final Report of the Balfour Committee, it is of opinion 
that in the main the conclusions come to in the Report are satis- 
factory, but it desires fo make a number of recommendations. 

The first of these suggests a number of amendments to the re- 
commendations of the Dalziel Committee respecting enemy aliens. 
The second is that, having regard to’ the future of British indus- 
tries, it is in every way undesirable that control in any shape or 
form should be exercised either by alien interest or capital in their 
development. Other recommendations are :—That it should be the 
primary aim of the Government to ensure and encourage the appli- 
cation of British capital to the development of British industries, 
and to ensure that all sources of raw materials within the British 
Empire be brought, and remain, under British control; that 
the banking system is totally inadequate to meet the needs 
of the engineering industry, and that it is incumbent on the 
Government, in the interest of oversea trade, to encourage, and, if 
necessary, actively support the formation of one or more financial 
corporations capable of assisting the demands for financial support 
of the manufacturers or traders of this country. 

With regard to the question of figcal policy, the Association 
is unable to agree entirely with the Committee’s recommendations” 
that protection shall only be given where an industry proves that 
it is efficient and unable to fight foreign competition, and desires 
to make the following observations :— 

That the underlying principle should be to support an industry in combating 
foreign competition in the tirst instance, either by preferential tariff, bounty, 
or financial assistance, and not to leave such assistance to form matter for 
consideration at such time as foreign traders sha!! have established themselves 
in the markets. 

That every industry is primarily entitled to be protected by the Government, 
and that therefore each industry should be dealt with separately on its own 
merits, 

That where there is reason to believe that production can be efficiently and 
economically increased within the Empire, a well-devised system of pre- 
ferential tariffs would give security to the manufacturer, and stimulate him to 
greater efforts to obtain the highest efficiency in production and increase in 
his output. 

In conclusion, the British Engineers’ Association recommends :— 

1. That preferential treatment shall be given to the British Oversea 
Dominions, and that Allied and Neutral countries shall only be permitted to 
trade in this country on terms equivalent to those granted to this country by 
the Allied or Neutral country concerned. . 

2. That for a definite period of years no enemy subject shall be permitted to 
trade within this country. 

8. That British capital shall be used first and foremost for the development 
of the resources of the Empire for the Empire. 

_ 4. That rates of inland rail and water carriage shall be revised to make it 
impossible for goods from oversea to be delivered at inland points cheaper 
than home-produced goods. 

5. That rates of ocean freights shall be so regulated as to make it impossible 
for the freight charged on British goods to and from British ports to be greater 
than that charged to and from foreign ports. 

6. That the policy of His Majesty's Government shall be specifically directed 
to the attainment of these ends, 


Trade Announcement.— Messrs. Porr’s Execrric 
LAMP Co., Lrp., have opened a depét at 5, Arthur Street, New 
Oxford Street, London, W.C. 1, where they will carry large stocks 
of all types of their “ Elasta” drawn-wire lamps. 


A Cable Factory in Norway.—The plant of the first 
Norwegian cable and rubber goods factory has been completed at 
Christiania. The new factory is to specialise in the manufacture 
of all kinds of wire and cable, as well as in the production, later, 
of certain rubber goods, the imports of which in 1913 amounted to 
about 6,000,000 kroner. The plant covers a large area, and the 
construction cost of the buildings was over 700,000 kroner, making, 
with the addition of the machinery, about 1,500,000 kroner (krone 
= Is. 1)d. at par).— Board of Trade Journal. 


Patent Applications. — The Comptroller-General of 
Patents records a further increase last year in the number of 
applications and complete specifications filed, the former number- 
ing 19,285 as compared with 18,602 in 1916, and the latter 11,539 
as compared with 10,700. The number of new patents sealed was 
9,347. 

Book Notices.—7e 7'raining of Our Industrial Forces, 
By H.F. L. Orcutt. London : Engineering, Ltd. Pp. 55. Price 1s. 6d, 
net.—This booket comprises the series of articles originally con- 
tributed to Engineering by Mr. Orcutt in August and September 
of last year. It suggests numerous reforms in the management 
and operation of British engineering firms, and discusses the possi- 
bility of freeing the post-war period from the industrial strife 
of pre-war days. Mr. Orcutt’s theme is the systematisation of the 
training of our industrial forces, from the manager down to the 
apprentice. He considers both workmen and staff under three 
heads — commercial, technical and scientific, and productive—and he 
has suggestive paragraphs on such important phases of industrialism 
as ‘*‘ Management and Education,” “ Management and Production,” 
“The Scientist,’ “‘The Buyer,” while other sections deal with 
every trade of importance in the engineering industries. By his 
advocacy of systematic training and what he calls the “ two abso- 
lutely necessary preliminaries—raising of wages and raising the 
school leaying age to 16 "—Mr. Orcutt has done a service to the 
cause of British engineering efficiency. 

“Some Characteristics of the Marvin Pyrheliometer.” By P. D. 
Foote. (Scientific Paper of the Bureau of Standards.) Price 
10 cents. “Copper” (Circular of the B. of 8.). Price 20 cents, 
Washington : Government Printing Office. 


Plant for Sale,—Salford Corporation electricity depart- 
ment has for disposal two 1,000-Kw. D.c. turbo-generator sets. For 
full particulars see our advertisement pages to-day. 


Safety Lamp Approved.—The Home Secretary has 
approved the “Fullex” miners’ electric safety lamp for use in 
mines. 


Agencies Wanted.—H.M. Trade Commissioner in 
Australia reports the receipt of the following inquiries :— 

A firm of manufacturers’ agents in Melbourne and Sydney and 
New Zealand desires agencies for manufacturers of electrical goods. 
Reference No. 204. 

A Melbourne firm desires to represent manufacturers of motors, 
electrical accessories (other than instruments, lamps, switehboards, 
and switchgear), wires, and cables. References No. 100/22. 

Manufacturers’ agents established in Melbourne, Sydney, and 
Fremantle seek agencies for United Kingdom manufacturers of 
engineers’ requirements and power house supplies. References 
No. 160/28. ’ 

H.M. Trade Commissioner at Toronto reports that a firm in that 
city desires to represent manufacturers of integrating watt-hour 
meters (A.C. and D.c.). Reference No. 205. 

Particulars from Department of Commercial Intelligence, 
73, Basinghall Street, E.C. 








LIGHTING AND POWER NOTES. 


Accrington.—Pricrk IncrEase.—The T.C. has decided 
to increase the price of electricity by 10 per cent., except to con- 
sumers covered by the coal clause. 


Australia.—E.L. Scuemes.—The following munici- 
palities have applied for authority to supply electricity within 
their areas, or are considering the subject :—Ararat (Vic.), Coraki 
(N.S.W.), Junee (N.S.W.), Hamilton (Q.), Mobilong (S.A.), Murrum- 
burrah and Harden (N.S.W.), Murwillumbah (N.S.W.), and St. 
George (Q.).— Commonwealth Engineer. 

LAUNCESTON.—For the year ending June 30th last, the income 
of the city electricity department amounted to £23,957 and the ex- 
penditure to £11,278. The net profit was £3,000; generating costs 
were ‘176d. per unit, distributing costs “357d., and the total 
costs “865d. 


Batley.—Price INckeaser.—The T.C. has approved an 
increase of the price for electricity, as from October Ist, by a further 
15 per cent. 


Birmingham.—Price [NckEast.—The E.S. Committee 
recommends that the charges for electricity to low-pressure con- 
sumers be increased by 14 per cent. on the presert scale for every 
1s, advance in the price of coal. 


Burnley.— Price Lycrease.—The Electricity Committee 
has recommended that the price of electricity for lighting be 
increased from 33d. per unit to 4}d., and that the scale for other 
consumers be also increased. 


Chester.—YrEARsS WorKING. —The annual accounts 
show that the income of the Corporation electricity department 
for the year ending March 25th, 1918, amounted to £26,649, com- 
pared with £24,375 in the. previous year, and the total expendi- 
ture to £14,123. compared with £11,530. The net profit was 
£2,945. 2,917,148 units were sold during the year, including 
public lighting, 53,265; tramways, 355,246; private consumers, 
1,138,036 ; and bulk supply, 1,370,601. The works cost per unit 
was ‘652d., against “548d., and the total cost was 1°02d., against 
"925d, 





Vol. 


Chi 
Corpo! 
maxin 
unit. 


Col 
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electr’ 
90 mé 
Ligur 
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equip 
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3,500 
crane 
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3,500 


Co 
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price 
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light 


decid 
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powe 
exist 
powe 
supp 
for ti 


Corp 
1918. 


show 
£105 
avail 
£1,8 
£13, 


char 
year. 


of 4 
from 
loan 
treas 
capi 
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sold 
publ 
load 
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havi 
1,40 


08, 
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Vol. 83. No. 2,124, AuausT 9, 1918.] 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 138 





Chelmsford.—Priczk IncrEase.—The Electric Supply 
Corporation has applied to the B. of T. for an order to increase the 
maximum price which may be charged for electricity to 9d. per 
unit. 


Continental.—ItaLy.—The province of Tuscany has 
erected on the River Garchio, near Gallicano-di-Garfagna, a hydro- 
electric station capable of producing 6,000 kKw., with a fall of 
90 metres. The works have been set up by the Societa Elettrica 
Ligure Toscana, and are one of a series of important central stations 
which the company proposes to establish on the same river. The 
equipment consists of two 7,500-H.P. Riva turbines, each direct- 
coupled to a 6,000-Kw. Westinghouse alternator, one being held as 
a reserve, with room for a third group. A third turbine of 
3,500 H.P. with alternator, a small turbine of 250 H.P., and a 30-ton 
crane are other items of the plant. In the transformer house three 
groups of three-phase transformers raise the energy peoduced at 
3,500 volts and 50 periods to 33,000 volts. 


Coventry. —New Works.—The City Council is to pur- 
chase a site in Foleshill at a cost of about £8,000 for new electric ity 
works. 


Dewsbury.—Price [Ncrease.—From October Ist, the 
price of electricity is to be advanced as follows :—For power, 
10 per cent., am increase of 50 per cent. on pre-war rates; on 
rateable value basis, 5 per cent. (30 per cent. over pre-war rates) ; 
lighting, 5 per cent. (25 per cent. over pre-war rates). 


Gillingham (Kent).—Price Increase.—The T.C. has 
decided to increase the price of electricity from the end of Septem 
ber by 4d. per unit -for lighting and jd. per unit for heating and 
power, with an all-round increase of 50 per cent. in place of the 
existing 50 per cent. on lighting and 60 per cent. on heating and 
power, making a net increase of jd. per unit. Energy is to be 
supplied to a Gillingham syndicate for the manufacture of cement 
for the Government. 


Hastings.—Year’s Workinc.—The accounts of the 
Corporation electricity department for the year ending March 31st, 
1918, show that the capital expenditure during the year amounted 
to £697, bringing the total up to £179,725. The loan statement 
shows that out of the total debt created, amounting to £188,149, 
£105,005 had been repaid, and that a further sum of £34,497 was 
available for repayment. The income was £20,941, an increase of 
£1,854 on last year. The expenditure was £14,404, compared with 
£13,056 last year. The gross profit carried to net revenue account 
was £6,537, an increase of £507. The interest and sinking fund 
charges, &c., amounted to £11,115, compared with £11,127 last 
year. The adverse balance of £4,658 transferred from net revenue 
account was met out of the general district rate account. Thesum 
of £1,027 was used for new capital purposes, instead of borrowing 
from outside sources. The provision made for the repayment of 
loans tothe end of the year was £139,503. The balance due to the 
treasurer was £1,188, as follows :—Revenue account, £2,997, less 
capital account in hand, £1,810. The average price obtained was 
5°20d. per unit, and total cest per unit sold was 3°28d. Total units 
sold were 933,904 (919,976 to private consumers and 13,928 to 
public lighting). Total connections in 30-watt lamps, 73,529 ; 
load factor, 20°08 ; number of consumers, 2,114 ; maximum supply 
demanded, 531 Kw. ; plant capacity, 1,850 Kw. 


Leeds.—New Puiant.—The Ministry of Munitions 
having sanctioned the replacement by the E.L. Committee of two 
1,400-KW. reciprocating engines and alternators by a 6,000-k Ww. turbo- 
alternator, the Committee has decided to proceed with the work, 
and to obtain tenders for the same. With the necessary buildings, 
extensions, boilers, &c., the estimated cost is £40,000., 


Leicester. —Price INcrEase.—The T.C. has decided to 
increase the price of electricity for lighting from 53d. to 6d. per 
unit, and for power by 12 per cent., which will make an all-round 
increase of 50 per cent. over pre-war rates, 


Leighton Buzzard.—Prorosep E.L.—The U.D.C. has 
inquired whether the Luton T.C. is prepared to supply electricity 
within the urban district. 


London, — HampsTeEAD.—YEAR’s WorkinG.—For the 
year ending March 31st, 1918, the total net income of the B.C. elec- 
tricity undertaking was £80,302, and the working expenses 

£53,112. In the previous year the figures were £76,142 and 
248.273. Interest absorbed £7,697, and loan redemption £22,001, 
leaving a deficit on the year of £2,508, against £2,164. Units sold 
during the year numbered 5,217,247 ; generating costs increased 
from 1*4d. per unit to 1°63d., and fuel from ‘91d. to 103d. The 
total cost per unit was 2°44d., against 2°23d. 

HAMMERSMITH.—PRICE INCREASE. —The Electricity Committee 
has recommended the B.C. to increase the charges for lighting to 
5d. per unit, and by a further 12} per cent. for other purposes, 
making 25 per cent. over pre-war prices. 

BERMONDSEY.—PRICE INCREASE.—The Electricity Committee 
has informed the B.C. that it must increase the charge for electricity 
by a further 7} per cent. : 

Kendal.—Yerar’s Workina.—There was a deficit of 
£604 on the past year’s working of the T.C, electricity under- 
taking, ’ 


Malvern.—PRrice IxcrEase.—The U.D.C. has increased 
the price of electricity for lighting, heating, and power by 1d. per 
unit from the September reading of the meters. 


Redditch. Rrorcantsation.—Early in 1914 the Corpo- 
ration undertaking was making a loss of about £3,000 per annum, 
the maximum demand was 640 Kw., the supply single-phase, 75 
periods, the units sold being 1,433,666. 

On the advice of Messrs. Handcock, Dykes, & Trotter, consulting 
engineers, a sum of approximately £40,000 was expended in bring- 
ing the station up to date by the addition of two 1,000-Kw. Parsons 
turbo-alternators and condensing plant; two motor-generators to 
transform from three-phase, 50 periods, to single-phase, 75 periods, or 
rice versi; condensing plant; new cooling tower; additional 
boiler plant ; extension of engine room ; anda system of three-phase 
mains. This new plant was first put into commission towards the 
end of 1916, and at the beginning of this year the maximum load 
on the station had increased to 1,340 Kw. 

The units sold for last year were 2,643,037, and notwithstanding 
that wages had more than doubled, and the rise in the price of 
coal, the reduction in generating costs was such that the station 
has now turned the corner. and shows a profit after paying running 
costs, interest, and sinking-fund charges. In a further report 
given to the Council at the beginning of the year, additional 
extensions, at an estimated cost of £54,000, were recommended, 
and approved by the Council, and the general approval of the 
Director-General of Electric Power Supply having been given to 
the scheme, the Council at its last meeting placed the above con- 
tracts as part of its extension scheme. 

Since the original instalment of the new three-phase plant, the 
largest works in Redditch has shut down all its own plant and relies 
entirely on the Corporation station. and the majority of the other 
large works in Redditch are now taking a supply. 


Sutton Coldfield —Price Increase.—The Electricity 
Committee has informed consumers that there will be a further 
increase of 10 per cent., making 30 per cent. in all, from the June 
quarter. 


Todmorden.— Buk Supp.y.—The T.C. has decided to 
take a supply of electricity in bulk from the Yorkshire E.P. Co., 
and has purchased a site for a sub-station. 


Twickenham.—The B. of T. has refused to authorise the 
Twickenham and Teddington E.L. Co. to increase its charges for 
electricity. 


Tunbridge Wells.—Price Ixcrease.—The T.C. has in- 
creased the charges for electricity as follows :—Units sold for 54d., 
plus 10 per cent., increased to 7d. ; 5d., plus 10 per cent., to 6d. ; 44d., 
plus 10 per cent., to 6d. ; 34d., plus 10 per cent., to 6d., less 20 per 
cent. ; 24d., plus 10 per cent., by 25 per cent. ; 1d., plus 25 per 
cent., to ljd. There is to be a minimum charge of 10s. per quarter 
to all consumers, except flats, tenements, offices, and stables, the 
minimum rate for which is to be 5s. per quarter. 


Watford.—Price Increase.—The E.L. Committee has 
recommended that the price of electricity for lighting be increased 
to 74d. per unit, and that the recent increase of 20 per cent. be 
increased to 50 per cent. from the end of December. 


West Bromwich.—YEAR’s Workina.—There was a net 
loss of £10,839 on the past year’s working of the Corporation elec- 
tricity department. The income amounted to £41,951, compared 
with £32,047 in the previous year, and the expenditure to £44,564, 
an increase of £15,106. Loan charges amounted to £8,226. The 
E.L. Committee recommends an increase in the charges for elec- 
tricity as from July lst. 

PricE REviston.—The T.C. is taking steps to get contracts 
for energy supplied to the tramways and certain firms at prices 
fixed before the war revised, with a view to an increase being 
made. 


West Ham.—Yrar’s Workinc.—The income of the 
Corporation electricity department for the year ended March 31st 
last was £181,705, compared with £153;872 in the preceding year. 
The expenditure amounted to £160,482, an increase of £25,720, 
and the net surplus was £5,994, against £2,270 ; 35,836,900 units 
were sold during the year (lighting, 2,515,834 ; power, 27,250,787 ; 
heating and cooking, 412,429; public lighting, 59,261 ; and tram- 
ways, 5,598,589), an increase of 538,600 units. The working cost 
per unit amounted to 1°07d., against “92d. in the previous year, and 
the average price obtained was 1°21d. per unit, against 104d. 








TRAMWAY AND RAILWAY NOTES. 


Australia. —LAUNCESTON. —The seat year’s working of 
the city, tramways resulted in an income of £23,139. The expendi- 
ture was £13,751, and, after meeting capital charges, £3,657 was 
carried to the general account and £496 to the reserve fund. 

SyDNEY.—An underground electrically-operated haulage plant 
for the Wallarah Coal Co., Ltd., has recently been completed by 
Messrs. Morison & Brearly, Ltd., of Newcastle, N.S.W. The 
machine is fitted with a Crompton direct-current motor of 125 H.P., 
which drives, through gearing, a winding drum 8 ft, in diameter, 

















134 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918. 





Brighton.——Ramtrss “'ractron.—An extension of a 
year from August 7th has been applied for by the T.C. for the com- 
pletion of the overhead equipment for trolley cars under the 
Brighton, Hove, and District Railless Traction Act, 1911, from 
Ovingdean to Rottingdean. 


Continental.—GrerMany.—According to the Daily Mail, 
great indignation has been aroused in Berlin by the decision of the 
Metropolitan Tramway Co. to install its own detective force for the 
purpose of catching passengers who may be endeavouring to evade 
paying fares. They are to be ‘dressed in plain clothes, and 
empowered to exact a fine of 1s. on the spot for each offence. A 
German paper is quoted as follows *—“ The tramway monopoly 
only wants to enrich its already bulging treasury. It talks about 
the increased upkeep of rolling stock. We have to ride 
nowadays in ramshackle old rattle-traps called cars.” 


East Kent.—Prorosep Licur Rarmways.—The Light 
RailWays Commissioners have submitted to the B. of T. for con- 
firmation an order for the construction of light railways from 
Hammill to Snowdown Colliery, from Little Mongeham to Deal. 
from Wickhambreaux to Canterbury, from Coldred to Alkham, 
with a branch to Lydden Colliery, and branches at Little Mongeham 
and Stonar. 


‘Leeds. — Tramways anp Town P.Lannina. — The 
Tramway Committee has visited Liverpool for the purpose of in- 
specting the construction of radial roads in relation to town 
planning. Mr. F. M. Lupton has advocated a separate tramway 
track for fast traffic on wide arterial roads in Leeds, and the visit 
was in furtherance of this improvement. 

Boycott FAILuRE.—Figures issued by the tramway department 
show that the boycott of the tramways as a result of the 50 per 
cent. advance in fares has died a natural death. In the first com- 
plete week of the new fares the number of passengers carried was 
reduced by 400,000 compared with the corresponding week a year 
ago. In the next fortnight the decrease was less by 20,000, and 
then a further 60,000. At the end of a month the decrease was 
again 400,000, but the next week it dropped to 175,000. During 
the past two weeks it has further diminished, and when the figures 
were issued it was only 197 less than in the corresponding week 
last year. Whilst the total reduction during the seven weeks was a 
million and three-quarters, the receipts increased by over £12,000. 
and the total takings of the 17 weeks of the current financial year 
are £31,068 ahead of those of the corresponding period last year. 





London. — Waces. — The Highways Committee has 
recommended the adoption by the L.C.C. of the award of the 
Committee on Production, which provides for an increase of 5s. 
per week to all tramway employés at present receiving a war wageof 
20s. The claim for the same wages to be paid to women as to men 
was not established. This increase is estimated to cost £88,000 per 
annum, 

Goops Trarric.—The L.C.C. has decided to incur an expendi- 
ture of £100 in the conversion of two tramcars for the carriage of 
yoods, for experimental purposes. 

UNDERGROUND RAILWAY.—INCREASED FARES.—A few in- 
creases in fares on certain sections came into operation on 
August Ist on the Bakerloo, Piccadilly, Hampstead, and City 
and South London Tubes and the District Railway. The increase 
amounted in most cases to $d., and in no case to more than 1d. 

Nigut SeRvice.—The London Society of Compositors has been 
informed that the Metropolitan Tramways will run cars from 
Finsbury Park to Wood Green at about | a.m. and 1.30 a.m., the 
service to begin on August llth. This arrangement is for the con- 
venience of printers, and is only an experiment for one month, and 
upon the results will depend whether it shall be maintained. 


Northampton.— YrAR’s WorkiING.—There was a gross 
profit of £13,922 on the Corporation tramways for the year ending 
March 31st last. The revenue was £46,113, compared with 
£38,258 in the previous year, and the expenditure £32,190, com- 
pared with £29,016. Capital charges amounted to £11,105, andthe 
net profit was £3,235, against a deficit of £3,004 in the preceding 
year. Passengers carried increased from 9,707,456 to 10,753,042, 
and the car mileage decreased from 748,271 to 737,007. Working 
costs amounted to 10°35d. per car-mile, and receipts to 14°77d. 


Shipley.— Prick Reviston.—The U.D.C., which applied 
for an increase of 50 per cent. for electricity supplied to the Brad- 
ford Corporation for the operation of the Shipley tramways, has 
been informed that the Corporation cannot entertain the payment 
of more than 20 per cent. 


West Ham.—Yerar’s Workinc.—For the year ending 
March 31st last, the revenue of the Corporation tramway depart- 
ment amounted to £188,851, against £166,143 in the previous year, 
and the expenditure to £168,827, an increase of £18,837. After 
allowing for capital charges (£31,636) and allowances to men on 
active service (£16,762), there was a deficit of £28,177. The income 
per car-mile was 12°63d, an increase of 1'7d., and the working costs 
were 11°27%d., an increase of 1°419d. 


Wolverhampton.— Yrar’s Workine.—The gross profit 
of the Corporation tramway department for the year ending 
March 3ist lagt was £32,039, including £2,189 on aceount of 
motor-‘buses. Capital charges amounted to £12,142, £4,351 was 
transferred to the reserve fund, £8,767 to the maintenance account, 
and £6,580 to the borough rate account 


TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE NOTES. 


Germany and Rumania.—A special Agreement has been 
reached concerning the future regulation of postal and telegraph 
traffic between Germany and Rumania. The provision affecting 
telegraphic traffic concerns the laying of a third direct line between 
Germany and Bukarest, the establishment of a. telephone service 
between Germany and Rumania, a telephone service over the 
Constantinople-Constanza-Bukarest-Berlin telegraph cable, and an 
eventual new line to Constantinople. The German Government 
obtains till the end of 1950 a monopoly of laying cables on the 
Rumanian coast.—TZhe Times. 


Royal Visit to the G.P.0,— On Thursday last week the King 
and Queen @isited the General Post Office. The Postmaster-General 
stated that the Post Office had released about 81,000 men and 1,000 
women for naval and military service. Since the outbreak of war 
the department had provided 40,000 telephones for the Army and 
Navy Departments. The private branch exchange for the Air 
Ministry was the largest in the world, and dealt with 2,500 tele- 
phones, A special system of telephonic aid raid warnings had 
been organised, and as many as 20,000 messages had been distributed 
on the occasion of one raid. In each raid 5,000 messages from the 
Field-Marshal's Department were circulated to local exchanges. 


Russia.—The transmission of private telegrams to Russia 
has been suspended in consequence of action taken by the Russian 
authorities. 


Underground Submarine Cables.—The New York 
Telephone Co., Long Island Division, has devised a method of 
burying a submarine cable so that it will be safe from the anchors 
of small boats, the spears of eel fishermen, or the rakes of clam or 
oyster diggers. It consists of a simple plough, which is dragged 
along in shallow water where there is a mud bottom, and buries 
the cable 14 in. in the mud. It has proved an unqualified success. 

The Long Island division has also developed a plough for bury- 
ing cables across salt marshes; it opens a trench 4 in. wide and 
16 in. deep at the rate of 40 ft. pér minute, when pulled by a Ford 
engine suitably geared to a winch. The ploughshare is curved in 
such a way that it tarows up a layer of sod which merely has to 
be pulled back into the trench with a rake after the cable has been 
laid. The line of the trench is then marked with concrete posts 
where the submarine cable is spliced to the lead cable, and with 
creosoted wood stakes at about 100-ft. intervals across the marshy 
islands. 








CONTRACTS OPEN AND CLOSED. 


OPEN. 


Australia.—September 4th. Victorian Railway Commis- 
sioners. 800 lighting transformers for signal system. A copy of 
the specification may be seen at the Inquiry Office of the Depart- 
ment of Overseas Trade (Development and Intelligence) in London. 


Belfast.—August 16th. Corporation. Two 6,000-Kw. 
turbo-alternators, &c.; one 500-Kw. turbo-alternator, &c.; one 
30@kKW. balancer-booster ; four 48,000-lb. per hour water-tube 
boilers ; four fuel economisers, &c. ; two steel chimneys, with fans, 
&c. ; two electrically-driven boiler feed pumps, &c. ; accumulators ; 
three 500-Kw., and five 1,000-Kw. rotary converters, with trans- 
formers, Kc. ; two 250-K.V.A., two 350-K.v.A., and six 1,250-K.v.A. 
transformers. See “ Official Notices” July 19th. 


Leeds. — August 10th. Electricity Department. Ex- 
tension to feeder switchgear ; alteration of generator switchgear ; 
one 6,000-Kw. turbc-alternator and jet condensing plant ; two 
water-tube boilers, stokers, economisers, Xc. ; coal and ash conveying 
plant ; pipes, centrifugal pump, &c. See “Official Notices” July 19th. 


Spain.—The municipal authorities of Albuqnerque have 
just invited tenders for the concession for the electric lighting of 
the town during a period of five years. 


CLOSED. 
Australia.—P.M.G.’s Department, South Australia :— 


Telephone accessories.—Western Electric Co. (Australia), Ltd., £984. 
Commonwealth Rail ways— 
Cable.—British Insulated & Helsby Cables, Ltd., £235. , 
Victorian Railways Department— 
Electric freight lifts at Auburn and Glenferrie.—Holmwood & Oncill, £1,205 
Australian Mining Standard, 
Gillingham.—T.C. :— 


640 ».H.P. Diesel set.—Banks, Warner & Co., Ltd. 





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Vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918] THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 135 





FORTHCOMING EVENTS. 


North of England Eosttiate of Mining and Mechanical Engineers. — 
Saturday, Augustl0th. At2p.m. Annual genéral meeting. 

Junior eatin of Engineers (North-Eastern Section).—Tuesday, 
August 13th. At 7 p.m. At the Mining Institute, Neville Street, Newcastle- 

* on-Tyne. Paper on ‘“‘ The Manufacture of Cast-iron Pipes,"’ by Mr. T. E. 

Dimbleby. 

Electrical Power Engineers’ Association (Southern Division, Western 
Section).—Thursday, August 15th. At7 p.m. At Hammersmith B.C. Elec- 
tricity Works, Inaugural meeting. 





NOTES, 


Electrician Summoned.—At Leeds West Riding Police 
Court, last week, William Ernest Poole, electrical engineer, Crossgates, 
was summoned for an offence under the Defence of the Realm Act, 
and, after a long hearing, was sentenced to three months’ imprison- 
ment. Notice of appeal was given, and defendant was allowed 
bail in two sureties of £250. 


Parliamentary.—Royat Assent.—The following Acts 
have received Royal Assent : 

Electric Lighting Orders Confirmation Act, 1918. 
County of London Electric Supply Co.’s Act, 1918. 

Volunteer Notes.—Lonpon Army Troops CoMPANIES, 
VOLUNTEER ENGINEERS.—Headquarters : Balderton Street, Gros- 
venor Square, W. 1. 

Corps Orders No. 33, by Lieut.-Colonel C. B. Clay, V.D., Commanding :— 

Captain of the Week.—Capt. W. Darley Bentley. 

Monday, August 12th, to Friday, August 16th.—Drills as usual. 

Sunday, August 18th. Commandant’ s Parade at Waterloo Station, 8.45 a.m., 
for work at Esher. Dress: Drill order with haversacks and water bottles. 


Mid-day and tea rations to be carried. 
C. Hicerns, Capt. R.E., Adjutant, 


Australian Production of Electrolytic Zinc and 
Calcium Carbide.—In the course of an article on the present 
situation and projected developments of hydro-electric enterprises 
in Australia, H.M. Trade Commissioner states in the B. of 7. 
Journal that the total annual output of zinc concentrates in 


Australia amounts to about 400,000 tons, derived chiefly from New ° 


South Wales and Tasmania. The Electrolytic Zinc Co., whose 
wharf at Risdon, on the Derwent River, is equipped with ore bins 
of 3,000 tons capacity, is expending about £200,0U0 on plant. The 
present installation is capable of producing by the electrolytic process 
10 tons of zinc per day of 24 hours. The zinc is of a purity of over 
99 per cent. The sulphuric acid used in the electrolytic process 
for the manufacture of spelter will be made from sulphur imported 
from Japan, while the aluminium sheets used are imported from 
the United States. The experimental trials of the plant point to 
the production of electrolytic spelter on a commercial scale being 
thoroughly successful, and at a later date the capacity of the plant 
will be greatly increased. 

The works for the manufacture of calcium carbide, which are 
situated at Electrona, North-West Bay, some 15 miles distant from 
Hobart, are now reported to be complete, and the arrival of the 
transformers is only awaited for energy to be delivered and the 
manufacture of carbide begun. Nearly all the equipment for 
manufacturing the product has been made in Australia, having 
been supplied by an engineering firm in Adelaide. 

The foundations of coke ovens have been built at Electrona, as 
the company proposes making its-own electrodes for the electric 
furnaces. Contracts have been let for the necessary machinery. 
Firebricks for the ovens are being made in Melbourne. The com- 
pany has entered into arrangements with the owners of a colliery 
for the supply of coal, and has an option to purchase the colliery. 
The limestone will come from the company’s own quarries near 
the works. At present the stone is conveyed over a local. timber 
company’s tramway line, but eventually an aerial ropeway, which 
has already been purchased, will be installed. 

Hitherto calcium carbide has not been manufactured in 
Australia—the imports, which during recent years have averaged 
about 13,000 tons per annum, having been derived principally from 
Norway, Sweden, Germany, and Canada. The present capacity of 
the Electrona Works is 5,000 tons per annum, but it is proposed to 
increase this. Previous to the introduction of the new tariff in 
December, 1914, calcium carbide was on the free list, but it is now 
subject to a duty of 5 per cent. ad ralorem, except from the United 
Kingdom, when it is free of duty under the Preferential Tariff. 
The shortage of supplies of carbide owing to the war situation, and 
consequently high prices, suggest that this project should prove 
successful. 

The industries which will be likely to establish themselves in 
Tasmania are electrochemical and -electrometallurgical, all of 
which require very large blocks of power, and’for which, it may 
be added, there is alarge amount of raw material within the State 
itself. These industries, which are regarded as primary, will, in 
course of time, lead to the development of existing secondary 
industries, as well as to the establishment of others entirely new 
in Tasmania. The principal inducement for the secondary 
industries to establish themselves would be the relatively greater 
facilities they would have in obtaining their raw material. 

Among minor applications of electrical energy, in the opinion 
of the administration of the Hydro-Electric Department, a very 
satisfactory business can be developed by applying electricity to 
incubation. New business has also been started by supplying 
energy to the medical profession. Motor cars and commercial 
vehicles propelled by electricity, as well as electric cooking and 
heating installations, are mentioned as probable developments. 


“all That We Have.”—The following * War Resolu- 
tion” was adopted by the National Electric Light Association at 
the annual meeting at Atlantic City, June 13th-l4th, 1918: 

“ Resolved, that the National Electric Light Association, in 
annual convention assembled, desires to extend to the President of 
the United States and all others in authority, the assurance that 
in its organisation and its membership it is in thorough accord 
with the fixed determination of the American people and their 
chosen representatives to prosecute the war with the utmost vigour 
and to a victorious conclusion—however long it may take and 
however much it may cost in men, money, and other forms of 
sacrifice. 

“The goal we seek through the prosecution of the war, is the 
winning of a great peace—a peace so well established that it can- 
not lightly be disturbed by autocratic force, wedded to the doctrine 
that might makes right. For such an end of the war we are ready, 
cheerfully, to submit to such further restrictions of personal and 
corporate activities and to such further burdens upon private and 
corporate property and business as it may be found necessary to 
impose upon the people and industries of the country. 

“We recognise as the one great menace of the future the possi- 
bility of an inconclusive peace—an armed truce which would 
inevitably end in a renewal of the unspeakable horrors of the 
present war. That must not be, and the only way to prevent it is 
to carry this war to VICTORY—a victory so complete and over- 
whelming that the forces of evil will be glad to accept such terms 
as an outraged world may be willing in justice to accerd. No 
compromise, no half-way measures, no patched-up ‘scraps of 
paper’ can accomplish this great end; but only devotion, the 
patience, the self-sacrifice, and the undying patriotism of our 
people and their great Allies. 

“With a realising sense of the stupendous sacrifices involved, 
but with an abiding faith in the ultimate result, _we pledge all 
that we have and all that we are to the holy cause.’ 


Planing by Electricity—A new industry recently estab- 
lished at Montreal is the manufacture of electric planers by the 
Simplex Floor Finishing Appliance Co. It is claimed that one of 
these planers does the work ordinarily done by 20 men in hand- 
planing. The machines are extensively employed in shipbuilding, 
and eight of them, varying in length from 150 to 300 ft., have been 
supplied to the Canadian Vickers Co. These planers can be re-set 
in a few minutes, after planing rough timber, for polishing deck 
surfaces or ways in shipyards.—7he Jronmonger. 


Fuel Economy.—The Board of Trade announces that 
owing to the large number of miners called to the Colours and the 
great need of coal for our Allies, the various Government Depart- 
ments; and industrial undertakings, the Controller of Coal Mines 
has instituted a Coal Economy Campaign with the object of 
reducing fuel consumption in every direction possible. 

The Controller is being assisted by a technical staff attached to 
the Head Office, and arrangements have been made for a large 
number of engineers in the provinces to attach themselves to 
the Coal Control Department for this special purpose. This 
arrangement enables the country to be mapped out in districts, so 
that all industrial consumers will within a reasonable time be in 
touch with the organisation. 

The scheme comprises two main sections, viz. :—(1) Electrical 
undertakings ; and (2) industrial undertakings. 

The work involved includes the careful scrutiny of the quantity 
and quality of coal consumed by the various undertakings and the 
efficiency obtained. It also includes the inspection of factories and 
works by experts, in order to ascertain means by which the fuel 
consumption may be reduced, and the best methods to that end. 

A considerable amount of work in connection with the campaign 
has already been done, but it is intended to accelerate the rate of 
progress as much as circumstances will admit. Some 400 skilled 
engineers will shortly be at work in various parts of the British 
Isles, and these gentlemen are giving their services to the Govern- 
ment without salary. 

Any public body or company or person wishing to effect 
economies at once, and desiring the Controller's assistance in this 
direction, is invited to communicate with Coal Control Head- 
quarters, Room 30%, Holborn Viaduct Hotel, London, E.C. 1, when 
arrangements will be made to send a technical expert to look into 
the conditions under which coal is being consumed, and to 
co-operate with the consumer in effecting; economy. 

Apart from special applications of this kind, the Controller's 
representatives will visit firms in turn, in accordance with a general 
plan of operations. 

So imperative is the need to reduce coal consumption to a 
minimum that a rationing scheme for all industrial undertakings 
will be introduced shortly. 


Electric Vehicles in New Zealand.—According to news 
just to hand from Chrigtchurch, the Municipal Council of that city 
is proposing to take up the business of the sale of electrical indus- 
trial motor-vehicles. A deputation from the Council recently 
waited on the N.Z. Board of Trade to ask for Government assistance 
in obtaining the shipment from America to New Zealand of a 
number of electric motor trucks. Mr. E. E. Stark, the city electrical 
engineer, stated that there was a field in the Christchurch district 
for the sale and use of 600 electric motor trucks, and that the City 
Council was in negotiation for taking over an agency for their sale. 
If the business were secured, at least 4,200 tons of petrol would be 
saved annually. After hearing the Council's arguments, the Board 
of Trade officials promised to ascertain whether it would be possible 
to secure the steamer space for 13 electric motor trucks in the near 
future 





mi 





130 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [Vol. 83. No. 2,124, Avcusr 9, 1918, 





hildren to live in. Vo accomplish this, he is prepared w 
fight indefinitely. J 
‘The information oullincd above comes from one who is 


in a pretty good position to know what is going on. 


H. R. Merton & Co., Ltd.—lIt is stated that the above 
company has issued a w rrit against Mr. W. M. Hughes, the 
Australian Prime Minister, on account of recent speeches con 
cerning the company 

In Parhament on Monday, in reply to questions regarding 
the company, Sir A. Stanley, President of the Board of 
‘Trade, according to the Times, said: 

rhe Metalgesellschaft formerly held a large number of 
shares in Henry R. Merton & Co., Ltd., but does not now 
hold any shares; the Australian branch of the company has 
been closed, but I have no information as to the African 
branch. ‘The present directors of the company are 8. Baer, 
H. Gardner, W. Gardner, O. Lang, E. R. Merton, and M. 
Wilson. German subjects have an indirect financial interest 
in the company through the holding of 11,875 shares by a 
Swiss company which is believed to be under German con- 
trol. I understand that the company is not now doing any 
work for the Government. Under the provisions of the Non- 
Ferrous Metal Industry Act the company will not be able to 
trade in non-ferrous metals without a licence, and I may 
inform the hon. and gallant member that in this case the 
Board of Trade have refused to grant a licence.” 

A writ for libel has also been issued on behalf of the com- 
pany against the Daily Mail. 


Exemption Applications.—Before the Bucks. Appea: 
Court, the National Service mo ™ appealed against 
the exemption granted to R. H. Philpott (47, Grade 2), 
electrician on the Tyringham Estate, on the ground that the 
electric supply of Tyringham House was not of national im- 
portance. ‘The certificate was amended to exemption until 
September 2th or the man doing work of national import- 
ance for 36 hours weekly. 

At Reigate, conditional exemption has been granted to Jas 
Seagrave (50, grade 2), stoker and driver at the Corporation 
Electricity Works. 

Wilts Appeal Court has granted exemption until August 
30th, pending protection, to A. Mackenzie, electrician, 
with Messrs. Harris & Co., of Calne. 

Rochdale Tribunal, on the recommendation of the Advisory 
Committee, has given exemption until November 30th to 
W. Ridgley (33, grade 3), motorman on. the Corporation 
tramways. 

Colchester Tribunal has granted conditional exemption to 
E. P. Harvey (grade 3), engaged at the tramway depét of 
the Corporation. 

At Dover, on July 31st. the Corporation Tramways Depart- 
ment appealed for G. F. Howard (35, C2), fitter, employed 
in the repair of tramcars. The manager said that the man’s 
work was necessary for the public safety, and he could do 
with three or four similar men if he could get them. Three 
months, subject to substitution, were conceded. 








CORRESPONDENCE, 


Letters received by us after 5 P.M. ON TUESDAY cannot -appear until 
the following week. Correspondents should forward their communi- 
cations at the earliest possible moment, No letter can be published 
unless we have the writer's name and address in our possessivn, 


The Nottingham Super-Power Station. 


The various announcements that have appeared in the 
technical Press re the report of the specal committee ap- 
pointed by the Nottingham Corporation to prove the advan- 
tages of their city as a suitable site for a super-station are 
very interesting, and are indeed a ‘‘ shaking among the dry 
bones.” 

Why should the most antiquated and inefficient station in 
the Midlands suddenly think itself sufficiently capable and 
experienced to be able to design, equip, and run a national 
power house, and to supply the surrounding towns and cities 
who are now generating at higher efficiencies and lower 
costs? 

The records of the towns it is intended to absorb are as 
follows :— 


Units gen.. Works Av. price Units per 


Town. in millions, costs. Coal. obtained, head. Profit. 
Chesterfield ... 2°3 “90 “Bl 1°45 38 + 1,800 
Mansfield ... 206 14 “48 19 16 + 1,600 
Lincoln eee 53 “84 =. °60 1°22 90° + 3,130 
Loughboro’ ... 15 ‘86 «°39—ss«d°26 68 — 877 loss 
Leicester 6°25 1°41 "65 2°13 22 — 764 ., 
Kettering ... 2°4 1°48 “BB 1°43 78 + 616 
Burton 4°0 “74 “31 1°37 72 + 3,011 
Derby eee 1iZ18° “73: "43 ss 80 + 2.600 
Nottingham... 14°97 «134 «6°62. «21°85 31 + 6,300 


? 

After twenty years’ experience, Nottingham (with the 
exception of Leicester) is the highest town for works: costs; 
coal, &c., it runs non-condensing, has over thirty sets, and 
only one ‘larger than 450 kw. Charges are higher, units sold 





Li 


™ Zana O° A comm wn ‘ 7 4 +s Ning 
Pei MEE wees av aus baiaS ata. §* ae ate SVC 
mana to make both ends meet. 


Such a record surely does not warrant the aeigthenring 
towns being handicapped by having to take ouppy from a 
station to be managed by such a Committee, eveh if they 
have the river Trent and a coal mine in the front garden. 


Pickle. 





Instruments for Central Station Switchboards, 


| see that Mr. Nield’s reply to my letter is mostly insinua 
tion, all of which is entirely baseless. [| am not out to sell 
(or buy) any particular make of meter, but only to obtain 
the best for the purpose. Further, I have never known 
a good case improved by the sort of ‘methods he adopts, and 
I am not going to presume on your space further than to 
say that I gave the particular items of our tests in which the 
two types showed a divergence, except that we found that 
an intense local magnetic field could not be made to affect 
the mercury meter (on account of its good — but 
did seriousiy affect the Aron meter if not maintai con- 
stant in position and strength for the complete cycle (21 
minutes), or multiple thereof. His ‘‘ random shot”’ about 
increasing voltage is quite wrong; I give the worst condition 
of the two. I simply intervened in this matter to explain the 
tests which someone else quoted; time and paper are too 
precious to allow of my saying more, and as far as I am con 
cerned the matter is closed. If rival manufacturers like to 
have a scrap, let.them—I do not pose as anyone’s champoin. 


E, Fawssett. 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, August.3rd, 1918. 





It is unfortunate that ‘“‘A.M.I.E.E.”’ ever wrote his criticism 
of Mr. Stubbings’s article in the tone he did, for he should 
have borne in mind that on the face of it, it was an out-and- 
out condemnation of the oldest -and most scientific of the 
watt-hour meters on the market. That this condemnation 
is not justified is shown by the fact that my sales of the Aron 
clock-meter were, in 1917, twice those of 1916, a state of 
things which I believe has not been equalled by any other 
meter manufacturer. 

As the one who entered into the negotiations for the Aron 
Meter Co., with Mr. Fawssett, I must beg to differ from him 
as to the general trend of his observations, particularly as 
emg damage our reputation, but have no consequences for 

im 

He suggests that he started the test with a bias in favour. 
of the Aron meter, but when I called on him for the first 
time, over six years ago, he refused to have anything to do 
with the meters, as he gaid he had tested them years before 
and would not touch them again. It is worth while noting 
that Mr. Fawssett had one of.our samples 18 months, and 
then had not time to test it, although it was in his test room 
until a few months before the above tests took place. When [ 
was asked to supply the meters we were given two weeks to 
deliver them, and I protested that this was not long enough, 
particularly as we wished to try. some experiments to reduce 
the temperature coefficient, and we prefer to run the meters 
longer than this before delivering. I was then told that this 
was all the time allowed, and we decided to risk sending 
two meters on the distinct understanding that no temperature 
tests should be taken into account (although such have been 
mentioned in the correspondence), for we can supply a whole 
current type meter with absolutely negligible temperature 
coefficient, and hoped to make the ‘shunted type as good. 

Mr. Fawssett’s statement about taking every precaution to 
ensure accuracy should be qualified, for in the first series of 
tests I strongly objected to our meters being placed above 
the adjusting resistance, which I believe carried 300 amperes 
at times developing a fair temperature. 

After seeing the results of the first tests, I asked to with- 
draw the two meters, for, seeing that the temperature coeffi- 
cient of one meter was twice that of the other, I came to the 
conclusion that there was something radically wrong with 
the one meter. 

Now to show where the bias, if any, comes in, I was told 
we could have the meters back for correction, and we had 
them back for some weeks, although in the first instance 
only two weeks could be given for delivery.- The other make 
of meters were sent back and altered in design according to 
Mr. Fawssett’s own specification, embodying, I believe, one 
of his temperature adjustment patents. . 

Because of a report I sent in to my firm as to the way I 
considered ‘‘ the wind to be blowing,”’ and as we “were very 
busy with actual war orders, nothing was done with the 
two meters until the last moment, and then they were over- 
hauled, but we could not keep them long enough for “ run- 
ning together ” tests. 

I consider that Mr. Fawssett has been guilty of a serious 
breach of faith in mentioning the question of temperature 
coefficient. when it was expressly understood that we were 
not to bother ‘about making any adjustment for this‘ till 
afterwards. It did not occur to ws until too late that if the 
temperature was allowed to vary, the meters would not run 
together if they had different coefficients, for we thought 
wrongly that the temperature would be. kept constant. 

As this is the second time that harm has been done to our 
business through a one-sided report from the same source 
being allowed to filter through the same channel, I strongly 










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—_—— 


protest against it in this case, I have had’ sufficient experi- 
ence with every type of meter on the British market to be 
able to bring enough evidence to damn every one if it is 
only presented in a certain way. 

A. E. Jepson. 


Southport, July 30th, 1918. 





Trade Unions: Past, Present, and Future. 


| have read * Electrical Pitter’s"’ letter, and am glad to see 
he has decided to become a trade unionist if the trade union 
is solely made for him, and to conduct and carry out his 
ideas of policy and politics. 

| can fully understand that it is useless for him to try and 
bring about reforms in the present trade unions, for time 
and experienice* count in all things; besides, his policy is 
wrong, for all unions adopt the policy of the majority, and 
are not governed by one, as ** Electrical Fitter ’’ would have 


it 
If he is qualified, it will be gf easy for him to join one 
of the present le unions, with his spark of patriotism and 
average intelligence; he will find the former qualification in 
a larger form than a spark amongst trade unionists, and as 
to the latter, if he uses it, he ‘will find he has been labouring 
under a delusion, or has been speaking of things he knows 
nothing about. 

With regard to the movement for helping and lifting pur- 
poses, I e it that “ Electrical Fitter ’’ means better moral, 
social, and economic conditions, also better wages, for that 
is the best way of helping or lifting the worker I know of; 
well, for his edification, it is one of the present trade unions 
he is seeking. ‘ 

As to some of the present.labour movements being out to 
assist the aliens, especially of the enemy variety, if ‘‘ Electrical 
Fitter” is referring to strikes that have taken place during 
this war, for his information all strikes since August 4th, 
1914, have been unofficial and against the leaders; it is silly 
for anyone to expect trade unions to be free from Bolchies, 
conchies, and aliens, for these are still at large, even in the 
Government’s employ. 

‘A fair day’s pay for a fair day's work.”’ This is the busi- 
ness deal between the employers and trade unions; the trade 
unions state your rate of pay, and the employers see that 
you do the work. 

Finally, if ‘* Electrical Fitter ’’ still finds he is not being 
catered for in one or two of the present trade unions, it may 
be an association he is seeking, not a trade union. 


J. W: Woolley, E.T.U. 
Whitley Bay, August 3rd; 1918. 
[This letter has been shortened.—Eps. Etec. Rev.) 





Motor Problems. ' 


The interesting article appearing in your issue of the 2nd 

inst. has raised considerable comment, and as one who has 
endeavoured to bring about a satisfactory state of affairs,in 
relation to an economical and reliable design of variable-speed 
induction motor for application to my ‘ Paragon’”’ thermo- 
electric ship propulsion system, and with my thermo-electrifi- 
cation traction system for railways, I am very interested in 
your valuable and instructive remarks, whch are highly 
appreciated. 
_Your article is timely in every respect, as there is no ques- 
tion in all the commercial field of electrical power engineer- 
ing, which is so ge oe with great ibilities as that of 
the production of a reliable and satisfactory variable speed 
induction motor for general purposes. 
_ Think, Sirs, of the thousands of tons of fuel per year that 
it is possible to save, in the event of a suitable type of motor 
being brought forward. In every direction in which you can 
look, the want of this essential motor is noted. 

I am pleased to inform you that I have now developed a 
type of short-circuited induction motor which promises to be 
of high importance in many directions, permitting the appli- 
cation of polyphase alternating current in fields heretofore 
entirely given to v.c. machines.. It has high power factor, 
and reduced weight per horse-power at given revolution 
speed, and can be ‘operated on the ‘* Paragon ”’ 
quency -system at any of a continuously variable speed; I 
believe. that it produces the ideal means of operating,. not 
only ordinary industrial machinery, but also meets the press- 
ing demand for a suitable marine motor for ships’ plant, 
besides being certainly interesting from traction aspects. 


William P. Durtnall. 
London, 8.W., August 4th, 1918. 


[This letter has been shortened.—Eps. Etec. Rev.] 





With reference to the problem which, in your leader of 
August 2nd, you commend to inventive readers, may I 
point out that the Igranic Electric Co., of London and Bed- 
ford, have standardised several patented devices which dis- 
pose of the difficulty you named. 

The simplest is their vibrating relay, which can easily, and 
at comparatively trifling expense, be incorporated with their 
leaflet No. 200 single-handled combined starter and regu- 
lator, which appears to be the type your article specifically 


variable fre- * 


referred to. The function of the vibrating relay, which has 
its operating cou in the motor circuit, co that it is seneitive 
to conditions which affect the motor, is to automatically 
prevent the too quick insertion or too quick short-circuiting 
of field regulating resistance, no matter how quickly the 
controlling handle may be moved, in either direction. It 
consequently prevents flashing over, by avoiding the too 
sudden strengthening of the shunt field 

The Igranic leaflet No. 36 inching starter is equally effe: 
tive in avoiding the evil you described, because the instant 
that any backward movement of the starting handle is made 
the circuit of the motor is opened. When this feature is 
added (as it often is) to the leaflet No. 200 combined starte: 
and regulator named above, the difficulty that you have 
named does not arise, because the circuit of the motor is 
opened before any of the regulating resistance is cut out of 
circuit. 

Of course, merely opening the motor circuit does not neces 
sarily produce a quick stop if the machinery possesses con 
siderable inertia, but if a solenoid-controlled brake be added, 
in which the solenoid circuit is openéd and closed simul 
taneously with the motor circuit, the kinetic energy can be 
quickly dissipated. 

On the other hand, one might ask, why should an attempt 
be made to stop the motor as quickly as the machine that 
it drives? Are there not many machines (as, for instance, 
newspaper printing presses) which possess so wuch internal 
friction that they would quickly stop if relieved from the 
effect of the inertia of the armature of the motor? In 
Igranic electrical equipments for large newspaper presses, 
the press is connected to the motor by a magnetic clutch, 
which is de-energised when the motor circuit is opened, with 
the result that the stopping of the press is not In any way 
delayed by the inertia of the motor armature, and the press 
consequently can be stopped in the very shortest time that 
is consistent with safety. 

Another instance where quick stopping is essential in 
emergency is in connection with rubber mills, and for driv- 
ing these it is common practice to use a magnetic clutch be- 
tween the motor and the mill, controlled by a switch which 
can be instantly opened by any operative at any one of a 
group of mills. A solenoid brake is a standard combination 
with Igranic clutches, and immediately an emergency arises 
any operator opens his switch, and all the mills are stopped 
in the shortest period possible. The Igranic Co., in one of 
their pamphlets, give an instance of a 200-b.H.p., 590-R.P.M. 
motor installed in the plant of a large rubber company to 
drive three rubber mills 20 in. and 22 in. by 60 in. Without 
the clutch brake attachment it was found that on opening 
the motor circuit the drive roll periphery travelled 276 in. 
before coming to rest. The same group of mills, when fitted 
with the clutch brake arrangement, were stopped with a 
recorded travel of 4 in. on the drive roll periphery after the 
time of opening the safety switch. 

This method not only ensures a quick stop without the 
electrical disadvantages you described, but it also relieves 
the motor from the heavy mechanical stresses which must be 
set up when an attempt is made to stop very quickly a 
heavy armature that is rotating at a high speed. . 

It is an advantage; too, to place the means of stopping at 
the disposal of more than one person. Experience has 
proved that in applying a safety cut-off device tc rubber 
machinery the machinery should be grouped; that is to say, 
the safety cut-off for one rubber mill should be controllable 
from a number of other mills, because when a workman is 
caught in machinery he seldom retains sufficient presence 
of mind to avail himself of the safety devices which have 
been installed for his protection. It is found that, where 
magnetic couplings have been installed, workmen at adjoin- 
ing machines are usually the ones to cut off the power and 
bring the machinery 6 rest. 

Jno. T. Mould. 


London, E.C., August 7th, 1918. 


—————E——E—EE 


BUSINESS NOTES. 


Excess Profits Duty.—The Board of Referees have 
refused an application by the Quasi-Arc Co., LTp., and the Quast- 
Arc Co. (France), Ltp., of 103, Cannon Street, E.C., for an in 
crease of the statutory percentage as respects “the manufacture 
and sale of electrodes for electric working of iron and steel com- 
prising metallic cores with blue asbestos yarn insulators.” 


Sports at Chelmsford.—The result of Crompton’s, 
Hoffmann’s, Marconi’s, and National Steam Car United Works’ 
Sports and Féte, held on July 6th on the Wood Street 
Grounds, Chelmsford (by kind permission of Crompton’s Club), 
was a net profit of £305—a record. The Committee has allo- 
cated £155 to the Chelmsford V.A.D. Hospital and £150 to the 
Essex Regiment Prisoners of War Fund. The handsome balance 
was helped considerably by Messrs. Godfrey & Sons supplying all 
tents, &c., free of charge. and by the valuable help rendered bv 
Capt. C. E. Ramsden, of the ASC. Mr. Percy G. Cheverton acted 
as hon. secretary and treasurer, 





e 





132 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 


[Vol. 83. No. 2,124, AucusT 9, 1918, 





Ignition Magneto Mannfacture in Sweden.—In addi- 
tion to ‘the Prior Co. mentioned in a recent issue, ignition mag- 
netos for use on motor vehicles and. aircraft are now being 
manufactured in Sweden by the Svenska Elektromagneter Aktie- 
bolag, of Amal, and the Svenska Verktygsmaskiner, Swenson & Co., 
of Stockholm. 


Liquidations.—Drvonrort anD District TRAMWAYS 
Co.—Winding up voluntarily, Mr. P. N. Gray, Manchester Hotel, 
Aldersgate Street, E.C., as liquidator. Meeting of creditors, 
August 9th. 

BRowN-BAYLEY's STEEL Works, Ltp.—This company is 
winding up for the purpose of reconstruction. 


The British Engineers’ Association and Economic Policy. 
—-The British Engineers’ Association has placed before the War 
Cabinet, the Imperial War Council, and the Heads of Government 
Departments a resolution placing on record its grave concern at 
the delay of the Government in making public the economic policy 
which is to be adopted by this country after the war. On behalf of 
the industry that it represents, the Association urges that such a 
declaration should be made at once, in order that this country may 
be prepared and properly organised to take its place in the economic 
struggle which will arise at the close of the war, and for which 
the enemy countries have been systematically and energetically 
preparing for some time past. The Association feels very strongly 
that unless the Government declares its policy this country will be 
at a serious disadvantage with competing countries after the war. 
It is stated that any further delay on the part of the Government 
will tend to increase the feeling of distrust and apprehension which 
is at present making itself felt throughout the country and the 
Dominions, and that the Government, having received reports of 
the various Committees and Commissions set up to deal with the 
questions which will arise at the close of the war, including the 
Report of the Lord Balfour of Burleigh Committee on “ Commercial 
and Industrial Policy After the War,” is now in a position to 
declare its policy. The Association states that, having fully con- 
sidered the final Report of the Balfour Committee, it is of opinion 
that in the main the conclusions come to in the Report are satis- 
factory, but it desires to make a number of recommendations. 

The first of these suggests a number of amendments to the re- 
commendations of the Dalziel Committee respecting enemy aliens. 
The second is that, having regard to the future of British indus- 
tries, it is in every way undesirable that control in any shape or 
form should be exercised either by alien interest or capital in their 
development. Other recommendations are :—That it should be the 
primary aim of the Government to ensure and encourage the appli- 
cation of British capital to the development of British industries, 
and to ensure that all sources of raw materials within the British 
Empire be brought, and remain, under British control; that 
the banking system is totally inadequate to meet the needs 
of the engineering industry, and that it is incumbent on the 
Government, in the interest of oversea trade, to encourage, and, if 
necessary, actively support the formation of one or more financial 
corporations capable of assisting the demands for financial support 
of the manufacturers or traders of this country. 

With regard to the question of fiscal policy, the Association 
is unable to agree entirely with the Committee’s recommendations 
that protection shall only be given where an industry proves that 
it is efficient and unable to fight foreign competition, and desires 
to make the following observations :— 

That the underlying pringiple should be to support an industry in combating 
foreign competition in the ‘first instance, either by preferential tariff, bounty, 
or financial assistance, and not to leave such assistance to form matter for 
consideration at such time as foreign traders sha!! have established themselves 
in the markets. 

That every industry is primarily entitled to be protected by the Government, 
— therefore each industry should be dealt with separately on its own 
merits, 

That where there is reason to believe that production can be efficiently and 
economically increased within the Empire, a well-devised system of pre- 
ferential tariffs would give security to the manufacturer, and stimulate him to 
greater efforts to obtain the highest efficiency in production and increase in 
his output. 

In conclusion, the British Engineers’ Association recommends :— 


1. That preferential treatment shall be given to the British Oversea 
Dominions, and that Allied and Neutral countries shall only be permitted to 
trade in this country on terms equivalent to those granted to this country by 
the Allied or Neutral country concerned. 

2. That for a definite period of years no enemy subject shall be permitted to 
trade within this country. 

8. That British capital shall be used first and foremost for the development 
of the resources of tht Empire for the Empire. 

4, That rates of inland rail and water carriage shall be revised to make it 
impossible for goods from oversea to be delivered at inland points cheaper 
than home-produced goods. 

5. That rates of ocean freights shall be so regulated as to make it impossible 
for the freight charged on British goods to and from British ports to be greater 
than that charged to and from foreign ports. 


6. That the policy of His Majesty's Government shall be specifically directed 
to the attainment of these ends. 


Trade Announcement.— Messrs. Porr’s. Enecrric 
LAMP Co., Ltp., have opened a depét at 5, Arthur Street, New 


Oxford Street, London, W.C. 1, where they will carry large stocks 
of all types of their “ Elasta” drawn-wire lamps. 


A Cable Factory in Norway.—The plant of the first 
Norwegian cable and rubber goods factory has been completed at 
Christiania. The new factory is to specialise in the manufacture 
of all kinds of wire and cable, as well as in the production, later, 
of certain rubber goods, the imports of which in 1913 amounted to 
about 6,000,000 kroner. The plant covers a large area, and the 
construction cost of the buildings was over 700,000 kroner, making, 
with the addition of the machinery, about 1,500,000 kroner (krone 
= Is. 1}d. at par).— Board -of Trade Journal. 


Patent Applications.— The Comptroller-General of 
Patents records a further increase last year in the number of 
applications and complete specifications filed, the former number- 
ing 19,285 as compared with 18,602 in 1916, and the latter 11,539 
as compared with 10,700. The number of new patents sealed was 
9,347. 

Book Notices,—7he 7'raining of Our Industrial Forces, 
By H.F. L. Orcutt. Loridon : Engineering, Ltd. Pp. 55, Price 1s. 6d, 
net.—This booket comprises the series of articles originally con- 
tributed to Engineering by Mr. Orcutt in August and September 
of last year. It suggests numerous reforms in the management 
and operation of British engineering firms, and~ discusses the possi- 
bility of freeing the post-war period from the industrial strife 
of pre-war days. Mr. Orcutt’s theme is the systematisation of the 
training of our industrial forcesyfrom the manager down to the 
apprentice. He considers both workmen and staff under three 
heads — commercial, technical and scientific, and. productive—and he 
has suggestive paragraphs on such important phases of industrialism 
as “ Management and Education,” “ Management and Production,” 
“The Scientist,’ “The Buyer,” while other sections deal with 
every trade of importance in the engineering industries. By his 
advocacy of systematic training and what he calls the “two abso- 
lutely necessary preliminaries—raising of wages and raising the 
school leaving age to 16 "—Mr. Orcutt has done a service to the 
cause of British engineering efficiency. 

“Some Characteristics of the Marvin Pyrheliometer.” By P. D, 
Foote. (Scientific Paper of the Bureau of 8S .) Price 
10 cents. “Copper” (Circular of the B. of 8.). Price 20 cents, 
Washington : Government Printing Office. 


Plant for Sale.—Salford Corporation electricity depart- 
ment has for disposal two 1,000-Kw. D.c. turbo-generator sets. For 
full particulars see our advertisement pages to-day. 


Safety Lamp Approved.—The Home Secretary has 
approved the “Fullex” miners’ electric safety lamp for use in 
mines. 


Agencies Wanted.—H.M. Trade Commissioner in 
Australia reports the receipt of the following inquiries :— 

A firm of manufacturers’ agents in Melbourne and Sydney and 
New Zealand desires agencies for manufacturers of electrical goods. 
Reference No. 204. 

A Melbourne firm desires to represent manvffacturers of motors, 
electrical accessories (other, than instruments, lamps, switchboards, 
and switchgear), wires, and cables. References No. 100/22. 

Manufacturers’ agents established in Melbourne, Sydney, and 
Fremantle seek agencies for United Kingdom manufacturers of 
engineers’ requirements and power house supplies. References 
No. 160/28. 

H.M. Trade Commissioner at Toronto reports that a firm in that 
city desires to represent manufacturers of integrating watt-hour 
meters (A.c. and D.c.), Reference No. 205. 

Particulars from Department of Commercial Intelligence, 
73, Basinghall Street, E.C. 





LIGHTING AND POWER NOTES. 


Accrington.—Pricr Increase.—The T.C. has decided 
to increase the price of electricity by 10 per cent., except to con- 
sumers covered by the coal clause. 


Australia.—E.L. Scuemes.—The following munici- 
palities have applied for authority to supply electricity within 
their areas, or are considering the subject :—Ararat (Vic.), Coraki 
(N.S.W.), Junee (N.S.W.), Hamilton (Q.), Mobilong (S.A.), Murrum- 
burrah and Harden (N.S.W.), Murwillumbah (N.S.W.), and St. 
George (Q.).—Commonwealth Engineer. 

LAUNCESTON.—For the year ending June 30th last, the income 
of the city electricity department amounted to £23,957 and the ex- 
penditure to £11,278. The net profit was £3,000; generating costs 


_were ‘176d. per unit, distributing costs\"357d., and the total 


costs “865d. 
Batley.—Price Increase.—The T.C. has approved an 


increase of the price for electricity, as from October Ist, by a further 
15 per cent. 


Birmingham.—Price Increase.—The E.S. Committee 
recommends that the charges for electricity to low-pressure con- 
sumers be increased by 14 per cent. on the present scale for every 
1s, advance in the price of coal. 


Burnley.— Price IncrEase,—The Electricity Committee 
has recommended that the price of electricity for lighting be 
increased from 3}d. per unit to 4}d., and that the’ scale for other 
consumers be also increased. 


Chester.—YeEaR’s Working. —The annual accounts 
show that the income of the Corporation electricity department 
for the year ending March 25th, 1918, amounted to £26,649, com- 
pared. with £24,375 in the previous year, and the total expendi- 
ture to £14,123, compared with £11,530. The net profit was 
£2,945. 2,917,148 units were sold during the year, including 
public lighting, 53,265; tramways, 355,246 ;. private — 
1,138,036 ; and bulk. supply, 1,370,601. The works cost per’ unit 
was..'652d., against 548d., and the total cost was 1'02d., against 
"925d, 


—_ 














——— 


1918, 


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- et 9, 1948.) 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. i 























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LONDON . 217, Shaftesbury Avenue, W.C. 
GLASGOW . 221, St. Vincent Street. 


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THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. : — 


——— 
’ . 
ZZ - - ay Z LE, 
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5-al 
With loos 
removable 
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CS of eur new catalogue on Coal and 
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and will be sent to any bona fide enquirer on 
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COAL & ASH PLANT 
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August 9, = THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 3 


“BANOQU O (2852) 
As 1 ae IN ee NUMBERS TO 
ARSEN DOCKYARDS, EXPLOSIVES 






















* BANQUO” IRON -CLAD WORKS, CHEMICAL WORKS, FACTORIES, ETC 
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itself to engineers as an im- 
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of ling units. The switches are pe 
one iron being usually fitted in proximity to th 

distribu tuse-box. The switches are foolproof, and 
saving is in cost and labour, The words “on” and 


“ orr” are cast on the lid, and the switch handle is of cast 
y= a © ee a substantial yet neat appearance. The 
ip yd pon gr) and there 

> emule apace Sneibe conn foe guiee end onse in wiring. 


SINGLE POLE 

























(Bhows Plug removed.) 


The Plug is Gun Metal, 
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DOCK AND FACTORY HEAVY 
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48 supplied to the War Office, and im 
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Prices for Double-Pole ol 10-amp. Switches on application. 





“BANQUO"’ Power and Heating Switch Plug Set. Waterproof Pattern. Mais tas os, ote rind tune tom 10 to 
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No. A9/20, cap. ps 28s. ea. 
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London Offices and Stores: Head Office and Norks: 
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THE WANDSWORTH SWITCHPLUG IS FOOLPROOF 
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IT 1S SELF-CONTAINED. NO SEPARATE SWITCH IS REQUIRED. IT IS AUTO- 
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August 9, 1948.) THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW \ SUPPLEMENT. 5 


BAXTER & GAUNTER, Lro, 


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- 


N° eee 





THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. (August 9, 1948, 





BRUSHES 


EVERY DESCRIPTION © 


FOR 


DYNAMOS AND MOTORS. 


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IN 
LONDON. 


0 


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Le Carbone, 


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A atae 


Manufactured only by the 
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CRYSELCO, LIMITED, 


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Telegrams : “ Cryselco, Kempston.” Telephone : 117 Bedford. 














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Our Booklet “HIGH EFFICIENCY LIGHT- 
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SUNVTDUTEOONNTETEOUUEOETOEOOC TEETER E ATED VETTE 


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hugust 9, 1918.) THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. | ; 
LYE | PLD BLLewo | Pew LeZre 


ES OT We SO ae 


QOS || CLOG 


ug 


Se lephone:- Telegrams 
TIPTON, ad ba) '-3 V4 oe} 
151 & 132. — TIPTON. 











MANY THOUSANDS] 
are in use in Government Departments. 


It is made to cover the cap of any 60-watt lamp, 


Produced entirely in our own Woodworking, Wire Weaving, Casting and _. 
Spinning Shops, in our own modern factory on our own freehold site | 
of twenty acres. 


Let us send you a sample, 





Send for complete list of Revo Electric Light Fittings and Electric Fires. 


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Cia Ps Ms 


THE CABLE ACCESSORIES. COL TOTON Skul 


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FU UUUULUUR RUE RRR UULUREDUR UTD U RUDE DDE RDUOUURER EDU DTDDE OUT D EET E ERECTED EEE 











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——— 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. (August 9, 1948, 


THE REES ROVURBO WW... Go. bro. 


Head Office and Works : WO LVER HAM PTON ; ENGLAND. 
— ELECTRICAL .AND PUMPING ENGINEERS. 





| 





a. 
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STEAM {nN Ler 


We were among the pioneers of the elec- 
trical industry in this country and have ever 
since specialised in D.C. machinery of the 
highest class. By our policy of continual 
improvement and adaptation of designs to 
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position to offer the right dynamo or motor 
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Our illustration shows one of our D.C. 
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A REES ROTURBU V.U. MOTOR DRIVING A London Office : 
REES ROTURBO ROTARY JET CONDENSER. HASTINGS HOUSE, 
NORFOLK STREET, 
STRAND, W.C. 








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ILLUSTRATION OF A PASS-OFF TURBINE DIRECT COUPLED TO AN ALTERNATOR HAVING 
A NORMAL OUTPUT 
OF 1200 KWS., INSTALLED AT THE WORKS OF THE CARRONGROVE PAPER CO., LTD., DENNY, STIRLINGSHIRE. 


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Western Electric Company Limited 


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THE “ELECTRICAL REVIEW” 


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Relating to Situations Vacant, Situations Wanted, Businesses Wanted, Businesses for Sale, Patents for Sale, 
Specific Articles of any kind Wanted, or for Sale or Exchange, are inserted at the rate of ONE PENNY 


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Number and “Electrical 


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NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS. 


| adams care is taken to ensure the prompt 

insertion of all Advertisements, and 
accurate delivery to Advertisers of replies to 
their Advertisements, but the Proprietors 
and Publishers do not guarantee the insertion 
of an Advertisement on any specified day, or 





at all, and will not-be liable for any loss . 


occasioned by the-failure of an Advertisement 
to appear on any specified day, or at all, 
from any cause whatever. 

Advertisements and replies are only 
accepted subject to the above conditions. 





ELECTRICAL 


PARTNERS and PARTNERSHIPS 


can be obtained through 


WHEATLEY KIRK, PRICE & CO. 


(Established 1850). 
46, Watling Street, London, E.C. 


16, Albert Square, 26, Collingwood Street, 
Manchester. Newcastle-on-Tyne. 





By Order of the Receiver. 
TO ENGINEERS, MANUFACTURERS AND OTHERS. 


BLACKWALL ENGINEERING & WELDING WORKS, Ld., 
221, WESTFERRY' ROAD, MILLWALL, E. 


PLANT and MACHINERY, 


COMPRISING, 
Lathes, DriHing and Shaping Machines, Angle Iron and Plate 











Bending Tools, Hack . Saws, Tanks, Time-Recording Machine | 


Tools, Stores, Stock of - trical Fittings, &c. 


LEOPOLD FARMER & SONS 


WILL SELL THE ABOVE BY AUCTION 
on the PREMISES, in LOTS, 
On Thursday, 22nd August, 1918. 








Catalogues of the AUCTIONEERS, 46, Gresham Street, E.C. 2, and 
61, High Road, Kilburn, N.W. 6. 


Note.—A BENZ 30-Cwr. Moron Lorry will be included in 
the Sale, 2284 





SITUATIONS VACANT. 
Latest time for receiving 9.30 a.m. Thursday. 











If letters are not to be delivered to certain firms or individuals 
(if known), instructions to that effect should be sent to the 
Manager of the ELECTRICAL REVIEW, who will do his best 
to carry out such instructions. Letters of applicants cannot 
in such cases be returned to them, nor can the names of 
Advertisers using a number in any way be disclosed. 

















Original Testimonials should never be sent. 





MEXBOROUGH URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. 
Electricity Department. 
CHARGE ENGINEER. 


EQUIRED immediately, Charge Engineer with experience of 
D.c, 3-wire station combined with refuse destructor. Wages 
£2 12s. per week of 56 hours, plus 124% ; all overtime paid. 
Apply stating age, experience, together with testimonials, to the 
undersigned. 
J. B. FELTHAM, A.M.LE.E., 
Engineer and Manager. 
Electricity Works, 


Mexborough. 2251 





_ RHONDDA URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. 


Electricity Department. 


UNIOR SWITCHBOARD ATTENDANT wanted, 8-hour shifts, 
knowledge of A.C., 3-phase supply a recommendation. Good 
opening for student. Wages 29s. 6d. per week, plus 9s. war bonus 
and 124%. Only applications from those ineligible for the Army 
will be considered. State age, experience, together with copies of 

testimonials, to be sent to the undersigned. 

J. M. BOWMAN, 
Engineer and. Manager. 
Electricity Works, 


Porth, Rhondda. 2245 





CHARGE ENGINEERS. 


YHARGE ENGINEERS wanted for Midland power station, ex- 
C perienced with Turbines, Water-Tube Boilers and E.H.T. three- 
phase. Salary £3 9s. per week. including all bonuses. 

Apply, stating experience, age, and enclose copies of testimonials, 
to 2192, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


‘ 





MAINS ASSISTANT. 
AINS ASSISTANT wanted, capable of executing small repairs 
to Motors and Meters, and of repairing mains faults in case 
of emergency ; 55s. for 44 hours, overtime at usual rates ; 13 days’ 
holiday per annum with pay. Pe:manency. 
Apply, with references, to ENGINEER AND MANAGER, Electricity 
Works, Heywood, near Manchester. 2272 





(Continued on next page.) 














“. 








‘12 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. : 


[August-9, 4948, 








SITUATIONS VACANT .—Coniinued. 


SITUATIONS VACANT.—(Continued, 








METROPOLITAN BOROUGH OF HAMMERSMITH. 
Electricity Department. 


é ae COUNCIL of the Metropolitan Borough of Hammersmith 
invite Applications from properly qualified men for the 
post of :— 

ENGINEER-IN-CHARGE. 

Salary £175 per annum, rising by annual increments of £12 10s. 
to £200 per annum, plus war bonus of 20s, weekly and 12} per 
cent. on earnings. ; L 

The appointment will be subject to one week's notice on either 
side. 

Applications, stating experi¢nce and accompanied by copies of 
three recent testimonials, must be delivered to the BorouGcu 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, Electricity Works, 85, Fulham Palace 
Road, Hammersmith, W. 6, not later than Monpay, AvuGuST 
19th, 1918. 

Candidates canvassing members of the Borough Council will be 
disqualified. 

Dated this 6th day of August, 1918. 

LESLIE: GORDON, 
Town Clerk. 

Town Hall, 

Hammersmith. 2281 





TELEPHONE FITTERS AND INSPECTORS. 


TF\ELEPHONE FITTERS and INSPECTORS 
required for intercom, telephone installations in 
munition works, &c. 


Good wages and permanency for competent men, 


No person resident more than 10 miles away, or 
already on Government work, will be engaged. 


Apply— 
LONDON TELEPHONE (N.8.) CO., LTD., 
Donington House, 
Norfolk Street, 
Strand, 
London, W.C. 2. 5262 





DURHAM COUNTY WAR PENSIONS COMMITTEE. 


Training of Disabled Soldiers and Sailors. 
DURHAM JOHNSTON SECONDARY SCHOOL, 


‘NLECTRICIAN, —Competent Instructor required at once to 

'4 train discharged men in electrical work. Must have 
thorough practical knowledge of electric equipment and be capable 
of supervising and maintaining an efficient workshop. 

Salary £4 per week. 

Applications, with full particulars and copies of testimonials, to 
be sent to— 

THE SECRETARY FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, 
Shire Hall, 
Durham. 
Bl st July, 1918, 2557 





WAR DEPARTMENT. 


Military Camps, South Irish District. 


VACANCY occurs for a thoroughly competent Electrician. 
Must be conversant with oil engines, D.c. generators, wiring 

and all repairs. 
Discharged Army and Navy men’ and those not eligible for 
military service should apply by 20th AuGusT, 1918, stating age, 
experience, wages required, and sending copies of testimonials, 

endorsed “ Power House Staff,” to— 
COMMANDING ROYAL ENGINEER, 
South Irish District, 
Military Barracks, 

Mallow, Co. Cork. 2260 





SHIFT ENGINEER. 


YHIFT ENGINEER wanted for sub-works with steam p.c. plant 
h and rotaries. Salary £3 3s. per week, inclusive of war wages, 
bonus and allowances. e 

Applications, stating age and giving particulars of present posi- 
tion and previous experience, together with date on which appoint- 
ment could be taken up if successful, to the— 

BOROUGH ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, 
St. Peter's Chambers, 
Glebe Street, Stoke-on-Trent. 2270 





ENGINEERS-IN-CHARGE. 


UNIOR Assistants wanted, with mechanical and electrical 
e training, and experience of D.C. and E.H.T. operation. Wage 
32s. 6d. plus 20s. plus 123%. 

Write, stating age and experience, to THE ENGINEER AND 
MANAGER, West Ham Corporation Electric Supply, 84; Romford 
Road, Stratford, E. 15. 2217 








QUEEN MARY’S MILITARY HOSPITAL (COUNTY ASLYLUM) WHALLEY. 


Ww* TED Shift Engineey for the above Institution ; experience 
with high-speed engines, D.C. three-wire system and battery, 
Wages £3 10s. per week of seven 8-hour shifts, inclusive of bonus. 
Applications, stating age and qualifications, must be sent in 
immediately to 


THE CLERK AND STEWARD, 
Queen Mary's Military Hospital, 
Whalley, near Blackburn. 
July 30th, 1918, 2225 





JUNIOR SHIFT ENGINEER. 


HE CREWE CORPORATION invite applications for the position 

of Junior Shift Engineer.. Preference given to applicants 

with experience in D.C. 3-wire Central Station work. Applications 

giving full particulars and stating wages required, together with 
copies of not more than two testimonials, to be sent to— 
THE BOROUGH ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, 

Electricity Works, 
Crewe. 2275 





JUNIOR ASSISTANT ENGINEER. 
UNIOR ASSISTANT ENGINEER required in H.T. A.c. single- 
e phase station (Certified Undertaking). Must be fully qualified 
with mechanical and electrical experience. Wages £3 10s., plus £1 
and 12}%. Seven 8-hour shifts per week. 

Applications, stating age and experience, to CHIEF ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEER, Corporation Electricity Works, Wimbledon,-S.W. 19. 
2277 





FITTER. 
e ELT eye eS 
JITTER, good general all-round man wanted at once, used to 
central station work, electrical and mechanical. Good per- 
manent situation to suitable man. 
Apply stating age, experience, and enclosing copies only of recent 
testimonials, to ENGINEER, 27, Osborn Street, Whitechapel, E. 1. 
2279 





ASSISTANT SHIFT ENGINEER. 


SSISTANT SHIFT ENGINEER wanted. Must have had 
mechanica| training and experience of E.H.T. power station. 
Wages, incluling bonus, 68s. 3d. per week. 
Apply, giving full particulars, to 8. J. Watson, Electricity 
Works, Bury. 2283 





SHIFT ENGINEER. 

Y HIFT ENGINEER wanted for power station near London ; must 

h have had experience with turbines and E.H.T. 3-phase plant. 
Wages £3 7s. plus 12% per week. 

Apply stating age and experience, with copies of recent testi- 

monials, to the CHIEF ENGINEER, Electricity Works, Luton. 2288 








CHARGE ENGINEER. 





HARGE ENGINEER wanted for combined A.c. and D.c. station. 
—Apply, stating experience, with copies of testimonials and 
salary required, BokoUGH ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, Electricity 
Works, Dover. 2274 





Cheap prepaid Advertisements are mserted under this heading at the rate 
of One Penny Per Word (minimum 1s.). Three Consecutive Insertions for 
the price of two, if ordered and prepaid with first insertion. ‘ 

Box Number and Exectrica, Review address count as seven wo! 





RMATURE Winder.—Good improver required with knowledge 

of A.c. and D.C. repairs for Stratford works. Good wages 

and prospects for suitable man. No person resident more than 1¢ 
miles away, or already on Government work, will be engaged.— 
Apply, JAMEs Evans & Co., Gibbins Road, Stratford. 2269 





RMATURE Winders, used to repair shop, D.c. work. No 
person resident more than 10 miles away, or already on 
Government work, will be engaged.—Apply H. D. & S., 32, New- 
ington Causeway, 8.E. 1686 





Fg Engineer wanted with car-shed experience and 
preferably with knowledge of power station and mains 
work. Wages 55s. weekly with 25s. weekly war bonus.—Apply, 
stating age, medical category, previous experience and references, 
to Tae CHATHAM & District Ligut RAILWways Co., Tramway 
Power Station, Chatham. 2273 








OURNEMOUTH. Man wanted to take charge of Generating 
Plant in general departmental store. Must be accustomed to 

gas engines, and with knowledge of electric wiring preferred. 
Permanent, progressive position, discharged man (navy) preferred. 
—Apply MAnaGine Director, Bright’s, Ltd., Bournemouth. 5171 





(Continued on next page.) 


























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August 9, 1948.) 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 3 





SITUATIONS VACANT.—Continued. 









SITUATIONS VACANT.— Continued. 





APABLE Test Rodm Assistant wanted. Experience with con- 
tactor gear an advantage but not essential, good prospects if 
suitable. No person already on Government work will be engaged. 
—Apply, giving full particulars of experience and wages required, 

to your nearest EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE, mentioning No. A5824. 
2265 


HARGE Seaheied (Junior) wanted, D.c. an A.c. Certified 

Undertaking, to take light shifts and train for heavy. Pay 

£3 weekly, including all bonuses to date,—Apply with full 

particulars, age, training and experience, to 2194, ELECTRICAL 
Review, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


HARGE Engineer wanted for combined A.c. and D.c. station in 
Scotland.—Apply stating age, experience and wage required, 
to 2166, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 








HIEF of “Technical Department required to institute and 
supervise same. ‘One able to conduct metallurgical and 
electro-magnetic investigations, tests on magnetos and telephones, 
including analyses of raw materials ; B.Sc. preferred. Good salary 
to suitable applicant ; permanency. For work of urgent national: 
importance. No person residing more than 10 miles away, or 
already engaged on Government work, need write, to Box 702, 
Sells, Ltd., 168, Fleet Street, E.C. 4. 2278 


OUNTRY house (Kent). — Men wanted ‘* once “to work 

occasionally two small Crossley oil engines (pumping and 

electric light) and to work in garden. Cottage provided.—5253, 
ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 








RAUGHTSMAN required, preferably experienced in L.T. 
switchboard work and accessories ; Birmingham district. No 
one already on Government work will be considered.— Apply, 
stating fully, experience, age, and salary required, to nearest 
EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE, quoting No. A5790. 5215 





LECTRIC Motor Mechanic, experienced in repairs to small 
motors; permanent progressive job for the right man. 
State age, experience and wages required. No person resident 
more than 10 miles away, or already on Government work, will be 
engaged.—2256, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 
s 





)\LECTRICAL Fitter wanted for Generating Works. Preference 

given to man who has had previous experieuce on high- 

tension work. .Inclusive wage 66s. 4d. for 53-hour week.—2132, 
ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





LECTRICIAN. (ineligible or discharged), eapeble of snaking 
‘4 general electrical repairs and inspections to lifts. Liverpool 
district.—Write full particulars to Box “8 615,” Lez & NIGHTIN- 
GALE, Liverpool. 2276 
LECTRICIAN required to take charge of, and run small plant 
‘4 consisting of water-power turbines and auxiliary oil engine. 
To carry out installations and repairs.—Apply, stating age and 
wages required, to SECRETARY, Dulverton Electric Lighting Co., 
Ltd., Dulverton, Somerset. 5182 


) STIMATING Engineer required immedialely for control gear 

‘4 sales department, electric engineering work. South coast.— 
Apply, stating age, qualifications, and salary required, to 2213, 
ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 








XPERIENCED Foreman or Forewoman required to take charge 

of flashing and mounting department, carbon filaments. No 

person resident more than 10 miles away, or already on Govern- 

ment work, will be engaged.—9728, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate 
Hill, London. 


OREWOMAN or Feoiend to take charge of and develop 
Winding Shop for small Motors in London. Experience 
essential. First rate opening, permanency, good wages. No person 
resident more than 10 miles away, or already on Government work, 
will be engaged. — 2282, ELEcTRICAL Review, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London. 
‘ ENERAL Manager required by well-established électrical con- 
tractors in Midlands, chiefly engaged at present on war 
work ; must be experieficed in estimating power, light, telephone 
contracts, also handling men.—Full particulars, age, experience, 
and salary required, to WM. Irons, Solicitor, St. James Street, 
Sheffield. 5196 











YO9D Wireman pe, iad to maintenance, lights, tele- 
phones, &c. No person resident more than 10 miles away, 

or already on Government work, will be engaged.—Apply House 
ENGINEER, G.E. Co., 67, Queen Victoria Street, E.C. 2280 





MPROVER required in Corporation Generation Station ; applicants 
to be ineligible for military service or in a low medical category. 
—Apply, stating age, experience, and wages required, to 2252, ELEc- 
TRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ladgate | Hill, London. 
UNIOR Assistant Electrical “Qaginess, “with good theoretical 
and some mechanical training. Opportunity to gain good 
general experience.—Apply stating age, experience, salary required, 
testimonials and form of military exemption, ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEER, Electricity Works, Grays, Essex. 5254 











ESIDENT Engineer wanted, rotary sub-station. Experience 

of mains, meters, &c., essential.—Apply, stating full par- 

ticulars and salary required, to 2259, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, 
Ludgate Hill, London. 








HIFT Engineer.—Shift Engineer wanted for c.c. station ; steam 
and Diesel engines.—Apply, stating experiences with copies of 
testimonials, and state wages required, to the MANAGER, Wycombe 
(Borough) Electric Light’& Power Co., Ltd., Lily’s Walk, High 
Wycombe. 5257 





HIFT Engineer wanted in State Controlled catia. to 
take charge of alternate day and night shift. Diesel and gas 
engines, D.c. plant. Only men not engaged on Government work, 
and free from military service, also thoroughly experienced, need 
apply.—Applications, giving full particulars, to be made to your 
nearest EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE, mentioning No. A5483. 2226 


gg sera ew and Substation Attendant wanted for large 
Power Station and Battery Substations; experienced with 
3-wire D.C. system with batteries and boosters and also preferably 
with A.c. plant and rotary converters. Good wages with war 
bonus per week of seven 8-hour shifts, plus 124 %. No person 
already employed on Government work will he engaged.—Apply 
your nearest EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE, giving full particulars 
of training and experience and stating military category, and 
mentioning No. A5819. 2214 





WITCHBOARD Attendant required for three-wire D.c. station. 


—Apply, stating age, full particulars of experience, and wages 
required, to 2250, ELECTRICAL , 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





Shea Assistant, with technical levontsthis and experience of 
D.c. and A.C. machines. No person resident more than 
10 miles away, or already on Government work, will be engaged.— 
Write SUBMERSIBLE Motors, LTD., Southall, Middlesex. 5263 


ANTED, at once, Fitter-Driver in country supply station. 

Gas and oil engines. Wages, inclusive of bonus, £3 per 
week.—Applications, stating experience and enclosing copies of 
testimonials, to ENGINEER, Electricity Works, Ascot, Berks. 5268 





\ \ J ANTED at once for London station, Shift Engineer ; wages 
to commence £3 15s. to £4 per week, according to ability.— 
2190, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





ANTED, by a firm in the 8.E. district engaged on munition 
work, first-class Telegraph Mechanics. No person resident 
more than 10 miles away, or already engaged on Government 
work, will be engaged.—State age and experience to 6125, 
ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 
ANTED, by leading engineering insurance company, Elec- 
trical Surveyors, having good knowledge of the theory and 
practice of alternating and direct-current plant.—Applicants must 


‘be ineligible for the Army or Navy.—2181, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 


4, Ludgate Hill, London. 
ANTED, Car Shed Fitter for night utes Carry out small 
repairs and adjust brakes, rate Is. 3d, per hour. Hours 
average 65 per week. Also Overhead Linesman, rate Is. 3d. per 
hour. — Apply stating age, experience, giving references, to 
MANAGER, Mexbro’ & Swinton Tramways Co.. Dale Road, Raw- 
marsh. 2267 
ANTED, General Assistant to Works Manager in an old- 
established electric lamp factory. Good opening and pro- 
gressive salary. No person already on Government work will be 
engaged.—Apply your nearest EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE, mentioning 
No. A5667. 2037 


BS agg ee man (ineligible) to take charge of electric lighting 

and pumping plant on estate in Berkshire.—Apply stating 
experience, wages, references, &c., to 5154, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


W28tEP on a Scottish Power Sinden (Certified Undertaking), 
a Shift Engineer with good mechanical and electrical 
training. Good wages toa man thoroughly experienced in F£.H.T. 
8-phase work and boiler house control.—Reply giving full par- 
ticulars, with copies of references,‘to 1975, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Lndgate Hiil, London. 
ANTED, Overhead Linesman uinansl to tramway work, 
ineligible for military service. Good wages. — Apply 
GENERAL MANAGER, Tramway Depot, Greenock, N.B. 2198 














ANTED, Switchboard Engineer (ineligible), accustomed to 
3-phase low-tension Turbo-generators, for works power 
station, Glasgow district. Wages slightly higher than standard 
rates.—Apply giving age, experience and full particulars, to 2271, 
ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





ANTED, Working Foreman, experienced in alternating, 
single, three-phase and 500-volt tramway current, also 
thoroughly experienced in maintenance work, electric lighting and 
power motors. Permanent situation to qualified and capable man. 
Apply with references. No person already on Government work 
will be engaged.—Apply your nearest EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE, 
mentioning No. A5767. 5178 


TREMAN wanted, permanency to competent man.—THE 
ALBANY WARD THEATRE Circuit, Guildhall Chambers, 
Weymouth. 5258 





"(Continued on next page.) 




















THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 


(August ‘9, 1948, 








SITUATIONS WANTED. 


Cheap prepaid Advertisements are incerted under this heading at the rate 
of One Penny Per Word (minimum 1s.). Three Consecutive Insertions for 
the price of two, i* ordered and prepaid with first insertion, 

Box Number and EvectricaL REVieW address count as seven words, 





DVERTISER, Engineer and Manager to supply undertaking, 
desires change ; 16 years’ central station experience. Good 
organiser and accustomed to the control of men. Commencing 
salary £350 for permanent post.— 5205, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


DVERTISER (34), present head electrician lenge rey main- 
tenance A.c. and D.c., lift, controller, telephone, lighting, 
wants change, with prospects. Good mechanical and civil engi- 
neering experience.—5261, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London. 


SSISTANT Commercial Manager, 14 years’ general supply 

station and contracting experience, desires post progressive 

firm. Ineligible, energetic, highest refs. — 5179, ELECTRICAL 
Review, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 








SSISTANT Engineer desires an appointment ; over 12 years’ 
experience in the generation and distribution of electrical 
energy. —5175, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


LECTRICAL Engineer, A.M.LE.E., desires change, home or 
abroad; 14 years’ practical and technical training in 
mechanical and electrical engineering. Large experience in A.c. 
and p.c. power and lighting, lifts, switchgear, telephones, &c. Oil, 
gas, steam, and petrol engines, also A.C. and D.C. power station ex- 
perience. Layouts of all descriptions, good organiser, capable of 
taking charge of a large factory, and obtaining best efficiencies. 
Only — position will be considered.—5248, ELECTRICAL 
REV IEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 








LECTRICAL Engineer Designer (29) desires change. Good 
technical education ; five years’ works experience ; six years 
commercial and design, D.c. and A.c. machinery. Government 
work in Yorkshire, West Riding, preferred.—5143. ELECTRICAL 
REvIEw, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





LECTRICAL Engineer desires position as Manager to con- 
‘4 tracting firm, many years experience in estimatirg, laying- 
out and supervising, power and lighting installations, good organiser 
and accustomed to controlling men.—5264, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 
LECTRICAL Engineer. Fully qualified i in eousteustion week 
and estimating contracts, &c.—5197, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 

4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


LECTRICAL Engineer, Grade 8, eight years’ practical ex- 
perience, desires management of power station, Certified 
Establishment essential—5251, ELEOTRICAL REview, 4, Ludgate 
Hill, London. < 


LECTRICAL Engineer (34), ineligible, dosine permanent 

responsible post ; thoroughly experienced central station, 

mains and install&tion management; salary round £250.—5193, 
ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London 


LECTRICIAN, light, power, telephones, instal, maintain, 
repairs, seeks job or charge.—JONES, 44, Warwick Road, 
Edmonton. 5210 





7 LECTRICIAN- Jointer (26), D.C., paper, jute, lead, armoured, 

‘4 3 and 4-cored and concentric cables, feeders, motors, lighting, 
‘phones, bells, conduit, casing, 11 years’ experience, desires per- 
manency ; discharged.—HILLIER, Paul Street, Frome, Somerset. 


5192 

K STIMATING Foreman Electrician, 10 years’ in present 
situation, wants change.—" ENGINEER,” 23, Grotto Road, 
Twickenham. 5224 


ADY, with high- -class electrical showroom en, desires 
_4 appointment.— 5252, ELEcTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London. 


ANAGER or-Foreman, Electrician-Engineer ; power, plant 
traction, wiring, distribution, estimating, &c. Over 20 years’ 
experience.—5259, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, i, Ludgate B Hill, London. 





yew pen ARD Attendant, ineligible, experienced in alternating 
and 3-wire D.C. switchboards.—5247, ELECTRICAL REVIEW 
4, , Ludgate Hill, London. 





Yr NG man, discharged army, desires post. Mechanical and 
electrical training, installation and upkeep private plants, 
supply station angerne. —5265, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate 
Hill, London. 








PARTNERSHIPS. 


Cheap prepaid Advertisements are inserted under this heading at the rate 
of One Penny Per Word (minimum 1s.). Three Consecutive Insertions for 
the price of two, if ordered and prepaid with first insertion. 

Box Number and ExecrricaL Review address count as seven words, 





A mnOLD 8 & CO. (Lonpon), Lrp., 143, Cannon Street, E.C., old- 
established Agents, have Engineers with capital wanting 
Partnerships, Directorships, and to purchase equipped works, in all 
parts of the country. No result no charge. Owners open to 
2261 


negotiate should apply for terms: ‘Phone City 7222. 











PARTNERSHIPS.— Continued. 





NGINEERING Works fully equipped producing Electrical 
Accessories, requires additional capital to cope with large 
orders in hand. Prepared to consider any sound proposition, 
including acquisition ; appliances manufactured. universally used ; 
production costs exceptionally good owing to unique designs fully 
patented ; labour obtainable and buildings available for further 
extention. Fullest investigation invited.— 5202, ELscTRICAL 
REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





AGENCIES. 


Cheap prepaid Advertisements are inserted under this heading at the rate 
of One Penny Per Word (minimum Is.). 
Box Number and Execrrican Review address count as seven words. 





GENTS wanted with good connections to sell Omega Drawn 
A Wire Lamps.—Apply Omeca LAMpworks, LTp.,‘83,; Merton 


Road, Wimbledon, S.W. 19. 5256 





LECTRICAL Engineer, shortly proceeding to South America, 
would undertake good agency—electrical ae &e. Direct 

touch with shipping and engineering.—Write H.,c/o Streets, 30, 
Cornhill, E.C. 3. 2163 





IRM of manufacturers and suppliers of electric traction. over- 
head line fittings, electrical accessories, moulded electrical 
insulation, and electrical insulating materials, require first-class 
energetic Representatives for following districts :—(1) Yorkshire, 
Lancashire, Cheshire, and North Wales ; (2) Midlands ; (3) South 
Wales ; (4) South of Midlands, excepting London and district ; 
(5) South-east, excluding London and district ; (6) Scotland. This 
organisation is required principally for after-the-war trade.— 
Apply with full particulars as to experience and remuneration to 
2291, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





FOR SALE. 





MACHINERY FOR SALE. 


NE 80-8.P., 400/500-volt, three-phase, slip- ring 50-period Motor, 
1450 R.P.M., fitted with brush-lifting and short-circuiting 

device. QOil- immersed rotary starter and switch case, com- 
prising 3-pole switch, no-volt and overload release, and 
ammeter. 

Two 30-H.P., 480/530-volt, D.c., shunt-interpole Motors, 900 R.P.M. 
complete. 

One 20-H.P., 220-volt, D.c. shunt, totally-enclosed Motor, 900 R.P.m. 
complete. 

One 20-H.P., 200-volt, D.c. compound, interpole Motor, 800 R.P.M. 
complete. 

Two 130-H.P., 200-volt, shunt, 3-pedestal bearing Motors, 300 R.P.M., 
with special switth pillars. 

One 9-Kw., 125-volt, compound Dynamo, 906. R.P.M. 

Two 8-H.P., 200-volt, shunt interpole Motors, 1400 R.P.M. complete. 

Two Cinema Motor Generator Sets. 

THE VICTORIA ELECTRIC PLANT CO., 
Spenser Street, Westminster, S.W. 1. 


’Grams : Vicminster, Sowest, London. 
2179 


*Phone : Victoria 4026. 





FOR SALE, 


, 15, 25, 30-H.P., 440 v., D.c.; 3, 7, 10, 12, 15, 20, 25, 27-H.P., 
440 v., A.c., 2 and 3-phase, 50 periods. Switches, Fuses, 
Starting Gear, Automatic features and Non-automatic. 

Cable from 1/18 to 37/12. Ironclad Mise Distribution Boards, 
with and without circuit switches, Home Office pattern. Power 
Circuit Breakers, 2 and 3-phase, from-100—600 amps. 

Materials and workmanship, the Bast.. Technical advice given 
with quotations if required. ! F 

Your enquiries and deliveries, prompt attention. 


Apply— 
ROBUST MACHINERY, 
62, Bradford Street, 


Walsall. 2264 





EBONITE. 


Bt. 10 cwt., f”’ sheet, good quality, whole 
or part supplied. 
Sample on application. 
SUN ELECTRICAL CO., LTD., 
57/59, Neal Street, W.C. 


2293 





( Continued on nowt page.) 






















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THE ELECTRICAL REYIEW SUPPLEMENT. 








FOR SALE.—Continued. 


FOR SALE.—Continued. 





MACHINERY FOR SALE. 





One 27-H,P., 825 revs, 400/500-volt, B.T.H. 


One 26 _,, 960 _,, we Electromotors, Ltd. 
Six 25 , 670 ,, “ Lancs. Dynamo Co. 
Four 25 ,, 835 _,, ” G.E. Co. 

Four 25° ,, 810 ,, a Siemens. 

One 20 ,, ce G.E. Co. 
One'-f7'... 3900 >, - Electromotors, Ltd. 
One 16 ,, 800 ,, - Morris, Hawkins. 
One Ps 725 ,, ‘ Lancs. Dynamo Co. 
Two ww 1400 , ce Electromotors, Ltd. 
One 5. ,, 950 ,, - G.E. Co. 

Four 5° ,, 815 ,, — e 


Six 1 ” 800 ” ” ”» 
ALL SPEEDS _ON-500 VotTs, DrrEcT CURRENT. 
Three 5-H.P., 1300 revs., 220-volt, D.c. 


Three 1 ,, 1500 ,, ” 
Four 3 ” 1400 ” ” 
Four 23,, 1400 ,, a 
One 15 ,, 900 ,, ‘ 


And numerous Motors for A.c, and D.c. 
Our Own SrTock. 
Full details with prices from— 


Cc. J. FERGUSON & SONS, 
: 54, Chiswell Street, 
London, E.C. 1. 2285 





MACHINERY FOR SALE. 


GENERATING SETS, D.C. 
One 500-TAw. Willans-E:C.C., 420/500 volts. 
Three 256-Kw. Belliss-Siemens, 460/500 volts. 
One 220-Kw. Willans-A.E.G., 220 volts. 
One 200-Kw. Allen-Parker, 460/500 volts. 
One 180-Kw. Anderson-Mavor 220/230-volt Set. 
One 160-Kw. Belliss-G.E.C., 460/500 volts. 


TURBO-GENERATORS, A.C. AND D.C. 


One 1,000-Kw. A.E.G. 500 volts, 50 cycles, 3-phase, with condensing 
plant complete ; the whole equal to new. 
One 500-Kw. Parsons, 460/530 volts, with condensing plant complete. 
Apply, FRANK GILMAN, 
Lightwoods Hill, Birmingham. 2128 





MACHINERY FOR SALE. 


GENERATING SETs. 


WO Siemens 6-pole Generators, 410 v., D.c., 550 amps., 
360 revs., with two Triple-expansibn Engines, 
360 H.P., 360 revs. Will sell separately. 


MoTorRS AND GENERATORS. 
54 Kw., Hall’s, 440 v., D.c., 470 revs. 
75 Kw., E.C.C., 110 v., D.c., 550 revs. 
20 u.P., Brooks, 110 v., D.c., 880 revs. 
15 H.P., Westinghouse, 500 v.. D.c., 650 revs. 
20 #.P., Brooks, 220 v., D.c., direct coupled to 4’’ vertical 
pump, 100 ft. head. 
600 H.P., 8.R., 2000 v., 2-phase, 50 periods, 730 revs. 
31 H.P., 8.C., 500 v., 3-phase, 50 periods, 1440 revs. 
11 B.P.,8.R., 400 v., 3-phase, 50 periods, 960 revs. 


BURY ELECTRICAL PLANT CO., LTD., 
Phenix Street, Bury. 


Grams : “ Electric, Bury.” Phone : 676 Bury. 2185 


: FOR SALE. 


YNAMOS, 100 v., 220 a., 900 revs. (Mather & Platt), compound, 
with spare armature. 
110 v., 50 a., 1.100 revs. (Scott), shunt. . 
500 v., 120 a.,500 revs. (Crompton), 6-pole, interpole single bearing. 
230 v., 65 a., 650 revs. (Brush), 4-pole, compound, single bearing. 
Motor-generator, 230 v. to 65 v., 40 a. (Newton). 
Porthole fan, 24-in., 230 v., 800 revs. 
Three Siemens Mining Switches, double automatic, 300 a., 3-pole. 
“Robey ” Vertical Steam Engine, 10 and 14 xX 9 inch. 
“Gardner,” 14 H.P., Horizontal Oil Engine, with base to take 
belt-driven dynamo. 
Motors, all sizes, A.c. and D.c. 
Switchboards, Cable from 61/12s., Resistances, Carbon Lamps (60 
and 65 v., 32 c.p.), Shades, Meters, &c. Send enquiries. 
MERCIER, 25, Union Street, Liverpool. 2067 


ALE or Hire, Second-hand Machines in Stock, ARMATURES 
and Coils repaired at shortest notice. 


THE TITAN ELECTRICAL ©O., 
9/11, Eagle Street, W.C. 
"Phone: Central 13,191, 








MACHINERY FOR SALE. 


5 -KW. Steam Generating Set, by Scott & Mountain, 

direct coupled to Generator, 500 volts, 100 amps., 
500 revs. 

25-Kw. Steam Generating Set, two crank Comp. Engines, 
direct coupled to two-pole Dynamo, 100 volts, 250 
amps., 450 revs. 

6'5-Kw. Steam Generating Set, by Robey & Co., direct 
coupled to two-pole Dynamo, 130 volts, 50 amps., 
350 revs. 

250-Kw. Steam Generating Sets, by Willans & Robinson, 
direct coupled to Clarke Chapman Dynamo, 115 volts, 
435 amps., 470 revs. 

No. 3 Four-spindle “ Acme” Automatic Screw Machine 
for §’’ bars. 

34” Centres “ Lo-Swing” Lathe on 8’ bed. 

3” by 36” All-geared head Flat Capstan Lathe, by Jones 
and Lamson. 

Cutting-off Machine, by Carter & Wright, take bars to 5’ 
diam. 

6 ft. Arm Portable Electric Radial Drilling Machine, by 
Kendal & Gent, 24’’ spindles, self-act feed. 

Richards Horizontal Oil Groove or Waving Machine, with 
self-act traverse head, self-act feed, T-slotted bed, 
2’ 2” by 2’ 3” 
ATALOGUE of Stock MACHINERY. 2-3000 LOTS. 

Free on Application. Inspection invited. 

THOS. W. WARD, LTD., ALBION WORKS, 

Tel. : “ Forward. Sheffield.” SHEFFIELD. 





R. H. LONGBOTHAM 4&4 CO., LTD., WAKEFIELD, 
and at Milburn House, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 


Tel : { 44 Wakefieli. Telegrams : 
* | 867 Newcastle, “Engineer, Wakefield.” 





FOR SALE. 


NE Parsons Steam Turbo Set, 3500 kw., 1200 R.P.M., 
with alternator field-rotating type and exciter com- 
pletg ; 6000-volt maximum load, 40 cycles. 

One ditto, 1500 Kw., 2-phase, 2000 volts, 50 periods. 

One Willans-Parsons Steam Turbo Set, 1200 Kw., with 
Alternator, 1200 R.P.M., 200 lbs. to sq. in., 11,000 volts, 
three-phase, complete with exciter, also condensing 
plant, air, and circulating water. pumps, &c. 

One Parsons Turbo - Alternator, 300 Kw., two-phase, 2000 
volts, 50 periods. 

One Surface Condenser, 3,400 sq. ft., Cooling Surface, by 
Cole, Marchent & Morley, complete with pumps, &c, 5277 





GENERATOR SWITCHBOARDS. 


| N perfect order and as new :— 


One 100/140-volt, 10-KW. size, with circuit-breaker, &c. 
One 460-volt, 45-kKw. size, with shunt regulator. 
One ditto, with change-over switch, and suitable for two 


generators. 
One Battery Charging Board for 55 cells, 60 amps., by 
Siemens. 
DRUMMOND & CO., Middlesbrough. 5249 





MACHINERY FOR SALE. 
NE Generating Set Comprising :— 

“Howden” Enclosed Compound Engine for 150 Ibs. steam 
pressure, direct-coupled to compound interpole generator, having 
an output of 300 KW. at 240 volts, 375 r.p.m. ; built ip 1910, and in 
first-class order. 

Specification and print on request. 


THE PHCENIX ELECTRICAL CO., 
32—36, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 1943 





CUNNINGHAM, LIMITED. 


MALL Motors and up to 300 'H.P. 
rewound and repaired, 


171, Edgware Road, 
London, W. 2. 


. Estimates free. 
*Phone : “5173 Padd.” 








(Continued on next page.) 








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16 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 





FOR SALE.— Continued. 


FOR SALE.— Continued. 





MACHINERY FOR SALE. 
NE 50-xw. Browett-Silvertowh Generating Set, 500 volts, D.c. 
One 62-Kw. Mirrlees Watson-Bruce Peebles Generating Set, 
500 volts, D.c. 
One 150-Kw. Belliss-Silvertown Generating Set, 220 volts, D.c. 
One 150-Kw, Browett-Mavor & Coulson Generating Set, 250 
volts, D.c. 
Two 150-Kw. Belliss-Bruce Peebles Generating Set, 500 volts, D.c. 
One 220-Kw. Belliss-Silvertown Generating Set, 500 volts, D.c. 


ROBERT WALKER, 
2, Oswald Street, Glasgow. 2286 








MOTORS, SWITCHES AND FUSES AND 
STARTING GEAR. 


.C., 2 and 3-phase, 200 v., 400 v., 50 periods, 5, 7, 10, 
15, 25, 27, 30, 35 HP. 
D.C., 220 v., 440 v., 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 H.P. 
Power Cables, Distribution Fuseboards and Switches. 
Safety Automatic Devices for either A.c. or D.C. circuits, 
Concrete, sound materials and workmanship. 
Guaranteed 18 months. 


“ROBUST MACHINERY,” 62, Bradford Street, Walsall. 2040 


Cheap prepaid Advertisements relating to second-hand goods and specified 
= —: inserted under this heading at the rate of One Penny Per Word 
minimum l1s.), 


TRADE RATES ON APPLICATION. 
Box Number and E.ecrricaL Revisw address count as seven words. 





.C. Motors, 2-phase, 200 v., 50 ~, 2, 4, 6, 74, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50, 

60 H.P.; single-phase Motors, $/10 H.P., 100/200 y.; several 

190-H.P., 3-phase Motors, 500 v., 50 ~ ; Motors, several, 30, 35, 50, 

60, 100 H.P., 3-phase, 50 ~, 400/440-v., cheap.—5275, ELEOTRICAL 
REviEw, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. . 


ABCOCK & Wilcox Boilers, two, each 11,000 lbs. evaporative 

capacity, 200 lbs. steam pressure ; excellent order; available 

immediately.—Full particulars from 5242, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


AMERON Boiler Feed Pump; duplex 5” stroke x 3’ rams gun 
metal, 125 lbs. boiler pressure. Duplex Hydraulic Pump, 
single acting, 1}’’ rams, 9’’ stroke, 125 lbs. boiler pressure. Water 
pressure 800 to 1000 lbs. per square inch.—* Ropust MACHINERY,” 
62, Bradford Street, Walsall. Sad 2130 
ELLULOID Waste for Sale. Two tons inflammable film. Best 


offers wanted.—5271, ELECTRICAL REviEw, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London. 


.C. Generator, 75 v., 70 a, 4-pole, 1,200 revs., compound 
wound, modern pulley, slide rails. Price £55, bargain.— 
5278, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4. Ludgate Hill, London. 

















GAS ENGINES AND ALTERNATOR. 





JOR Sale, 10-B.H.P. Andrews Stockport Gas Engine, two fly-wheels 
and pulley, tube ignition. 

89-B.H.P. Crossley Gas Engine, X.A.E. type, with extra heavy 
fly-wheel, electric lighting engine, magneto ignition. 

142-B.H.P. Crossley Gas Engine, Z.A.E. type, with extra heavy 
fly-wheel, electric lighting engine, magneto ignition. 

One 70-Kw. Elwell-Parker single-phase Alternator, wound for 
110 or 220 volts, with separate exciter. 

Can be seen running. 


CRYSELCO LIMITED, Kempston Works, Bedford. 2107 





TURBO-GENERATOR. 


l 00 -KW. TURBO-GENERATOR, 500 volts, 50 periods, 
5 3-phase, complete with Switchboard, Cables, Sur- 
face Condensing Plant, Piping, and Electrically-Driven Centrifugal 
Pump, together with a quantity of Spare Parts, the whole practically 
new and ready for immediate despatch at Liverpool. 
Apply 
FRANK GILMAN, 
Lightwoods Hill, Birmingham. 2170 





COUNTY BOROUGH OF SALFORD. 


HE Electricity Department have for sale two 1,000-Kw. direct- 
: current Turbo-Generators, Willans disc and drum _ type, 
coupled to Siemens machines, voltage 440-490. Rated output 1,000 
kilowatts, with 160 lbs. steam pressure. The sets are in regular 
commission, practically new, and can be seen in operation, by 
appointment. Full particulars from the BorouGH ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEER, Electricity Works, Frederick Road, Salford. Tenders 
are invited by SATURDAY, AUGuST 17th, 1918. 


L. C. EVANS, Town Clerk. 2266 





MACHINERY FOR SALE. 


HREE 70-n.P. Laurence-Scott Motors, D.c., 220 volts, £20 R.P.M. 


One 50-H.P. - - a we a” 2. 
One 30-H.P. ‘ “a » 220 , 670 ,, 
One 25-H.P. - “ i ae <n  _ 
One 20-H.P, a os “Ee . ue 800, 


With rails and pulleys.» 
ROBERT WALKER, 
2, Oswald Street, 
Glasgow. 2287 





POCKET LAMP BATTERIES. 


200 STANDARD Pocket Lamp Batteries, 3-cell, 
job line. Also 3000 P.L. Cases, assorted, 
and 500 “Penlite” Cases, Can-be inspected. 


2292, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C. 4. 





ELECTRIC DYNAMOS AND MOTORS. 


ACHINES always available for Sale or hire, 
ARMATURES and FIELD COILS 
rewound or repaired without delay. 
Phone: MACDONALD, SYER & CO., Lp., 
6773 Holborn, 295, Gray's Inn Road, WS. 1, 8485 








.C. Motors, 230-v., 4, 3, 3, 1, 14, 2; 3, 4, 5, 8, 20, 30 H.P.; 

Motors, 460 v., 1, 34, 5, 6, 10, 18, 30 H.p.; Motors, 110 v., 

4, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 20, 25, 70, 100 Hyp.—5274, ELECTRICAL 
REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


.C. Starters, to 150 H-P., in all sizes; Shunt Regulators 

Voltmeters, Ammeters, Ohmmeter and Generator, 500 v' 

Slide Potentiometer; 4-H.P., 200-v., 100 ~, single-phase Motor’ 

£8 10s.; brand new enclosed }-H.P., 230-v. Motor, shunt, £10 10s" 
—5276, ELEcoTRIOAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill. London. 


SP ey 200/250 v., 21, 60, 100, 450, 650 amps. ; Dynamos, 

110 v., 12, 18, 26, 30, 40, 50. 60, 70, 90, 100, 125, 520, 950 
amps. Several 60/80 v., 60/100 amps.—5272, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. = 


YNAMOS, 3000, 1500, 1000 and 750 amperes at 6 volte; also 
smaller sizes. Apply for lists.—CANNING & Co., Electro- 
Platers Engineers, Birmingham. : 7769 


;\LECTRIC Motors and Dynamos, Sale or Hire. Always a large 
‘4 stock of nearly new guaranteed machines. Immediate 
delivery.—ELECTRO-GENERATOR Co., 14, Shepherd's Bush Road, 
W. ’Phone: 488 Hammersmith. 4723 
‘LLECTRIC Vehicles. Four three-wheel Vans, motor fitted in the 
4 front wheel, all with solid rubber tyres, one fitted with 
batteries. Cheap for quick sale-——-Hyams, 11, Glengall Terrace, 
Old Kent Road, S.E. 5156 


OR Disposal, 50 Glass Boxes, 8’ x 15’’ x 18” deep outside ; 
also glass tube Separators 13’ long, };’' diameter. What 
offers )—2258, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 
OR Sale, eight 20-H.P., 500-volt, totally-enclosed Crane Motors. 
_Cheap.—PuHa@nix, 32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 2233 

















YOR Sale, House Lighting Plant (100-volt D.c.), consisting of :— 
Hornsby Akroyd Oil Engine, complete with water and fuel 
tanks, connecting pipes, &c. Engine, direct-coupled to 4°5 Kw. 
Dynamo (Mavor & Coulson 150 volts, 30 amps.), also 53-Cell 
Tudor V, 7 Accumulator, 144 ampere-hours capacity and main 
switchboard. Plant in first-class condition. Can be seen by 
arrangement in Edinburgh district. Purchaser must dismantle and 
remove.—Offers to STEVENSON & McGurriE, 163, Hope Street, 
Glasgow. 5245 








;YOR Sale or Hire, 36 D.c. Motors ‘and 13 A.c. Motors. Par- 
ticulars on request.—E. P. ALLAM & Co., 107, Gray’s Inn 
Road, W.C.1. Holborn 1280. __ ___2219 


OR Sale, owing to extension and re-arrangement of power 

plant, a nearly new 600-KW., 460-volt, generating set by 

Westinghouse. Plant can be seen under steam up till end of 
August.—2242, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


i ee Sale, second-hand 400-volt, 50-period, 3-phase Motors, 25, 
30, 40 and 60 H.P., complete. with starting gear—PHCNIX, 
32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 2236 


OR Sale, Traction Booster, comprising: ~218-H.P., 440-H.P. 

motor, coupled to 150-K.w., 550-volt generator. Makers : 

Brush Electrical Engineering Co., Ltd. Little used.—2242, ELEc- 
TRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


OR Sale, Transformer, 440 volts, 50 periods, 3-phase, to 100 volts, 
170 amperes, single-phase. £27.—PHaNIx, 32, Broomielaw, 
Glasgow. 2234 














OR Sale, two 50-Kw., 230-volt, multipolar, shunt-wound 
Generators or Motors.—PHENIX, 32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 
. 2241 


OR Sale, two 200-amp. new D.P., LcC.,'C.0. Switches; a few 
D.P., 15-amp., 3 and 5-way Dist. Boards, H.O. pattern ; a few 
Coils ; 3/228 wire-armoured C.M.A. 2500 Wire; 110 yards 61/22s 
corded trailing Cable.—2268, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London. 








(Continued on newt page.) 


[August 9, 1918, — 











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August 9, 1948.) 





THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 17 





FOR SALE.—Continued. 





OR Sale, 15-H.P., 400-volt, 50-period, 3-phase, squirrel-cage 
Motor, with spur reduction gear, having a ratio of 4 to 1, 
complete with starter,—PHa@NIX, 32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 2237 
JOR Sale, 50-amp. B.T.H. Controller, 3-phase, as new ; quantity 
of Empire Tapes and Cloths; odd Iengths of pD.c.c. Wire, 
various sizes.—5270, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 
JOR Sale, 140-H.P., 440-volt, 40-period, 245 R.P.M., 3-phase, 
slip-ring, 2-bearing Motor. Complete with starter,—PHENIXx, 

32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 2240 
OR Sale, 140-Kw., 550-volt, 400 R.P.M., 6-pole, compound, single- 
bearing Generator, by Siemens. £350. — PH@NIX, 32, 
Broomielaw, Glasgow. __ 2239 


JOR Sale, 150-H.P., 440-volt, 50-period, 285 R.P.M., 3-phase, slip- 
ring type Motor, with starter. In new condition.—PH@NIX, 

















32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. . 2235 
OR Sale, 220-H.P., 460-volt, 230 R.P.M., 6-pole, shunt-wound 
Motor.—PHeENIX, 32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 2238 





OR Sale, 3,000-volt Meter, complete with potential transformer, 
3,500 v. to 100 v., 50 ~ ; new. Also Ammeter, 0 to 100, 
with current transformer.—5269, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate 
Hill, London. E 
Y ENERATOR, B.T.H., 27} Kw., 250 volts, 850°R.P.a., with 
switchboard, —MARTINS, 320, “Witton Road, Birmingham. 
5232 


rOTOR- Genensber in Seh-lien ‘enition, having Motor 480 
ps volts, D.c., and Generator, 60 volts, 50 amps., 1,300 R.P.M., 
complete with starter and regulator.—2200, ELEcTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


OS 200-Kw. Steam Generating Set for immediate sale, Willans- 
Mather & Platt, 220 or 440 volts. Perfect working con- 
dition. JENNINGS, West Walls, Newcastle-on-Tyne. ___ 1518 


ETROL Set, 70 v., 80a., Crypto; Motor-Generator, 220 v. to 

70 v., 80 a.; ditto, 480 v. to 60 v., 80a. ; ditto, 440 v., 2-phase, 

50 ~, to 100 v., 20 a.; ditto, 220 v., single-phase, 50/60 ~, to 60 v., 
60 a.; ditto, 110 v., 60 ~, single-phase, to 85 v., 35 a.; ditto, 
100/200 v., single-phase, to 60 v., 10a. Cheap.—5277, ELECTRICAL 
REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. . 


LATING Dynamos, 50, 100, 200, 2500 amps.; immediate 
delivery. — 5273, ELECTRICAL REviEw, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London. 








i OTARY Converter, 5 Kw., 440,volt, D.c.; 295 volt, a.c. Single- 
.U phase, 1350 revs. Perfect condition—JamEs SIMMONDS 
AND Co., 1914, Lrp., Newhampton Road, Wolverhampton. ~ 2222 


HREE new 12-volt, 40-amp. Accumulator Sets in teak cases ; 
high-class make, never been charged ; pair would make 
excellent 25-volt lighting set; £4 12s..6d. set. 8-volt ditto, 
£3 12s.6d. Approval willingly.—105, Loyd Road, Northampton. 
5211 


WO Tachometers, 150-1000 revs. (Schaeffer & Budenberg) ; 
perfect condition.—PHoTECcTOR Co., Central Hall, Southall. 

5255 

tla 250-KW. Belliss Alternator Sets, each comprising a Com- 
pound Enclosed Engine, with E.C.C. Alternator, 3000 volts, 

50 periods ; quite modern, and for immediate delivery. —_Harry H. 

GARDAM & Oo., LTD., Staines. 1852 


-inch Gwynne Centrifugal Pump, direct coupled to 17-H.P., 
460-volt, shunt Westinghouse Motor, with control panel, 
only used short while ; condition perfect. — —DrRuMMOND & Co., 
Middlesbrough. 5189 


l l “beg 75-amp. bi-polar Dynamo by Scott & Mountain. 
In perfect running order.—DrumMonD & Co., Middles- 
: 5216 


brough. 

l 7 -H.P., 500-volt, 50-period, 290-R.P.M., 3-phase, slip-ring 
type Motor, with liquid starter. £420.—PHa@nrIx, 32, 

Broomielaw, Glasgow. 2230 


20 -K.V.A. Generator, 3-phase, 500 volts, 50 cycles, 333 R.P.M. ; 

50-H.P. Slip-ring Motor, 720 revs., 200 volts, 50 cycles, 
2-phase ; 45-H.P. Squirrel-cage Motor, 720 revs., 400 volts, 50 cycles, 
3-phase.—HERCULES ENGINEERING Co., LtD., Charmouth Street, 
Leeds. 2255 


300: , 230/250-volt, Steam Set ; Howden engine, coupled 
to compound interpole generator. New 1910.— 
PHENIX, 32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 2232 


50 QO: 440/500-volt, 150-R.P.M., compound interpole, four, 
bearing Motor, with rope pulley and elaborate control 
gear, 2231 
50 -KW. Steam Generating Set, comprising a Belliss ti triple- 
expansion engine, coupled to an alternator by the Electric 
Construction Co., Wolverhampton, 3000 volts, 50 periods, with 
W heeler- Worthington independent surface condensing plant ; 
modern plant in first-class condition, and for immediate delivery. 
—Harry H. Garpam & Co., Lrp., Staines. 1851 


500=*. Sem Steam Set, comprising triple-expansion enclosed 
engine, coupled to Westinghouse multipolar generator, 
440/490 yolts, p.c. For prompt delivery—Harry H. GARDAM 
AND Co., Lrp., Staines. 1413 


60 Ca - 


#1 fully paid Shares in the Enfield Electric Cable 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


























Nearly new.—PHeEniIx, 32, Broomielaw, Glasgow. 





Mfg. Co., Ltd., for sale.—2254, ELEOTRICAL REVIEW, 












BUSINESSES FOR SALE AND WANTED. 


Cheap prepaid Advertisements are mserted under this heading at the rate 
of One Penny Per Word (minimum 1s.). Three Consecutive Insertions for 
the price of two, if ordered and prepaid with first insertion. 

Box Number and Etecrrica, Review address count as seven words, 





J,OR Sale, through the proprietor leaving London. Splendid 
shop and workshop, with stock of materials for electric and 

gas installations. Price very moderate.—Apply or write to “1.C., 
Contractor, 46, Newman Street, Oxford Street, W. 1 5260 





ARTICLES WANTED. 


Cheap prepaid Advertisements are inserted under this heading at the rate 
of One Penny Per Word (minimum 1s.). 
x Number and Execrrica, Review address count as seven words, 





CCUMULATORS wanted for refining purposes. Obsolete 
Generating Sets, Dynamos, Motors, and all kinds of 
Machinery. Scrap Cable, Arc Lamps, Meters, Metal Residues, and 
Scrap Metals of every description purchased for prompt cash, town 
or country.—Apply A. Brown & Sons, 142, Lower Clapton Road, 
London, N.E, Telephone: Dalston, 555, Telegrams : Secondhand, 
Lowclap, London. Established 1860. ___ 4358 


C. and p.c. Motors (second- hand), ¢ any y type, any condition, 
. wanted for prompt cash.—A, LEAROYD & Son, Bridge Works, 
Heatherley Street, Clapton, N.E. 4765 


LEAROYD & SON, Bridge Works, Clapton, N.E.—Telephone 
Dalston, 2278 ; Telegrams: Frangible, Lowclap, London— 

buys for prompt cash every description of second-hand Generating 
Sets, Accumulators, Motors, Transformers, old Arc Lamps, Meters, 
Cable, Scrap Metals, Metallic Drosses, &c., &c, Enquiries solicited. 
Established over 50 years. — 4766 


1 CASH Prices given for Electrig Cable, Flexible’ Wire, Electrical 
_Accessories, &e.—Apply Davis, 11, Sun Street, E.C.2. 1424 


cCCUMU LATORS, one set fot 100 volts, suitable for 100 
20-watt lamps, second-hand or new.—5166, ELECTRICAL 
REvieEw, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


LL for Munition purposes. —Obsolete Motors, Dynamos, Insu- 
lated Cable, and every description of Electrical Plant bought 

to break up. Send us your stocks of scrap metals.—G. H. CHAPPELL 
Sons & Co. Midland Wharves, Lea Bridge Road, Leyton, N.E. 
"Phone :— :—Walthamstow 500. Estab. 40 years. _4707 


D Wes 40 amps., .220 volts, 2-pole, in good condition.— 
WENMAN, Bishop's Castle. _ 5246 


YNAMOS, -Motors, Arc Lamps, Meters, Scrap Cable, Iron, 
Metals or Machinery purchased for cash in any quantities.— 

J. Hyams, 11, Glengall Terrace, Old Kent Road, 8.E. Telephone : 
3339 Hop. 5158 


ODERN Dynamo, 110. v., 75/100 amps., "with pulley, slide 
aN rails, and suitable panel. Perfect condition.—Full par- 
ticulars to 5267, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 

OTOR-Generator, comprising 200-volt, 50-cycle, single-phase 

Motor (slip-ring), coupled to 70-volt, 80-100 amp, Dynamo.— 
2289, ELEOTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. __ 


460-volt, Motor, coupled to 
Complete.—2290, ELECTRI- 











OTOR-Generator, direct-current, 
150-200 amp., 70-volt Dynamo. 
CAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


IL-driven Electric Light Plant wanted 100 or 50 volts with 
battery complete, about 200 to 300 ampere-hours capacity.— 
5169, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


LD Cable urgently required, also Lamp Tops,— WALLACE, 
Cromwell House, High Holborn. 4114 


LD Electric Lamps that have had wire-drawn tungsten filaments 
in them with is 188 — intact, 14d. each, any make.—104, 
Craven Park, London, N.W. 10 5049 


LD Electric Laine that have had wire-drawn Snninibe n filaments 
in them previously wanted, glass parts intact. Agent's price 
2d, each.—847, Harrow Road, London, N.W. 10. 4932 


LATINUM, in any form and quantity, purchased at highest 
_ prices by Dery & Co.. LTp.. 44, Clerkenwell] Road, London. 


LATINUM Scrap purchased in large or small quantities. 
Highest market value given.—Before selling elsewhere call or 

post to the old and reliable firm, Tak Depdér, 156, Charing Cross 
Road, London. Established 1850. 5199 


RIVATE Plant, with or without meter, capable of running off 
town gas, 50/70-volt dynamo, 20 amps., 27 good class cells, 
switchboard complete.—Send particulars, price and capacity of 
battery, to G. E. Broape, 15, Lichfield Road, Stafford. _ 5244 


PARE Armature wanted for Stevens & Barker 10-H.P., 460-volt 
motor. Bi-polar open-type machine, plain drum armature, 

core length 8”, wound diameter 8)". commutator diameter 4” to 5”, 
face 34”, bearings 1}”, overall length of shaft 3 ft. Anold scrapped 
armature that could be adapted and rewound would suit.— 
MarpsTone & District LAUNDRY, Loose Road, Maidstone. 2263 


TEEL Tubes, all sorts, wanted ; Lampholders and Metal and 

















Cardboard Shades; Gas Lighters, Static Electric ; Screws, 
round head, and Hexagon Nuts.—Du«GpILLs, Failsworth, Man- 
chester. 5052 





ANTED, a few - 400-volt, 50-cyele, 3- phase Motors, preferably 
alip-ring type, 5 to 35 H.P.—8133, ELEoTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 





(Continued on next page.) 











\ 








18 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 


[august 8, 1948, 











ARTICLES WANTED.—(Coniinued. 





\ \ J ANTED. Battery, 54 cells, 230 ampere-hours capacity, shunt- 

wound Generator, 140 to 145 volts, 22 amps., for accumulator 
charging —W. A. Meapows & Co., Ltp., Percy Street, Hanley. 
Staffs. 5243 


ANTED, Berry's Patent Transformer, 3-phase, 200-K.v.A. 
Primary 5,000 volts. periods 25. secondary 440 volts, amps. 262. 
Oil cooled.—5229, ELEcTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill. London. — 


ANTED, for direct-coupling to high-speed steam engine, 500 

revolutions, 30/40 kw. Generator, any standard voltage, but 

preferably 220 p.c.—Reply, stating maker, price and full details, 
to 1639, Miv-eerremart. Review, 4. Tndgate Hill. London. 


ANTED, Generating Sets, all sizes, Boilers, Accumulators, 
Dynamos, &c., for export: also Scrap Cable and Metals, 
Complete plants purchased.—WILLIAMs & Sons 37, Queen Victoria 
Street. London. Telephone : 3938 City. 7000 


War. Imperial Vacuum Cleaner for 100-volt circuit ; shunt 

Dynamo, 70 v. 15-20 a.; Crawley Automatic Switch for 
27 cells; small Accumulator Switchboard for 15 a. 50 v.— 
E. PowELL, Ltd., Tunbridge Wells. 5164 


ANTED, one compound high-speed vertical Steam Engine, 
direct coupled to alternating current, three-phase Generator, 

50 cycles, 220 volt, and exclusive of exciter ; engine to be suitable for 
steam pressure of 100 to 150 lb. ; output required 120 to 130 Kw. ; 
set must be complete with all accessories, and absolutely first-class 
condition and make. State maker, date, and full particulars of 
plant, also price f.o.r.—2229, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London. ; Mah 
ANTED, second-hand Charging Dynamo, 50/75 volts, 10 amps., 
shunt regulator and rails, 27 cells suitable-—WARING’S 
ELECTRICAL DeEpt.. 164, Oxford Street, W. 1. 5250 


ANTED, two a.c. Motors, 110° volts, 60 periodicity, 20/30 
H.P., single phase.— Particulars to CRYSELCO LIMITED, 
Kempston Works, Bedford. 1826 


ANTED, two Babcock & Wilcox water-tube Boilers, about 

1000 sq. ft. heating surface each, 150 lb. working pressure, 

complete with fittings and mountings, preferably Hopkinson make ; 

must be in first-class condition and available immediate delivery. 

Full particulars required, also price f.o.r.—2228, ELECTRICAL 
REvIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


ages a vertical compound high-speed Engine, 80/100 #.P., 

enclosed, self-lubricating type, by well-known maker pre- 
ferred. Send price and full details, to 1638, ELECTRICAL REVIEW, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


ANTED, 20-8.H.P. Motor, 480 volts, ~1,000 R.P.M., shunt- 
VY __wound.—NEALE & FREUND, 31, Budge Row. E.C. 4. _2262 
ANTED, 150-Kw., 220-v. Generating Set: 30’ x 8’ Boiler 
5-ton Travelling Crane, electric preferred; two 50-H P., 
220-volt Motors.—MARTINS, 320, Witton Road, Birmingham. 5103 


K 0 -Volt Megger or Metrohin Set, good condition.—JAMES 
9) SrmMonDs & Co. (1914), Ltd., Newhampton Road, Wolver- 
hampton. 2223 


WORKSHOPS, PREMISES AND SITES 
TO LET OR WANTED. 
































O Let, four good rooms (self-contained) on fourth floor of 
building, on Ludgate Hill; electric light, lavatory, &c.— 
Apply to PUBLISHER, ELECTRICAL REviEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.C. 4, 4522 





MISCELLANEOUS. 





ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS. 


“LEASE NOTE— 
We are Telephone Faultfinders and Repairers to 
the TRADE. 
Write us and you have telephone experts at your 
service, 
THE BALDING ELECTRICAL REPAIRING. CO. 
Office : 34, Harberton Road, London, N. 19. 5165 





MANUFACTURING FACILITIES WANTED. 


A WELL-Known Firm of Electrical and Mechanical Engineers 
are desirous of acquiring by purchase or amalgamation 
further manufacturing facilities. 
The work is mostly high grade Electric Motors with mechanical 
adjuncts for which the demand is very large.—Fullest particulars 
to F. Stuart CLARK, 85, Gresham Street, E.C. 2. 5266 





Cheap prepaid Advertisements are inserted under this heading at the rate 
of One Penny Per Word (minimum 1s.). Three Consecutive Insertions for 
the price of two, if ordered and prepaid with first insertion, 

Box Number and Execrrica. Review address count as seven words, 





A RC Lamps and Telephone Instruments repaired at reasonable 
cost.—Send to Lister, 94, Hudderstield Road, Stalybridge. 
5200 


— 





“| have always reckoned 
‘Z’° Lamps about the 
best which I have 
handled for some time, 
and will endeavour to push 


same wherever | am.” 


Extract from an unsolicited letter 
from an Electrical Contractor. 














This is sound proof that. the 
quality of British - Made “Z” 
Drawn Wire Lamps is _ being 
maintained. Whatever happens 
we shall continue to use the 
greatest care in the manufacture 
of “ Z’s” as we have done in the 
past. “Quality and Uniformity ”’ 


will remain our watchword: 





LIST AND TRADE 


TERMS ON REQUEST. 


The “Z” ELECTRIC LAMP Mfg. Co., 


LTD., 


Sales Office and Works: 
SOUTHFIELDS, LONDON, S.W. 18. 


DEPOTS : 


BIRMINGHAM—8, CHURCH ST., COLMORE ROW. 
DUBLIN—5, SOUTH ANNE STRBET. 
NEWCASTLE~—MILBURN HOUSE 

MANCHESTER—60, LONG MILLGATE. ? 
GLASGOW—40, WEST CAMPBELL STREET. 
BRISTOL—59, VICTORIA STREET, 























(DE 





One 





Roll 
No 


Cor 


Oxy 




















2 





= Angast 9, 1948.) 




















“LAZILITE” TELEPHONE ARM. 


{Manufactured under Letters Patent 4491-11.) 


AN INDISPENSABLE adjunct to every well equipped and up-to-date 
office. It has the-following advantages :— 


Telephone always in the one place when out of use at will. 





ze anywhere within a radius of 42 ins. when in use. 





tty a0 am 


elevated away from the paper when in use or out 





of .use. 


— —_ ——— 





nepali eR . 





a 








ee ow 7 oe 








One instrument easily accessible by two or more 





people without disturbing the other man. 
Roller bearing where greatest stress occurs. 


No twisting of cord. 











Cord _is absorbed jn the fitting open or closed. 


Price 
Oxydised Copper Finish, Bracketor Wall Pattern 
50/- édach. (WALL PATTERN—OPEN.) 


LEAFLET T3198 AND ATTRACTIVE TERMS FOR RESALE FREE ON REQUEST 


To THE EDISON SWAN ELECTRIC CO., LTD., 


PONDERS END, MIDDLESEX. 


Depots and Branches : 


123/5, QUEEN VICTORIA ST., E.C. 4 71, VICTORIA ST., S.W. 1 
BELFAST. HULL. 
BIRMINGHAM. ENGLISH LEEDS. 


BRISTOL. EDISWAN LIVERPOOL. 


CARDIFF. MANCHESTER. 
CORK. EVERYTHING NEWCASTLE. 


DUBLIN. ELECTRICAL NOTTINGHAM. 
DUNDEE. ’ SOUTHAMPTON. 


GLASGOW. 





























mae Tee ee Ee ee 


rb | 
: 


eee a i 


a 














~ hugust 



























ALL 


EVERSHED INSTRUMENTS 


possess characteristic qualities which 
distinguish them from similar instru- 






































ES 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. (August 9, 4918, 





DI 


AI 


Tk 


















These Panels are standardised for all duties for both Constant and Variable Speed Machines, and any 
combination of Control Gear can be provided to suit Customers’ requirements. Our INCHING PICLARS are 





Suitable for the BEAVIEST DUCY. Chey contain Double-pole Contactors, with magnetic blow-out and 
carbon sparking tips, interlocked with an €.A.C. Patent Inching Starter, are operated by one handle only and 
form a REALLY FOOL PROOF arrangement. 

Che current cannot be made, or broken, or reduced on the Starting Switch, and the Releases are operative 
in any position of the Starter handle. 


All fittings are mounted on channel tron Frame fixed\'to the base and EVERY PARC -1S ACCESSIBLE = for 
inspection or repair on removing the Sheet Steel }housing. 











UOMO UAH CTELLULAOOLINUHUONVUHOYONOOLOOVOOOLLOOSOOVOLIONLUCVOLYOALUONYOLOAAOLOUNOULODO.LIONSONQEEOO 1 4.LIHUULELLSASE EULESS 


ww. 
21,H10PE STREET. 
CENTRAL, 250. ; 


3 HIGH ‘Gelephone:- 
—— 4 - BRIXTON. 





ments of other makes. For example, Latest fi 
— 
SUCCESS 
CELL TESTING we, 
City a 
Ten Ye 
-to-date | 
ies of E 
Specis 
P Exastic Ps 
A“U.E. 
These instruments are specially constructed for hard Ren 
service, and are fitted with undamageable pivots. They atl ‘te 
are of the Moving Coil type and are dead-beat in UNIVER 
action. The case is acid and fume proof, and the Crescent, Re 
instrument is easily held in the palm of the hand. NO 
The detachable barbed spikes enable rapid and Lates 
effective contact to be made to any type of cell. 
Queen Anne 
28, The 2 
wes! EVERSHED & VIGNOLES, Lid, —— 
ACTON LANE WORKS, CHISWICK, LONDON, W. 4. , 
Telegrams—" Dorothea, Chisk, London.” Telephone—Chiswick 1370. 
DVER 
i fact 
oft or wor) 
distance e 
ELRCTRIOA 
HE O1 
nnn mii mm mn mT Mn oe 
, ELZcTRIO/ 
€.A.C. Pillar Cype Control Panels 
Har € COnTTO! Pall me MO 
¢ ¢ ° Up ° See 


FILM COC 











PTTTUUTTUTUUTLULUTU LULL LLULLLULLLLLLRLLLLUL LLL UU ULLL LULL LLL LRL LLU RL LALLA AGEL 




















a 





18, 


| 


De 


in 


LLL LLM 





| 31, LOMBARD ST., E.C.3. | MILLWALL DOCKS, 


IPURE TAPE | HOOPER’S Volcanised India_Rubber 








“Fugust 9, 1948.) 


<r ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 





DISPLAYED ADVERTISEMENTS 


ADVERTISERS will please note that NEW | COPY and ALTERATIONS 





to Existing Advertisements (with Blocks) should reach here 
not later than SATURDAY MORNING. 





The ELECTRICAL REVIEW is the recognised Medium of the Electrical Trades, and has BY FAR THE LARGEST CIRCULATION 
of any Electrical Industrial Paper in Great Britain. 








EDUCATIONAL NOTICES. 


Latest time for receiving, 9.30 a.m. Thursday. 


SUCCESSFUL CORRESPONDENCE COACHING GUARANTEED for 
A.M.I.E.E., A.M.1.C.E., A.M.1.M.E., 
City and Gulids Exams., Matriculation, B.Sc. (Eng.), etc. 
Ten Years of Successes. Personal Enquiry Invited. 
Up-to-date Courses to meet your particular needs in any branch 
of Electrical—p.c. or A.c., Civil or Mechanical Eng. 

Special Courses in Practical Mathematics and Calculus. 
Euastic PAYMENTS, STRICT Privacy, EXPERT ADVICE FREE. 
A“U.E.C.” Course will return you many times the outlay 

through the ADVANCEMENT SECURED professionally. 

Apply now (saying what interests you) for the “U.E.C.” No. 7 
PROSPECTUS—FREE, to :—ADVISORY SECRETARY, 
UNIVERSITY ENGINEERING COLLEGE, 3, St. Mark's 
Crescent, Regent’s Park, London, N.W. 1—(No provincial branches.) 5014 


NOTICES RELATING TO PATENTS. 
Latest time for receiving 9.30 a.m. Thursday. 


John E. Raworth, 


ae Fog A — ay CO s.w.1. Chartered Patent Agent. 


SEFTON-JONES, ODELL & STEPHENS, 
Chartered Patent Agents, 
(Suceessors to W. P. THOMPSON & CO. of LONDON), 


285, HIGH HOLBORN, W.C. 1. 


DVERTISER desires to get into touch with a Firm of Manu- 

i facturing Electrical Engineers, with a view to the purchase 

of or working of his Patent for recording and indicating at any 

distance electrically the speed of engines, shafting, c.—51‘v, 
ELfCTRIOCAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 

TTYHE Owner of Patent No. 115,973 invites correspondence from 

those interested with a view to the sale of rights.—5152, 
ELZCTRIOAL REVIEW, 4, Ludgate Hill, London. 


























F. WIGGINS & SONS. 


ee: Avenue 2248 
FOR INSULATION. 
Largest Stock in the World, 








' 102, 103 & 104, Minories, LONDON, E.1. 








ieMOLLER Fat ro ATR FILTERS. 


FILM COOLING TOWERS, LTD., 124, Chancery Lane, London, W.C. 2 








HOOPER’S 


Teloygraph & India-Rubhber Works, Ld. 





Established 1860, ) LONDON, E.14. 








; Cables for Electrical Work main- 

AND STRIP, tain the highest quality, and their 
&c., &Cc., durability has been proved. 

Tele;-ams: LINEAR, London. Telephone: 1169 Avenue & 84 East. 














fceeeeaece bs 


iQ | NOTICE. | 


OWING to the many hundreds of 
replies passing through this 
Office each week, we would ask those 











answering Advertisements to be 


EXTREMELY ACCURATE 
with regard to the figures WHEN 
ADDRESSING REPLIES to Box 
Numbers. 









































ee ee 


THE CONDUCTOMETER 


AND 


ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY. 
By ROLLO APPLEYARD. 
LIMP CLOTH. 40 PAGES, 


POsT 1 6 FREE, 


H. ALABASTER, GATEHOUSE & KEMPE, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C. 4 


Se 


Rasoccnnmnsccummmn;cqummstcqummmnsoeummnccemmmnes 


REGULATING. 
RESISTANCES 









FO? FIELD REGULATION. 








\* BACK OF BOARD” TYPE. 


ISENTHAL & CO., Ltd., 


(DEPARTMENT 3), 


Denzil Werks, Willesden, London, N.W. 10 


— 





ee are eee eee Be 




























THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 


[august 9, 198 


























The Lusty Lung, with all his might 
The praise is sung to friend Fluxite. 


Electricians, Plumbers, Gasfitters and other Metal Workers, 
all sing the Praises of 


FLU XITE 


as the paste flux that s6lders even dirty metals without clean- 
ing or corrosion, and joints lead without solder merely by 
the use of a blow-lamp or blow-pipe. In short, Fluxite 


SIMPLIFIES SOLDERING 


and Supersedes Leadad-Burnind. 


If desired some solder can be filed intoa little Fluxite and the 
two applied together. Fluxite is a necessity in every tool-kit, 


YOU WANT SOME. 


Of Ironmongers and Oilshops. in Tins, 8d., 1/4 and 2/8. 
Made by THE AUTO-CONTROLLER CO., 54, Vienna Road, 
Bermondsey, 8.E. 


95, 
CAMDEN S! 
BIRMINGHAM, 





—— 


Mechani Electrical Enginee 
ders . Electrical Contro Gear 
BIRMINGHAM -: LONDON - 


STER 
GLASGOW: NEWCASTLE ‘LEEDS -MOSCow 
MILAN * JOHANNESBURG - SYDNE ° 

COPENHAGEN 














BrON-ACCORD 


CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS 


For Coal Washing. Circulating, &c. 





Try “Bon-Accora” PACKING 
For the Stuffing Boxes of your Pumps and Engines. 
TURBINE PUMPS (or Mine Pumping and Sinking. 


HIGH-SPEED ENGINES 


For Dynamos, Fans, Pumps, &c. 


DRYSDALE & CO., LTD., YOKER, GLASGOW, W. 














ELLISON 
SWITCH 


CONTROL 
GEAR. 


T is the principle of the firm 
to provide for export require- 
ments in every detail. Our 
catalogue has been specially 
arranged to facilitate ordering 
by cable, to give shipping par- 
ticulars, and te not only show 
prices, but to provide ade- 
quate infermation concerning the 
service that the various pieces of 
apparatus are designed to give. 

The apparatus is designed to meet 
colonial requirements, and every part 
is carefully standardized, worn parts 
can be thus quickly, eas#ly and 
cheaply renewed. 

Ensure safe and reliable opera- 
tion of your electrical machinery 
by installing Ellison Control Gear. 
Our IMlustrated Catalogue will 
be sent post free at request. 


| 


HANNAN HH 





(HI 


iii} 
| 


ANH 





| 
| 


MMT 
Tn 


A 


IAL 








Head Office and Works: 
PERRY BARR, 
BIRMINGHAM, 























W. MACKIE & CO., 


ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERS, 
PALACE ENGINEERING WORKS, 
129, 131, 133, LAMBETH RQAD, S.E. 1 


Telephone: Hop 182. 
DYNAMOS AND MOTORS. 
REPAIRS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
MANUFACTURERS OF WIRELESS COMPONENTS, 








ELECTRICAL 
CONTROL GEAR 














~~ fugust 


Te 





| 





2-ft. 114 in. 
























Tia 9, 106) ~—~—~S*S*S*CU RRA, REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 





, m8. 
a 





~ 23 








Telephone: Museum 333. 








= 





tu! 


cord grip, also ;" and 


IAN 


Flexibles 


| 
1 


TT 


and Cables. 


TREDEGARS, 
WHOLESALE AND EXPORT ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES, 


9, Diana Place, Euston Road, N.W. 1, 


Also at 47, Exchange Buildings, Birmingham. 


We are holding a good stock of English Holders, 


;" shade carrier Holders, 








-—--—_—. 











TTT 


“Simple” Type. 


——— 
—<—<$<$<—<—_—_—_—_—__———— 




















SECONDARY 
_EJECTOR 


| 
IH 





\ 











Write us for advice as 
to which type is most 
| suitable for your conditions. 


STEAM SUPPLY 





STEAM 




















DISCHARGE FROM 


LB.IS98 TO FEED HEATER. 


SPECIALISTS IN CONDENSING PLANTS, 
For 5000 KW. Plant. Glasgow. 


Weight 97 lbs. 














= | A se 
= | AIR PRIMARY AR 
|= SUCTION CJECTOR = SUCTION 
| = ! ik oe MIRRLEES 9 
| = + WATSON 
_ EJECTOR 
= 
Ee 
|= 
ai 


The Mirrlees-Leblanc 
Steam Miultijector. Air Pump. 


“Intermediate Condenser” Type. 











SUPPLY 


PRIMARY 


STEAM TO 
PRIMARY 
EJECTOR 


COOLING 
WATER INLET. 











EJECTOR 














’ 
DISCHARGE FROM 


y 
secowary cxcctor The Mirrlees Watson Co., Ltd. so secre 


TO FEED HEATER. 


’ 
DRAIN TO CONDENSER 
OR 


CONDENSATE SUCTION. 
LB1599, 


For 5000 KW. Plant. 


Weight 200 Ibs. 





Operating Steam 400 Ibs. per hour. 


‘a i138 








athe 
~=_>- 











| | _ Operating Steam 880 Ibs. per hour. 











een 





= 

























“ 





THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW REVIEW SUPPLEMENT, 


[angus 7 a 





WALTHAMSTOW, 


MICA. 
MIGANITE. 


Uncut Mica in original cases. 
Cut Mica for all purposes. 
Mica Splittings, Washers, &c. 


Moulding Commutator,' Flex- 
ible, Mica Folium, Tubes, 
Cloth»and Paper, Washers, 
Commutator Rings and seg- 
ments. 





LEATHEROID 


in all thicknesses. 








MICANITE & INSULATORS 









LONDON, E.17. Co., Ltd, 





EMPIRE INSULATING CLOTH, | 


Paper, Linen, Silk, Tape. 





PAXOLIN. 
FORMALITE. 


Sheet, Tubes, Cylinders, &&. 


Black Mouldcc Material, with 
or without Asbestos. 














THE 


RELIANCE 
i) DRY | 


BATTERY | 


HIGH 


Menguance o ORY parte 
"Madesuitable for Oper 
NINA) Will’ give ex” I 
Hii) Fesults. 
HIGH AMPERAGE: 
LONG LIFE. 


MADE In ENGLANO 





E 51721. 


SCA ELECTRI 





EL. LONDON 








THe “RELIANCE” DRY BATTERY 


BRITISH MADE. 





AMPERAGE. 





LONG LIFE. 





LARGE STOCKS FOR 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 








PRICE ON APPLICATION. 


alk Siadelmann: 6 Co, 


BP.2 8.4. £ OF s 0 De & 2S FF 











RIGHT 1 ne FRONT] | 


the “ADAPTABLE” 


EARTHING AND BONDING CLIP 





Absolutely the only clip on the market that — 
will fit any size Conduit, Cable or Pipe. 





HANN & INGLE, 


13, ALBERT PLACE, BRIDGE STREET, 
5 MANCHESTER. 


Or your Supplier. 











Tel. 5635 City, 





CASING CAPPING 
OF HIGH ae Fi 





SCA 
~~ 


SEND 
FOR LIST 
AN) DISCOUNTS 












» HASLAM<c-STRETTON.L™® 


EL a N-WINDSOR PLACE rye caRDIF” 






: ‘@ GRADE 
Cie THE MARK OF "WALITY 






Aug 























“ s 
», 1918, 





, Ltd, 
OTH: 


ers, &c. 


ial, with 


Ee, ' 
eee 


ode 








= pugust 9, 1948.) 

















HOPE'S PATENT 


luvent 


(REGD. TRADE MARK) 








UNIT BOARDS | 


provide an arrangement of “FLUVENT™” Fuses 


only where Switches are not required 





or, alternatively, ordinary handle fuses, whichever is desired. 


MICA, STEEL & CHINA only 


are employed to build these totally-enclosed, ironclad, power-centre 
boards, which will stand up to the severest conditions. 


Extra units can be added at any time by merely detaching the end covers, 
and extra bus-bar sections can also be added, without fitting. 


The FLUVENT Fuses used ia the Board illustrated have been proved 
to be absolutely ideal for large power consumers. The Board itself is one 
of a large number which have been supplied to the Admiralty. 


Full FLUVENT Fuse advantages described in our Catalogue. 


PARMITER, HOPE & SUGDEN, L”- 
Hulme Electrical Works, MANCHESTER. 


London Office : 25, Victoria Street, S.W.1." Scotland : David Alexander, Mains St., Waterloo St.,Glasgow.. 
Birmingham & Midlands: S. Thos. Pemberton & Co., 7, Church St., Colmore Row, Birmingham. 

























nee al genni 9 ye ne pate eli tm mae Ge 








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































REGISTERED 


TRADE MARK 
















































































THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 






















































































































































































































































































































































































918, 
ey 


*-e 


Se SSH SHEET EBTEFEETESEECEOZCEE*SESESO*S 


¢ 
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+ 
’ 
¢ 
° 
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, 


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~~ fugust 9, 1948.) 








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5 Aisin’ ry 


~ }No. 14.—ROLLING MILLS. 


OLLING £ Mill electrification puts severely to the test the 
R competence -of the industrialzelectrical engineer. The problems 

that he has to solve are, in general, two-fold: firstly, 
those of computation of the horse-power required by the mill, and 
secondly, those of construction of the plant to meet the very severe 
duty to which it is subjected. 


Deciding the horse-power is a complicated matter, in’ which the ~ 


engineer must bring into play a specialised experience, and often 
involves (in the case of the electrification of old mills) the conduct 
of a long series of tests in order to arrive at an accurate basis for 
calculation. 


An error on the low side is fatal to the success of the plant; and 
on the high side involves heavier running expenses than are needed. 


The industrial electrical engineers of the General Electric 
Co., Ltd., have had long experience in rolling mill elec- 
trification; and the estimates of horse-power they have 
made have, in the past, been justified by the results 
obtained in the actual plant after installation. 


The construction of a rolling mill motor can only be entrusted to 
firms having a wealth of experience on which to draw, ensuring that 
the product shall be sufficiently strong in every detail, that the 
lubrication and commutatien shall be perfect, and that fhe motor and 
fly-wheel’ shal] operate in harmony to relieve the motor and the 
system of the heavy peak loads. 


The experience of the Company’s Industrial Electrical Engineers 
is.at the disposal of rolling mills engineers and managers, and 
of supply authorities having rolling mills within their supply area, and 
they are invited to consult the G.E.C. regarding any extensions 
contemplated either immediately or in the future. 


Next Week - “WITTON-KRAMER” LIFTING MAGNETS. 


The General Electric Company, Ltd., 


Head Office: Queen Victoria Street, London, E.C. 4. 





Telebhones: London Wall No. 3600 (30 lines). ‘ Telearams : ‘ Electricity Cent, Londo.” 
; BRANCHES— 
Liverpesl—Chorch Alley, Genesee’ Gree, Nee pg eo 
: her j = t. 
Leede— Wellington Street. Birmingham—High Street. 
Sheffield—Angel Street Wegepeee. as- Trae Nottingham—Chapel Bar. 
Cardiff—Womanby Street. Ipswich—Princes Street, Cork—Grand Parade. 








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DSSS FS SSF SFOS ESS SESH SE HHH HH HHHHHHHH HGS 
> 




















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—— <I 
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——__ ____” ° 
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) 


28 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. (August 9,498, 


Eliminate voltage fluctuation caused by the starting 
of small motors. ACTUAL MANUFACTURERS. 


Ga TAPES, 


1/10 to 1/4 H.P., 
REPULSION START—INDUCTION 
SINGLE-PHASE MOTORS WEBS, 


which start with considerably less han 3 times 
full load current and accelerate to ful speed under SL in, EVI NX GS 
full load in 2 to 10 seconds. J 
. This makes it possible to 
donnect them to lighting classes Work 
circuits, using fuses which), For all af Electrical ' 
will really protectand which 
will still be of sufficient} 
capacity to insure success- é Large Stocks kept. 
Illustrating a 1/6 u.P. Motor, ful starting. . . 

Samples by return on application, 


Other sizes up to 40 Horse-power. 


















































Manufactured only by citoebpnoersies 
CENTURY ELECTRIC COMPANY, 


Porto res Si ts” || PMS HORTH HARDY & SOR 
j 


& STOCK OF “CENTURY” MOTORS !S CARRIED IN LONDON BY— 
The Sole British Agents— LTD., 
54, Portland Street, MANCHESTER. 


SWEDISH GENERAL ELectRIC, LTD., senieonin “ncdoastnaneien  Gaaneseel 


5, CHANCERY LANE, W.C. 2. 
Sales Manager: R. A. MARPLES. LONDON : 3, Fitchett’s Court, Noble Street, E.C. 


Tel "A Ww , London.” Telephone : I 
a a GLASGOW : 76, Virginia St. BELFAST: 29, Frankiin St. 


248 


REWINDING AND REPAIRS 


MOTORS AND DYNAMOS, 
FA N S, ALTERNATING 
RHEOSTATS, &c. AND 


.. \VACUUM CLEANERS. cummins 


MAGIC APPLI ANCES, LT. 159, Westminster Bridge Road, LONDON, S.E.|. 


Telegrams : “ Magicapco, Lamb, London.” Telephone: Hop 4703. 









































SEND US YOUR ENQUIRIES 


e FOR 


MOULDED 
INSULATING 
ARTICLES. 


Our composition can be used as a substitute for Ebonite, 


QTC CORO 





(iy ty 
I 











THE IMPROVED SOLIDITE CO., L°- 


10, CHARLTON PLACE, 
Opposite Agricultural Hall, 
ISLINGTON, N. 1. 


Telephone : NORTH 1345. 





‘J DIFFERENT " 
CHANGES (C) far Row. § 


NorTHUMBERLAND 
Park, a 
Torrennam, N. 17. ‘ 
Pn ee eer Ce 



























TD., 


nklin St. 


ING 


wid | 
















THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 





—_— 7 









epee ees em 


TT 











~ 


’ > ae pas Pet EO. - i % 
oe ‘. . 4 ’ F bt sve 
» 4 Zk , WTA s < aS 
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oo en A a a Ber ag ee 


4 * & 


ed 


_ 







On the other side of your counter is the in- 
exhaustible field of modern illumination. 







Factories, Works, Mills, Theatres, Churches, ' 
Mansions, Villas, Offices, Stores, Warehouses, ' 
e: —unlimited scope for the enterprising Con- 
tractor to supply lighting equipment of every 
description. 



















On your side of the counter is the able and | 
experienced organisation of the B.T.H. It is 
there to help you exploit these opportunities. 
No lighting problem is beyond your achieve- 
ment, no competitor can surpass the quality of 
your service if you co-operate with the B.T.H. 


Not only the best lamps but the best fittings for use 
with them are designed and manufactured by the 
British Thomson-Houston Co., Ltd., in their works 





at Rugby, England. ‘If it’s Electrical, get it from 
B.T.H.”—it will pay you to make that your rule. 
*e The British Thomson-Houston Co., Ltd., Mazda House, 77, Upper Thames Street, London, E.C. 4. — £9. 


* 















Se ie dee /L/ | 
Mazda House is the Home . RS / in ae are Specialists in Good 

















as ”? ighti Ww i 

mo ~~ r Lighting. e design and make 

Relia iring Accessories. : ~ <S \ t joe Scientific Lighting Appliances 

Send us your eng ites fer —S LE and Fittings as well as the Lamps. 

thing a ao ' = = Lighting Advice and Plans on 
slectrical eo A > request. 















ES aan ee 




















i Fie Sate > te 
' , 





30 . “THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 











(WESTOOL ELECTRIC DRILLS. } 


(ENTIRELY BRITISH MADE.) ! 
Three Standard Sizes. 








No. a 
No. 3.—1}" 


Wound for any Direct Current 
Standard Voltage. 


Sole Makers— 
THE WESTMINSTER TOOL 
AND ELECTRIC CO., 
Suffolk House, 
Laurence Pountney Hill, 


Cannon Street, 
London, E.C. 4 


[August 9, 1918. 





CONDENSERS 


CONDENSERS for HIGH TENSION and WIRELESS Wort, 




















\e Telegrams: “ Westoleico, Cannon, London.” Telephone: City 54 
S 


NS 











ELECTRIC 


FOR ALL PURPOSES. 


High-Class Condensers for Telegraph & Telephone Lines. 
MANSBRIDGE AND ROLLED FOIL TYPES. 
STANDARD CONDENSERS. 


Sole Makers of Dearlove’s PATENT Artificial Line, having 
condacter of negligible temperature co-efficient. 





THE TELEGRAPH CONDENSER CO., L™- 


Vauxhall Street, Kennington Oval, London, S.E. |! 











Wardle Reflectors 


for 
Aerodromes. 











No. 528. Dispersive Type Reflector (Open Type). 


Scientifically designed, well and strongly 
4 made of the best materials, this is the 
IDEAL Reflector for Aerodrome Light- 
ing. Ask for Catalogue Section 24R, 
sent free on request to— 


; The 
WARDLE ENGINEERING CO., 


LTD 
Illuminating 
Engineers, 
196, Deansgate, Manchester. 


We, T-7. 

















are THE tubes for Electrical 
Engineering work, madeof the HIGHEST 
QUALITY materials, they are strong, 
sound and dependable, and always give 
complete satisfaction. 


Remember the name ORIENTAL, and when re- 
quiring reliable Steel Tubes send us your enquiries. 





ORIENTAL TUBE Co., Ltd., West Bromwich. 
Birmingh lephone: 45 & 166, West Bromwich. 
“Tubes, West Bromwich.” 











Save your MEN’S time 
and increase your output 
by 
INSTALLING 


“PREMIER 


ELECTRIC GLUE-POTS 


No, 265, 2-pints Cast-Iron Pot, consumes 
1 UNIT only in an 8 hours’ day. 


May we send you further particulars? 


PREMIER Electric Heaters, Ltd., 


258-260, Bradford Street, BIRMINGHAM. 














r’ CED |) ies 1 om | ED 4 | SEES = 


ELECTRIC TRAMGAR HAND-BOOK 


FOR and 
MOTORMEN, DEPOT 
INSPECTORS, WORKERS. 

Post FREE 2s. 2d. 


BY W. A. AGNEW. 


H. ALABASTER, GATEHOUSE @& KEMPE, 
4, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C. 4 


ee 


ae eee 








~ gust 9, 4948.) 


— 














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































to the. complete. 
wire filament 

































































































































































































































































Process by process the work is carried ont by British 
labour, in our London Works. We do not buy the 
Tungsten Powder or the Tungsten Rod. 

We begin with the Ore, refine and reduce it, work it 
into rod, swage it down, and finally draw down into 
the finest filaments. 


We are Tungsten and Molybdenum experts. 






































































































































‘ 











































































































See that your lamps are made with 


7 


Z Wire 
RE ad 


which is the only sure guarantee of 
a British product from start to finish. 


Duram ‘Ltd 

























































































































































































































































































































































































Thanet House, 
231-2, Strand, London, W. 






































= 
comm scan 






















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































m 


Rreecennpmnesnmnnsteneenesiiis 











82 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 


(August 9, 1948. 








—_ SIMPLEA—— 
Deep Water-Tight Lanterns 


Tapped to receive {" down drop or 
bracket arm. | 








The new pattern illus- 
trated is cast with a deep 
recess in the top into 
which the lampholder goes. 


The deep cast body and 
standard well glass make 
a pleasing well-balanced 
combination and avoids 
the necessity of stocking 














extra deep well glasses. 


Write for Mailing Card No. 676. 


Simplex Conduits, Ltd., 


Works : 


113-112 Charing Cross Road, 96 Whitechapel, Liverpool, 
London, W.C. 6 White Horse Street, Leeds. 
16 Corporation Street, Manchester. 281-3 Attercliffe Common, Sheffield. 
72a Waterloo Street, Glasgow. 14 Heathfield Street, Swansea. 
61 High Bridge, Newcastle. 4 Westgate Street, Cardiff. 
11 Denmark Street, Bristol. 1 Crimon Place, Aberdeen, 


Garrison Lane, Birmingham. 


SKATOSKALO BOILER SCALING TOOLS. 


SOLE MARKER: 


FRANK GILMAN, 
Lightwoods Hill, Birmingham. 


(N.B.—See my last and next week's Advertisement.) 














POWER mS Peant. 


James GORDON & Co., 
Queen's ae, 
W.C.2 


WATER 























AND SMALL 


SCREWS .... 


THE ORMOND ENGINEERING Co. 



































(PRoPRIETOR, E. J. DELFOSSE). 
*Phone: Holborn1812. 199, PENTONVILLE ROAD, LONDON, N. 1, 


bie wari ASTNES 





| The LONDON ELECTRIC FIRM.CROYDON | 


- iww £ EE 


PHONE- PUR 





PROMPT DELIVERY 








Factory Lighting. 
HE question of Factory Lighting is easily settled by 
wrsrincHouse 4 ) 
te ; T installing Cooper Hewitt Light. By using this system you 
| can have 24 hours’ daylight in your factory every day. 
Firms interested should write for Beoblet No. 273. 


THE WESTINGHOUSE COOPER HEWITT CO., 
80, York Road, King’s Cross, London, N, 1. 


RALPH NEAL, 


mer - Presses, Press Tools & Punches 


Of Description for Electrical and Mechanical Ie 
BLANKS,” ASHER: PRESS PIERCINGS, DIE S8T PINGS IN 
STEEL, BRASS OR ANY MATERIAL FOR THE TRADE, 
LABELS and NAME PLATES A SPECIALITY. 


ao & 50, PERCIVAL ST... LONDON, E.C.1 
Telephone: 4948 Central. 


*~NAME~-PLATES+ 


ENCRAVED CAST PRESSED PRINTED 
BRASS LOPPER ALUMINIUIA /VORINE CELLULO/0 


LTD., 




















LONDON LABEL ce Lro 


HARLEY WORKS, BECKTON R? 

















The Croft Granite, Brick & Concrete Co., Ltd., 


CROFT, near LEICESTER. 
CROFT ADAMANT CELLWGRK FOR E£.H.T. EQUIPMENT. 


URGENT REWINDING, 


REPAIRS & RENEWALS. 


nd to— 


ELLERD- STYLES, 81, ROSEBERY AVENUE, E E.C. 1. 


OWITGHBOARDS. 


Westwood Mfg. Co., Empire Works, Shepherd’s Bush, London, W. 12. 



































PuRE Acrps 


ELECTRICAL PURPOSES. 


Write— THOMAS JACKSON (CLAYTON), LTD., 


MANCHESTER. 





















——es 


rE 














1. 


















* CHALLENGE" (Type Hi1) 


~~ ugust 9, 4948.) THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 33 


4“GUARDIAN” (7223 | THE NEW ORDER RE 
T 














HAN 


ro compty wa ao. =‘ AMPSIS HT PLIGHTING 








REGULATIONS. 
he IDEAL MUNITION SHOP LAMPS. 


ADOPTED BY THE LEADING ENGINEER- 
ING FIRMS, SHIPYARDS, CORPORATIONS 








requires that all Deckhouses, Lavatories, Cabins, 
etc., are to be fitted with 


"| DOOR 




























AND GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS. FLEXIBLE Nee ener 
CORD TO 
lt a wn | SWITCHES 
“Guardian” Han 
Lamp is the excep- —— a 
tional strength of ore” 20 that when a person 
the galvanized TR. , : nore 
guard, which is CORD, is leaving t hese rooms 
manufactured from WHICH IS the light is automa- 







No. 8’s iron wire. 
No Hand Lamp 
approaches the 


PROTECTED tically switched off 
WITH TOUGH before the door is 

































“Guardian” for RUBBER, opened, thus prevent- 
eeeete, | _ Senay AXD IS ing any beam of light 
a SHOCK showing and dis- 
PROOF. closing the where- 
abouts of the ship. Price 5/4 each, subject. 
It will withstand the This Switch is Me- Suitable for right or left-hand doors. 
roughest usage, and chanically and Elec- ee ateln anee a : 
is chemical and oil trically the best type . § away of door posts. 
es made for the purpose; the Metal Barrel is a heavy 
Prices on application. casting turned and polished. 






The current-carrying parts are mounted on China. 
x. a The Switch is actuated by fixing a bolt on the door, and 
the Switch on the frame of door, in line with each other. 
When the door is closed and bolted, the bolt presses 
We hold large stocks of down the plunger of the Switch. Attached to the 
ener. plunger is an insulated metal disc which engages the 
Insulators and @ al spring buffers, thus switching on the light. When the 
Accessories, and invite bolt js withdrawn the light is automatically turned off. 




















applications for our 





Suitable Door 
Bolts for above 
switches. Brass 
Barrel with iron 
shoot. 


Price 2/0 each. 






“ GUARDIAN” (Type G1), New Accessory List 
complete with heavy Guard 

and Lamp Holder, No. 104. 

Paice 8/- each. 













Reliable H.O. Pattern, 
Hand Lamp, complete 
with Galvanised Guard, 
and Holder. 
Price §/- each. 







Showing method of fitment. 


THE MOST SOLIDLY CON- 
STRUCTED BOLT SWITCH. 



















BAXTER & CAUNTER, Ltd., 
219, Tottenham Court Road, W. 


MANCHESTER: , 


H. G. MABBS, 
Marble St., Spring Gardens. 


LEEDS : 
LOXLEY & CO., Ltd., f 
20, Basinghall Street. 


NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE : : 


ROBERT BOWRAN & CO., Ltd., | 
St. Nicholas Buildings. 





GLASGOW : 
A. & J. M'CULLOCH, 
140, West George Street. 


IRELAND : 
F, A. PORTER, 


LIVERPOOL ELECTRIC CABLE CO., LTD., (55 pucen’s square, Bellas. 


Head Office & Works: LINACRE LANE, BOOTLE, LIVERPOOL. 
Telephone Wo. 542 Bootle. Telegraris : “ Concentric, Liverpool.” 
































cy 





THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW SUPPLEMENT. 


[August 9, 7918 












and 


Tel.: 1629-1630. 







‘absolute 
Satisfaction 


E. BROOK, L* 


EMPRESS WORKS, HUDDERSFIELD, 


Wires: “ Phase.” 





VERTICAL MOTORS. 







Tel. : 4468 City. 


Tel.: 23396. 


+ 
Also at 


11, QUEEN VICTORIA ST., LONDON, E.C. 4. 


Wires: “ Phasebroo Phone, London.” 
and 


49, BASINGHALL STREET, LEEDS. | 








Stocks at 








Birmingham & Huddersfield. 


London, Leeds, 





a sf 


















~~ ma 








~~ ugust 9; 1948.) 























BECAUSE THEY CAN 
BE CONVERTED 
FROM PROTECTED 
TYPE 

















“ FIVE MOTORS 


ping A, WOOD Ltd. 


OuNTURY vanes FAX. 


WORKS. 
"Grams: Motor, Hx. 


into 






way are our FIVE-|N-QNE’ inpuction motors 
SUPERIOR 
OTHERS ? 











Ventilated Enclosed, 
ae » Enclosed, 
Pipe Ventilated or 
Rain-Proof Types, 
AT VERY SMALL COST; 





























AUTOMATIC PRESSURE REGULATORS. 





Part of an order for Automatic Pressure Regulator Equipments vor the 
Victorian State Railways, 








BROWN, BOVERI & CO., LIMITED 





9, OLD QUEEN ST., 
3 WESTMINSTER, S.W. 1 














a eee 
+ era & : 





[August 9, 4948, 











¢ r 7 chas 
. worl 

D 

pric 

10 | 


PUSH-BUTTON CONTROL |] © 


deci 
ber 
for motor - driven on 
pow 


PLANERS & SLOTTERS |] * 


Cor 
191) 


Reduces initial cost of complete | a 
electrical equipment. | £1 
Speeds up the running and reduces re 


idle time. was 





Simple to instal—a compact, well- | yea 
designed unit. of 
All working parts are exceedingly 
robust and amply rated. | cap 
Long life and minimum main- | sol 
tenance charges. | loa 


Fully protects the machine against 
Mechanically oferated Panel, electrical bréakdown. 


showing substantial switchgear 


SIMPLIFIES THE DRIVE— 


No motor-generator is required, and 
only one motor. 





Belt shifting and crossed belts are 
unnecessary. 


SIMPLIFIES OPERATION— 


Starting and Stopping by push-buttoris. 
Any mechanic easily understands the 
operation. The control is ruggedly 
strong in every part, and requires no 
delicate adjustments. 








IGRANIC ELECTRIC C2 | By No. 520.— Planer Control Equipment, com- , " 
$. prising Mechanical Panel, Circuit Breaker he 
Panel, Resistances and Push-Button Boxes. by 

147, Queen Victoria Street, | 
LONDON. Works: BEDFORD. / £ 








Printed by Wiiu1aM Cate, Ltp., 47-150, Saf’ron Hill, E.C. 1, and-Published by the Proprietors, H. ALABASTER, Gatenovse & Kempe, 4, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C. 4. 











Vol. 83. No. 2,124, Avavsr 9,191.7 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 188 





Chelmsford.—Pricz Increase.—The Electric Supply 
Corporation has applied to the B. of T. for an order to increase the 
maximum price which may be charged for electricity to 9d. per 
unit. 


Continental.—ItaLy.—The province of Tuscany has 
erected on the River Garchio, near Gallicano-di-Garfagna, a hydro- 
electric station capable of producing 6,000 Kw., with a fall of 
90 metres, The works have been set up by the Societé Elettrica 
Ligure Toscana, and are one of a series of important central stations 
which the company proposes to establish on the same river. The 
equipment consists of two 7,500-H.P. Riva turbines, each direct- 
coupled to a 6,000-kw. Westinghouse alternator, one being held as 
a reserve, with, room for a third group. A third turbine of 
3,500 H.P. with alternator, a small turbine of 250 H.P., and a 30-ton 
crane are other items of the plant. In the transformer house three 
groups of three-phase transformers raise the energy produced at 
3,500 volts and 50 periods to 33,000 volts. 


Coventry—New Works.—The City Council is to pur- 
chase a site in Foleshill at a cost of about £8,000 for new electricity 
works. 


Dewsbury.—Price IncrEAsE.—From October Ist, the 
price of electricity is to be advanced as follows :—For power, 
10 per cent., an increase of 50 per cent. on pre-war rates ; on 
rateable value basis, 5 per cent. (30 per cent. over pre-war rates) ; 
lighting, 5 per cent. (25 per cent. over pre-war rates). 


Gillingham (Kent).—Price Increase.—The T.C. has 
decided to increase the price of electricity from the end of Septem- 
ber by $d. per unit for lighting and }d. per unit for heating and 
power, with an all-round increase of 50 per cent. in place of. the 
existing 50 per cent. on lighting and 60 per cent. on heating and 
power, making a net increase of jd. per unit. Energy is, to be 
supplied toa Gillingham syndicate for the manufacture of cement 
for the Government. 


Hastings.—Year’s Workinc.—The accounts of the 
Corporation electricity department for the year ending March 31st, 
1918, show that the capital expenditure during the year amounted 
to £697, bringing the total up to £179,725. The loan statement 
shows that out of the total debt created, amounting to £188,149, 
£105,005 had been repaid, and that a further sum of £34,497 was 
available for repayment. The income was £20,941, an increase of 
£1,854 on last year. The expenditure was £14,404, compared with 
£13,056 last year. The gross profit carried to net revenue account 
was £6,537, an increase of £507. The interest and sinking fund 
charges, &c., amounted to £11,115, compared with £11,127 last 
year. The adverse balance of £4,658 transferred from net revenue 
account was met out of the general district rate account. Thesum 
of £1,027 was used for new capital purposes, instead of borrowing 
from outside sources. The provision made for the repayment of 
loans tothe end of the year was £139,503. The balance due to the 
treasurer was £1,188, as follows:—Revenue account, £2,997, less 
capital account in hand, £1,810. The average price obtained was 
5°20d. per unit, and total cost per unit sold was 3°28d. Total units 
sold were 933,904 (919,976 to private consumers and 13,928 to 
public lighting). Total connections in 30-watt lamps, 73,529; 
load factor, 20°08 ; number of consumers, 2,114 ; maximum supply 
demanded, 531 Kw. ; plant capacity, 1,850 Kw. 


Leeds.—New Puiant.—The Ministry of Munitions 
having sanctioned the replacement by the E.L. Committee of two 
1,400-Kw. reciprocating engines and alternators by a 6,000-kKw. turbo- 
alternator, the Committee has decided to proceed with the work, 
and to obtain tenders for the same. With the necessary buildings, 
extensions, boilers, &c., the estimated cost is £40,000. 


Leicester. —Prict IncrEase.—The T.C. hag decided to 
increase the price of electricity for lighting from 5}d. to 6d. per 
unit, and for power by 12 per cent., which will make an all-round 
increase of 50 per cent. over pre-war rates. 


_ Leighton Buzzard,—Proroskp E.L.—The U.D.C. has 
inquired whether the Luton T.C. is prepared to supply electricity 
within the urban district. 


London, — HampsTEAD.—YEAR’s Workinc.—For the 


year ending March 31st, 1918, the total net income of the B.C. elec- , 


tricity undertaking was £80,302, and the working expenses 
£53,112. In the previous year the figures were £76,142 and 
£48,273, Interest absorbed £7,697, and loan redemption £22,001, 
leaving a deficit on the year of £2,508, against £2,164. Units sold 
during the year numbered 5,217,247 ; generating costs increased 
from 1°4d. per unit to 1°63d., and fuel from ‘91d. to 103d. The 
total cost per unit was 2°44d., against 2°23d. 

HAMMERSMITH.—PRICE INCREASE.—The Electricity Committee 
has recommended the B.C. to increase the charges for lighting to 
dd. per unit, and by a further 124 per cent. for other purposes, 
making 25 per cent. over pre-war prices. 

BERMONDSEY.—PrRIcE INcREASE.—The Electricity Committee 
has informed the B.C. that it must increase the charge for electricity 
by a further 74 per cent. 


Kendal.—Year’s Work?na.—There was a deficit of 
= on the past year's working of the T.C. electricity under- 
aking, , 


Malvern.—Price Increase.—The U.D.C. has increased 
the price of electricity for lighting, heating, and power by 1d. per 
unit from the September reading of the meters, 


Redditch.—RrorGanisation.—Early in 1914 the Corpo- 
ration undertaking was making a loss of about £3,000 per annum, 
the maximum demand was 640 Kw., the supply single-phase, 75 
periods, the units sold being 1,433,666. 

On the advice of Messrs. Handcock, Dykes, & Trotter, consulting 
engineers, a sum of approximately £40,000 was expended in bring- 
ing the station up to date by the addition of two 1,000-Kw. Parsons 
turbo-alternators and condensing plant; two motor-generators to 
transform from three-phase, 50 periods, to single-phase, 75 periods, or 
vice versi; condensing plant; new cooling tower; additional 
boiler plant ; extension of engine room ; anda system of three-phase 
mains. This new plant was first put into commission towards the 
end of 1916, and at the beginning of this year the maximum load 
on the station had increased to 1,340 Kw. 

The units sold for last year were 2,643,037, and notwithstanding 
that wages had more than doubled, and the rise in the price of 
coal, the reduction in generating costs was such that the station 
has now turned the corner, and shows a profit after paying running 
costs, interest, and sinking-fund charges. In a further report 
given to the Council at the beginning of the year, additional 
extensions, at an estimated cost of £54,000, were recommended, 
and approved by the Council, and the general approval of the 
Director-General of Electric Power Supply having been given to 
the scheme, the Council at its last meeting placed the above con- 
tracts as part of its extension scheme. 

Since the original instalment of the new three-phase plant, the 
largest works in Redditch has shut down all its own plant and relies 
entirely on the Corporation station, and the majority of the other 
large works in Redditch are now taking a supply. 


Sutton Coldfield.—Price Increase.—The Electricity 
Committee has informed consumers that there will be a further 
increase of 10 per cent., making 30 per cent. in all, from the June 
quarter. 


Todmorden.—BuLk Suprrpiy.—The T.C. has decided to 
take a supply of electricity in bulk from the Yorkshire E.P. Co., 
and has purchased a site for a.sub-station. 


Twickenham.—The B. of T. has refused to authorise the 
Twickenham and Teddington E.L. Co. to increase its charges for 
electricity. 


Tunbridge Wells.—Prick Increase.—The T.C. has in- 
creas@d the charges for electricity as follows :—Units sold for 54d., 
plus 10 per cent., increased to 7d. ; 5d., plus 10 per cent., to 6d. ; 44d., 
plus 10 per cent., to 6d.; 34d., plus 10 per cent., to 6d., less 20 per 
cent. ; 24d., plus 10 per cent., by 25 por cent.; 1d., plus 25 per 
cent., to 1?d. There is to be a minimum charge of 10s. per quarter 
to all. consumers, except flats, tenements, offices, and stables, the 
minimum rate’for which is to be 5s. per quarter. 


Watford.—Price Increase.—The E.L. Committee has 
recommended that the price of electricity for lighting be increased 
to 74d. per unit, and that the recent increase of 20 per cent. be 
increased to 50 per cent. from the end of December. 


West Bromwich.—YEAR’s Workinc.—There was a net 
loss of £10,839 on the past year’s working of the Corporation elec- 
tricity department. The income amounted to £41,951, compared 
with £32,047 in the previous year, and the expenditure to £44,564, 
an increase of £15,106. Loan charges amounted to £8,226. The 
E.L. Committee recommends an increase in the charges for elec- 
tricity as from July Ist. 

PricE Reviston.—The T.C. is taking steps to get contracts 
for energy supplied to the tramways and certain firms at prices 
fixed before the war revised, with a view to an increase being 
made. 


West Ham.—Yerar’s Workine.—The income of the 
Corporation electricity department for the year ended March 31st 
last was £181,705, compared with £153,872 in the preceding year. 
The expenditure amounted to £160,482, an increase of £23,720, 
and the net surplus was £5,994, against £2,270 ; 35,836,900 units 
were sold during the year (lighting, 2,515,834 ; power, 27,250,787 ; 
heating and cooking, 412,429; public lighting, 59,261 ; and tram- 
ways, 5,598,589), an increase of 538,600 units. The working cost 
per unit amounted to 1'07d., against ‘92d. in the previous year, and 
the average price obtained was 1°21d. per unit, against 1°04d. 








TRAMWAY AND RAILWAY. NOTES. 


Australia,.—Launceston.—The past year’s working of 
the city tramways resulted in an income of £23,139. The expendi- 
ture was £13,751, and, after meeting capital charges, £3,657 was 
carried to the general account and £496 to the reserve fund. 

SypNrY.—An underground electrically-operated haulage plant 
for the Wallarah Coal Co., Ltd., has recently been completed by 
Messrs. Morison & Brearly, Ltd., of Newcastle, N.'S.W. The 
machine is fitted with a Crompton direct-current motor of 125 H.P., 
which drives, through gearing, a winding drum 8 ft, in diameter, 





PGE OL ne BO 








134 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. (vol. 83. No. 2,124, Avavsr 9, 1918, 





Brighton.—-Raruess Traction.—An extension of a 
year from August 7th has been applied for by the T.C. for the com- 
pletion of the overhead equipment for trolley cars under the 
Brighton, Hove, and District Railless Traction Act, 1911, from 
Ovingdean to Rottingdean. 


Continental.—GerMany.—According to the Daily Mail, 
great indignation has been aroused in Berlin by the decision of the 
Metropolitan Tramway Co. to install its own detective force for the 
purpose of catching passengers who may be endeavouring to evade 
paying fares. They are to be dressed in plain clothes, and 
empowered to exact a fine of 1s. on the spot for each offence. A 
German paper is quoted as follows :— The tramway monopoly 
only wants to enrich its already bulging treasury. It talks about 
the increased upkeep of rolling stock. . . . ,We have to ride 
nowadays in ramshackle old rattle-traps called cars,” 


East Kent.—Proposep Ligut Rarways.—The Light 
Railways Commissioners have submitted to the B. of T. for con- 
firmation an order for the construction of light railways from 
Hammill to Snowdown Colliery, from Little Mongeham to Deal. 
from Wickhambreaux to Canterbury, from Coldred to Alkham, 
with a branch to Lydden Colliery, and branches at Little Mongeham 
and Stonar. 


Leeds. —TRAMWAYS AND Town PLANNING. — The 
Tramway Committee has visited Liverpool for the purpose of in- 
specting the construction of radial roads in relation to town 
planning. Mr. F, M. Lupton has advocated a separate tramway 
track for fast traffic on wide arterial roads in Leeds, and the visit 
was in furtherance of this improvement. 

Boycott FaILurRE.—Figures issued by the tramway department 
show that the boycott of the tramways as a result of the 50 per 
cent. advance in fares has died a natural death. In the first com- 
plete week of the new fares the number of passengers carried was 
reduced by 400,000 compared with the corresponding week a year 
ago. In the-next fortnight the decrease was less by 20,000, and 
then a further 60,000. At the end of a month the decrease was 
again 400,000, but the next week it dropped to 175,000. During 
the past two weeks it has further diminished, and when the figures 
were issued it was only 197 less than in the corresponding week 
last year. Whilst the total reduction during the seven weeks was a 
million and three-quarters, the receipts increased by over £12,000, 
and the total takings of the 17 weeks of the current financial year 
are £31,068 ahead of those of the corresponding period last year. 


London. — Waces. — The Highways Committee has 
recommended the adoption by the L.C.C. of the award of the 
Committee on Production, which provides for an increase of 5s. 
per week to all tramway employés at present receiving a war wageof 
20s. The claim for the same wages to be paid to women as to men 
was not established. This increase is estimated to cost £88,000 per 
annum. 

Goops TraAFrric.—The L.C.C. has decided to incur an expendi- 
ture of £100 in the conversion of two tramcars for the carriage of 
goods, for experimental purposes. 

UNDERGROUND RAILWAY.—INCREASED FARES,—A few in- 
creases in fares on certain sections came into operation on 
August Ist on the Bakerloo, Piccadilly, Hampstead, and City 
and South London Tubes and the District Railway. The increase 
amounted in most cases to $d., and in no case to more than 1d. 

NIGHT SERVICE.—The London Society of Compositors has been 
informed that the Metropolitan Tramways will run cars from 
Finsbury Park to Wood Green at about 1 a.m. and 1.30 a.m., the 
service to begin on August 11th. This arrangement is for the con- 
venténce of printers, and is only an experiment for one month, and 
upon the results will depend whether it shall be maintained. 


Northampton.— Year's WorkING,—There was a gross 
profit of £13,922 on the Corporation tramways for the year ending 
March 3ist last. The revenue was £46,113, compared with 
£38,258 in the previous year, and the expenditure £32,190, com- 
pared with £29,016. Capital charges amounted to £11,105, andthe 
net profit was £3,235, against a deficit of £3,004 in the preceding 
year. Passengers carried increased from 9,707,456 to 10,753,042, 
and the car mileage decreased from 748,271 to 737,007. Working 
costs amounted to 10°35d. per car-mile, and receipts to 14°77d. 


Shipley.—Price Reviston.—The U.D.C., which applied 
for an increase of 50 per cent. for electricity supplied to the Brad- 
ford Corporation for the operation of the Shipley tramways, has. 
been informed that the Corporation cannot entertain the payment 
of more than 20 per cent. 


West Ham.—YeEAR’s Workinc.—For the year ending 
March 31st last, the revenue of the Corporation tramway depart- 
ment amounted to £188,851, against £166,143 in the previous year, 
and the expenditure to £168,827, an increase of £18,837. After 
allowing for capital charges (£31,636) and allowances to men on 
active service (£16,762), there was a deficit of £28,177. The income 
per car-mile was 12j63d, an increase of 1°7d., and the working costs 
were 11°279d., an‘increase of 1°419d. 


Wolverhampton.— Year's Workixe.—The gross profit 
of the Corporation tramway department for the year ending 
March 31st last was £32,039, including £2,189 on account of 
motor-’buses. Capital charges amounted to £12,142, £4,351 was 
transferred to the reserve fund, £8,767 to the maintenance account, 
and £6,580 to the borough rate account. 


TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE NOTES.’ 





Germany and Rumania.—A special Agreement has been 
reached concerning the future regulation of postal and telegraph 
traffic between Germany and Rumania. The provision affecting 
telegraphic traffic concerns the laying of a third direct line between 
Germany and Bukarest, the establishment of a telephone service 
between Germany and Rumania, a telephone service over the 
Constantinople-Constanza-Bukarest-Berlin telegraph cable, and an 
eventual ‘new line to Constantinople. The German Government 
obtains till the end of 1950 a monopoly of laying cables on the 
Rumanian coast.— Zhe Times. : 


Royal Visit to the G.P.0.—On Thursday last week the King 
and Queen visited the General Post Office. The Postmaster-General 
stated that the Post Office had released about 81,000 men and 1,000 
women for naval and military service. Since the outbreak of war 
the department had provided 40,000 telephones for the Army and 
Navy Departments. The private branch exchange for the Air 
Ministry was the largest in ‘the world, and dealt with 2,500 tele- 
phones. A special system of telephonic aid raid warnings had 
been organised, and. as many as 20,000 messages had been distributed 
on the occasion of one raid. Im each raid 5,000 messages from the 
Field-Marshal’s Department were circulated to local exchanges. 


Russia.—The transmission of private telegrams to Russia 
has been suspended in consequence of action taken by the Russian 
authorities. 


Underground Submarine Cables.—The New York 
Telephone Co.. Long Island Division, has devised a method of 
burying a submarine cable so that it will be safe from the anchors 
of small boats, the spears of eel fishermen, or the rakes of clam or 
oyster diggers. It consists of a simple plough, which is dragged 
along in shallow water where there is a mud bottom, and buries 
the cable 14 in. in the mud. It has proved an unqualified success. 

The Long Island division has also developed a plough for bury- 
ing cables across sajt marshes; it opens a trench 4 in. wide and 
16 in. deep at the rate of 40 ft. per minute, when pulled by a Ford 
engine suitably geared to a winch. The ploughshare is curved in 
such a way that it throws up a layer of sod which merely has to 
be pulled back into the trench with a rake after the cable has been 
laid. The line of the trench is then marked with concrete posts 
where the submarine cable is spliced to the lead cable, and with 
creosoted wood stakes at, about 100-ft. intervals across the marshy 
islands. : 








CONTRACTS OPEN AND CLOSED. 


OPEN. 


Australia,—September 4th, Victorian Railway Commis- 
sioners. 800 lighting transformers for signal system. A copy of 
the specification may be seen at the Inquiry Office of the Depart- 
ment of Overseas: Trade (Development and Intelligence) in London. 


Belfast.—August 16th. Corporation. Two 6,000-Kw. 
turbo-alternators, &c.; one 500-Kw. turbo-alternator, &c.; one 
30-KW. balancer-booster ; four 48,000-lb. per hour water-tube 
boilers ; four fuel economisers, &c. ; two steel chimneys, with fans, 
&c. ; two electrically-driven boiler feed pumps, &c. ; accumulators ; 
three 500-Kw., and five 1,000-Kw. rotary converters, with trans- 
formers, &c.; two 250-K.v.A., two 350-K.V.A., and six 1,250-K.v.a. 
transformers. See “ Official Notices” July 19th. 


Leeds.— August 10th. Electricity Department. Ex- 
tension to feeder switchgear ; alteration of generator switchgear ; 
one 6,000-Kw. turbc-alternator and jet condensing plant ; two 
water-tube boilers, stokers, economisers, c. ; and ash conveying 
plant ; pipes, centrifugal pump, &c. See “ Official Notices” July 19th. 


Spain.—The municipal authorities of Albuquerque have ; 
just invited tenders for the concession for the electric lighting of 
the town during a period of five years. 


CLOSED. 

Australia.—P.M.G.’s Department, South Australia :— 
Telephone accessories.—Western Blectric Co. (Australia), Ltd., £834. 
Commonwealth Railways— 

Cable.—British Insulated & Helsby Cables, Ltd., £235, 
Victorian Railways Department— 

Electric freight lifts at Auburn and Glenferrie.—Holmwood & Oncill, £1,205 

Australian. Mining Standard. 

Gillingham.—T.C. :— 


640 8.u.P, Diesel set.—Banks, Warner & Co., Ltd, 








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vol. 83, No. 21%, Avover 9, 1918] THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 186 





—— 


FORTHCOMING EVENTS. 


North England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers.— 
ol, ngustl0th, At2p.m. Annual general meeting. 
nstitution of Engineers (North-Eastern Section).—Tuesday, 
junior 13th. At 7p.m. At the Mining Institute, Neville Street, Newcastle- 
on-Tyne. Paper on “‘ The Manufacture of Cast-iron Pipes,’ by Mr. T. E. 
Dimbleby. 
Power Engineers’ Association (Southern Division, Western 
Bectricel Ve rnureasy, August 15th. At7 p.m. At Hammersmith B.C. Elec- 
tricity Works. Inaugural meeting. . 








NOTES. 


Electrician Summoned,—At Leeds West Riding Police 
Court, last week, William Ernest Poole, electrical engineer, Crossgates, 
was summoned for an offence under the Defence of the Realm Act, 
and, after a long hearing, was sentenced to three months’ imprison- 
ment. Notice of appeal was given, and defendant was allowed 
bail in two sureties of £250. 


Parliamentary.—RoyaL Assent.—The following Acts 


have received Royal Assent :— 
Electric Lighting Orders Confirmation Act, 1918. 
County of London Electric Supply Co.'s Act, 1918, : 
Volunteer Notes.—Lonpon Army Troops CoMPANIEs, 
VoLUNTEER ENGINEERS.—Headquarters : Balderton Street, Gros- 
venor Square, W. 1. 

Corps Orders No. 33, by Lieut.-Colonel C. B. Clay, V.D., Commanding :— 

Captain of the Week, -Capt. W. Darley Bentley. 

Monday, August 12th, to Friday, August 16th.—Drills as usual. — 

Sunday, August 18th.—Commandant’s Parade at Waterloo Station, 8.45 a.m., 
for work at Esher. Dress: Drill order with haversacks and water bottles. 
Mid-day and tea rations to be carried. 

' C, Hicotns, Capt. R.B., Adjutant, 


Australian Production of Electrolytic Zinc and 
Calcium Carbide.—In the course of an article on the present 
situation and projected developments of hydro-electric enterprises 
in Australia, H.M. Trade Commissioner states in the B. of 7. 
Journal that the total annual output of zinc concentrates in 
Australia amounts to about 400,000 tons, derived chiefly from New 
South Wales and Tasmania. The Electrolytic Zinc Co., whose 
wharf at Risdon, on the Derwent River, is equipped with ore bins 
of 3,000 tons capacity, is expending about £200,000 on plant. The 
present installation is capable of producing by the electrolytic process 
10 tons of zinc per day of 24 hours. The zinc is of a purity of over 
99 per cent. The sulphuric acid used in the electrolytic process 
for the manufacture of spelter will be made from sulphur imported 
from Japan, while the aluminium sheets used are imported from 
the Uhited States. The experimental trials of the plant point to 
the production of electrolytic spelter on a commercial scale being 
thoroughly successful, and at a later date the capacity of the plant 
will be greatly increased. 

The works for the manufacture of calcium carbide, which are 
situated at Electrona, North-West Bay, some 15 miles distant from 
Hobart, are now reported to be complete, and the arrival of the 
transformers is only awaited for energy to be delivered and the 
manufacture of carbide begun. Nearly all the equipment for 
manufacturing the product has been made in Australia, having 
been supplied by an engineering firm in Adelaide. : 

The foundations of coke ovens have been built at Electrona, as 
the company proposes making its own electrodes for the electric 
furnaces. Contracts have been let for the necessary machinery. 
Firebricks for the ovens are being made in Melbourne. The com- 
pany has entered into arrangements with the owners of a colliery 
for the supply of coal, and has an option to purchase the colliery. 
The limestone will come from the company’s own quarries near 
the works. At present the stone is conveyed over a local timber 
company’s tramway line, but eventually an aerial ropeway, which 
has already been purchased, will be installed. 

Hitherto calcium carbide has not been manufactured in 
Australia—the imports, which during recent years have averaged 
about 13,000 tons per annum, having been derived principally from 
Norway, Sweden, Germany, and Canada. The present capacity of 
the Electrona Works is 5,000 tons per annum, but it is proposed to 
increase this. Previous to the introduction of the new tariff in 
December, 1914, calcium carbide was on the free list, but it is now 
subject to a duty of 5 per cent. ad ralorem, except from the United 
Kingdom, when it is free of duty under the Preferential Tariff. 
The shortage of supplies of carbide owing to the war situation, and 
consequently high prices, suggest that this project should prove 
successful. ; 

The industries which will be likely to establish themselves in 
Tasmania are electrochemical and electrometallurgical, all of 
which require very large blocks of power, and for which, it may 
be added, there is alarge amount of raw material within the State 
itself. These industries, which are regarded as primary, will, in 
course of time, lead to the development of existing secondary 
industries, as well as to the establishment of others entirely new 
in Tasmania, The principal inducement for the secondary 
industries to establish themselves would be the relatively greater 
facilities they would have in obtaining their raw material. 

Among minor applications of electrical energy, in the opinion 
of the administration of the Hydro-Electric Department, a very 
Satisfactory business can be developed by applying electricity to 
incubation. New business has also been started by supplying 
energy to the medical profession. Motor cars and commercial 
vehivles propelled by electricity, as well as electric cooking and 
heating installations, are mentioned as probable developments. 








“all That We Have:’—The following “ War Resolu- 
tion” was adopted by the National Electric Light Association at 
the annual meeting at Atlantic City, June 13th-14th, 1918 :— 

“ Resolved; that the National Electric Light Association, in 
annual convention assembled, desires to extend to the President of 
the United States and all others in authority, the assurance that 
in its organisation and its membership it is in thorough accord 
with the fixed determination of the American people and their 
chosen representatives to prosecute the war with the utmost vigour 
and to a victorious conclusion—however long it may take and 
however much it may cost in men, money, and other forms of 
sacrifice. 

“The goal we seek through the prosecution of the war, ig the 
winning of a great peace—a peace so well established that it can- 
not lightly be disturbed by autocratic force, wedded to the doctrine 
that might makes right. For such an end of the war we are ready, 
cheerfully, to submit to such further restrictions of personal and 
corporate activities and fo such further burdens upon private and 
corporate property and business as it may be found necessary to 
impose upon the people and industries of the country. 

* We recognise as the one great menace ef the future the possi- 
bility of an inconclusive peace—an armed truce which would 
inevitably end in a renewal of the unspeakable horrors of the 
present war. That must not be, and the only way to prevent it is 
to carry this war to VICTORY—a victory so complete and over- 
whelming that the forces of evil will be glad to accept such terms 
as an outraged world may be willing in justice to accord. No 
compromise, no half-way measures, no patched-up ‘scraps of 
paper’ can accomplish this great end; but only devotion, the 
patience, the self-sacrifice, and the undying patriotism of our 
people and their great Allies. 

“With a realising sense of the stupendous sacrifices involved, 
but with an abiding faith in the ultimate result, we pledge all 
that we have and all that we are to the holy cause.” 


Planing by Electricity—A new industry recently estab- 
lished at Montreal is the manufacture of electric planers by the 
Simplex Floor Finishing Appliance Co. It is claimed that one of 
these planers does the work ordinarily done. by 20 men in hand- 
planing. The machines are extensively employed in shipbuilding, 
and eight of them, varying in length from 150 to 300 ft., have been 
supplied to the Canadian Vickers Co. These planers can be re-set 
in a few minutes, after planing rough timber, for polishing deck 
surfaces or ways in shipyards.—T7he Jronmonger. 


Fuel Economy.—The Board of Trade announces that 
owing to the large number of miners called to the Colours and the 
great need of coal for our Allies, the various Government Depart- 
ments, and industrial undertakings, the Controller of Coal Mines 
has instituted a Coal Economy Campaign with the object of 
reducing fuel consumption in every direction possible. 

The Controller is being assisted by a technical staff attached to 
the Head Office, and arrangements have been made for a large 
number of engineers in the provinces to attach themselves to 
the Coal Control Department for this special purpose. This 
arrangement enables the country to be mapped out in districts, so 
that all industrial consumers will within a reasonable time be in 
touch with the organisation. 

The scheme comprises two main sections, viz. :—(1) Electrical 
undertakings ; and (2) industrial undertakings. 

The work involved includes the careful scrutiny of the quantity 
and quality of coal consumed by the various undertakings and the 
efficiency obtained. It also includes the inspection of factories and 
works by experts, in order to ascertain means by which the fuel 
consumption may be reduced, and the best methods to that end. 

A considerable amount of work in connection with the campaign 
has already been done, but it is intended to accelerate the rate of 
progress as much as circumstances will admit. Some 400 skilled 
engineers will shortly be at work in various parts of the British 
Isles, and these gentlemen are giving their services to the Govern- 
ment without salary. 

Any public body or company or person wishing to effect 
economies at once, and desiring the Controller's assistance in this 
direction, is invited to communicate with Coal Control Head- 
quarters, Room 309, Holborn Viaduct Hotel, London, E.C. 1, when 
arrangements will be made to send a technical expert to look into 
the conditions under which coal is being consumed, and to 
co-operate with the consumer in effeeting economy. 

Apart from special applications of this kind, the Controller's 
representatives will visit firms in turn, in accordance with a general 
plan of operations. 

So imperative is the need to reduce coal consumption to a 
minimum that a rationing scheme for all industrial undertakings 
will be introduced shortly. 


Electric Vehicles in. New Zealand.—According to news 
just to hand from Christchurch, the Municipal Council of that city 
is proposing to take up the business of the sale of electrical indus- 
trial motor-vehicles. A deputation from the Council recently 
waited on the N.Z. Board of Trade to ask for Government assistance 
in obtaining the shipment from America to New Zealand of a 
number of electric motor trucks. Mr. E. E, Stark, the city electrical 
engineer, stated that there was a field in the Christchurch district 
for the sale and use of 600 electric motor trucks, and that the City 
Council was in negotiation for taking over an agency for their sale. 
If the business were secured, at least 4,200 tons of petrol would be 
saved annually. After hearing the Council’s arguments, the Board 
of Trade officials promised to ascertain whether it would be possible 
to secure the steamer space for 13 electric motor trucks in the near 
future. 








136 


‘ THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 


a 


[Vol. 83. No. 2,124, AuGusrT 9, 1918, 





Fatality —Denis White, electrician, was working at 
wires in a Dublin munition factory, last week, when the pincers 
which he had in his hand came in contact with alive wire. He 
had to hold on to the pincers to save himself from falling, and his 
comrades, seeing his plight, switched off the current. White, 
however, was unable to recover his foothold, and fell to the ground, 
striking against machinery on the way. When taken to the hospital 
it was found that he was dead. 


Water Power in India.—In a paper on water power in 
India, which was read before the Indian Section of the Royal 
Society of Arts by Mr. Alfred Dickinson, M.I.E.E. (No. 3,417, 
Vol. LXVI, Journal of the Society), particulars are given of the 
various water-power schemes already developed, the most important 
of which thus far is that of the Tata Hydro-Electric Power Supply 
Co, The advantages of water-power development in India will be 
apparent to those who appreciate the industrial awakenings of the 
vast Empire. It is the author’s opinion that, so far as the captains 
of finance and industry in the West are concerned, they have not 
been ignorant of the industrial possibilities in India, but hitherto 
have not shown the necessary confidence by taking part in helping 
forward rapid development. They had the opportunity to finance 
and construct the Tata hydro-electric scheme, but failed to appre- 
ciate its importance. It was, therefore, left to India to find the 
requisite capital, to the great advantage of the Indian investor, for 
this is the only electrical undertaking of magnitude which, in the 
first year of its working, has earned and paid a dividend on its full 
capital ; and, although it is as yet incomplete, it is earning a profit 
of over £190,000 per annum. 

In the discussion that followed, the chairman (Lord Lamington) 
asked whether any reason could be given for the fact that yarn 
was much better when the motive power used was electricity, and 
also whether the pipe track of 2} miles, witha fall of over 1,700 ft., 
was not a record. He agreed with the author that it would be 
very advantageous if the Government of India had a complete 
survey made of all the possible sources of supply in the country, 
which ought not, in his opinion, to be worked by the Government, 
but by private enterprise. 

Sir Charles H. Armstrong, Sir Francis Younghusband, and Mr. 
C. H. B. Burlton all spoke on the large amount of water power that 
was being wasted at the present time due to ignorance of the 
hydrographic conditions in India, and the great benefits that would 
accrue were these water powers to be harnessed and the railways 
electrified. Mr. E.S. WooMard Moore, replying to the discussion, 
mentioned that the Tata scheme at Khopoli, earning £190,000 per 
annum profit at $d. per unit, showed that the capital expenditure 
was not incommensurate with the results that had been achieved. 
The height of the Khopoli Fall was not unique; but although 
there were higher falls harnessed, their installed horse-power was 
less. The aggregate horse-power of the three schemes of Messrs. 
Tata—the Khopoli scheme which was actually at work, the Audhra 
Valley scheme which was in course of construction, and the Koyna 
River scheme, the largest of them all, which was being studied— 
was over half a million continuous horse-power, or about one 
million horse-power on a 10-hour day basis. Their capacity ex- 
ceeded the aggregate horse-power of steam turbines installed at the 
present time in the whole of the United Kingdom. It was some- 
what difficult to realise what such huge super-power stations 
meant. Taking a station of 300,000 H.P., such as the proposed 
Koyna River station, if that were a steam station operated for 24 
hours per day, it would need 30,000 to 35,000 tons of good quality 
coal per week. The price of coal in India was rising faster than 
the interest on capital was rising. He thought that coal could be 
more usefully employed in the development of industry in India 
in the way of actual direct manufacture than in the production of 
power. Another point of comparison was that the storage capacity 
for a 300,000-H.P, steam station in the matter of coal was a point 
of considerable importance when coal was being used at the rate of 
35,000 tons a week. The amount of ashes that would have to be 
disposed of would be about 5,000 tons a week. The condensers for 
a station of that size—a problem far more difficult in the Tropics 
than in a temperate climate—would require about 25,000,000 
gallons of water per hour. So that the comparison between water 
power and steam power in India seemed to tend enormously in 
favour of water power, and cheap water power for India was no 
idle dream, but a realisable proposition. 


Standardising Fuses for Motor-Car Electric Lighting Sets. 
—The smallest standard fuse marked under the National Electric 
Code of the American National Board of Fire Underwriters is 2 in. 
long with ferrules ;"; in. in diameter. Smaller fuses are regarded 
as‘ special, and the National Board above mentioned recommends 
that all fuses, whether special or not, shall be marked with their 
voltage and current capacity. The American Society of Auto- 
motive Engineers, on the recommendation of the Electric Equip- 
ment Division of its Standards Committee, has resolved that fuses 
of the same dimensions as the National Electric Code be marked 
according to the requirements of that code. It has also been 
decided that the present marking instructions be changed from 
“ Fuses to be marked 25 volts and their carrying capacity,” to read 
“The voltage (V) and current capacity (C) shall be plainly marked 
on one of the ferrules of each fuse.” 


Canadian Metallurgy.—lIn a paper by Alfred Stansfield, 
F.R.S.C., on recent advances in Canadian metallurgy, read before 
the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers, the author states that at 
the outbreak of war a Commisssion was appointed to consider the 
situation with respect to the supplies of copper and zinc. The 
Commission concluded that the electrolytic process offered ‘the 
greatest probability of filling the need, and made arrangements 


with the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co., which led to the 
establishment at Trail of a plant for producing electrolytic zinc 
from British Columbia ores. At the present time this plant has 
capacity of about 300 tons of zinc per week. During the war, 
research has been taken up, and although commercial success hag 
not yet been attained, it is expected that work will be resumed 
during the present year. Experimental work on the production of 
zinc oxide for paint by the Wetherill process has been carried out, 
and following on from this a full-sized plant has been erected at 
Notre Dame des Anges. 

Soon after the outbreak of war the International Co. agreed to 
erect a nickel’ refinery sufficiently large for the British require- 
ments of nickel. This refinery is now being built at Port Colhone, 
in Ontario, and should be in operation in the present year ; it will 
have an initial output of 7,500 tons of nickel perannum. Mean- 
while, the British America Nickel Corporation, a strong British- 
Canadian company controlled by the Imperial Governmént, has 
acquired about 17,000 acres of mineral land in the Sudbury district, 
and early in 1917 began the construction of a large smelting and 
refining works. The new plant is expected to be in operation in 
1919, and will have an output of 6,000 tons of refined nickel per 
annum. By 1919 we may expect a production of some 13,000 tons 
of nickel in Canada, in addition to, perhaps, three times this amount 
in matt refined abroad. 

Antimony is not produced to any extent in Canada, although a 
small amount is derived from the electrolytic refining of lead at Trail. 
In view of the high price and unusual demand for the metal, a 
mine of low-grade ore at Lake George, New Brunswick, was opened, 
and an efficient process was devised for extracting the metal from 
ore by volatilisation. By the time that the process had been 
brought to a satisfactory condition, other supplies became available, 
and the mine and smelter had to be closed. 

The metal aluminium is made at Shawinigan Falls from bauxite 
which is imported from France, as no ores of commercial value 
have been found in Canada. Figures for the production of this 
metal are not; published, as only one firm is engaged in the industry, 
but the production has increased materially during the war. 

The process of extracting aluminium from alumina (purified 
bauxite) was the only operation in Canada before the war that 
depended on the electrolysis of fused salts, but a fresh industry of 
this kind has now been started—the production of the metal 
magnesium. The author succeeded in producing magnesium in 
the laboratory, and the process was developed into commercial 
operation at Shawinigan Falls. At present the crude materials 
are imported, but ultimately it is intended to use Canadian 
magnesite as the ore of this metal. Magnesium is now made in 
considerable quantities at this plant. 


Electricians’ Allowances.—An_increased* out-of-town 
allowance for members of the National Federated Electrical Asso- 
ciation and the Electrical Trades Association has been conceded, 
The award, issued during the week-end, provides for an allowance 
of 3s. 6d. per night for the first fortnight and 3s. per night after- 
wards. The old scale of out-working allowance was 2s. 6d. per 
night.— Manchester Daily Dispatch. 


Committee on Transport Reform.—A Select Committee 
of the House of Commons has been appointed to consider what 
steps, if any, it is desirable to take to develop and improve the 
internal facilities for transport within the United Kingdom, to 
secure effective supervision and co-ordination, and to ensure that 
such developments and improvements shall be adequate and suit- 
able to meet the national requirements; and to make recom- 
mendations. 


Battery Service for Electrics——A simple scheme for 
popularising the extensive use of commercial-electric vehicles is 
outlined in the Commercial Motor of June 20th, as carried out by 
the Edison’ Electric Illuminating Co., of Boston, which has intro- 
duced what is known as a battery and inspection service. The 
owner of the vehicle enters into an arrangement with the company 
whereby he is assured of being able to use his vehicle the round 24 
hours if the exigencies of his business so demand, the service being 
divided into two shifts—day and night respectively. The facility 
with which the electric can be handled has contributed very 
materially to this end, while the fact that there is virtually 
nothing to go wrong, so far as the mechanical equipment is con- 
cerned, also has appreciably assisted the movement towards 24 
hours’ duty. 

The customer signs an agreement with the company to observe 
its conditions and the schedule of prices which has been drawn 
up. This contract is made for a period of 33 months, although it 
may be terminated at any time by either party by giving 60 days’ 
notice. The contract carries a card on which particulars of the 
make of the customer’s car, its size and rating, are entered, while 
the vehicle is also given a serial number. The card, which is kept 
by the accounting department, has space to receive a record of the 
fixed costs incurred by the vehicle during the period of the contract. 
The customer, is then provided with a new battery, the price of 
which naturally varies according to the weight and carrying 
capacity of his vehicle. An advance payment is made on account 
of this item, ranging from £147, in the case of the 4-tonner, which 
is fitted with a 9 MV Ironclad battery, to £320 for a 6-tonner, 
which carries a 21 MV accumulator. This payment is divided into 
four equal instalments, the first being paid upon the signing of the 
agreement, the second when the battery is first installed in the 
vehicle, the third 30 days after its installation, while the final 
payment falls due at the end of 60 days. 

This initial charge is supposed to cover the cost of the battery 
provided, together with a proportionate additional sum to defray 
the cost of additional batteries that may be required to guarantee 

y ‘ 


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7o—X— 


Vol. 83. No, 2,124, Avaust 9, 1918.] 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 137 





—_—_—_ 


the customer @ permanent service. Should the latter decide to 
terminate his agreement at any time prior to four months before 
the normal expiration of the term of 33 months, the company 
delivers to him a battery similar to that provided for the vehicle, 
and having an estimated life, under ordinary duty, equal to the 
unexpired part of the term, less four months, which is the accepted 


salvage value of a worn-out battery expressed in terms of use. - 


When the battery is installed the customer is entitled to call at any 
of the stations maintained by the company for the provision of 
battery service, to have his battery re-charged, or, if time and 
business will not permit, to have the run-down unit withdrawn, and 
a fully-charged accumulator substituted. So faras the customer is 
concerned, he is merely called upon to pay for the energy contained 
in the substituted battery in precisely the same way as the driver 
of a petrol vehicle pays only for the fuel contents when he 
surrenders an empty tin for a full tin, plus a sum inclusive of 
depreciation, When making the exchange the company gives a 
coupon declaring the capacity of the exchanged battery in ampere- 
hours. Should the battery fail to deliver this capacity and the 
vehicle accordingly become stranded, the company defrays the cost 
of towing the vehicle back to the station. 

The scale of charges which has been drawn up to assure this 
battery and inspection service is determined upon a mileage basis. 
The garage charge is only levied when the customer does not 
garage his vehicle with the company. For the determination of 
the mileage run the customer is compelled to fit an odometer of a 
type approved by the company. 

So far as the user is concerned, he merely undertakes to protect 
and to take care of the batteries while in his possession, subject to 
reasonable wear and tear, and to maintain his lorries, keeping them 
well oiled. He also agrees to permit the company at any reason- 
able time to inspect his vehicle for the purpose of ascertaining the 
condition of the mechanical and electrical details, as well as the 
accuracy of his.odometer. Should any defects be discovered, he is 
called upon to remedy them at his own expense. But so far as the 
battery is concerned, he is exposed to no liability,other than that 
arising from wilful neglect or damage. The company undertakes 
to keep this factor in a condition of high efficiency. 

The enterprise is meeting with considerable success in Boston, 
electric vehicle users having enthusiastically embraced the oppor- 
tunity of being relieved of battery attention. So far as the changing 
of batteries is concerned, but little delay is incurred. The batteries 
are disposed in readily demountable cradles, facilitating their 
removal and substitution. A discharged battery can be removed 
and a fully charged one replaced within five minutes. 


Institution and Lecture Notes.—Association of Mining 
Electrical Engineers.—Mr. T. J. Nelson, A.M.LE.E., who has 
been unanimously elected President of the South Wales Branch 
of the Association of Electrical Engineers, is the electrical engineer 
at the Cribbwr Fawr Collieries. 

Electrical Power Engineers’ Association.—SournHern Dtv1- 
SION, WESTERN SECTION.—Owing to the large influx of members, 
it has been decided to form a London Western Section, and an 
inaugural meeting will be held on Thursday, the 15th inst., at 
7 p.m., at Hammersmith Electricity Works. All staff engineers 
engaged in the generation, distribution, or utilisation of electrical 
energy within an area of approximately five miles north, west, or 
south and one mile east of Hammersmith Borough Council Elec- 
tricity Works are invited to attend. 


44 Hours per Week.—According to the Muenchester 
Daily Dispatch, the Engineering and Shipbuilding Trades Union 
Federation has passed a resolution favouring a 44 hours’ week, 
and the employers are to he asked for a joint conference within a 
month to discuss the question. 


Appointments Vacant.—Electrician for the military 
camps in South Irish district ; shift engineer (63s.) for the Stoke- 
on-Trent Corporation Electricity Department; junior assistant 
engineer (70s. + £1 and 12} per cent.) for the borough of Wimble- 
don Eleetricity Department ; junior shift engineer for the Crewe 
Corporation Electricity Works ; charge engineer for the Dover B.C. 
Electricity Department ; engineer-in-charge (£175 plus £1 plus 
12) per cent.) for the Hammersmith B.C. Electricity Department ; 
assistant shift engineer (68s. 3d.) for the County Borough of Bury 
Electricity Department ; shift engineer (67s. + 124 per cent.) for 
— Corporation Electricity Works. See our advertisement pages 
to-day. 


_ Auction Sale.—By order of the Receiyer, Messrs. L. 
Farmer & Sons will, sell by auction at Millwall, on August 22nd, 
the plant and machinery and stock of electrical fittings, &c., of 
the Blackwall Engineering and Welding Works. Full particulars 
are given in our advertisement pages to-day. 


New Norwegian Electrode Factory.—The new factory 
at Frederikstad, Norway, for the manufacture of electrodes 
is owned and to be operated by the A. S. Norske Elektrode- 
verker, and both carbon and graphite electrodes will be 
produced. The plant’s capacity is 4,000 tons of carbon or 
1,000 tons of graphite electrodes a year. The same general 
standards and sizes of graphite electrodes are to be manu- 
actured as those used throughout the United States. Ameri- 
can engineers and machinery experts have been engaged to 
onduct the work of the factory, in which the machinery is 
t) be almost exclusively of American manufacture. Previous 
to the war most of the electrodes imported into Norway came 
frou Italy, Sweden, and the United States, but for some 
+ now the imports have come almost solely from the 
nited States.—Iron and Coal Trades Review. 


Heat Treating in Electric Furnaces.—According to a 
paper on the electric furnace in the forge shop for heating 
illets for forging, and the heat treating of iorgings, pre- 
sented to the American Drop Forging Association by Mr. 
T.. F. Baily, president of the Electric Decanes Co., Alliance, 
Ohio, there.is a saving of metal due to the lack of oxidisation 
in the electric furnace. which in extreme cases of, say, 5 per 
cent. loss on steel worth £16 13s. 4d. per ton would amount 
to about 16s. 8d. per ton of metal heated. In addition to 
this, the steel being in much better condition when it goes 
to the hammer or press due to the absence of scale, there 
is less wear on the dies, and less danger of the dies being 
filled up with scale, as it is sometimes difficult even with an 
air draught to keep the dies entirely free. A typical running 
sheet on an electric furnace of 600 KW. capacity he 34-in. 
round billets for forging into 3-in. naval shells showed the 
average energy consumption per ton to be a little less than 
260 Kw.-hours, but taking as a basis 300 kw.-hours per ton 
to cover the delays in starting up on this type of furnace 
and with energy at 4d. per KW.-hour, the cost of heating for 
electricity would be 12s. 6d. a ton. It was stated that the 
renewals and repairs should not exceed those of a fuel fired 
furnace, and in fact these repairs should average much less. 
Against this cost per ton for electric furnace operation the 
fuel oil for a similar furnace operating on substantially 2 tons 
per hour would approximate in the average plant at least 
50 gal. per ton. With a consumption of 40 gal. per ton and 
oil at 24d. per gal., this charge would be at least 8s. 4d. per 
ton. Thus if the metal loss on a £16 steel should be over 
14 per cent., or 4s. 2d. a ton of steel heated, the cost of 
electric furnace and fuel fired furnace operation would be 
the same with the exception of a better class of work done 
in the electric furnace, which would make a greater saving 
due to the production of more good forgings. The paper also 
states that in the furnace referred to the difference in metal 
loss is somewhat over 5 per cent., and the reduction in the 
number of pierced billets rejected is such that in this item 
alone there would be at least 5 per cent. more forgings by 
the electric furnace heating due to the more perfect heating 
of the billets —Iron and Coal Trades Review. 








OUR PERSONAL COLUMN. 


The Editors invite electrical engineers, whether connected with the 
technical or the commercial side of the profession and industry. 
also electric tramway and railway officials, to keep readers of the 
ELECTRICAL REVIEW posted as to their movements. 


Central Station and Tramway Officials.—Leicester Cor- 
poration has increased the salary of Mr. A. F. Lucas, the 
tramway manager, from £450 to £500 per annum. 

Mr. C. A. NerHercot, accountant at the Bath electricity 
works, has tendered his resignation, having received an ap- 
pointment under the Ministry of Munitions. 

Mr. L. Brapsurn has left the position of engineer in-charge 
to the Mansfield Corporation electricity works, and taken up 
a similar post under the Ashton-under-Lyne Corporation. 

Mr. H. Lees, of Eastbourne, has been appointed shift 
engineer at the Accrington electricity works in place of Mr. 
A. Ecroyd, resigned, at a salary of £195, inclusive of war 
bonus. 


_General.—The King has authorised the wearing of decora- 
tions conferred upon the following by the President of the 
French Republic :— 


Officer of the Legion of Honour. 


Sir Epmunp Wy.ipsorre Situ, Assistant Secretary, Board of Trade, Presi- 
dent of the Commission Internationale de Ravitaillement. 

Uuick Firzceracp Wrwtour, Esq., C.B., C.M.G., Permanent Secretary, 
Ministry of Food, late Director of Army Contracts. 

Cuaries Hirwoop, Esq., C.B., Assistant Secretary, Marine Department, 


Board of Trade. 
Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. 

Sir Dante. Macautay Stevenson, Bt., Chairman of the Scottish Coal E#- 
wae Association, and of the Joint Committee on the Supply of Coal to 
france and Italy. 

Sir Ricnuarpv Avucustine Struppert Repmayne, K.C.B., Chief Inspector of 
Mines. 

Sir Dovuctas Wiut1am Cwen, K.B.E., Chairman of the War Risks Advisory 


Committee, and of the Coal Exports Committee. 
Recinacp WALTER Matruew, Esq., Principal Clerk, Board of Trade. 
Grorce Renwick, Esq., of Newcastle-on-Tyne. 
Apam “Nimmo, Esq., President of the Mining Association of Great Britain. 
Roll of Honour.—Lieutenant H. E. Betamy, R.A.F., has 
been killed whilst on duty as a flying instructor. Before the 


war Lieutenant Bellamy was with the Lancashire Dynamo 
and Motor Co., Ltd., Trafford Park. 

Private R. Tayuor, Lancashire Fusiliers, previously re- 
ported missing and now officially presumed to have been 
killed, was employed by Messrs. Dick, Kerr & Co., Ltd., 
Preston. 

Bombardier F. Rawcuirre, R.F.A., who has been presented 
with the Military Medal for repairing communication wires 
under intense fire, was assistant electrician with Messrs. Thos. 
Dugdale, Brother & Co., Blackburn. 

Corporal P. SieiGH, formerly an electrical engineer in the 
Salvage Corps of the Glasgow Corporation, has died from 
wounds received in action, 








2 





188 THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. ‘vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918, 


——y 





Private B. Viacars, R.A.M.C., who was on the electrical 
engineering staff of the Shelton Iron & Steel Co.,-Ltd., has 
gained the Military Medal for gallantry on the field. - 

Second-Lieutenant J. S. You.t, formerly an electrician at 
the power station at Thornley Colliery (Co. Durham), has 
been awarded the Victoria Cross for killing the team of a 
German machine-gun and turning the weapon on the enemy, 
and in recognition of other valiant deeds in counter-attacks. 
He has also received from the King of Italy the Silver Medal 
for Valour. Ps 

Second-Lieutenant A. MarsHatL, Northumberland Fusiliers, 
who has been awarded the Military Cross, was an electrician 
with the Banknock Coal Co. 

Private J. W.- WaRDILL, who was employed at the Leeds 
Corporation Tramways power station at Crown Point, has 
been wounded. 


Obituary.—Mr. Epwin Biakey.—We regret to record the 
death of Mr. Edwin Blakey, M.I.E.E., consulting engineer, 
Barmouth, who died on July 2th, at his residence, Cwm 
Glas, Arthog, near Dolgelley, aged 68 years. He was seized 
with influenza about a month ago, and it developed into 
pneumonia. Mr. Blakey before he went to Wales, over 20 
years ago, was a partner in the firm of Blakey, Emmott and 
Co., Halifax, and a pioneer in the telephone line. He was 
also for some years consulting engineer to the Madeira Elec- 
tric Lighting Co., and other concerns. 








OFFICIAL RETURNS OF ELECTRICAL 
COMPANIES, 


Budenberg Gauge Co., Ltd.—Particulars of £15,000 six 
per cent. debentures created June 24th, 1918, filed pursuant to Section 93 
(3) of the Companies (Consolidation) Act, 1908, the amount of the present 
issue being £12,800. Property charged: The company’s undertaking and 
property, present and future, including uncalled capital. No trustees. (Note: 
£10,000 debentures dated 1903 have been paid off recently.) 


Chemico-Electric Co., Ltd.—Mortgage dated March 28th, 
1918, created by the company as guarantor in respect of £3,500 owing to the 
Capital and Counties Bank by Crosby Oil Shales, Ltd., charged on the sum 
of £3,500 (part of £4,500) owing to this company by the Ballengeich Col- 
lieries on certain debentures. 


Banbury & District Electric Supply Co., Ltd. (65,746).— 
Capital, £25,000 in £10 shares. Return dated May 28th, 1918. All shares 
taken up and fully paid. Mortgages and charges: £5,200. 








CITY NOTES. 


At the annual meeting held on July 


Marconi’s 3lst, Mr. Godfrey Isaacs presided, in the 
Wireless absence of Senatore Marconi in Italy. 
Telegraph Mr. Isaacs, referring to the recent verdict 
Co., Ltd. against him in the Courts, tendered his 


resignation of the managing directorship 
of the company, and offered to terminate his agreement forth- 
with. The meeting, however, on the motion of Captain 
H. R. Sankey, declined to accept it, and expressed its com- 
plete confidence in Mr. Isaacs’s honour and integrity. After 
this the chairman proceeded to deal with the report, touching 
first upon the capital account, and the shares in associated 
companies, afterwards reviewing the proceedings in the action 
against the Post Office. Judgment was given for the com- 
pany, and the matter had been referred to a referee to assess 
the damages. The learned judge appointed for that purpose 
would not be able to sit until October. There was, however, 
at last a fair prospect of the matter being disposed of .before 
the end of the present year. It had always been their wish 
to arrive at a reasonable and friendly settlement of the 
matter by which the nation could benefit by the stations, 
rather than pay a very large sum of money in damages with 
nothing to show for it. Even at this eleventh hour any 
reasonable and fair offer would be most willingly accepted 
by the company. The position with regard to the other sums 
due from the Government remained just as it was a year ago. 
There had been some negotiations, but so far no offer even 
approaching the sum which the company could reasonably 
accept had been forthcoming, and one almost began to despair 
of being able to obtain a settlement by negotiation and agree- 
ment. Their inventions and patents continued to be used on 
an immense and ever-increasing scale by the Admiralty, the 
War Office, and the R.A.F. After passing considerable 
criticism on the attitude of the Government and the absence 
of co-ordination and authority, Mr. Isaacs: said that the in- 
terests of the company abroad continued to develop satisfac- 
torily, on the whole. In the U.S.A. a new company had 
been formed with the approval of the U.S. Government, by 
the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co. of America, with the 
title of the Pan-American Telegraph & Telephone Co. Its 
object is to erect stations for the purpose of creating a com- 
mercial service of wireless telegraphy between North, Central, 
and South America. The shares of the company are held as 
to 40 per cent. by the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co. of 
America, as to 20 per cent. by the Federal Telegraph Co., the 
owners of the Poulsen system interest in the U.S., and as to 


—_—_—— 


40 per cent. by this company. It was intended to proceeg 
momediately with the erection of high-powered stations. 
The Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co. of America had declared 
a dividend of 5 per cent. for the past year, and their works 
had been considerably increased in order to cope with Goverp. 
ment, orders. The whole of their long-distance and coast 
wireless stations were under the control of the U.S. Gover. 
ment for the duration of the war upon terms which had been 
agreed and which were regarded by the management a 
reasonable, and monthly payments were regularly made. The 
Canadian Co. had made good progress during the past year 
and a fair profit resulted. Before, however, the company 
could be expected to pay dividends some reorganisation of its 
capital would be required. The matter should not be longer 
delayed, and they had invited the Canadian company directors 
to submit their suggestions. 4 

The Australian company, Amalgamated Wireless (Austra. 
lasia), Ltd., was making excellent progress under the manag- 
ing direction of Mr. E. T. Fisk and a reconstituted board. 

The Argentine company, the Compania Marconi de Tele. 
grafia sin Hilos del Rio de la Plata, in consequence of the 
war, had necessarily stood still. The Spanish company, the 
Compania Nacional de Telegrafia sin Hilos, was conducting 
a very substantial telegraph business, and had made excellent 
arrangements in other directions, which gave every reason 
to hope that the company had now turned the corner. 

The Russian ¢ompany, the Société Russe de Télégraphes 
et Téléphones sans Fil, had been passing through very difii- 
cult times. They had, naturally, suffered severely from the 
difficult labour conditions, but had suffered no other harm, 
and having regard to the importance of wireless telegraphy in 
Russia, no matter what the Government of the day might 
be, there were fair grounds for supposing that importance 
would always be attached to a business such as that of the 
Russian company. In these and other circumstances they 
had not thought it necessary to make any special reserve in 
respect of the very considerable surn of money they had in. 
vested in_ Russia. 

The Belgian company, the Société Anonyme Internationale 
de Télégraphie sans Fil, notwithstanding the prevailing con- 
ditions, had continued to conduct its business satisfactorily, 
It had, however, been impossible for the board, other than 
Captain Sankey and himself, to meet, and therefore no divi- 
dend could be paid until circumstances changed. 

The French company, the Compagnie Francaise Maritime 
et Coloniale de ig om gre sans Fil, had continued to doa 
good business, and had substantially increased its dividend. 

The Cie. Universelle de Télégraphie et de Telephonie sans 
Fil, in which they were so largely interested, was now in 
course of liquidation. The whole of its tangible assets had 
been sold to a new company, entitled the Cie. Générale de 
Télégraphie sans Fil, with a capital of 12,500,000f., the whole 
of which had been subscribed in cash by about twenty share- 
holders,.amongst which were the French Cable Co. (with the 
approval of the French Government), the Banque de Paris 
et des Pays Pas, Banque Francaise pour le Commerce et 
l’Industrie, Banque Transatlantique, Crédit Mobilier Fran- 
cais, Messrs. Jacques, Gunzburg et Cie., Société Centrale des 
Banques de Province, and, again with the approval of the 
French Government, Marconi’s Wireless Telegraph Co., Ltd. 
It had been agreed that they should subscribe for 40 per cent. 
of the total capital, and that they had done, representing 
sum of 5,000,000f. The liquidation of the Cie. Universelle, 
when complete, would produce to this company a sum of 
approximately 11,000,000f. This was a most satisfactéry 
settlement of one of the most troublesome and difficult posi- 
tions with which he had ever had to deal. Under this new 
régime, the 40 per cent. of the capital which they now held 
in this new French company would produce to them right 
away excellent returns and far more than they ever could 
have secured through ‘their much larger holding in the Cie. 
Universelle. 

After alluding to the substantial developments of the Mar- 
coni International Marine Communication Co., the speaker 
said that the Italian business had again been of a highly 
satisfactory nature and most ably directed by the Marquis 
Solari, their representative in' Rome. 

The Relay Automatic Telephone Co., Ltd., in which they 
had a very large interest, had had its sphere of action very 
considerably restricted if consequence of the war. It had, 
however, been able to do some business, notably that of in- 
stalling its system at Australia House, amongst other large 
establishments, where it was working to perfection. This com- 
pany, when war closed, had a great future in front of it: 
unquestionably automatic. telephones would be the order of 
the day when circumstances changed. 

They had many important negotiations in many parts of 
the world of which it would not be wise for him to. speak 
that day, but one might fairly contemplate that the business 
of wireless telegraphy would be no less. important when peace 
came than it had been during the war. In speaking with an 
eminent officer of the U.S. Navy Department a day or 9 
ago, he told him that although before the war he was of @ 
very different opinion} he had now come to the conclusion 
that no new long-distance cables would ever again be laid: 
that, in his view. wireless telegraphy was thoroughly efficient 
for all telegraphic purposes. It would not be perhaps 
altogether advisable for.him (the speaker) to express such 
views, but they were those of a practical man, holding 40 
important position in 4 great and progressive country. 





9, 1918, 


es 


to proceed 
d stations, 
“* declared 
Heir work 
ith Govern. 
and coast 
8. Govern. 
had been 
Bement as 
made. The 
} Past year 
> Company 
ation of its 
_ longer 

Y directors 


iS (Austra. 
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1 de Tele. 
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© excellent 
ary reason 


jay might 
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rnationale 
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ther than 
e no divi- 


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ionie sans 
S now in 
ssets had 
nérale de 
the whole 
ity share- 
(with the 
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merce et 
ier Fran- 
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al of the 
Co., Ltd. 
per cent. 
senting a 
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) sum of 
tisfactéry 
cult posi- 
this new 
now held 
em right 
er could 
the Cie. 


the Mar- 
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ich they 
ion very 
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=n peace 
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iy or 80 
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nclusion 
be laid; 
efficient 
perhaps 
ss such 
ding an 











Vol. 83. No. 2,124, AvcusT 9, 1918.] 





THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. - 189 









At the annual meeting on July 18th, 

Edmundson’s Mr. P. D. Tuckett, who presided, said 

Electricity that despite the ever-increasing difficulties 

Corpn., Ltd. they were able to show approximately the 

same net profit as for the previous year. 

Apart from the Lancashire Power Co., the capital expendi- 
ture of the sub-companies had again been extremely small, 
and this and the virtual disappearance of their private in- 
stallation work, except on Government contracts, had in- 
evitably reduced the gross trading profit. On the other hand, 
the item of dividends and interest showed a small but gratify- 
ing increase, whilst the loss hitherto shown on the working 
of the local authorities’ and other undertakings was for the 
first time converted into a profit (£612), as ‘against a loss of 
#3896 for the previous year. : : Sr 

Expenses risen in every direction, the rise in wages 
and in the price of coal had add¢éd some £22,000 to costs. It 
was only by advancing rates of charge and by the encourag- 
ing growth of power and heating loads that they had been at 
all able to meet them. Apart from the Lancashire Power 
Co., they sold over 3,000,000 more units for power and 
heating, which now accounted for about 85 per cent. of the 
total output, whilst connections increased by 5,076 Kw., of 
which 92 per cent. represented power and heating. It was 
surprising how well the connections had been maintained, in 
spite of the manifold restrictions and other difficulties. Most 
of them were required for war purposes, and might therefore 
not be retained in their entirety after the war. - 

But for the facilities afforded by the electric supply in- 
dustry it would have been impossible for the pressing needs 
of increased production to have been promptly met. His 
only regret was that the benefit to the nation was not re- 
flected im @ more adequate and immediate benefit to the 
shareholders. During the past four years they had connected 
over 20,000 KW., independently of 7,500 Kw. connected by 
the Lancashire Power Co., and since, during the same period 
they had spent less than £150,000 capital, and no more than 
£9,000 and £10,000 the last two years, they were now faced 
with the necessity. in one or two instances of making’ sub- 
stantial additions to plant and mains, whilst after the war 
they would probably have to make good the leeway which 
had occurred in a good many of their undertakings. It was 
therefore fortunate that, thanks to their past policy of 
strengthening the financial stability of the sub-companies by 
the provision of more adequate reserves, they were to-day in 
the happy position of finding themselves with something 
like £75,000 liquid resources, as compared with £14,000 in 
1914. These resources would be invaluable after the war. 
In the meantime, the Ministry of Munitions-had agreed to 
make the Urban Co..@ loan of £75,000 to enable it to under- 
take the extension of its plant, and they were hoping to 
secure a still larger loan for the Cornwall Co. 

Most of their undertakings had done somewhat better, but 
Guernsey and the Isle of V ight had again suffered severely. 
In all cases, good and bad, the results were almost entirely 
determined by war conditions. Where local industry had 
been stimulated by the war, or where ‘troops had been 
quartered in the neighbourhood, the undertakings had bene- 
fited, and vice versa. The marked improvement shown by 
the Urban .Co. was largely due to the development of the 
power load at Twickenham and in Cornwall, and to the pro- 
sperity of Grantham. The Lancashire Power Co. had again 
made some progress, and as a result of its reduction and re- 
arrangement of capital, they had now received a dividend 
on the preference shares. He had to report the renewal, for 
« further period of five years, of their contract with the 
Urban Co. on pry the same terms as before, except 
that the annual ‘fee payable to them for management was 
increased from £2,000 to £3,000. 

In referring to the difficulties under which they were 
operating, Mr. Tuckett said that their latest nightmare was 
the new rationing scheme. It was very doubtful whether the 
scheme was going to result in any material saving of coal 
so far as their stations were concerned, the conditions govern- 
ing the supply of electricity beiig so entirely different from 
those governing the manufacture of gas; but it would doubt- 
less have been difficult to ration one without the other. 

_ In addition to the relief which they hoped to derive from 
increased charges, they could rely on some increase in trad- 
ing profit this year owing to the much larger capital expendi- 
ture which was likely to be incurred by the sab-companies. 

Referring to the reports of three Government Committees 
on various aspects of the electrical industry, the chairman 
said that the Electric Power Supply“Committee’s proposals 
would probably be materially modified before legislative effect 
was given to them, and it would therefore be premature for 
him to discuss them in any detail. 

: For the half-year ended June 30th, 

_ Yorkshire 1918, the directors report satisfactory pro- 
Electric Power gress. The gevenue has increased, and 
Co, although the cost of coal, labour, and 
materials continues to rise, the net profit 
is greater on account of the larger business done. After pay- 
ment of bank and other interest the net profits for the three 
half-years ended June 30th were :—I1916, £13,550; 1917, 
£17,617; 1918, £28.683. The 6 per cent. cum. pref. dividend 
for the half-year has been paid. In view of the financial 
conditions arising out of the war the directors are deferring 
the payment of a dividend on the ordinary shares until the 
accounts are made up for the year. The second 6,000-xw. 





turbo-alternator at Thornhill power station is now in use. 
The Bill to extend the company’s powers on lines found 
advisable from past experience has now received the Royal 
Assent. 

The Board of Trade reported on the Bill, that, without expressing any 
opinion on the merits of the questions raised, it was inexpedient to proceed 
with Clause 3 pending such action as might be taken as a result of the 
Report of the Coal Conservation Sub-Committee and that of the Electric 
Power Supply Committee. In view of this the directors decided to withdraw 
the clause, and the Bill proceeded as an unopposed measure. 


The Act empowers the company and local authorities who have electricity 
undertakings to make working agreements, and to enter into joint schemes 
for co-ordinating the whole of the existing supply undertakings in the com- 
pany’s area. 

The association of the company with the Corporation of Bradford for joint 
working has. been extended by a further agreement, the benefits to both 
parties by the first agreement having been fully demonstrated. 

Arrangements have also been entered into with the Corporations of Sheffield 
and Rotherham having a similar object in view, so that the development of 
the southern portion of the company’s area yl be made in cooperation 


with their important undertakings. 

A memorandum by the chairman on the recent report of the Board of 
Trade Committee on Electric Power Supply accompanies the directors’ report. 

Of the issue of £71,640 of 6 per cent. cumulative preference 
shares made in September, 1916, £9,67 has been applied for 
during the half-year, leaving £9,075 still available. 

The Ver. Gluhlampen A.G., of Neupest, 
earned net profits of £86,000 in 1917, and 
the dividend is 15 per cent., or the same 
rate as in the previous year. 

The Ungarische Siemens-Schuckert Werke A.G. reports net 
profits of £24,300 for 1917, as against £24,700 in the previous 
year, the dividend being 5 per cent. for each year. 

The Gesellschaft fur Elektrische Industrie,' of Vienna, re- 
commends a dividend of 10 per cent. for 1917 on share capital 
of £250,000, being thé same rate as in 1916. ‘It is intended 
to increase the share capital to £500,000. 

The report of the Oester. Siemens-Schuckert- Werke, of 
Vienna, states that the requirements of the military authori- 
ties had the effect of further reducing the amount of work 
carried out for peace purposes in 1917, and despite numerous 
difficulties the works were in full and constant operation. 
The gross profits amounted to £1,002,000, as compared with 
£780,000 in 1916. After meeting general expenses, &c., and 
setting aside £82,000 for depreciation, as against £104,000 in 
1916, the net profits are returned at £133,000, as compared 
with £126,000 in 1916. It is proposed to pay a dividend of 
7 per cent. on the ordinary share capital of £1,333,000, being 
the same rate as in the preceding year. The report states 
that the demand for peace manufactures has become more 
pressing in the new financial year. 

The report of the A.E.G.—Union Elektrizitats Gesellschaft, 
of Vienna, states that the company was occupied exclusively 
on direct and indirect army orders in 1917. The gross profits 
increased from £200,000 in 1916 to £289,000 last year, and 
after making provision for depreciation, which corresponds 
to 30 per cent. of the book value of machinery and plant, the 
accounts show net profits of £69,000 for 1917, or the same as 
in the preceding year. It is proposed to pay a dividend of 
8 per cent. on share capital of £833,000, being the same rate 
as in the previous year. It is stated that the large new 
machine shops are to be partly brought into operation this 
month, and that on their being fully utilised it will be pos- 
sible for the company to increase the production and be less 
dependent upon procuring machines from Germany than in 
the past. 


Austrian 
Companies. 


The directors of the Gotthard-werke, 

Swiss A.G. fur Elektrochemische Industrie, of 

Companies. Bodio, in which! the South German Dis- 

count Co., of Mannheim, and the metal 

firm of L. Weil & Reinhardt, of Mannheim, are interested, 

recommend a dividend of 15 per cent. for 1917 on the share 

capital of £80,000, this contrasting with the same rate on 
£48,000 in the previous year. 

The Société Financiére pour Entreprises Electiiques aux 
Etats-Unis, of Geneva, after deducting general expenses and 
taxes, reports profits of £26,000 from interest and dividends 
in 1917, as compared with £31,000 in the preceding year. 
Owing, however, to losses in exchange and depreciation of 
investments, the final result is a deficiency of £80,008 on a 
share capital of £400,000. The directors believe, however, 
that this loss is merely transitory, and that financial equili- 
brium will be restored on the conclusion of peace. 

The report of the directors of the A. G. Brown, Boveri and 
Co., of Baden, which deals with the financial year ended on 
March 31st, 1918, states that increasing ‘difficulties were 
experienced in obtaining raw materials, which could only be 
procured by having no regard to the prices paid. The mate- 
rials which advanced the least were twice the cost of the 
peace-time quotations, whilst others were ten times greater 
than the latter. As wages were also dearer, the cost of pro- 
duction and consequently sale prices underwent very extra- 
ordinary augmentations. Under the circumstances the value 
of the turnover again rose, although the production continued 
quantitatively less than in the last peace year. The inland 
sale of manufactures was favoured by the greater importance 
attached at present to the utilisation of electrical energy in 
Switzerland, although considerable difficulties arose in the 
construction of new power stations. Under the pressure of 
the inadequate supply of coal the Swiss Federal Railway 
Administration had approached the question of the conversion 
to electric traction of the St. Gothard Railway and of other 
lines, and besides the erection of two large power stations, 
orders for 24 electric locomotives had so far been placed. In 








140 . 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. [vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918, 





the export markets the conditions were the most favourable 
at present in some neutral countries. The deliveries to belli- 
gerent countries also were not inconsiderable, although they 
seemed to be falling off as the company did not produce 
actual war material. Business with Russia had ceased, and 
it was feared that considerable losses would arise on the 
outstanding debts there. The company’s foreign undertak- 
ings were yielding appropriate results, which, however, were 
diminished by the low level of foreign exchange. The ac- 
counts show that the gross profits increased from £330,000 
in 1916-17 to £441,000 last year, and the net profits from 
£123,000 to £175,000, permitting of the payment of a dividend 
of 9 per cent. on share capital of £1,280,000, as against 7 per 
cent. in 1916-17, and 9 per cent. pro rata for six months on 
new capital of £160,000. 





Fife Tramway, Light & Power Co.—The Commercial 
Bank of Scotland is authorised to receive subscriptions for 
£130,000 5 per cent. debenture stock at £89 per £100. 


National Gas Engine Co., Ltd.—Interim dividend 7} per 
cent. per annum, less income-tax, on the ordinary shares for 
the past half-year. 

Rio de Janeiro Tramway, Light & Power Co., Ltd.— 
Dividend of 14 per cent. 


Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd.—The accounts for 1917 
are not yet completed, but a dividend on the ordinary shares 
of 6 per cent. per annum, free of tax, is announced. 


Charing Cross, West End & City Electricity Supply Co., 
Ltdéd.—The directors have decided not to pay an interim 
dividend on the ordinary shares of the West End undertak- 
ing. 

National Boiler & General Insurance Co., Ltd.—Interim 
dividend of 12s. per share, less tax, for the half-year. 








STOCKS AND SHARES. 


TUESDAY EVENING. 
BuoyeD up by the splendid news from the Front, Stock Ex- 
change markets are good in nearly all departments. The 
holiday feeling is somewhat apparent, but, in spite of this, 
there is a good deal of business about.» The strength of the 
War Loan, Consols, and other Government securities is re- 
flected in rising prices in all gilt-edged stocks. Debenture, 
and preference issues amongst Home Rails are particularly 
yood; buyers are keen upon the cheaper descriptions, of 
which the Undergrounds afford a few examples. Home Rails 
are firm, however, in all these classes, and one of the fea- 
tures of the moment is liveliness in the £10 and shilling 
shares of the Underground Electric Railways of London. 

‘Bus A, as the market calls the shilling shares, have risen 
to 6s. 6d., and the ten-pounders to 2%, while the Income 
Bonds are also better. With them, London and Suburban 
Tractions have hardened, the ordinary being 4s. 3d., and’ the 
preference 9s. 6d. Ever-busy rumour reports that a scheme 
is afoot for amalgamating the London and Suburban with 
the Underground Electric Co.,,and it is declared that nego- 
tiations have so far progressed as to include the advent to 
London of a well-known tramway expert whose fame is in 
the Western counties. Caution suggests that there may be 
legal difficulties in the way of a railway taking over a tram- 
way, and that Parliamentary consent may be required. How- 
ever this may be, the position is certainly interesting, and 
the next developments are eagerly awaited. Meanwhile, the 
price of London United Tramways debenture stock is un- 
chan®ed at 40. 

Holders of Toronto Power 44 per cent. debenture are in- 
vited to tender their’ stock for purchase, and the circular 
containing the offer mentions that the price in the Stock 
Exchange Official List was, at the time the circular went out, 
79-82. Those who feel disposed to tender might be advised 
to put their price considerably higher. The security is ample, 
and having regard to the scarcity of such stocks, the price 
of 803 is low. We should not advise anyone to tender below 
86 unless they want-the money for other purposes, and per- 
haps a point or two higher- would not be too extravagant to 
fix, because even if the tender failed, the proprietor need 
have little qualm about the investment. 

There is still no animation in the market for electricity 
supply shares. The last-published Regulations affecting 
rations of coal and illuminants have not yet been svfficiently 
digested to tempt money into the industry. Prices, neverthe- 
less, keep steady, and there is no pressure to sell. We under- 
stand that most of the stock has been placed which came 
to market recently on behalf of several deceased accounts, s0 
there is nothing to stop a recovery as soon as attention is 
directed to this section again. But the passing of the in- 
terim dividend on the ordinary shares of the Charing Cross 
and City: (West End undertaking) is not pleasant reading. 


Manufacturing shares hold their strength, and Babcocks 
remain popular by reason of the expected bonus, The 
General Electric Co.’s new issue proved a great success, the 
subscription lists closing very promptly. Probably .a market 
in the new shares will be started at an early date, although 
dealings may have to wait until allottees are able to supply 
the distinctive numbers of the riew shares in accordance with 
the Treasury Regulations that govern Stock Exchange busi- 
ness nowadays. The shares are now quoted ex share bonus, 
and so also are Chile Telephones and Orientals. _Ediswans 
are an active market at about 44s. 9d. for the £3 paid shares, 
these attracting most of the interest. A deal of the 
latest buying has come from Wales. The fully-paid shares 
have advanced substantially. Fraser & Chaliners dropped 
sharply on a few thousand shares coming to market, but the 
supporters of the recent. upward movement profess them- 
selves as confident as ever\hat the General Electric will take 
over the concern at a price materially higher than Frasers 
are at present quoted in the market. India-Rubber shares 
aoe gained 5s., and Westinghouse preference are a little 
etter. 

Marconis took a jump to over £4; the adjourned meeting 
is regarded as a bull-point, and optimism once more toys 
with the expectation of what payment the company will 
receive from the Government when the day of settlement 
arrives. Marconi Marines, Americans, and Canadians have 
participated mildly in strength of the patent shares. Cable 
stocks are a good market, Anglo-Americans being picked up 
by investors attracted by the character of the security. Rub 
ber anes are better, and the Armament group is very 
steady. 


SHARE LIST OF ELECTRICAL COMPANIES. 
Home Eecrriciry Companies. 


Dividend Price 
——. Aug. 6. Riseorfall Yield 
1916. 1917. 1918. this week. p.c. 


Brompton Ordinary . . ee ee 9 10 | _- £713 1 
Charing Cross Ordinary .. ee 5 4 — 4 680 
do. do. do, 44 Pref... 43 4h — 618 6 
Chelsea .. ee ee ee ee 8 5 f - 7:13 10 
City of London ee oe ee 8 8 11 +i 703 
do. do. 6 percent. Pref. .. 6 6 — 604 
County of London .. aa ee 7 7 104 _ 617 7 
do. do. 6 percent. Pref. 6 6 10 — 600 
Kensington Ordinary ee ee 6 7 b = 613 4 
London Electric .. es -. Nil Nil 1 — Nil 
do. do. 6 per cent. Pref... 4 5 i 7138 10 
Metropolitan .. es oe oe 8 4 -— 680 
do. 4b per cent. Pref. .. 44 44 34 ~ 618 6 
St. James’ and Pall Mall .. es 8 9 62 xd -— 2 © 
South London ae i ° 5 5 8 — 613 4 
South Metropolitan Pref. .. 7 7 ™ 21)/- _ 613 4 
Westminster Ordinary .. 7 9 6 —s 710 0 
TELEGRAPHS AND TELEPHONES. 
Anglo-Am. Tel. Pref. 6 6 96 -- 650 
do. ef. 4 14 22 +2 6 11 10 
Chile Telephon 8 8 73 xd +3 as 9 
Cuba Sub. Ord. ‘0 7 7 10 - 70 0 
Eastern Extension .. 8 8 154 _ 6% 3 3 
Eastern Tel. Ord. .. 8 8 1584 +1 % 10 
Globe’Tel. and T. Ord. 7 7 143 — “4:17 5 
do. do. Pref. .. ed 6 6 10 -- 600 
Great Northern Tel. ‘< on ae 22 b -- 517 4 
Indo-European es a — 5 -- 5 1 
Marconi on yee es i BB 20 4 + 417 1 
Oriental Telephone Ord. .. eo 10 8 xd _ 868 
United R. Plate Tel. °° ve 8 8 7h — % 6 8 
West India and Panama .. o GQ. Od. 14 _ 3 6 8 
Western Telegraph ee ee 8 8 16 — % 0 0 
Home Raltts. 
Central London Ord. Assented .. 4 4 6 -- 6 8 0 
Metropolitan .. ee ee oe 1 1 233 xd _ 4483 
do. District - -- Nil WNil 21 _ Nil 
Underground Electric Ordinary.. Nil Nil 2 + Nil 
do. do, “4” eco BL Mi 6/6 + 9d. Nil 
do. do, Income .. 6 4 86 +14 413 0 
ForEicn Trams, &c. 
Adelaide Sup. 6 per cent. Pref. .. 6 6 43 -- 664 
Anglo-Arg. Trams. First Pref. .. 54 — _ 
do. do. 2nd Pref. af — 2 _ — 
do. do. 5 Deb... ee 5 5 65. = 712 8 
Brazil Tractions A ee ee — — 46: —4 _- 
Bombay Electric Pref.  .. oa 6 6 94 xd — 699 
British Columbia Elec. Rly.Pice. 5 5 614 _ 828 
do. do, Preferred Nil Nil 45 _— Nil 
do. do. Deferred Nil Nil 404 _ Nil 
do. &.' Beh. .. ¢ at 604 — 70 6 
Mexico Trams 5 percent. Bonds.. Nil Ni 443 _ Nil 
do. 6percent.Bonds.. Nil Nil 364 — Nil 
Mexican Light Common .. eo on EE 21 _ Nil 
0. Pref. oe - Nil Nil 39 a Nil 
do. lst Bonds. > --» Nil WNil 49 ~ _ 
MANUFACTURING COMPANIES. 
Babcock & Wilcox ee ee ub Bb Big a 316 2 
British Aluminium Ord. .. ee 10 10 1 _ 5 6 8 
British Insulated Ord. es = 20 20 2 — 5 0 0 
British Westinghouse Pref. _ hm 213 +a 5 69 
Callenders.. - oe ee 20 25 1 a 611 7 
do. 5 Pref. .. oe <* 5 5 4 _ 6 5 0 
Castner-Kellner - aa oe 22 20 8 _ 516 0 
Edison-Swan, fully paid .. oe _ -- + %& Nil 
do. do. 4percent., Deb. .. 4 4 7 +1 5 6 0 
Electric Construction mn oe 7% 1% — 712 4 
Gen. es... SO 103 = 65 4 
do. Ord. e6 oe ee 1 184 xd _ *% 8 1 
Henley .. ee od ee ee 3 2 p _ 5617 8 
do. 4% Pref.. be es ee 4 4% 3 _ 512 2 
India-Rubber .. oe ee oe 10 10 1 _ 6 38 0 
Telegraph Con, asta eee ~- % 7 8 


*Dividends paid free of Income Tax, 


Vol. 83. 


THE offici 
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—_ _ 


vol. 83. No. 2124, Avevsr 9, 1918.) THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 141 





Exports and Imports of Electrical Goods during April, May, and June, 1918. 


Tue official returns of electrical exports and imports for the past 
+hree months show, as regards exports, totals of £255,741 in April, 
£446.448 in May, and £266,533 in June, which, compared with the 
preceding three months—January, £266,533 ; February, £255,064 ; 
and March, £174,482— record an increase of £310,000 over the 
previous quarter. Telegraphic and telephonie exports@reached 
considerable proportions during the quarter, submarine cable to 
the value of £247,000 being included in May, and of £14,000 in 
June. The figures for electrical machinery exports for the three 
months under review show an increase of over £50,000, while con- 


EXPorTs AND IMPORTS OF ELECTRICAL Goops AND MACHINERY DURING APRIL, MAy, AND JUNE, 1918. 


siderable increases appear in the items for batteries, meters and 
instruments. The electrical imports for the second quarter of 
the year were :—April, £87,614 ; May, £102,316 ; June, £156,311 ; 
as compared with £212,434 in January, £163,788 in February, and 
£200,966 in March, a reduction of £230,000 for the three months ; 
the principal falling off occurring in electrical machinery £140,000, 
batteries £50,000, and lamps £40,000. 

The re-exports of foreign and overseas electrical material show a 
falling -off in all sections, the figures being :—April, £3,705; 
May, £3,106 ; June, £2,780 ; compared with £11,661 for January, 
£90,036 for February, and £3,132 for March. 














April. May. June. 
~ Exports. Imports. Re-exports. Exports. Imports. Re-exports. Exports. Imports. Re-exporte. 
Electrical goods and apparatus unenumerated £31,802 £39,509 £2481 £34,330 £54,517 £1,128 £33,567 £81,186 £979 
Insulated wire and cable (not telegraphic or 
telephonic) ... eee oes wee coe 11,175 417 = 5,811 770 11,186 327 a 
Electric glow lamps eee ose ees oes 7,605 440 36 5,300 4,545 364 6,273 11,753 1,292 
irc lamps and parts (not carbons) _.... nal 3,977 1,608 5,277 5,902 _ 3,367 3,635 — 
Meters and instruments ... with Son one 10,627 2,260 } 16.816 1,360 143 10,359 2.340 18 
Electrical machinery (including switchboards 
and transformers) ... eee oes ++, 115,303 22,563 817 74,994 21,187 649 121,539 40,489 475 
BatterieS s+. ose eee ave ove oss 9,397 6,438 89 12,793 9,955 20 9,454 4,195 
Carbons a. os deo hel ois ha 420 6,803 — 608 3,391 _ 509 3,418 - 
Telegraph and telephone wire and apparatus... 65,465 7,126 278 200,519 1,459 35 70,279 8,968 16 
£3.705 £446,448 £102,316 £3,106 £266,533 £156,311 £2,780 


Totals ... ese «. £255,771 £87,164 





THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF 
ENGINEERING APPRENTICES. 


By P. H. 8. KEMPTON, A.R.C.Sc., B.Sc. 





(Concluded from page 117.) 
GERMANY. 

[hat we can ill afford to scoff at the progress 
made by Germany in these matters is evidenced by 
the recent statement by Dr. W. E. Dalby that ten 
ears ago he found that in Germany 10,000 well- 
educated men over 18 were studying engineering, 
compared with only goo in this country. 

It is surprising that we should regard compulsory 
continuation education as so revolutionary a type 
of change when we remember that as far back as 
1869, in the Gewerbeordnung of the North German 
(nion, permission was given to any local authority 

frame laws compelling the attendance at con- 
tinuation school of apprentices and young workmen 
under the age of 18. In 1874 the Central Govern- 
ment of the Empire issued an official statement of 
the principles on which such schools should be run. 
\s a result compulsory continuation education, 
partly in working hours, is now a regular thing 
practically all over Germany, and in 1910, Essen 
was the only large town in Prussia without a public 
compulsory continuation school. But there the 
\rupp’s firm have established their own works 
school at which the attendance of apprentices is 

ligatory. 
| Mr. Clay, who, at the instance of the Board of 
“ducation, undertook a visit to Germany to investi- 
sate the systéms in vogue in 1909, says: “‘ In the 
States where the general continuation schools are 
ompulsory they form part of the elementary school 
system, and are administered by the Minister of Edu- 
ition. In spite of the increasingly technical charac- 
ter of these schools it would be wrong to suppose 
that they form the main provision for technical in- 
‘ruction even for the workmen. For the leaders of 

(ustry and commerce there are the technical, com- 

ercial high schools, and schools of mines which 

standing are recognised to be fully the equal of 
old universities, while below them are various 
istitutes training their students for subordinate but 
portant positions in factories and other industrial 
tndertakings. (Compulsory Continuation Schools 

‘zermany. Educational pamphlet No. 18. Board 
-ducation.) 





The best examples of German works schools are 
to be found in connection with the great engineering 
and munition of war industries ;— 

1. Messrs. Siemens & Schuckert, electrical manu- 
facturers, of Nuremburg, Bavaria, established a 
school for apprentices in 1892. The apprentices 
enter at 14, and during the first three years of ap 
prenticeship they receive theoretical instruction 
during the mornings. In this, and in all other Ger 
man works schools no provision is made for cultural 
or general education im spite of the early age of 
entry, and there also appears to be no aitempt to 
foster the social activities of the apprentices. 

2. Messrs. Ludwig Loewe & Co., iron founders 
and engineers, Berlin, founded a school in 1899 in 
order to give the apprentices ‘‘ theoretical illumina- 
tion.’’ There are about 100 apprentices, and the 
theoretical training is given mainly in the mornings 
from 7 to 8 o’clock, the juniors getting one hour a 
day, while the more advanced apprentices also re 
ceive instruction in mechanical drawing from 4 till 
6 p.m. 

3. Siemens & Halske, Berlin. These works are 
devoted chiefly to the manufacture of electrical in 
struments and apparatus, such as Rontgen ray, 
electrochemical and sterilisation apparatus, cables, 
and incandescent lamps. 

There are 160 apprentices, who enter at 14. The 
firm has its own works school, and all apprentices 
attend evening classes during two or three hours 
of the 8-hour working day. The sons of workmen 
do not pay fees, others pay 300 marks for the 4-year 
course. This school was founded in 1906, and the 
teachers are all engineers employed by the firm. In 
this case German and citizenship are taught, in addi 
tion to the mathematical and technical subjects, and 
the firm are convinced of the absolute necessity of 
the school training. 

4. Vulcan Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering 
Co., Stettin, have in their employment 350 appren 
tices. Here again attendance at the firm’s own 
school is compulsory, but the classes are held on 
Sunday mornings from 8 till 11.30, in order to cause 
no disturbance in the workshop routine. The in- 
struction given in these classes is purely theoretical 

Apart from these cases the majority of the German 
engineering firms support the continuation schools 
In some cases, as with Messrs. Traun, vulcanite 
manufacturers, and the Hamburg-American Line, 
facilities are given for such attendance by allowing 
apprentices to leave work early. In a few cases 











142 "HE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 


[Vol. 83. No. 2,124, AUGUST 9, 1918, 


« 








firms allow the apprentices time from work hours 
to attend these outside classes. A notable feature 
of Messrs. Traun’s scheme is that every boy between 
14 and 18 must attend a gymmastic class. In the 
continuation schools the curriculum is adapted to 
the special occupations of the students, but the 
adaptation is of course less complete than in the 
case of the works schools. In every case, however, 
German is taught,-and thus in breadth of training 
the outside schools often excel the schools founded 
by firms merely for the training of apprentices along 
vocational lines. 

One of the chief difficulties which have confronted 
the German authorities is the provision of suitable 
teachers for this work, and although the training of 
such teachers is yet in an experimental stage, there 
appears to be a tendency to recruit their ranks about 
equally from among expert workmen by giving them 
special courses in the theory of education and from 
among professional teachers by giving them work- 
shop training. In every case, however, and especi- 
ally in the works schools, it is found necessary to 
have a nucleus permianent staff of expert teachers 
and organisers. 

On analysis, and in spite of so many dissimilarities, 
these schemes which represent the definite tested 
opinions of educational experts and captains of in- 
dustry both at home and abroad, provide certain 
fundamental points of agreement upon which it will 
be safe to build. 

In the first place it seems to be agreed that the 
education of apprentices should proceed side by side 
with their trade training, and during work hours. 
Whether this should be supplemented by evening 
classes is doubtful, but it is certain that when a boy 
has been at work since 6 or 7 a.m. he is in no fit 
condition to study for any prolonged period at night. 
In the evidence given before the Lewis Commission 
there was absolute unanimity against compulsory 
attendance at evening classes. 

A second point of agreement among those best 
qualified to judge, is that this educational training 
should not be entirely vocational, but that general 
culture, citizenship, and physical training should find 
a place in the curriculum. 

In most successful schemes promotion to the more 
advanced courses is made to depend upon the effort 
and ability of the student. Hence a third point of 
agreement apears to be that a periodic sifting pro- 
cess is necessary in order to render the training 
most efficient and economical. 

The difficulty experienced in connection with all 
these schemes of obtaining suitable teachers also 
indicates that specialised training and adequate pros- 
pects must be offered to prospective teachers in such 
schools. 

Upon the teaching staff of the apprentice school 
ultimately rests the responsibility for the success or 
failure of the whole scheme, and no amount of or- 
ganisation or equipment can make -good a lack of 
sound and enthusiastic teaching capacity. 

There {femain some minor but important facts 
upon which agreement has not been reached. Chief 
among these is the question of the relation of thee 
school to the works. Without attempting to dog- 
matise, it seems reasonable to suggest that where 
works schools are conducted on a broad basis, as in 
the case of the British Westinghouse Co. and the 
General Electric Co. (U.S.A.), there can be no 
reasonable ground for desiring to remove the 
education of apprentices to less convenient or more 
arbitrarily managed concerns outside. It is in fact 
obvious that the invariable Education Committee df 
local tradesmen is infinitely less capable of conduct- 
ing a school for engineers than are members of the 
engineering profession. On the other hand, any 
attempt to use the works school to serve aS a mere 
machine for the increase of output and the inflation 
of dividends must be severely discountenanced, and 
it ought not to be impossible to devise some means 





of combining the necessary disinterested contro] 
with complete adaptation to the needs of the industry 
ei which the apprentices are being trained. The 
uggestion on this subject made by the N.E. Coast 
Conniithes is perhaps a step in the right direction, 

Among other moot points are the method of entry 
of apprentices, the relative advantages of short fre- 
quent classes or longer periods of school instruction 
at cenngy oaners intervals, and the number of years 
to which such training should extend. 

Such trivial and theoretical divergencies of opinion 
are, however, of little account in viéw of the urgent 
national necessity for a definite practical programme 
of action. The hands of Mr. Berriman and Mr. 
Fleming and other pioneers must be held up. To 
quote again from Mr. Orcutt’s book; ‘* School- 
masters and Government officials tan do little unless 
supported and guided -by our industrial and commer- 
cial leaders. A definite programme which has for 
its object industrial betterment must embrace 
general education, technical training, science and 
research, and economics. We must consider these 
subjects as interlocked and inseparable; if, we wish 
to attain to a position as leaders and put our in 
dustries in an unassailable posftion.’’ 

Engineers cannot be produced in a day, and it is 
necessary to remember that no educational scheme 
can have any real effect until many months after its 
adoption. _We would repeat that action in this 
matter is long overdue, and any attempt to postpone 
it is fraught with grave peril to the nation after the 
war. If we win the war and begin the new era 
educationally, technically, and commercially impo- 
tent we shall indeed only escape Scylla to be 
wrecked in Charybdis. 





TAR OIL AS A MOTOR FUEL. 


We have heard much of late regarding the use of tar oil in 
Diesel engines; many difficulties have been met with in so 
utilising it, and somewhat refined methods have been de 
vised to overcome them. What, then, may we expect of the 
suggestion to use tar oil as fuel for motor-cars, electric light- 
ing sets, &c.? ‘Tar oil costs 5d. a gallon—before the war it 
was od while petrol costs 3s. 9d. plus tax; the former is a 
home production, the latter imported. Clearly, if tar oil 
could be substituted for petrol both the individual and the 
nation would profit. it can be done quite easily. 

Last week we had the pleasure of a trip with Mr. F. A. 
Wilkinson, of Hatfield, in his Overland car, which is fitted 
with a four-cylinder petrol engine. The fuel used was tar 


“oil, and it was impossible to “distinguish any difference in 


the running of the engine from its behaviour with the fuel 
for which it was designed. The car was run for.a time on 
coal gas, and the change from one fuel to the other was 
absolutely imperceptible. 

As the use of tar oil presented no peculiarities in operation, 
there is nothing further to be said under this head; it only 
remains, therefore, to explain how so heavy an oil can be 
substituted for the volatile petrol spirit. 

We may first recall our article of November-17th, 1916, in 
which we described the method by which Mr. Wilkinson 
succeeded in running his car with paraffin. The chief diffi 
culty was in starting, and this was overcome by the use of 
an electrical heater, of which we reproduce the illustration 
The héater a contains a small resistance coil, and is mounted 
alongside of the carburetter, so that the level of the oil in 
the heater is always the same as that of the oil -in_the float 
chamber. A valve c is connected by a pipe to the T-piece | 
which is connected to the induction pipe of the engine. The 

valve D is connected between the T-piece and the exhaust 
pipe, and allows a small portion of the exhaust gases t be 
by-passed into the inlet pipe of the engine, to heat the in 
coming charge of paraffin and air from the carburette! 
These valves are controlled from the dashboard, and a switch 
and pilot lamp are provided for the control of the heater 
When the heater is used no petrol at all is required, as the 
engine can be started from cold on paraffin; but the heate! 
is,only used for . starting, and consumes 196 watts for 24 
minutes. If the heater is not installed, the engine can be 
started on petrol and changed over to paraffin. 

To step up—or down—from paraffin to tar oil requires 3 
slight addition to the equipment. This consists of nothing 
more than a half-inch copper tube passing through the in 
terior of the exhaust pipe, and communicating at one en‘ 
with the atmosphere; at the other with the air inlet pip 
Through .this tube air -is drawn by the engine, becoming 
highly heated by the exhaust gases which surround the tub 
and the hot air enters the inlet pipe close to the carburetter 








ee 


), 1918, 
ee 


contro] 
industry 
d. The 
L. Coast 
ection, 
of entry 
10rt fre- 
truction 
of years 


Opinion 
> urgent 
yramme 
ind Mr. 
ip. To 
School- 
e unless 
ommer- 
has for 
‘mbrace 
ice and 
‘r these 
ve wish 
our in 


nd it is 
scheme 
ifter its 
in this 
oStpone 
fter the 
Ow era 
impo- 
to be 


ar oil in 
th in so 
een de 
‘t of the 
‘ic light- 
> war it 
ner 1s a 

tar oil 
and the 


r. F. A, 
is fitted 
Was tar 
ence in 
the fuel 
time on 
hel was 


eration, 
it only 
can be 


1916, in 
ilkinson 
ef diffi 
» use of 
stration 
nounted 
p oil in 
he float 
piece | 
e. The 
exhaust 
s i be 
the in 
urettel 

switch 
heater 
as the 
heate! 
for 2} 


can be 


mires a 
nothing 
the in- 
ne end 
t pip 

coming 
e tube 

puretter 















Vol. 83. ‘No. 2,124, Avueust 9, 1918.] 


THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW. 





tul 


the electric 


| a! ry 


charge battery, 


nnection, where the hot blast atomises and vaporises the 


oil on its way to the cylindér. This device, which has 
en patented hy Mr. Wilkinson, is very inexpensive, and 
conjunction with the by-pass from the exhaust pipe 
lescribed above it suffices to enable the engine to run per- 
ctly on tar oil. 

[t should be clearly understood that the electric heater is 
t required for this purpose; the heater is used only-when 
is desired to start from cold with paraffin or tar oil. If 
heater is not fitted, the engine is started on 


trol or gas. 
The alterations required to convert the engine to tar oil 
so simple that any engine can easily be adapted for this 
moreover, by including a couple of valves con 
lled from the dashboard, the additional fittings can be 
t out at pleasure and the engine run on petrol or gas. 
Some actual resultswill be of interest; they show that 
th the same quantity of fuel the mileage run is practically 


same, but the cost of the fuel is vastly different :— 
Flash Cost of Miles Cost 
Sp. gr. point. fuel. per gal. per mile. 
Petrol ... ewe §=60°745 — 3s. 9d. 19°61 2°29d. 
Paraffin «- 0°810 — 1s. 9d. 18°76 1'lid, 
Tar oil... --? L016 184° F. 5d. 18°33 0'27d. 
son --- 1040 180—190°F. 5d. 19°18 0°26d. 


[he car weighs.26 ewt. It has run 7,000 miles in two 
irs on paraffin, and for three micatiiie on tar oil. No 
ouble is experienced with the sparking plugs, nor is pre- 
ition ever observed. ‘The only point to which objection 
be raised is a slight tendency to emit ‘‘ visible vapour ”’ 
ien running with tar oil on no load, as when the car is 
tanding with the engine running. On load, the exhaust is 














Fic. 1.—‘‘ By-pass ’’ Evecrric HEATER. 


isible. With an electric starter (which is fitted on the 
iv referred to) there is no need to keep the engine running 

light load, 

Precisely the same considerations 

trol engmes, such as those driving 
\ We understand that with these the cost of fuel per 

-hour is 0.75d., and obviously the matter is of consider- 
ible importance to the users of these sets. 

Being an electrical engineer, Mr. Wilkinson favours elec- 
tric driving, but considers the scarcity of charging stations 
n some routes to be a serious drawback to the battery 

hicle. He therefore has worked out a scheme for an oil- 

tric vehicle, involving the minimum of departure from 

the existing designs of motor-cars. His plan is to install a 
hattery capable of driving the car for about 10 miles un- 
ided. The engine drives a dynamo-motor, with a double- 

mmutator armature, and mechanical clutches provide for 
the following combinations :—Engine driving dynamo to 
with armature windings in series; battery 
ind motor driving vehicle, with armature windings in 
irallel; engine driving vehicle, assisted by the battery and 
iotor. Thus the battery can be charged while descending 
ills or standing, regenerative action being secured in the 

xmer case; hills can be ascended at full speed; and the 
iser is independent of charging stations. Such a vehicle has 

‘tually been built to Mr. W ilkinson’s designs, but has not 

vet been tested. The principle % not new, but the method 
carrying it into effect is novel, and the idea appears to 
© very promising. Lastly, by a very simple device, Mr. 
ilkinson has arranged his engine to act as a gas compressor 
two firing cylinders driving the other two as compressing 
linders—so that, if desired, coal gas can be compressed to 
“Uv lb. per sq. in. ‘with no additional apparatus. 
It will readily be understood that our visit to Hatfield was 
of interest, and we wish the inventor every success—not 
carrying out his inventions, as that part is already accom- 
—— _ in introducing them to the public, the hardest 
isk Of all. 


apply to stationary 
electric lighting sets, 




















TRADE STATISTICS OF INDIA. 

THE following figures of the imports of electrical and similar 

goods into Britis sh India in the year ending March 3lst, 1917, 

are taken from the recently-issued official trade statistics 

details for the year ended March 3ist, 1916, are added for 
purposes of comparison, and notes of any mereases or « 
creases are given :— 

1915-16. 1916-17. Inc. or dex 

Brass, wrought.— £ £ £ 

From Great Britain 16,000 53,000. + 7.000 
», Japan ; ad 42.000 103.000 + 61,000 

Straits Settlements 6,008 52.000 + 46,000 
Other countries 24 000 12,000 - 12.000 
Total 118.000 290.000 + 102.000 

Copper and copper ware.— 

From Great Britain 309.000 158.000 — 156,000 
» Germany 45,000 — . 45,000 
» Belgium 10,000 . — 10,000 
, France 7.000 15.000 + 8 000 
» United States 6,000 1000 =«—- 2.000 
» Japan 108 ,000 70,000 — 38,000 
» Other countries 9,000 10,000 + 1,000 

Total 494.000 252,000 - 242 000 

Iron wire.— 

From Great Britain 140,000 199,000 + 59,000 
» Germany 1,000 1,000 
» Belgium . 7,000 — - 1,000 
» United States 71,000 62,000° — 9,000 
,, Other countries 1,000 2000 + 1,000 

Total 214,000 264,000 + 50,000 

Prime movers, other than locomotives. 

From:Great Britain 268 000 299000 — 39,000 
» Italy 1,000 9000 + 8,000 
0 Unite d States 14,000 17,000 + 3,000 
,, Other countries 4:000 6,000 + 2.000 

Total 287,000 261.000 26.000 

Electric generators.— 

From Great Britain 8,000 13,000 + 5,000 
» Italy : 6,500 oe -~ 6500 

United States 7,500 7,500 —— 
Other countries 500 1500 + 1,000 
Toft! 15,000 2000 + 7,000 

Electric motors.— 

From Great Britain 50,000 77,000 + 27,000 
,» United States 2.000 13.000 + 11,000 
» Other countries 2,000 1000. - 1,000 

Total 54,000 91,000 + 37,000 

Other electrical machinery.— : 

From Great Britain 129,000 153.000 + 24,000 
»  Ltaly 9,000 8.000 1,000 
» United States 10,000 18,000 « + 8.000 

Other countries 2,000* 1000 - 1,000 
Total 150,000 180.000 + 80,000 
* Switzerland, £1,000. 

Mining Machinery.— 

From Great Britain 63,000 65,000 + 2,000 
» Switzerland 9,000 a — 9,000 
» United States 58.000 38,000 20,000 
,», Other countries 2 000 2 000 

Total 132,000 105,000 27,000 

Electric fans.— 

From Great Britain 19,000 23.0 + 4.000 
»»  Ltaly 26,000 36,000 + 10.000 
» United States 25 000 299000 + 4,000 
,, «Other countries — 1000 + 1,000 

Total 70,000 89.000 4 19.000 

Electric lamps and parts.— 

From Great Britain 40,000 47,000 «+ 7.000 
» Holland 7,000 16,000 + 9 000 
» Japan 1,000 4000 + 3.000 
» United States 4,000 5.000 4 1.000 
,, Other countries 2.000 1,000 - 1.000 

Total 54.000 73,000 + 19.000 

Electric wires and cables.— 

From Great Britain 145,000 179,000- + 34,000 
»  Ltaly 1,000 3,000 + 2,000 
» Japan 2,000 27,000 + 25,000 
» United States 2,000 7,000 + 5,000 
,». Other countries 1,000 1,000 - 

Total 151,000 217,000 + 66,000 








| 





THE 


ELECTRICAL RKEVLEW. [vol. 83. No. 2,124, Aveusr 9, 1918, 











1915-16. 1916-17. 
. . ; £ 
Machinery, other (except tertile, agricultural, 


and printing).— 


Ine. or dec. 





From Great Britain a 387,000 387,000 —_ 
Japan ate =a 2,000 7,000 + 5,000 
»  dtaly te wo 3,000 ¢ — _ 3,000 
» United States aes 30,000 56,000 + 26,000 
,, Other countries es, 12,000 10,000 - 2,000 
Total ad as 434,000 160,000 + 26,000 


Other electrical instruments, apparatus, dc. (except 
telegraph and telephone materials).— 


From Great Britain ee 257,000 309,000 + 52,000 
Holland * a 6,000 6,000 _ 
Japan me ed 7,000 32,000 a 25,000 
United States 20,000 38,000 + 18,000 
Other countries sa 6,000 6,000 

Total el i 296 000 391.000 + 95.000 

Scientific, dc., instruments.— ; 

From Great Britain net 48,000 56,000 + 8,000 
France 4,000 1000 - 3,000 
United States aie 7,000 14,000 + 7,000 
Other countries... 5,000 9,000 + 


4,000 
Total ~~ 64,000 ~=—«80,000 + ~—«16.000 


Telegraph construction materials.— 








From Great Britain Be 10,000 6,000 — 4,000 

Telephone construction materials.— 

From Great Britain eae 18,000 21,000 + 3,000 
Sweden ; oe 8,000 2000 — 1,000 
Other countries ee 1,000 2000 + 1,000 

Total 22,000 95,000 + 3,000 


In addition to the foregoing, the following were imported 
as Government stores :— 


Instruments, apparatus, &c. (except musical).— 





From Great Britain ad 171,000 261,000 + 90,000 
Other countries... 1,000 1,000 — 
Total .. 172,000 262,000 + 90,000 
Machinery .— 
From Great Britain tA 127,000. 138,000 + 11,000 
United States a 1,500 500 — 1,000 


500 — - 500 
Total Me ... 129,000 138,500 + 9,500 


Iron wite.— 
From Great Britain as 16,000 40,000 + 24,000 


Telegraph construction materials.— 


Other countries 





From Great Britain x: 80,000 125,000 + 45,000 

Copper and copperware.— \ 

From Great Britain a 128,000 92,000 — 36,000 

; New South Wales... 193,000 159,000 — 34,000 
Other countries... 45,000 70,000 + 25,000 





Total a .- 866,000 321,000 — 45,000 








FOREIGN AND COLONIAL TARIFFS ON 
ELECTRICAL GOODS. 


CHILE.—@ippers of goods from the United Kingdom to 
Chile should "Rote that the Chilean regulations require that, 
when goods destined for Chile are transhipped en route to the 
tepublic, the Chilean Customs, on the arrival of the goods 
at the port of destination, shall be furnished with a certificate 
issued by the Chilean Consul at the port of transhipment, 
attesting the operation of transhipment and the necessity 
therefor. A fine is imposed if this certificate is not forth- 
coming in such cases; and firms who ship goods to Chile 
should, therefore, take steps to secure that their agents at 
the port of transhipment shall obtain and forward the certifi- 
cate to the consignees in Chile. 


CHINA.—The existing specific rates of Customs duty levi- 
able on goods imported into China by sea, which were fixed 
in 1901, are to be revised by an International Commission now 
sitting at Peking. This revision has become necessary owing 
to the general increase of values since. that date, the rates 
fixed no longer yielding an effective 5 per cent. A new draft 
ariff on a 5 per cent. basis will accordingly be drawn up by 
the Commission, which will, it is proposed, calculate the 
new specific rates on the basis of the average values of goods 
during the period 1911-13. The assent of ‘the Treaty. Powers 
is necessary before the new Tariff comes into operation. 





7 





NEW PATENTS APPLIED FOR, 1918, 
(NOT YET PUBLISHED.) 

Compiled expressly for this journal by Messrs. Serton-Jongs, O'Dea ano 
STEPHENS (successors to W. P. Thompson & Co., of London), Chartered 
Patent Agents, 285, High Holborn, London, W.C 1. 

11,940. ‘* Means for separating magnetic material." W. Bow Le-Evans 

July 22nd 

11,984. ‘* Electric resistances." W. F. Jones. July 23rd, 
12,011. *‘ Magneto operating mechanism.” E. C, R. Marks (Splitdor! 

Electrical Co., U.S.A.) July 23rd. 

12,021. ‘* Trolley heads, &c.,. for collecting electric power.”’ S, Bure 

July 23rd. 

12,042. “ Electric motor starters." C. Bonner, C. C. Garrarp, P. H 

Jackson & A. H. Ranmino. July 24th. 

12,078. “* Valves for wireless transmission systems."’ Eptson Swan | 
rric Co, & C. E. Huatr. | July 24th. 
12,086. ‘* Apparatus for electrically controlling air-brakes. W. J. Meiers 

Waterhouse & Prince) & B. A. Prince. July 24th. 

12,089. ‘* Manufacture of ionic valves."” Cosmos Lamp Works. July 24: 
12,090. ‘* Train-controlling systems.” P. H. Jackson (Waterhouse 

Prince) & Bs A. Prince. July 24th. 

12,188,, “Cores for Pupin loading coils, magnets, &c."" WesTERN Exa 

Co. (Western Electric Co., U.S.A.) July 26th 

12,189, “ Electric heaters.” J. H. Rommso~n & W. O, Workman. 
26th 


12,125. “ Process for electroplating metals, particularly for coppering 
nd steel.”’, QO. Marino. July 25th 
12,132. ‘* Portable electrical appliances.” E. Mepway. © July~ 25t! 


12,135. “ Electrically-driven motor or engine.” D,. Fowrer & J. Fi 
July 25th. 


12,140. “‘ Boxes or receptacles for ectri uses, switches, & 
Weekes. July 25th. 

12,143. “* Electric heating element.”. W. B. Sirs. July 25th Ho 
August 29th, 1917.) 

12,145. “ Ignition devices."’ Setrrporr ELecrrica. Co July 25th. U.S.A 
July 25th, 1917.) 

12,201. “Insulators for supporting electric conductors on, transmis 
lines, &c." Catrenper’s Caste & ConstRucTION Co. & ¢ W. Kay 
26th 


12,212. “ Electric switches.". H. N. Davis & W. R. Twice. July 26: 

12,214. ‘“‘ Electrically operating mechanism from a dist ance.’ a 4 
Luoxam (Russische Akt. Ges. L.°M. Ericsson & Co.). July 26th 

12,217. “ Relay for electric circuits... D. A. Curistian. July 260 


12,218. ‘* Contacts of electrical. switchgear.’ R. S. O'Nen July 2 
** Method for extracting zinc in electric furnaces.” E. S. Bi 
July 26th. (Sweden, October 22nd, 1917.) 


“Wireless control apparatus."” D. Fenur & J. S. Gipson 





“ Telegraphing apparatus." W. Kxow.es. July 27th 

“* Sparking plugs for ignition.”” A. E. Heatu. July 27th 
12,262. ‘* Incandescent electric lamps.”” D. K. Watney. July 27 
2,266. “ Electric heaters." J. R. Quaix. July 27th 








PUBLISHED SPECIFICATIONS. 





The numbers in parentheses dre those under which the specifications wil) 
be printed and abridged, and all subsequent proceedings will be taken 
1916. 


15,008. APPARATUS’ FOR REGULATING THE VOLTAGE OF DYNAMOS \ 
June 9th, 1914. (101,887.) 


1917. 

3,558. APPARATUS FOR THE RECEPTION AND UTILISATION OF ELECTRIC CURRENT 
IMPULSES SUITABLE FOR WIRELESS OR OTHER TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY. W 
Lyons & Selective Signal Co March 10th, 1917 117,090 

6,320. ELECTRICAL HEATING AFPARATUS A.” F. Berry, May 3rd, 1917 
(117,099.) 

9,371. ExecrricaL recerHones. G. M. Masters. June 2%h, 1917. (117,113 

9,573. SEPARATORS OR NON-CONDUCTING SUPPORTS FOR ACCUMULATOR PLATES 
H. Leitner. July 3rd, 1917. (117,121) 

9,585. ELeCTROMAGNETIC VIBRATORY INTERRUPTORS Marconi’s Wireless 
graph Co., H. M. Dowsett & W. Platt. July 3rd, 1917. (117,122.) 

9,724. Vottace REGULATORS. British Thomson-Houston Co. (General | 
tric Co., U.S.A.) July Sth, 1917. 117,128.) 

9,747. Execrric ruses. E. S. Conradi & L. Newitt. July Sth, 1917 
117,132.) 

9,897. Execrric spuzzers. Marconi’s Wireless Telegraph Co. & \ 


Smart. July 9th, 1917. (117,138.) 

9,964. DISTRIBUTING MECHANISM FOR ELECTRIC IGNITION SysTeMS. Bosch May 
neto Co. January 3lst, 1916. (108,473.) 

9,973. DusTRIBUTING MECHANISM POR ELECTRIC IGNITION systems. Bosch M 
neto Co, February 15th, 1916. (Addition to 9,964/17.) (108,475.) 

11,392. ELecTRIC TRANSFORMING AND CONVERTING appaRaTUS. British The 


son-Houston Co. (General Electric Co., U.S.A.) August 8th, 1917. (117,166 
11,765. SELECTIVE SIGNALLING SYSTEMS AND SELECTIVELY-OPERABLE DEVICES 
THEREFOR. Western Electric Co. (Western Electric Co., U.S.A.) Augus 


16th, 1917. (117,170.) 

11,820. ELecTRIC BELLS AND THE LIKE. Automatic Telephone Manwufact: 
Co. & S. R. Smith. August 17th, 1917. (117,171.) 

13,725. ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS OF* POWER TRANSMISSION AND REGENER ATI 
BRAKING. British Thomson-Houston Co. (General Electric Co., U.S.A.) 5 
tember 24th, 1917. (117,181.) 

14,107. LOCKING ELECTRICAL SPIGOT AND SOCKET UNIONS. W. Stewart. N 
ember 10th, 1916. (117,181.} 

14,723. Eecrric switcues. British Thomson-Houston Co. (General | 
tric Co., U.S.A.) October 11th, 1917. 117,188.) 





15,391. WELDED JOINTS FOR METALLIC PLATING. Quasi-Arc Co. & W 
Cole. October 23rd, 1917. (117,190.) 
16,856. SPARKING PLUGS FOR EXPLOSION motors. A. Ceffali May 10 


1917. 116,069.) 
17,292. Exxcrric satrertes. A, A. Price. November 23rd, 1917. (117,209 


i918. 

3,305. AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE sysTEMS. Automatic Telephone Manufacturin 
Co. May 23rd, 1917. 116,075.) 

3,870. CONTACT BREAKERS FOR MAGNETOS. Compagnie Generale de Magnetos 
May 3rd, 1917. (115,620.) 

6,899. RAILWAY SIGNALLING. McKenzie, Holland & Westinghouse Pow 
Signal Co. April 26th, 1917. 115,239.) 

8,143. WIRELESS AND OTHER TELEGRAPHIC OR TELEPHONIC PECEIVING Af 
ratus. W. J. Lyons & Selective Signal Co. March 10th, 1917. _ (Divid 
application on 3,558/17.) (117,247.)